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3 Axis Surface Machining

Preface Methodology Recommendations Where to Find More Information What's New Getting Started Operation-oriented Machining Entering the Workbench Rough Machining the Part ZLevel Machining of the Outside of a Part ZLevel Machining of the Inside Walls of a Part Sweeping Checking the Results Creating a Rework Area Reworking Generating an NC Output File Generating NC Shopfloor Documentation Area-oriented Machining Entering the Workbench Defining the Areas to Machine Defining the Tools to Use Sweep Roughing the Part Sweeping the Top Surface Sweeping the Side Areas ZLevel on Vertical Walls Reworking Between Contours Generating an NC Output File Generating NC Shopfloor Documentation Basic Tasks Roughing Operations Sweep Roughing Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data Roughing Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data

Automatic Rough Stock Finishing and Semi-finishing Operations Sweeping Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data ZLevel Machining Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data Spiral Milling Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data Contour-driven Machining Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data Contouring Reworking Operations Pencil Operations Geometric Components Machining Strategy Macro Data Roughing Rework Machining Areas Defining an Area to Machine Defining an Area to Rework Defining Offsets Tool path Editor Editing a Point Editing an Area Transformations Connecting Tool paths Reversing a Tool path Tool Path Approaches and Retracts Packing and Unpacking a Tool Path Checking for Tool Holder Collision Importing Files STL Files

NC Code Files Workbench Description Menu Bar Toolbars Machining Operations Toolbar Tool Path Editor Toolbar Machining Areas Toolbar Edge Selection Toolbar Face Selection Toolbar Specification Tree Glossary Index

Preface
3 Axis Surface Machining is a new generation product that defines and manages NC programs. 3 Axis Surface Machining is dedicated to the machining of 3D geometry work parts with 3-axis machining techniques. It is particularly adapted to the needs of mold, die and tool makers and prototype manufacturers in all branches and at all levels of industry. 3 Axis Surface Machining offers easy-to-learn and easy-to-use shopfloor-oriented tool path definition for 3-axis manufacturing. 3 Axis Surface Machining is based on industry-recognized, leading-edge technologies which offer the tightest integration between tool path definition, verification and instant cycle updates. 3 Axis Surface Machining covers full design-to-manufacture processes offering functions for: defining the areas you want to machine, rough machining either by vertical or horizontal planes, roughing rework, sweeping, ZLevel machining, pencil operations, contour-driven operations, profile contouring, drilling, detecting residual material, defining areas to rework, visualization of the result of the machining program, the production of shopfloor documentation. 3 Axis Surface Machining gives you the freedom to choose the working methods that best suit your needs. Methodology Recommendations Where to Find More Information

Methodology
Surface Machining is a versatile application, fully adapted to your needs and your working methods whether they are machining area-oriented or operation-oriented. You can either define the machining areas on your part and then assign an operation to each of them or you can define your machining process as a series of operations with an area to machine for each operation. A machining area can be: the whole part (for example, in roughing), a subset of the faces on the part, a subset of faces on the part with a limiting contour. The Getting Started chapter contains two sections, one which demonstrates operation-oriented machining and another which demonstrates area-oriented machining. Before starting work with Surface Machining, please ensure that you have an open file (CATPart or CATProduct) and that you are in the Surface Machining workbench (Start > NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining). Here is a suggested order for operations in a machining program: rough machining operations, (semi-)finishing operations, detection of unmachined areas, reworking of unmachined areas, generation and output of documentation. Area-oriented Area-oriented methodology is useful when you have a complex part to machine and you know in advance what kind of operation you are going to apply to each separate area. This approach is of great use when, for example, you are going to machine a "family" of similar parts and when you have dedicated machines for mass production. You define the areas on one part, you assign an operation to each area, and then you machine. At the end you have a program that you can apply to all of the "members" of the "family" at least working cost because: the machining strategy has already been defined (chosen operations), the tool has already been defined, only the area need be redefined, you know exactly what kind of output you require,

4. Define all of the separate areas to machine on your work piece. The only mandatory data for a operation is the area to machine (with the exception of roughing which requires a rough stock too) and all of the other parameters have default values. Compute the operation. Select the area or areas you want to machine with a particular operation. Compute the operation. 5. and 4 for all of the other areas to machine. Use operation-oriented machining when you want to progressively define your machining program operation-by-operation sequentially. The only mandatory data for a operation is the area to machine (with the exception of roughing which requires a rough stock too) and all of the other parameters have default values. continue defining the remaining operations for your machining program. Change the parameters in that operation (if required). 5. 2. 4. Change the other parameters in the operation (if required). Choose the operation you want to use. Click on the appropriate icon (for example. If the results are satisfactory. repeat steps 2. Operation-oriented 1. . We recommend that you use the default parameters first unless you are sure of the values you wish to enter. 3. sweeping).1. and as a result the computation can be run in batch to further reduce time loss. 3. 3. If the results are satisfactory. Each operation has the area it deals with defined as part of its data. This approach is useful for single or limited part production because it allows you to define your requirements step-by-step. Select the area(s) to machine either as the whole part with the contextual menu or as a face or group of faces with the face selection wizard. Click the "part" area in the geometric components of the operation. 2. We recommend that you use the default parameters first unless you are sure of the values you wish to enter.

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then make sure that this box is not ticked.Recommendations If you intend to create complementary geometry. you should deactivate the Optimize retracts option. Apply and Cancel buttons). If you have defined a safety plane. Before starting 3 Axis Surface Machining. Depending on your screen size. the safety plane will be ignored. . If you do not. or. if you are using large fonts. In an operation. exit your CATIA session and use Settings > Control Panel > Display > Settings to: give a higher value for your screen resolution. in the Display tab of the NC Manufacturing options. before you start 3 Axis Surface Machining go to Tools/Options and. You should save your CATProcess before generating HTML workshop documentation. use small fonts. tick the box that allows you to create a CATPart to store necessary geometry. go to Tools/Options and in the Operation tab of the NC Manufacturing option and tick the Use default values of the current program box. if you cannot see the whole dialog box (particularly the OK. This will ensure that when a new operation is created its parameters will be initialized with default values that are appropriate to that operation and not with the values from the operation just before it. you may have to use both of the solutions. If you are not going to modify the geometry.

. we recommend that you read the Version 5 Manufacturing Infrastructure User's Guide.Where to Find More Information Prior to reading this book.

