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Sarah Sell

ELD 307, Dr. Casey- Lesson Set #2

March 6, 2012

Writing
Rationale: Students explore relationships of historical figures to better understand the event/ situation. Standards: W.5.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]). W.5.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. Objectives: SWBAT SWBAT SWBAT SWBAT SWBAT compare and contrast the dialogue between Tubman and God. draw connections between the forms of dialogue of each character. practice writing dialogue in a personal account that they have had. explore internal narration through dialogue and the characters speaking. explain the importance and role of dialogue in informational texts.

Procedure: Anticipatory set Nonfiction text usually does not include dialogue between multiple figures except in memoirs or biographies. Refer to the compare and contrast chart used in the reading lesson. o Writers, lets look back at our Venn diagrams that compared and contrasted traditional nonfiction texts with creative nonfiction texts, both on the same topic of Harriet Tubman. One of the things I noticed that you had on your differences list was that creative nonfiction texts include dialogue like a fictional text would. We use dialogue as non fiction writers to add interest and to supply the readers with real accounts of the situation. Sometimes this could be a full conversation between two figures or quotes of the main character. Teach and model Interpret the events through dialogue in Moses. How do Harriets conversations with God influence the plot? o As we saw in Moses, the dialogue between God and Harriet supported and drove her plans of escape. This type of dialogue was used to better

Sarah Sell

ELD 307, Dr. Casey- Lesson Set #2

March 6, 2012

describe the plot and overall account of her first journey toward freedom. Expose students to what else this may look like in another web based article. o Lets take a look at another example of where dialogue is included in nonfiction texts. o Read either the complete article or around the areas that include quotes or Dialogue. o See here in this article, Harriet is quoted when she lands on free soil. Also someone makes an account of her that is quoted within the story. Notice I emphasized within. Dialogue or quotes should fit cohesively within the rest of the text and in appropriate places. Look back at the multimedia sample. Where are places we could add dialogue to help the reader better understand/ support the description of events? o So now writers, I want us to look back at the PBS article and think of placed where we could add some dialogue. The dialogue, although it will not be true, must be authentic and seem real. For instance, you would not talk about Harriet taking a segway to her next safe house. You have to consider the time, place and people. So here is what I am going to add: After With some assistance from a friendly white woman, Tubman was on her way, I am going to include some dialogue between her and the woman. It may sound something like this: o Oh My dear, Slavery is such a sin. Let me help you travel to the Free states. o Thank you Said Harriet I will never forget your kindness and help along this daunting journey. Guided Practice Have students in their Writers notebook record dialogue in designated areas by the teacher or where they feel it could work within ghte text appropriately. So now lets keep reading form here. I will stop periodically for places for you to write down dialogue or quotes or just write them down where you feel that you can. Remember that what you write must fit within the text. Read each paragraph stopping at the end of it. Prompt if necessary or for the first two paragraphs what dialogue could be added into that specific section. o Writers, Im noticing that in this particular paragraph it talks about them men discussing Harriets capture. What might this sound like? How can we turn it into dialogue?
o By 1856, Tubman's capture would have brought a $40,000 reward from the South. On one occasion, she overheard some men reading her wanted poster, which stated that she was illiterate. She promptly pulled out a book and feigned reading it. The ploy was enough to fool the men.

Independent Practice Now that students have practiced inserting dialogue in nonfiction texts have them try it with a nonfiction book of their own. o You are now writer experts on including dialogue in on fiction texts. Therefore, what I want you to do last is pick a nonfiction book from the library and if it has dialogue, I want you to mark it with a post it and summarize what it said. If it does not, I want you on a sticky to make up dialogue or quote that you could add to any part of the book that you see fit if you were the author. Are there any questions?

Sarah Sell

ELD 307, Dr. Casey- Lesson Set #2

March 6, 2012

Closing: What have we learned about dialogue in nonfiction texts? How can you include dialogue in nonfiction text? What is important about dialogue in nonfiction texts? How does it help the reader?

Materials Moses by Carole Boston Weatherford PBS African in America recourse bank on Harriet Tubmanhttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1535.html Women in History, Harriet Tubmans Biographyhttp://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/tubm-har.htm Smartboard Writers notebooks Writing utensil Sticky notes Assessment Students have contributed to discussion and given at least one piece of dialogue in the model. Students mark at least three location of dialogue or write three pieces of dialogue in their independent practice. Students dialogues fit appropriately within the texts. Students can explain how dialogue helps the reader.