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APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Trash to treasure
Rummage sale coming up at
Hopewell Presbyterian. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Special to The Sun
The children of Hopewell engage in an activity offered at the 2011 Harvest Fair, where they jumped from one haystack to another, while their
parents watch.
Police:
Robbery
reported
at bank
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On April 14, at approximate-
ly 1:35 p.m., there was a bank
robbery at the PNC Bank locat-
ed inside of the Stop and Shop
supermarket on Denow Road
in the Hopewell Crossing
Shopping Center in Penning-
ton.
The suspect was described
as a white man in his 40s with
a dark complexion, a hearty
beard and full mustache. He
was wearing a dark-colored
jacket, a light colored shirt and
a light colored baseball cap,
and stands approximately
510 and weighs 165 pounds.
Hopewell Township police
say they received a call report-
ing the robbery, but by the
time they arrived, the suspect
had already fled the bank with
less than $1,500.
The bank teller, who was
alone, reported the suspect ap-
proached him and handed him
a note demanding money as
well as stating that he was
armed. At one point, the sus-
pect partially displayed a
weapon, which was hidden in-
side of his jacket and believed
to be a semi-automatic hand-
gun.
The teller complied with the
notes request, and gave him
Organizers plan for Harvest Fair
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On April 25, the Hopewell Har-
vest Fair Planning Committee
will be holding a meeting to dis-
cuss the 2012 Harvest Fair at 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Train Sta-
tion located at 2 Railroad Place.
The annual Hopewell Harvest
Fair, which is celebrating its 25th
anniversary this year, is a volun-
teer community event that is de-
signed to provide a full day of fun
and entertainment for local fami-
lies and friends.
The fair involves a variety of
activities, contests and hands-on
events. Last year, the fair hosted
classic country games, a bake-off,
inflatable rides, hayrides, a pet-
ting zoo for kids, live musical per-
formances, dozens of craft and
food vendors and multiple games
run by community groups.
Although the fair was can-
celled in October last year be-
cause of rain, it was rescheduled
to early November, with a great
turnout, according to Hopewell
Harvest Fair Planning Chair-
woman Julie Sansone.
The fair unites community
groups, businesses, civic organi-
zations and individuals toward
the common goals of community
celebrations, entertainment,
recreation and fundraising, San-
sone said. Money raised from
the fair, including a percentage of
profits from vendors, goes toward
the Hopewell Harvest Fair Com-
munity Grant Program, which
provides small grants to local
community non-profit organiza-
tions.
The organizations that re-
ceived grants in 2011 included
Easel Animal rescue League,
Homefront, Hopewell Elementary
School PTO (for the science fair
and fifth-grade trip), Hopewell
Fire Department, Ladies Auxil-
iary, Hopewell Public Library,
Hopewell Second Calvary Baptist
Church, Hopewell Valley Youth
Chorale, Hopewell Valley Chil-
drens Theatre, Hopewell Valley
please see SUSPECT, page 2 please see FAIR, page 10
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
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Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
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the cash, police said, and no vehi-
cle was observed.
Some of the employees who
work at Stop and Shop werent
even aware that the robbery was
taking place, report said.
Hopewell police are currently
reviewing the store and bank
video for any leads. Patrol Officer
Sara Erwin and Detective Kevin
Zorn are also investigating, in co-
operation with the FBI.
If anyone has any information
regarding the incident, contact
Chief George C. Meyer at (609)
737-3100 or by emailing gmey-
er@hopewelltwp.org.
PNC Bank is offering a $10,000
reward for information that leads
to the arrest of the suspect.
SUSPECT
Continued from page 1
Suspect allegedly fled
with less than $1,500
Special to The Sun
Above is the suspect from the
April 14 PNC Bank robbery.
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4 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
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Our colorful displays of unique
merchandise create an oasis of
beauty and style. Visit us for
quality buys at bargain prices!
In May, PEAC Health & Fitness
has the opportunity to display
more than 60 works of art by chil-
dren from the elementary schools
of the Hopewell Valley Regional
School District.