You can find this option in the sweeping and contour-driven operations. Tools to use New: tapered tool/conical mill for sweeping. ZLevel New: You can now use variable offsets in ZLevel operations. New: There is now an option that allows you to extend paths in a straight line to link two areas in a part when they are separated by a hole or a gap. Enhanced: The Face selection wizard now has an option that lets you select faces that are normal to an axis or parallel/perpendicular to a selected face. This option is intended for use with zig-zag tool path style only. spiral milling. contour driven and pencil operations and also for rework areas. Part to machine New: You can now apply an overall default offset to an offset group. Roughing New: You can now choose whether or not you want to contour the rough stock before milling. New: You can now use faces from existing machining areas or offset areas to form a new machining area.What's New? General functions New: There is a new cycle. New: There are three new types of approach and retract for sweeping. contour-driven and pencil operations. . that has been developed to finish-mill flat surfaces.

a message now tells you that it has been reversed. New: You can now add approaches or retracts to a tool path via an item in the tool path contextual menu. Enhanced: When you reverse a tool path. . if you have cut an area out of it). Enhanced: If a tool path is not closed (for example. you will be informed of this by the word open after its name in the specifications tree. All of the tool paths now appear in the specifications tree under the operation they belong to.Tool Path Editor New: You can now create multiple transformations of a tool path.

use specific machining operations on the part and output data. Try both tutorials to see which method suits your working techniques best. There are two ways of defining your machining program.Getting Started Before getting to grips with all of the Surface Machining capacities. you can either base it on operation definition or on area definition. The tutorials should take you 30 minutes each to complete. here are two short step-by step tutorials that will help guide you through the key functionalities. You will learn how to use the functions listed below and learn how to define areas on the part to machine. Operation-oriented Machining Area-oriented Machining .

Operation-oriented Machining Operation-oriented machining is a method where you define each operation one-by-one. When you define an operation you decide (using the geometry tab) which areas of the part you want to machine with that particular operation. run the program to create the tool paths. and produce an APT file and a workshop document. This tutorial teaches you how to: define the operations necessary for the machining of the part below. check for residual material. rework the unmachined areas. Entering the Workbench Rough Machining the Part ZLevel Machining of the Outside of a Part ZLevel Machining of the Inside Walls of a Part Sweeping Checking the Results Creating a Rework Area Reworking Generating an NC Output File Generating NC Shopfloor Documentation .

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Open the SurfaceMachining3. The Surface Machining workbench is displayed. 2. 1.CATProduct file in the samples directory.Entering the Workbench This task shows you how to open a part and enter the Surface Machining workbench. Select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining from the Start menu. Select Product1 containing the shape to machine and the rough stock in the specifications tree and display them in wireframe mode using this icon . The part surrounded by the rough stock is displayed in the Set Up Editor window along with the manufacturing specifications. . 3.

Click Ok to confirm. 4. click the design part icon.Double click Part Operation. In the dialog box that is displayed. The rough stock it the rough stock for the overall part. The design part defines the reference part that will be used by the application to calculate the residual material. Then click the stock icon. select the part in the viewer and double click in the viewer to validate your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Select Manufacturing Program. . tools and auxiliary commands. A program must be current before you can insert program entities such as machining operations.1 in the tree.1) in the specifications tree to make it the current entity. Each successive operation works on the residual material that is left by the operation before it in the manufacturing program.1 (under PartOperation. select the rough stock in the viewer and double click in the viewer to redisplay the dialog box.

Select the Roughing icon . you just specify the geometry to be machined. In roughing. A Roughing.1 entity and a default tool are added to the program. 1. 2.Rough Machining the Part This task shows you how to insert a rough machining operation in the program. These are areas that represent geometry that must be defined. . The Roughing dialog box is displayed. As this operation will use the default tool and options proposed by the program. The status light on the geometric components tab is red ( ) which means that you must select the part geometry in order to create the operation. Hold MB3 down over the red area (do not click) that represents the part. There are sensitive areas that are colored red in the tab. they are the part to machine and the rough stock.

Choose Body in the contextual menu. Double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and to redisplay the dialog box. The red area in the geometric area is now green to indicate that the geometry has been selected. click on the part inside the rough stock. 4. The dialog box shrinks to allow you to select the part in the viewer. 5. The dialog box shrinks to allow you to select the rough stock in the viewer. In the viewer. The red area in the geometric components tab is now green to indicate that the geometry has been selected. Click the sensitive area that represents the rough stock. click on the geometry that defines the rough stock.3. In the viewer. .

Click Replay. Click OK. Click OK to close the dialog box.6. . 8. The tool path is erased from the viewer and you come back to the operation dialog box. 7. The tool path is displayed and the display and analysis dialog box is called up. Now we are going to use ZLevel machining on the walls of the pocket and the outside of the part.

using the Hide/Show option in the contextual menu.1 entity is added to the program. . Select the ZLevel machining icon .ZLevel Machining of the Outside of a Part This task shows you how to use ZLevel machining for finishing the outside of the part. To simplify the selection of faces in this task. Make sure that Roughing. 1.1 is the current entity so that the ZLevel operation will be inserted after it. The Zlevel dialog box is displayed. A Zlevel. Then select Shape to Machine in the ProductList and display it in shading with edges mode ( ). select Rough Stock in the ProductList and. make it invisible.

The dialog box is redisplayed and the red area is now green. the edges around the selected faces are highlighted. The dialog box shrinks and the face selection wizard is displayed. In the viewer. Select all of the walls that form a belt around the part. . Click the sensitive red area. Click OK.2.

5.3. Click OK to close the dialog box. ) and choose Outer part for the Machining Click Replay. . Click the check element in the sensitive icon and select the upper face of the part. Click OK. Go to the machining strategy tab ( mode. The tool path is displayed and the display and analysis dialog box is called up. 6. 4. Now we are going to define the ZLevel machining of the pocket. The tool path is erased from the viewer and you come back to the operation dialog box. 7. The operation you have just created should still be the current entity.

2 entity is added to the program. 1.ZLevel Machining of the Inside Walls of a Part This task shows you how to use ZLevel machining for finishing the inside walls of the pocket. Make sure thatZLevel.1 is the current entity so that this operation will be inserted after it. A Zlevel. . The Zlevel dialog box is displayed. Select the ZLevel machining icon .

Click OK to close the dialog box.2. The tool path is erased from the viewer and you come back to the operation dialog box. The dialog box shrinks and the face selection wizard is displayed. The operation you have just created should still be the current entity. Click the sensitive red area. The dialog box is redisplayed and the red area is now green. The tool path is displayed and the display and analysis dialog box is called up. Select all of the faces that form the inside wall of the pocket. In the viewer. 3. ) and choose Pockets only for the Machining 4. . Click Replay. Click OK. Click OK. 6. 5. Now we are going to define a sweeping operation for the top surface of the part and the bottom of the pocket. Go to the machining strategy tab ( mode. the edges around the selected faces are highlighted.

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A Sweeping.Sweeping This task shows you how to use sweeping for finishing the part. 1. Select the Sweeping icon . . The Sweeping dialog box is displayed. Make sure that ZLevel2 is the current entity so that the sweeping operation will be inserted after it.1 entity is added to the program. You are going to define two separate operations one for the top surface and another for the bottom of the pocket.

Click OK. Click the sensitive red area. . The tool path is displayed and the display and analysis dialog box is called up. 5. In the viewer. The dialog box shrinks and the face selection wizard is displayed. Click OK. 3. the edges around the top surface are now highlighted. Select the top surface of the part. Click Replay. 4. The operation you have just created should still be the current entity. The dialog box is redisplayed and the red area is now green.2. Repeat all of the above steps for the bottom surface of the pocket.

1. Your specification tree should look like this.Checking the Results This task shows you how to visually check the machined part resulting from the tool paths for the operations you defined in your machining program. Select Manufacturing Program. .1.

. The Display and Analysis dialog box is displayed. Click this icon to go from one operation to the next displaying the computed tool path after each operation.2. If any of the operations were not computed with Replay. You can display a photo of how the finished part would look with Press OK to close the dialog box. they will be computed at this stage. . In the contextual menu. choose Manufacturing Program.1 object > Tool Path Replay.

Creating a Rework Area This task shows you how to define an area to rework from the areas of the part that were not machined with the tool used in the operations. Choose Body in the contextual menu. You should also make sure that you defined a reference part and rough stock. Hold MB3 down over the red area (do not click) that represents the part. Select the part. . The dialog box shrinks to allow you to select the part in the viewer. Click the Rework Area icon . 2. You must compute the tool paths for your machining program first. 1. Double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and to redisplay the dialog box.

Enter a value of 10mm for the Entry diameter and 2mm for the Corner radius (values used in the machining operations). The areas that we are going to rework are displayed. Click OK to close the dialog box. 5. 4. This creates a Rework Area which remains the current entity. . Click Compute.3.

click the Manufacturing Features icon 1. If you have doubts about whether the rework area you just defined is still the current entity or not (i. Double click the tool diameter. . 3. Enter a value of 5. . if you performed another action since). double click the tool that is In the Manufacturing Features window ( associated with the third ZLevel operation.Reworking This task shows you how to rework the areas of the part that have not been machined and were there is residual material. 2. ). Click the ZLevel icon and click OK.e. You must have created a rework area. The rework area must be the current entity. A rework area is an area that cannot be machined with a given tool.

. Go to the strategy tab . In the Machining tab. 5. double click ZLevel.4. 6. 5. Now we are going to generate an NC data file. choose Outer part for the Machining mode. The new tool path is displayed. Press Replay. Click OK to close the operation dialog box and Close to close the manufacturing view.3 to display the ZLevel dialog box. Press OK to confirm the tool diameter and then OK to close the tool definition dialog box. Still in the Machining Features window.

. Save your program with File/Save as . in the directory of your choice (here we have a directory called models) and call your program MySurfaceMachining.1 in the specifications tree and select Generate NC Code interactively in the contextual menu.. . Press Save. Select Manufacturing Program.Generating an NC Output File This task explains how to interactively generate NC code from the program you have just created. 2. 1.

In the dialog box that is displayed. Browse to the directory where you want to save it (here we have chosen to put it in the same directory as the CATProcess but this is not obligatory). call your file SurfaceMachining (the aptsource suffix is automatic). Click Save to create the APT file. .

.The APT file can be read with any kind of text editor.

CATScript file from the samples directory. Your NC document has been created. 1. Choose the directory where you want to store your new file (we have chosen MyFiles. . Press Done to close the dialog box. Press Document now. Select the Generate documentation icon .Generating NC Shopfloor Documentation This task explains how to interactively generate shopfloor NC documentation in HTML format from the program you have just created. Select the SurfaceMachinist4. but this is not obligatory). Leave "Process" as the process name. Leave "Process" in the Base field. The process documentation dialog box is displayed. 3. 2.

change a tool axis. use a safety plane. Entering the Workbench Defining the Areas to Machine Defining the Tools to Use Sweep Roughing the Part Sweeping the Top Surface Sweeping the Side Areas ZLevel on Vertical Walls Reworking Between Contours Generating an NC Output File Generating NC Shopfloor Documentation . In this tutorial you are going to learn how to: define areas (including a rework area) on the part below. create an APT file and a workshop document.Area-oriented Machining Area-oriented machining is a method where you define all of the separate areas you want to machine on the part before assigning an operation to each one. define tools to use on the areas.

In the dialog box that is displayed. The double click anywhere in the viewer and press OK.Entering the Workbench This task shows you how to open a part and enter the Surface Machining workbench. 1. Open the Gets2.1 in the tree. 3. 2. The part is displayed in the viewer along with the manufacturing specifications. 4. . Select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining from the Start menu. Double click Part Operation. The Surface Machining workbench is displayed. This step is necessary for the visualization and analysis part of the process. Press MB2 and MB3 at the same time and turn the part round so that it looks like this.CATPart in the samples directory. click the design part icon and click the part in the viewer.

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4. The whole part is selected. sensitive area in the dialog box and press MB3. Place your mouse cursor over the red. You are going to define: the whole part as a machining area for rough machining purposes four other areas for use with different cycle types and a rework area. Double click anywhere in the viewer to redisplay the dialog box. . 2. Click the part in the view.Defining the Areas to Machine This task teaches you how to define the specific areas on the part that you are going to machine. Click on the Machining Area icon . Choose Body(ies) in the contextual menu. 3. 1.

5. Call this area Top. Give the machining area a name. You have just created your first machining area. Replace the text in the name box by Whole. Now do the same for the left side of the part with these faces: . 7. Select the Machining area icon and click (MB1 this time) on the red. Click OK. sensitive area in the dialog box. Now select the areas that you see selected in the picture below. Now create an area on the top of the part. 6. Click on OK in the face selection toolbar.

8. . Define a third area with these faces and call it Right. Call this area Left.

. Check the areas that you have just created in the Manufacturing view The view should look like this: . 12. Select Whole in the manufacturing view. Finally. 11. create the last machining area with the faces below and call it Bottom. 10. Now you are going to create a rework area to use when removing residual material.. Click the Rework area icon .9.

13. . change the Entry diameter to 10 mm. the Corner radius to 5 mm and the name to Rework. In the dialog box that is displayed.

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Press Compute to compute the area. The rework area should look like this on the part:

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Press OK to close the dialog box. Press Close to close the manufacturing view. The next step is to define the tools that you will need to machine the areas you have just defined.

Defining the Tools to Use
This task defines the three tools that you are going to need to machine the part. Click Manufacturing Program.1 in the PPR and then click the End mill tool change 1. icon . If you cannot see this icon, use View > Toolbars and activate Auxiliary Operations. In the dialog box that is displayed, click the box to select a ball-end tool

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3. 4. 5.

and confirm with OK. Click the End mill tool change icon again. Tick the ball-end tool box. Double click the diameter.

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Enter a value of 20 in the dialog box that is displayed.

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Click OK Change the tool name to T2 End Mill D 20.

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Click OK. Now define a third tool that: is ball end, has a diameter of 4 mm, and is called T3 End Mill D 04. You now have the three tools that you will need to machine the part. Your PPR should look like this:

We are now going to move on to the next step where you will rough machine the part.

Sweep Roughing the Part
This task will show you how to rough machine the whole part using a sweep roughing operation. 1. Open the manufacturing view by clicking this icon 2. Select Whole from the list of areas. .

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Click the Sweep roughing icon Go to the geometry tab

. and click on Part autolimit.

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. Go to the tool tab and choose tool T2 End Mill D20.