Assisting in the coordination
of this spectacular event is art
teacher Kathleen Belton.
Belton teaches art at Toll Gate
and Stony Brook elementary
schools.
Students are excited to share
their artwork, Belton said. Last
years display was well received
by the community, with many
compliments on what our elemen-
tary artists are able to accom-
plish.
PEACs art is on display for its
members and the public. If you
wish to display your artwork,
contact Laura Geltch at (609) 883-
2000 or email
Lgeltch@peachealthfitness.com.
For more information, visit
www.peachealthfitness.com.
PEAC is located at 1440 Lower
Ferry Road in Ewing.
Special to The Sun
Hopewell Valley School District
art teacher, Mrs. Kathleen Bel-
ton, instructs art students mak-
ing clay containers.
PEAC displays student
artwork through May
Send us your Hopewell news
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-
0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Ed Lynes
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Joe Eisele
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
letters to the editor
in our opinion
A
nyone who doubted the need
for New Jersey to enact
tougher laws against bullying
should read the story of Sawyer
Rosenstein. The Associated Press re-
ported last week that his family had
settled with the Ramsey school district
for $4.2 million.
The reason for the settlement: Back
in 2006, a student with a history of bul-
lying other kids punched Rosenstein
in the stomach, leaving him paralyzed.
The AP story notes that the familys
lawsuit alleged that the puncher had a
history of being a bully, and that the
school district knew or should have
known about it.
Even more distressing, Rosenstein,
then only 12, had emailed school offi-
cials notifying them that he was being
bullied.
After the death of Rutgers student
Tyler Clementi, the state got tough on
bullying.
In addition to mandating training
and reporting, the law states that bul-
lies can be suspended or expelled from
school.
And that, removing the problem
from schools, will go a long way to-
ward solving the problem.
Some critics of the new law claim it
is too burdensome and could lead to
more lawsuits and additional expenses
for school districts. Well, so be it.
Every child should feel safe at
school. No child should go to school
every day in fear of being attacked,
physically or emotionally. Schools
have to be safe havens.
And its hard to believe that school
districts dont have, or cant have, a
good idea of who the bullies are. The
kids certainly do.
The law came too late for many N.J.
students, but it is in place now, and we
encourage every school district to
make sure that everything possible is
done to ensure the safety of every stu-
dent.
Simply identifying and then getting
rid of the bullies will go a long way to-
ward achieving that goal.
No doubt about bullying laws
A punch that paralyzed a student leads to huge settlement
Getting tough on bullies
Last week, we saw another reminder
of why it is imperative that school dis-
tricts take a hard line against bullying.
Identify the bullies. Then remove
them from the school.
Sewer bond ordinance needs
to pass, says writer
Those who seek to defeat the sewer bond
ordinance selfishly argue that, since they
will not directly benefit from the projected
sewers, they shouldnt pay for it. Put aside
that those residents who do need sewers,
because they have failing septic tanks, will
reimburse the township.
Put aside that we need a limited amount
of sewers to support a mandated Afford-
able Housing Project.
And if we do not build it, the builders
remedy will come.
My concern is if a small group of resi-
dents are successful at defeating the sewer
bond ordinance at a special referendum on
May 8, then what is next?
Will they defeat a bond ordinance to
build a planned senior center because they
are not senior citizens?
Will they defeat a bond ordinance to
build recreational facilities like Twin
Pines because their families do not plan to
use those facilities?
Will they force the township to sell Pen-
nytown to a commercial developer because
as they have argued we have no current af-
fordable housing obligation?
Will they force the township to pave
Aunt Molly Road because it costs more tax
dollars to maintain an historic dirt road?
Hopewell Township is a diverse commu-
nity essentially made up of a lot of minori-
ty interests. And, we as a community have
always supported each other even if we do
not directly benefit from it. We will lose
more than a sewer project if the sewer
bond ordinance is defeated. We will lose
our sense of community.
Please vote yes on May 8.