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Press Replay to compute the operation. The toolpath is displayed on the part. Press OK to close the small dialog box that is displayed (bottom right). Press OK to close the operation dialog box. Now you are going to machine the Top surface.

give a stepover distance value of 1mm. Click the Sweeping icon . In the strategy tab. Now you are going to machine the sides of the part. 6. Go to the tool tab and choose tool T1 End Mill D 10. Go to the geometry tab and make sure that Part autolimit is turned on. This task will show you how to sweep the top surface of the part and how to change a tool. Press OK to close the operation dialog box. In the manufacturing view. 4. Press Replay to compute the tool path. 3. select the machining area called Top from the list of areas. 2. 5. . 7.Sweeping the Top Surface 1.

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Go to the tool tab and change the tool like this: . In the manufacturing view. Click the Sweeping icon . select the machining area called Left. 1. 2. define a new tool axis like this: 4. 3.Sweeping the Side Areas This task is going to teach you how to: sweep machining areas Left and Right and change the orientation of the tool axis. In the strategy tab.

Press OK to close the operation dialog box. Click the Sweeping icon . 8. Change the tool axis like this: .5. Select it in the manufacturing view. Now you are going to machine the area called Right. 7. Press Replay to compute the tool path. 9. 6.

. 12. Press Replay to compute the tool path. The next step is to machine the area called Bottom.10. Define the same tool as for area Left. Press OK to close the operation dialog box. 11.

2. In the strategy tab.ZLevel on the Vertical Walls This task teaches you how to: use ZLevel milling change a tool axis use the safety plane. select the machining area called Bottom. 1. 3. Click the ZLevel icon . define a new tool axis like this: Click here: Define the tool axis with these settings: . In the manufacturing view.

Press Replay to compute the tool path. Press OK to close the operation dialog box. Click the safety plane in the sensitive icon. Go to the geometry tab. 5. The purpose of this is to ensure that the tool rises high enough over the area to avoid gouging the rest of the part. . Then click the top face of the part to define the safety plane. 6.4.

3. .Reworking Between Contours This task shows you how to take an area that has not been machined because the tool used was too big and rework it with a smaller tool. Press Replay to compute the tool path. Select Rework in the manufacturing view. Go to the Stepover tab and choose Constant on part. 6. you are going to create an APT file. Now go to the tool tab and select tool T3 End Mill D 04. Now. 5. Click the Contour-driven operation icon . Press OK to close the operation dialog box. 2. 4. 1.

2.. Select Manufacturing Program. Save your program with File/Save as .. Press Save.Generating an NC Output File This task explains how to interactively generate NC code from the program you have just created.1 in the specifications tree then select the Generate NC Code Interactively icon . in the directory of your choice (here we have a directory called models) Call your program MyGettingStarted. 1. .

. Next you are going to generate workshop documentation in HTML format. Click Save to create the APT file. The APT file can be read with any kind of editor.Call your file SurfaceMachining (the aptsource suffix is automatic). Browse to the directory where you want to save it (here we have chosen to put it in the same directory as the CATPRocess but this is not obligatory).

Select the SurfaceMachinist4. Leave "Process" in the Base field. The process documentation dialog box is displayed. Press Document now. Press Done to close the dialog box. Select the Generate documentation icon .CATScript file from the samples directory. . Leave "Process" as the process name. Choose the directory where you want to store your new file (we have chosen MyFiles. Your NC document has been created. but this is not obligatory). 2. 3. 1.Generating NC Workshop Documentation This task explains how to interactively generate shopfloor NC documentation in HTML format from the program you have just created.

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editing and managing machining operations and other entities of the manufacturing process. simulation and program output . Roughing operations Finishing and semi-finishing operations Reworking operations Axial machining operations Machining areas Tool path editor Reading STL files Auxiliary operations Part operation and manufacturing program Managing manufacturing entities Verification.Basic Tasks The basic tasks in this section involve creating.

Create a roughing operation: Select the roughing icon. You can also specify machining parameters. Create a sweep roughing operation: Select the sweep roughing icon. feedrates and spindle speeds. choose a part to machine and specify the tool to be used. .Rough Machining Operations These are the tasks that you will use for rough machining the part. choose a part to machine and specify the tool to be used. feedrates and spindle speeds. You can also specify machining parameters.

all of the other requirements have a default value. .Sweep Roughing This task shows you how to insert a sweep roughing operation into the program. All of the other geometry parameters are optional. Open file Basic1. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. The dialog box opens at the geometry tab page . The area that represents the part geometry is colored red indicating that the geometry is required for defining the area to machine. . Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time.only end mill tools . Select the sweep roughing icon . A SweepRoughing entity and a default tool are added to the program. . Only the geometry is obligatory. This page includes a sensitive icon to help you specify the geometry to be machined.CATPart then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. are available for this operation. the feedrates and spindle speeds the macros . To create the operation you define: the geometry of the part to machine the parameters of the machining strategy the tool to use . 1. Sweep roughing is an operation which allows you to rough machine parts by vertical planes.

You will see that the top area of the part has been rough machined. . You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Press Replay. Press MB 3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies) and click on the part in the viewer.2. 3.

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or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: The other geometric components that you can select in the view (but that are not obligatory) are: the check element. the limit line which defines the outer machining limit on the part.Sweep Roughing . the offset on the part. You can also define a new safety plane with the Offset option in the safety plane contextual menu. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part. . The new plane will be offset from the original by the distance that you enter in the dialog box. an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it. the offset on the check element.Geometric Components In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard. a lower plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. an upper plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. the safety plane.

the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit. the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. inside stops inside the limit line. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop Position. the blue outline is the part edge. In the pictures. . whether it is the contact point or the tool tip. the whole part is machined. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. the yellow part is the area that will be machined. on stops the tool on the limit line. Offset is the distance that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop Mode that you chose.e. If you activate Part autolimit. Part autolimit.You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line. i.

speeds and rates. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined.If you use Limiting contour. store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. or macro data tabs first. . tool data. You can now either run the operation on the part.

Selection by coordinates has the following options: Feature-defined.Sweep Roughing . the machining tolerance. you can define the cycle type. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin. the tool path style. Change the tool axis and the machining direction with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. The sensitive icon illustrates the roughing type you select: ZOffset.Machining Strategy In the machining strategy tab. the part is machined plane by plane. the tool path is offset from the part. You can change the tool axis and the machining direction in the sensitive icon. Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. ZProgressive. the part is machined by interpolating the tool path between the part and the top of a theoretical rough stock. the stepover distance and the maximum cut depth. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. ZPlane. . Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. You can also choose the tool stepover direction and the tool axis.

stepover side and machining tolerance. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis or machining direction.Selection. you enter the XYZ coordinates. . Consider the tolerance value to be the acceptable chord error. The tool path style can be: Zig-zag. Points in the view. the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. Manual. The machining tab concerns the tool path style. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis or machining direction.

. the tool path always follows the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next. The stepover side can be either to the left or the right of the tool path and is defined with respect to the machining direction. One-way same. The strategy tab allows you to define the distance which is the width of the overlap between two successive passes and the maximum depth of cut.One-way next. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass.