John Murphy
Committee needs to improve
ordinance for taxpayers
The old slogan politics is dirty unfortu-
nately still rings true. Proponents of the
ELSA bond ordinance would have you be-
lieve the Hopewell Township Affordable
Housing Plan would be out of date if the or-
dinance is defeated in the May 8 referendum.
If defeated, they say, developers will have
nearly unbridled control of the township.
That is dirty politics scare tactics, and
its simply untrue. Its meant to unneces-
sarily alarm people to bully them to get
their way. We find these tactics very disap-
pointing.
The fact is our currently approved Af-
fordable Housing Plan will still be intact
the day after the bond ordinance is rejected
by the voters. Developers will not be knock-
ing down our doors on May 9. Defeat of the
bond does not thwart our Affordable Hous-
ing Plan. Rather, rebuffing it provides the
township committee the opportunity to ex-
punge the existing defective ordinance,
and advance one that properly addresses
our Affordable Housing Plan wastewater
needs, ensures that the users fund the in-
frastructure (as opposed to the taxpayer),
and reduces the amount of reserve sewer-
age capacity to that which is actually need-
ed (not twice what is needed, as in the cur-
rent ordinance).
Proponents of the ordinance do indeed
have a point that defeat of the ordinance,
in conjunction with no further action by
our township committee on developing an
improved ordinance that addresses the
above deficiencies, could, in fact, leave the
township vulnerable to the greed of devel-
opers.
If nothing is done by the committee to
replace the flawed ordinance with a better
one, developers could argue that the town-
ship is not taking its affordable housing
needs seriously.
We are, on record, urging the township
committee to roll up its sleeves and get to
work on an improved ordinance that does
not require the taxpayers to fund waste-
water infrastructure that only a few will
benefit from, and that does not provide sur-
plus sewerage capacity for developers to
please see LETTERS, page 7
sink their teeth into. We wonder
why the proponents arent en-
couraging the same.
So send a message to the town-
ship committee by voting no on
May 8.
By saying no, you are insisting
they immediately adopt a high-
quality ordinance that does not
create a new tax and maintains
the rural nature of the township.
For more information on the
ELSA bond ordinance referen-
dum, see our website at www.el-
sareferendum.org.
Robert Kecskes, Chair
Citizens For Tax Choice
APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
letters to the editor
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LETTERS
Continued from page 6
The annual Spring Rummage
Sale at Hopewell Presbyterian
Church located at 80 W. Broad St.
will be held on Thursday, May 3,
and Friday, May 4, from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Large items will be sold out-
side beginning at 8:30 a.m. On Sat-
urday, May 5, from 9 a.m. to noon,
$4 will buy a whole grocery bag
full of good used items.
Donations may be dropped off
at the church beginning at 3 p.m.
on Sunday, April 29, through noon
on Wednesday, May 2. Please
bring clean clothing in good con-
dition, books, jewelry, toys and
games, household items and
small appliances in good working
order. Large items, such as furni-
ture, will also be collected.
Call (908) 788-8186 to schedule a
pick-up.
Do not bring shoes, plastic cups
or bottles with advertising logos,
magazines, textbooks, encyclope-
dias, computers, typewriters,
mattresses or large appliances.
Proceeds from the sale allow
the Hopewell Presbyterian
Women to contribute to a variety
of local and worldwide mission
projects.
Rummage sale coming up
at Hopewell Presbyterian
Send us your Hopewell news
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-
0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
WEDNESDAY APRIL 25
Chicken Chat: 7.p.m. at Rosedale
Mills in Pennington. The popular
free workshop on keeping back-
yard chickens. Come listen to
guest speakers provide advice
and join in on the fun question
and answer sessions. Its a great
time for all with door prizes,
refreshments, giveaways plus a
bonus private sale for attendees
only! Please call (609) 737-2008
or visit rosedalemills.com to
reserve a seat.
Movies for Adults: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
and 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Watch The
Help, based on the book by
Kathryn Stockett. This is an
empowering story about very dif-
ferent women in the 1960s south
who build an unlikely friendship
around a secret writing project
one that breaks societys rules
and puts them all at risk. Rated
PG-13. Starring Emma Stone and
Viola Davis.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
THURSDAY APRIL 26
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
FRIDAY APRIL 27
Open Play Time: All ages. 11 a.m. to
noon at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
time for parents and children to
socialize in the childrens activity
room. Toys and coloring supplies
available.
SATURDAY APRIL 28
Operation Take Back New Jersey:
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Hopewell Town-
ship police officers will collect
unused, expired, or unwanted
prescription drugs for safe dis-
posal.
Family Story Time: 10:30 to 11 a.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Enjoy
stories, songs, rhymes and a craft
for children and their families.
Program runs about 30 minutes.
Online registration required.
SUNDAY APRIL 29
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY APRIL 30
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY MAY 1
Hopewell Seniors Connect Skype
The Next Best Thing to Being
There: 10 to 11 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Skype is an Inter-
net program that turns a person-
al computer into a telephone.
Make free voice and video phone
calls, text, chat, screen share or
transfer files with anyone around
the world. Join for a demonstra-
tion of how to make a free voice
and video call and learn about
additional Skype features.
Top 10 Things You Must Know
Before Selling A Home: 7 to 8:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Mark Butler of Weichert Realtors
will talk about the realities of
todays market, how to value your
home, preparing it to sell, use of
the internet for real estate, home
appraisals, property disclosure
and numerous other issues in
selling a home. Question and
answer session will follow presen-
CALENDAR PAGE 8 APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
OPEN HOUSE
April 29, 1pm to 3pm
or
Contact us for a tour!
please see CALENDAR, page 9
APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Minutes from Pennington, Hopewell and Princeton
Programs for Infants - 6 years
Coupon expires
May 2
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
4/30/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
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Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. A great way to introduce
your child to library story times
and reading. Age-appropriate
books shared. Songs, nursery
rhymes, puppets and felt board
figures create a rich audio-visual
and social experience. Adult
supervision required. No registra-
tion needed.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Hopewell Township Agricultural
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. at the Township Build-
ing first Tuesday of the month.
Public is invited. For more infor-
mation contact: Lucia Huebner at
466-0277 or lucia@doorposter.
com; or John Hart at 737-2008 or
ihart89@aol.com.
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
CALENDAR
The Hopewell Township Parks
and Recreation Department is
sponsoring season five of the
Baseball Home Run series that
will run throughout the summer.
There are five events sched-
uled; four baseball games and one
overnight trip to Cooperstown,
N.Y.
The first game is scheduled on
Tuesday, May 8 to see the Yankees
take on Tampa Bay. The second
Yankee game is scheduled for
Monday, Aug. 13 with the Bronx
Bombers taking on the Texas
Rangers.
Other games in the series in-
clude a trip to Citi Field to see the
Mets play the Phillies on Thurs-
day, July 5.
The fourth game of the series
is scheduled for Tuesday, July 24
with the Phillies hosting the
Milwaukee at Citizens Bank
Park.
These Valley-wide family trips
are open to all residents and their
guests. The cost is $55 per person
($50 for Hopewell Twp. residents),
which includes motor coach
transportation and admission to
the games.
All trips depart from Independ-
ence Park, adjacent to the Stony
Brook Elementary School off
Pennington-Lawrenceville Road.
The Cooperstown Trip is
scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 26 to
Monday, Aug. 27.
Pricing for the overnight trip
starts at $209/person and will in-
clude transportation, lodging, ad-
mission to the National Baseball
Hall of Fame Museum and much
more.
A $100 deposit to secure your
spot on the overnight trip is due
by June 1.
For further information on any
of the baseball trips or to reserve
your tickets, call 737-3753.