You can also define an approach/retract distance for all of the values and XYZ value to define the vector used in Along a vector.Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool approach and retract data. The approach/retract mode can be: Along tool axis. the tool moves along the tool axis. no approach/retract. Tangent to movement. the tool moves along a vector that you define with the Approach/Retract direction: X/Y/Z boxes. Along a vector. Normal. and None. . the tool moves in a direction perpendicular to the surface being machined.Sweep Roughing . the approach/retract is tangent at its end to the rest of the tool path.

The red area in the sensitive icon represents the part geometry. Open file SurfaceMachining3. The dialog box opens at the geometry tab page . This page includes a sensitive icon to help you specify the geometry to be machined. A roughing entity and a default tool area added to the program. all of the other requirements have a default value. To create the geometry you define: geometric components machining strategy tool data . . Select the Roughing icon . Then display the model in wireframe mode with this icon 1. . are available for this operation.only end mill tools . Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time. .Roughing This task shows you how to insert a roughing operation into the program. as is the rough stock. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. Roughing is an operation which allows you to rough machine parts by horizontal planes. All of the other parameters are optional. .CATProduct. then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. It is obligatory. . speeds and rates macro data Only the geometry is obligatory.

Press Replay to compute the operation. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. 4.2. 3. Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies). Click on the rough stock in the sensitive icon. Click on the part in the viewer. You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion. . Click on the stock in the viewer. You will see that the part has been rough machined.

The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined.Roughing . The new plane will be offset from the original by the distance that you enter in the dialog box. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part. an imposed plane that the tool must obligatorily pass through. the offset on the check element. the safety plane. the check element.Geometric Components In the geometric component tab. a start point where the tool will start cutting. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. Use this option if the part that you are going to machine has a particular shape (a groove or a step) that you want to be sure will be cut. a lower plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. You can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard. or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: The other geometric components that you can select in the view (but that are not obligatory) are: the rough stock. . Use this option when accessing the part from the outside. an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it (the small light brown corner near the part selection area). an upper plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. If you do not have a rough stock you can create one automatically. the offset on the part. You can also define a new safety plane with the Offset option in the safety plane contextual menu.

. You can now either run the operation on the part. This parameter is useful in cases where there is an island near the edge of the part and the tool diameter is too wide to allow the area behind the island to be machined. It is expressed as a percentage of the tool diameter. store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. inside stops the tool inside the rough stock.You can also define the following parameters: Position defines where the tool center stops: outside stops the tool outside the rough stock. on stops the tool on the rough stock. This parameter can only be used of the position is inside or outside and you must check the Overshoot box. tool data. speeds and rates. or macro data tabs first. There is an option which allows you to replay all previous operations. Offset defines the distance that the tool can overshoot the Position.

. and the zone to machine. you enter the XYZ coordinates. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. Manual. Selection.Roughing . click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis. Selection by coordinates has the following options: Feature-defined. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis.Machining Strategy Here you can define parameters concerning the style of machining. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin. the machining strategy. The sensitive icon illustrates the tool path style that you chose. You can also choose the tool axis. Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. Change the tool axis with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. Points in the view.

the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next. The tool moves from one pass to the next by stepping over. One-way same. the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. Helical. Zig-zag. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass. only machines around the external contour of the part. Contour only. the tool moves in successive concentric passes from the boundary of the area to machine towards the interior.The Machining tab defines: the Tool path style which can be: One-way next. .

Part contouring is an option that is only used with the zig-zag tool path style. The tool that you are using and the part you are working on must be such that contouring the rough stock is superfluous. Pockets only. By length and enter a length. The Zone tab includes: Min. The tool is never directly in the heart of material. the tool goes round the outside contour of the part before continuing to zig-zag. consider it to be the acceptable chord error. only the outside of the part is machined. the Cutting mode which can be Climb or Conventional. The approach mode with this style is always Helix. the Machining mode which defines the type of area to be machined and can be: By plane. only pockets on the part are machined. the tool removes the most constant amount of material possible at each concentric pass. The Strategy tab defines: the maximum depth of cut which is the depth of the cut effected by the tool at each pass the overlap between two successive passes. Outer part and pockets. It also respects the given cutting mode in all cases. Deactivating this option allows you to gain machining time. With part contouring switched on. Outer part. area which lets you filter out areas that you consider to be too small (in millimeters) to be machined. the whole part is machined plane by plane. the Machining tolerance value.Concentric. Define this distance by choosing either: By ratio and enter a percentage of the tool diameter. Tool core diameter is the diameter of the tool tip that does not actually cut the material. . the whole part is machined outer area by outer area and then pocket by pocket.

Note that the tool goes straight into zig-zag mode: .With part contouring switched on. Note how the tool went round the area to machine first: With part contouring switched off and exactly the same parameters.

Drilling. . The approach mode can be: Plunge. In some cases (where areas of the part are higher than the zone you are machining and when you are using a safety plane). The Axial safety distance is the maximum distance that the tool will rise to when moving from the end of one pass to the beginning of the next. There is a button that optimizes tool retract movements. Ramping.Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool engagement parameters. When this happens. This means that when the tool moves over a surface where there are no obstructions. the tool moves progressively down at the Ramping angle. deactivate the Optimize retracts button.Roughing . the tool will cut into the part. Approach distance is the engagement distance for plunge mode. The result is a gain in time. angle and length. Helix. the tool plunges into previously drilled holes. You can change the drilling tool diameter. it will not rise as high as the safety plane because there is no danger of tool-part collisions. The Radial safety distance is the tool clearance distance with respect to the sides of the part. the tool moves progressively down at the ramping angle with its center along a (vertical) circular helix of Helix diameter. the tool plunges vertically.

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Automatic Rough Stock This task explains how to create an automatic rough stock for a roughing operation. You can modify the values if you choose. 3. You must have a part to machine in your workbench. Press OK to create the rough stock. Select the Automatic rough stock icon Select the part that you want to machine. . 2. Go into the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench via Start/Mechanical Design/Wireframe and Surface Design. A dialog box is displayed that contains the minimum and maximum values that are required in X. 4. 1. Display the Surface Machining Tools via View > Toolbars > Surface Machining Tools. Y and Z to create a box that would surround the part.

Sweeping ZLevel machining Contour-driven machining Profile contouring Spiral milling .Finishing and Semi-finishing Operations These are the operations that you will need to finish or semi-finish the machining of the part.

Select the Sweeping icon .CATPart then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. all of the other requirements have a default value. To create the operation you define: the geometry of the part to machine the tool to use this operation. .Sweeping This task shows you how to insert a sweeping operation into the program. A Sweeping entity and a default tool are added to the program. . or conical tools for . you have the choice of end mill the parameters of the machining strategy the feedrates and spindle speeds the macros . Sweeping is a semi-finishing and finishing operation that is used after a part has been rough machine and that machines the whole part. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. This page includes a sensitive icon to help you specify the geometry to be machined. 1. Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time. The area that represents the part geometry is colored red indicating that the geometry is required for defining the area to machine. Open file Basic1. Only the geometry is obligatory. The tool paths are executed in vertical parallel planes. . . The dialog box opens at the geometry tab page .

Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies) and click on the part in the viewer. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Press Replay. You will see that the top surface and the bottom of the pocket have been sweep machined.2. 3. . You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion.

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a start plane which is the first plane that will be machined. the offset on the part. The other geometric components that you can select in the view (but that are not obligatory) are: the check element. the safety plane. and the tool retract mode which may be either normal to the safety plane or normal to the tool axis. the limiting contour which defines the machining limit on the part. the offset on the check element. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part.Sweeping . an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it. an end plane which is the last plane that will be machined. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. an upper plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. The safety plane contextual menu allows you to define: an offset safety plane at a distance that you give in a dialog box that is displayed. .Geometric Components In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard. a lower plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: You can also use an Offset Group on the part. The contour that defines the outer machining limit on the part. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it.

The picture is slightly different if you are using a rework area and will have fewer parameters. There is also an Info button that. when pressed. gives the details on the parameters that were defined with the rework area. .

the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined. Offset is the distance that the tool that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop mode that you chose. inside stops inside the limit line. the whole part is machined. on stops the tool on the limit line. the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. whether it is the contact point or the tool tip. If you use Limiting contour. Part autolimit. In the pictures. I f you activate Part autolimit. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop position. the blue outline is the part edge. the yellow part is the area that will be machined.You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line. .

You can now either run the operation on the part. or macro data tabs first. . tool data. speeds and rates. store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy.

Sweeping . Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select.Machining Strategy In the machining strategy tab. You can also choose the tool stepover direction and distance. the machining tolerance. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. . the stepover and the types of area to machine. A button allows you to reverse the tool path direction. Change the tool axis and the machining direction with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. the tool axis and the tool advance direction. you can define the tool path style. The sensitive icon illustrates the mode that you have chosen. Selection by coordinates has the following options: Feature-defined. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin.

you enter the XYZ coordinates. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis or machining direction. .Selection. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next. Points in the view. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis or machining direction. Manual. The machining tab lets you: define the tool path style which can be : One-way next.

reverse the tool path direction. define the machining tolerance value. . the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. The stepover tab concerns the distance between successive passes and has two possibilities: Constant Scallop Height Constant has a constant stepover distance defined in a plane and projected onto the part. consider it to be the acceptable chord error.One-way same. You can modify the stepover distance. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass. Zig-zag.

You can also define the maximum and minimum distances that can exist between passes with the scallop height that you defined.Scallop height has a stepover which depends on the scallop height that you choose. .

When it is selected. Minimum distance is the minimum stepover distance if you chose Via Scallop height. Other axis can only be used with a ball-nose tool. Scallop height is a value that you define for the maximum allowable height of the crests of material left uncut after machining. all of the points where the toolholder would have collided with the part are displayed on the tool path (after Replay). The stepover side can be left or right and is defined with respect to the machining direction. Activating Other axis displays a button for collision checking.There are three parameters in the Stepover Strategy area: Maximum distance is the stepover distance if you have selected Constant as the value or the maximum stepover distance if you chose Scallop height. . the axis/direction icon lets you define a second axis (the other axis . When this is turned on.the one pointing up to the left). Use Along tool axis when you want to machine along the axis you have selected (or along the default axis).

horizontal surfaces of the part are machined. all of the surfaces are machined. Lateral walls. frontal surfaces of the part are machined.The Machined Zone tab lets you define: which parts of the part or machining area you wish to machine: All. Horizontal zones. . Min. Min. frontal slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a frontal wall. lateral slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a lateral wall. horizontal slope gives the maximum angle between the tool axis and the part surface for the surface to be considered to be a horizontal area. Max. lateral surfaces of the part are machined. Frontal walls.

the tool will not rise to the safety plane.Sweeping . The parameters that you can modify are: the length (1) the height (2) the ramp angle (3). In some cases (where areas of the part are higher than the zone you are machining and when you are using a safety plane). The approach/retract mode can be: Along tool axis. High speed milling parameters are: Transition radius is the radius of the arc that joins successive passes. You can either define this type with two lengths or a length and an angle. None. deactivate the Optimize retracts button. the tool moves in a direction perpendicular to the surface being machined. Tangent to movement. the tool will cut into the part. the tool moves along a vector that you define with the Approach/Retract direction: X/Y/Z boxes.Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool approach. This means that if no collisions are detected. the tool moves along the tool axis. retract and plunge data as well as the parameters for high speed milling and optimization of retracts. The result is a faster machining process. . There is a button where you can optimize retracts. the tool doubles back like an arrow above the cutting tool path. gives a smoother tool path. Normal. the approach/retract is tangent at its end to the rest of the toolpath. Back. It will only rise as high as necessary in order to clear the part. Safety distance is the clearance distance that the tool passes over the part at the feedrate in order to disengage the tool from cutting between passes. Discretization angle is a value which. no approach/retract. when reduced. When this happens. Along a vector.

e. In the Linking tab. The parameters that you can set are: the length (1). If you do not use Part autolimit. the distance along the tangent (2) . either in a straight line or in a curve (Linking mode). the tool can plunge and rise with the surface. the approach/retract arc will be normal to the plane that you select. The Length(4) is the distance that the tool will move in once it has crossed the box. check the Island skip box if you want to use intermediate approaches and retracts (i.Circular. . the tool does not plunge but will not stop when it encounters a peak. the curve will be below the surface of the part. the tool moves towards/away from the part in an arc. Plunges can only be defined if you selected a one-way sweeping mode in the machining strategy tab. Same height. The box is defined by three distance values: the distance along the normal axis (1). If you use the manual plane computation mode. In the image. the tool moves across the diagonal of an imaginary box. the angle (2) the radius (3). Left or right is determined by looking along the tool path in the direction of the approach/retract. the distance (can be a negative value) along the tool axis (3). The direction of the box diagonal is defined by whether you want to use the normal to the left or the right of the end of the tool path. the tool cannot plunge. Box. it is the the right side that is used. those that link two different areas to machine and that are not at the beginning nor the end of the tool path). Plunges can be : No check. No plunge.

With Island skip turned on: With Island skip turned off: Island skip length is the height that the tool will rise to on intermediate approaches and retracts. the Feedrate length was set to 45 mm. The Feedrate length defines the distance beyond which tool path straight lines will be replaced by intermediate approaches and retracts. In the picture below. Feedrate length is only active if the Island skip length is 0 mm. Note that the gaps that were less than 45 mm are crossed by a straight line tool path and those that are greater than 45 mm are crossed with a standard intermediate tool path with an approach and a retract. .

. ZLevel operations are finishing or semi-finishing operations that machine the whole part by parallel horizontal planes that are perpendicular to the tool axis. Only the geometry is obligatory. . all of the other requirements have a default value.ZLevel Machining This task shows you how to insert a ZLevel operation into the program. Select the ZLevel icon . Open file Basic1. A ZLevel entity and a default tool area added to the program. The dialog box opens at the geometry tab page .CATPart then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time. the parameters of the machining strategy the feedrates and spindle speeds the macros . The ZLevel dialog box is displayed. Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. 1. This page includes a sensitive icon to help you specify the geometry to be machined. .only end mill tools . are available for this . To create the operation you define: the geometry of the part to machine the tool to use operation.