Baseball Home Run series takes
place throughout the summer
Municipal Alliance, Hopewell
Valley Central High School Schol-
arship, MOMS Club of Hopewell-
Titusville, Real Food for Thought,
Resource Center of Somerset,
Inc., Stoneybrook-Millstone Wa-
tershed Association, Sunshine
Foundation, Visiting Nurses of
Mercer (hospice) and Woman-
space.
Since the fairs inception, near-
ly $190,000 has been distributed to
groups serving the citizens of the
Hopewell, mostly in the form of
grants under $1,000 each.
Sansone says the fair provides
interactive events and financial
benefits for the community,
which is the most important part
of the event.
I love to see all of the families
that come out to the fair spending
time together, engaging with
other community members and
enjoying the atmosphere of a
great community event, she
said. With children spending so
much time inside behind screens,
and engaged with multimedia de-
vices so often, I think these events
are more important than ever.
Roxanne Klett, a trustee for the
committee and volunteer of six
years, has been attending the fair
since its inception in 1987. She
has a background in booking
music and planning events,
which is a perfect combination
for helping plan an event like this.
She and her husband, Ted, also
own a small, local sound compa-
ny, RoxyLou Entertainment,
which they feature at the fair to
contribute their time and skills to
help create an enjoyable event.
Klett also believes the fair is a
family tradition that is beneficial
to the community.
I am a firm believer in volun-
teering in the community, she
said. Everyone involved with the
fair now and in the past, believes
it is a valuable asset to the com-
munity. It is not only a fun, com-
munity event for families to enjoy,
but it aids well-meaning
groups whose mission is to help
others.
The committee is just starting
to plan the 2012 fair, so it hasnt
made any decisions as to what
events it will entail, but it encour-
ages residents to bring ideas for-
ward.
We are always looking for new
and exciting things to add, San-
sone said.
At the April 25 meeting, the
committee will be talking about
the planning process, their com-
mittees and brainstorming ideas
for the 2012 fair, scheduled for
Oct. 13. Last year, the fair attract-
ed 20 volunteers, as well as a
handful of people who volun-
teered the day of the event.
There's plenty to do big and
small so even if you only have
an hour to spare between now
and Oct. 13, we'll take it, Sansone
said.
For further information or
questions about volunteering,
email volunteer@hopewellhar-
vestfair.org or call Sansone at
(609) 915-5789.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
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FAIR
Continued from page 1
Fair provides interactive events,
financial benefits to community
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POLICE REPORT
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On April 9 at 5:23 p.m., Sgt.
William Springer charged a 24-
year-old woman with hindering
apprehension. Springer had
stopped the woman for a view ob-
struction on March 7 while she
drove along Pennington Road.
She provided a false name to
Springer knowing that her dri-
vers license was suspended. A
further investigation revealed her
true identity and she was taken
into custody. She was processed at
police headquarters and was
charged with hindering appre-
hension, driving while suspended
and view obstruction. She was
later released and her case will be
heard in municipal court.
On April 8 at 3:42 p.m., Officer
Louis Vastola stopped a car after
observing it traveling 36 mph in a
25 mph zone along Columbia Av-
enue. Vastola say he spoke with
the driver, a 36-year-old man, who
was found to have outstanding
warrants out of Montgomery
Township, Ewing Township and
Trenton. He was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. He
was charged with driving while
suspended and a child car seat vi-
olation, which will be heard in
municipal court. He was later re-
leased after posting bail.
On April 9 at 8 a.m., Officer
George Sabatino responded to
Shrewsbury Court on a report of
criminal mischief. Sometime
overnight, someone smashed out
the driver side window on the res-
idents car, which was parked in
front of the residence. An esti-
mate of the damage was unavail-
able.
On April 9 at 8:03 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino took a criminal
mischief report. Sometime
overnight, someone damaged two
light fixtures at the end of the
driveway on Baker Way. The dam-
age was estimated at $400.
On April 10 at 12:28 p.m., Officer
James Hoffman responded to the
Pennington Shopping Center on a
report of criminal mischief. Some-
time between April 2 and April 10,
someone punctured the front tire
of a parked car. An estimate of the
damage was unavailable.
On April 11 at 4:17 p.m., Officer
Michael Toth responded to Route
29 on a report of a motor vehicle
crash. Police say a 24-year-old
man was driving a 1999 Dodge
Ram pick up truck south along
Route 29 when the driver side
rear tire came off of the truck.
The tire rolled into the north-
bound lane where it struck a Toy-
ota Corolla and forced the driver
off of the road into a field. The
tire then struck a second north-
bound car, a Toyota Scion, and
that car also ended up in a field
after the driver took evasive ac-
tion. No was injured in the crash.
He received summonses for an
unsafe vehicle and being an unli-
censed driver. These charges will
be heard in municipal court.
On April 14 at 2:14 a.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino observed
a car traveling along Route 29
weaving in and out of its lane and
traveling at 60 mph in a 45 mph
zone. Vaccarino says he spoke
with the driver, a 26-year-old man,
who had the odor of alcohol on
his breath. After performing
field-sobriety tests, he was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with drunk-
en driving, refusal to submit to a
breath test, speeding, reckless
driving, failure to maintain lane,
unlicensed driver and uninsured
motorist. He was later released to
an acquaintance and this case
will be heard in municipal court.
On April 14 at 7:12 p.m., Officer
Brian Dendis observed a car trav-
eling at 48 mph in a 25 mph zone
along Harbourton Rocktown
Road. Dendis says he stopped the
car and spoke with the driver, a
29-year-old man, who was found
to have outstanding warrants for
his arrest out of East Greenwich
and Linden. He was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. He
was charged with speeding and
driving while suspended, which
will be heard in municipal court.
He was later released on his own
recognizance on the outstanding
warrants.
MARCH STATISTICS
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Township: Officers respond-
ed to 51 motor vehicle crashes,
nine of which were crashes in-
volving deer. There were 733
traffic summonses issued and
four drunken-driving arrests.
Officers investigated three as-
saults, one burglary, three
thefts, three domestic-violence
incidents, four CDS violations,
give criminal mischief inci-
dents, one liquor-law violation
and seven harassment inci-
dents. Nineteen men, four
women, four boys and one girl
were arrested. Officers assisted
with 74 ambulance calls and 15
fire calls. Officers responded to
68 alarm calls. Officers investi-
gated 33 suspicious occurrence
calls and 28 suspicious car
and/or person calls.
Borough: Officers responded
to one motor vehicle crash.
There were 91 traffic summons-
es issued. Officers investigated
three assaults, one domestic vi-
olence incident, one CDS viola-
tion and two criminal-mischief
incidents. Three men and boy
were arrested. Officers assisted
with six ambulance calls and a
fire call. Officers responded to
two alarm calls, one suspicious-
occurrence calls and two
suspicious car and/or person
calls.
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012
Minds and Manners
to host open house
Minds and Manners is a pre-
school that educates the heart as
well as the mind. Minds and Man-
ners is a new name in the area,
but the staff has been teaching in
the area since 1993. Bonnie Mar-
tin, formerly of Hopewell Coun-
try Day School, will be heading
the preschool, which is located at
the Country Day Schools former
location at Rambling Pines on
Route 518, just off Route 31 at the
Hopewell/East Amwell border.
Minds and Manners offers de-
velopmentally appropriate pro-
grams for full or half-days, with
flexible schedules. Call to sched-
ule a tour at (609) 649-4214, or stop
by at an open house on Saturday,
April 28 from noon to 2 p.m.
For more information, email
Bonnie at blm718@comcast.net.
Program for seniors
on April 25
Learn more about a local part-
nership to help you age in place
with Soni Pahade of the Prince-
ton Senior Resource Center on
Wednesday, April 25, from 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Hopewell
Valley Senior Center located at
395 Reading St., in Pennington.
Nine partner agencies provide
no wrong door wrap around
care management services to sen-
iors and people with disabilities
so that they can remain in their
own homes and age in place with
dignity.
People can access services
through any of the agencies and
receive as many services as they
need in their own homes with
transportation provided. The
event is free and no registration
is required. For more informa-
tion, contact senior services at
(609) 737-0605, ext. 692, or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
Tour of Trenton Cyrus
No. 5 Lodge on May 1
On May 1 at 7 p.m., the
Hopewell Valley Historical Socie-
ty will sponsor a tour of the Tren-
ton Cyrus No. 5 Lodge located at
131 Burd St. in Pennington. With
roots going back to 1787, Trenton
Cyrus No. 5 has a long and fasci-
nating history. To RSVP, email
hvhist@aol.com. For more infor-
mation, contact Beth Kerr at (609)
737-1547.
AARP Safe Driver
Program being offered
The AARP Driver Safety Pro-
gram is the nations first and
largest classroom refresher
course designed especially for
drivers 50 and older. Participants
learn defensive techniques, new
traffic laws and rules of the road.
Through interacting with one an-
other, they find out how to safely
adjust their driving to compen-
sate for age-related changes in vi-
sion, hearing and reaction time.
Participants must have a valid NJ
drivers license. Graduates re-
ceive a certificate of completion
that entitles them to a reduction
for their auto insurance premi-
ums in New Jersey.
This course is being offered at
the Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter on Wednesdays, April 25 and
May 2, from 1 to 4 p.m. Partici-
pants must attend both days to
complete course. The course is
$12 for AARP members and $14
for non-members. AARP &
YMCA membership is not re-
quired. Call the Hopewell Valley
YMCA at (609) 737-3048 to register.
The Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter is located at 395 Reading St. in
Pennington.
Victorian Tea set for
May 12 in Hopewell
A Victorian Tea will be held on
Saturday, May 12, at the Hopewell
United Methodist Church, 20
Blackwell Ave., in Hopewell.
The tea will support mission
projects for women and children.
The menu includes a variety of
teas, savory finger sandwiches,
scones, as well as fruit and sweet
desserts.
Two sessions will be held,
which will be from 1:30 p.m. to
2:30 p.m. or from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Tickets cost $12.50 per person.
Due to limited space, reservations
are required. Tickets must be pur-
chased by Monday, May 7.
To make a reservation or pur-
chase tickets, contact Kathy
Berry at (609) 466-7913.
YMCA offering
summer activities
This summer, the Hopewell
Valley YMCA is offering a wide
range of fun and memorable ac-
tivities at Camp Reign.
Campers will grow individual-
ly as well as a team through an ex-
tensive hands-on curriculum.
Campers enrolled in Turtles
through Wolves will participate
in specialty activities such as arts
and crafts, games and more,
sports, and wiz kids.
Campers enrolled in sports
camp will take part in structured
fun drills as well as various
sports.
Of course, one of the best ways
to beat the summer heat is
through swimming, which is why
all campers will receive both in-
structional and recreational
swimming during the week.
Daily snacks and weekly trips
are also included.
Have more than one child? No
problem.
By having more than one child
enrolled, your oldest childs sum-
mer fun will be at a 10 percent dis-
count.
For more information, contact
the Hopewell Valley YMCA at
(609) 737-3048, email info@hvym-
ca.com, or visit www.hvymca.org.
Also, please join us at our sum-
mer camp 2012 open house on
May 29 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
the Toll Gate Grammar School.
History of Titusville
program on April 29
On Sunday, April 29, at 12:30
p.m., the Hopewell Valley Histori-
cal Society will host The History
of Titusville at the Titusville
Presbyterian Church located at 48
River Drive in Titusville.
Bob and Carol Meszaros will
give a slideshow presentation of
pictures from Titusvilles past. A
light lunch will be provided.
To RSVP, email
hvhist@aol.com.
For more information, contact
Beth Kerr at (609) 737-1547.
BRIEFS
20 Nassau Street
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 PAGE 15
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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HeIp Wanted
Wanted To Buy
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Rare south-end Asbury Ave single family home. This gorgeous
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HeIp Wanted cont'd

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