3. Press Replay. Double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection. All the other geometry parameters are optional. You will see that the outside of the part has been machined. . The area that represents the part geometry is colored red indicating that the geometry is required for defining the area to machine. The edges surrounding the selected faces are highlighted. Click on the red area that represents the part geometry then select the belt of faces around the outside of the part.2.

.You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion.

the offset on the part. The other geometric components that you can select in the view (but that are not obligatory) are: the check element. a start point where the tool will start cutting. . the offset on the check element. or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: You can also use an Offset Group on the part. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. the start point(s) will be ignored. an upper plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it (small light brown corner near the red part selection area). If you use a limiting contour that results in successive passes not being closed. Use this option when accessing the part from the outside. an imposed plane that the tool must obligatorily pass through.ZLevel Machining . Use this option if the part that you are going to machine has a particular shape (a groove or a step) that you want to be sure will be cut. the limiting contour which is the contour that defines the outer machining limit on the part.Geometric Components In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. a lower plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. the safety plane which is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part.

The picture is slightly different if you are using a rework area and will have fewer parameters. There is also an Info button that. . gives the details on the parameters that were defined with the rework area. when pressed.

the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit. whether it is the contact point or the tool tip. the tool will stop when it reaches the edge of the face (as shown below). the tool will machine both sides of the face. the whole part is machined. Part autolimit. If you use Part autolimit.You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line. . the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. In the pictures. Offset is the distance that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop mode that you chose. If you activate Part Autolimit. If you use Limiting contour. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop Position. on stops the tool on the limit line. inside stops inside the limit line. If you have selected a single face to be machined and you are not using Part autolimit. the blue outline is the part edge. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined. the yellow part is the area that will be machined.

store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. or macro data tabs first.You can now either ix-ZLevel parameters:run the operation on the part. . speeds and rates. tool data.

You can also choose the tool axis. the machining tolerance and the stepover distance. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin. Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. Change the tool axis by clicking the tool in the sensitive icon and choosing Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. The sensitive icon illustrates the machining mode that you have chosen. you can define the cutting mode.Machining Strategy In the machining strategy tab. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. Selection by coordinates has the following options: . A button allows you to reverse the tool path direction.ZLevel . the machining mode.

Manual. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis. the machining mode which defines the type of area to be machined and can be: By plane. only the outside of the part is machined. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. the cutting mode which can be Climb or Conventional. The machining tab lets you define: the machining tolerance value. Outer part & pockets. Points in the view. Pockets only. only pockets on the part are machined. you enter the XYZ coordinates. the whole part is machined plane by plane. consider it to be the acceptable chord error.Feature-defined. the whole part is machined external area by external area and pocket by pocket. Outer part. . Selection.

The stepover tab concerns the distance between successive passes and has two possibilities: Constant Scallop Height Constant has a constant stepover distance defined in a plane and projected onto the part. You can modify the stepover distance. .

.Scallop height has a stepover which depends on the scallop height that you choose. You can also define the maximum and minimum distance between passes with the scallop height that you defined.

.The Machined Zone tab lets you define: the maximum slope that can be considered to be horizontal (any area that is considered to be horizontal will not be machined). the width of the overlap of the end of a pass over its beginning.

Another button lets you use high speed milling. deactivate the Optimize retracts button. gives a smoother tool path. In some cases (where areas of the part are higher than the zone you are machining and when you are using a safety plane). Discretization angle is a value which. When this happens. There is a button where you can optimize retract distances. when reduced. High speed milling parameters are: Transition radius is the radius of the arc that joins successive passes. The approach and retracts are defined with these parameters: . retract and plunge data.Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool approach. Safety distance is the clearance distance that the tool over over at the feedrate in order to disengage the tool from cutting between passes. the tool will cut into the part.ZLevel Machining . this means that if no obstacle is detected between two passes. the tool will not rise to the safety plane (because it is not necessary) and the operation will take less time.

The linking pass (i. Safety distance is the distance that the tool moves horizontally before it begins its approach. you should choose Circular or ramping rather than simply Circular in order to ensure that your tool path will be produced.e. the tool follows a slope defined by the ramping angle. Circular. Ramping. Approach distance is the engagement distance for all types of linking pass. In certain cases. . the tool uses either circular or ramping mode depending on whichever is best adapted to the part being machined. the tool describes a circle defined by the value of Radius. notably where there is a risk of collision with a circular linking pass. Circular or ramping. the tool moves along the tool axis. the means of moving from the end of one pass to the beginning of the next one) can be: Along tool axis.

. Open file gets2. . the feedrates and spindle speeds the macros Either: . The tools that can be used with this type of operation are: . . . To create the operation you define: the geometry of the part to machine the parameters for the machining strategy the tool to use end mill tools conical tools face mill tools and T-slotters . .Spiral Milling Spiral machining gives a good surface without having to use a particularly small tool. It gives particularly good results for areas that are relatively flat. .CATPart. Use this type of operation to optimize machine time by reducing the stepover. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. Select the Spiral milling icon . make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time. The Spiral milling dialog box opens at the geometry tab page . Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. A Spiral milling entity and a default tool are added to the program. 1. .

3. Press Replay to compute the tool path for the operation. Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies) and click on the part in the viewer. Go to the machining strategy tab and make sure that Horizontal area selection is Automatic. 4. . Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion.2.

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Geometric Components In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard.Spiral Milling . or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: The other geometric components that you can select in the sensitive icon are: the check element. . The safety plane contextual menu allows you to: define an offset safety plane at a distance that you give in a dialog box that is displayed. a top plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. the safety plane. an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it (light brown area in the left hand corner near the part selection area). remove the safety plane. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part.

inside stops inside the limit line. Offset is the distance that the tool that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop mode that you chose. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop Position. . the offset on the part. on stops the tool on the limit line. a start point which is the first point that will be machined. the offset on the check element.a bottom plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. the yellow part is the area that will be machined. The contour that defines the outer machining limit on the part. the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit. Part autolimit. the blue outline is the part edge. a limiting contour which defines the machining limit on the part. the whole part is machined. an end point which is the last point that will be machined. whether it is the contact point or the tool end. In the pictures. the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. If you activate Part autolimit. You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line.

You can now either run the operation on the part. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined. store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. or macro data tabs first. speeds and rates. tool data.If you use Limiting contour. .

the black contour represents the second contour. You can also define more than one contour. Click on it and then select the contours that will form the limit to the area you want to machine. inside one and outside the other) will be machined. horizontal or not. . The blue contour represents the first contour.Spiral Milling . or manual.Machining Strategy The machining strategy tab is where you define the machining and strategy parameters and also the area that you want to machine. Defining another contour inside the original contour will have the effect that only the area between the two contours (i. and the yellow area represents what will be machined. the surfaces that are considered to be horizontal with respect to the maximum angle are automatically selected for machining. There are four tabs: Machining.e. Zone. A red contour lights up in the sensitive icon. The selection takes account of all the surfaces inside the limit. HSM (High Speed Milling). Stepover. Start by selecting what you want to machine with one of the two options: automatic.

Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. Selection by coordinates has the following options: . There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin.You can also change the tool axis with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates.

Points in the view. the machining tolerance value. the tool offset with respect to the contour.Feature-defined. . Manual. consider it to be the acceptable chord error. The machining tab lets you define: the cutting mode which can be Climb or Conventional. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. the tool path will begin at the middle of the area to machine and work outwards. With Inward. the tool path will begin at the outer limit of the area to machine and work inwards. you enter the XYZ coordinates. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis. Selection. the tool path style: With Outward.

At the bottom of the stepover tab are the View Direction buttons. If you wish to use an axis other than the tool axis to define the stepover.You can also reverse the tool path. View direction is used to calculate the stepover distance. . as if you were looking along an axis. select Other axis. there is a box is also displayed where you can choose to check for toolholder-part collisions. When Other axis is active. Other axis can only be used with a ball-nose tool. Reversing the tool path means that a tool path that goes from right to left will now go from left to right and vice versa. The stepover tab lets you define the maximum distance between successive passes in the tool path.

The icon at the top of the tab for axis selection has changed and you can now select an axis (the oblique axis in the icon) other than the tool axis for the view direction. you can define the maximum angle that can be considered as horizontal. you can define the corner radius to round the ends of passes. The ends are rounded to give a smoother path that is machined much faster. In the Zone tab. The angle is measured perpendicular to the tool path. If you choose to perform high speed milling. .

Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool approach and retract data. the tool moves in a direction perpendicular to the surface being machined. You can either define this type with two lengths or a length and an angle. no approach/retract. . the tool moves along a vector that you define with the Approach/Retract direction: X/Y/Z boxes. the tool moves along the tool axis. The approach/retract mode can be: along tool axis. back. The parameters that you can modify are: the length (1) the height (2) the ramp angle (3).Spiral Milling . none. tangent to movement. along a vector. the tool doubles back like an arrow above the cutting tool path. normal. the approach/retract is tangent at its end to the rest of the tool path.

the tool moves towards/away from the part in an arc. . The parameters that you can set are: the length (1).circular. If you do not use Part autolimit. the angle (2) the radius (3). If you use the manual plane computation mode. the curve will be below the surface of the part. the approach/retract arc will be normal to the plane that you select.

it is the the right side that is used. the distance (can be a negative value) along the tool axis (3). Left or right is determined by looking along the tool path in the direction of the approach/retract. The Length(4) is the distance that the tool will move in once it has crossed the box.box. The direction of the box diagonal is defined by whether you want to use the normal to the left or the right of the end of the tool path. In the image. . the tool moves across the diagonal of an imaginary box. the distance along the tangent (2). either in a straight line or in a curve (Linking mode). The box is defined by three distance values: the distance along the normal axis (1).

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To create the operation. or conical tools for . . Only the geometry and the guide contour(s) (strategy tab) are obligatory. . then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. All of the other requirements have a default value Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time.CATPart. you define: the geometry of the part to machine the parameters of the machining strategy the tool to use this operation.Contour-driven Machining This task explains how to machine an area on a part by using a contour as guide. between contours where the tool sweeps between two guide contours along a tool path that is obtained by interpolating between the guide contours. or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. Open file Basic2. The ends of each pass lie on two stop contours. . There are three types of machining included in this task: parallel contours where the tool sweeps out an area by following progressively distant (or closer) parallel offsets of a given guide contour. you have the choice of end mill the feedrates and spindle speeds the macros . . Below we are going to see how to do the first of these with a between contours operation on a small area of a part. spine contour where the tool sweeps across a contour in perpendicular planes.

1. Click on Guide 2 in the sensitive icon and select these contours in the viewer. The Contour-driven dialog box is displayed. The dialog box opens at the geometry tab page 2. . Go to the strategy tab. Click on Guide 1 in the sensitive icon and select these contours in the viewer. . Click on the part in the viewer. Select Between contours. Double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. 3. Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies). Select the Contour-driven icon .

Click on Stop 1 in the sensitive icon and select these contours in the viewer. Click on Stop 2 in the sensitive icon and select these contours in the viewer. So your selections should give you this as an overall result: .

4. Press Replay to compute the tool path for the operation. .

.You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion. The result will show you that you have machined between two guide contours delimited at either end by two others.

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Geometric Components In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard. by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. or by choosing a pre-defined area like this: You can also use an Offset Group on the part. The other geometric components that you can select in the sensitive icon are: the guide contours. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. the stop contours (only used for machining with parallel contours).Contour-driven Machining . the check element. .

.an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it (light brown area in the left hand corner near the part selection area). an upper plane which defines the highest plane that will be machined on the part. There is also an Info button that. The contour that defines the outer machining limit on the part. a lower plane which defines the lowest plane that will be machined on the part. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part. the safety plane. when pressed. and the tool retract mode which may be either normal to the safety plane or normal to the tool axis. gives the details on the parameters that were defined with the rework area. the offset on the check element. When using a rework area. a limiting contour which defines the machining limit on the part. The safety plane contextual menu allows you to define: an offset safety plane at a distance that you give in a dialog box that is displayed. please remember to use a smaller tool than the one defined the rework area as this is necessary to ensure the generation of a tool path inside it. the offset on the part. The picture is slightly different if you are using a rework area and will have fewer parameters.

store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop Position. In the pictures. the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. If you activate Part autolimit. Part autolimit. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined. the yellow part is the area that will be machined.You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line. speeds and rates. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. the blue outline is the part edge. or macro data tabs first. You can now either run the operation on the part. on stops the tool on the limit line. the whole part is machined. . If you use Limiting contour. the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit. inside stops inside the limit line. Offset is the distance that the tool that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop mode that you chose. whether it is the contact point or the tool end. tool data.

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First choose whether you want to machine: between four open contours (i.e. parallel contour or spine contour) that you want before setting any of the other parameters. Strategy. that are not necessarily perfectly connected to each other) Guide 1 and Guide 2 are the two contours between which you are going to machine. Machined Zone. Stepover. . Between Contours The Between contours option has four active tabs: Machining. You should choose the cycle type (between contours. The parameters that you can use depend on the cycle type you choose.Machining Strategy In the machining strategy tab. strategy and stepover parameters and the zone to machine. you can define the machining. Stop 1 and Stop 2 delimit the ends of the machining paths.Contour-driven Machining .

Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. P2. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin. You can also change the tool axis with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. Selection by coordinates has the following options: . P3 and P4 are the four points that you select on the contour within which you are going to machine. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis.or by machining or within one closed contour. To do this you must select four points on the contour and you must select them in the order that you see in the sensitive icon. P1.

One-way same. The machining tab lets you: define the tool path style which can be: One-way next. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass. define the machining tolerance value. Zig-zag. reverse the tool path direction. Manual. you enter the XYZ coordinates. . consider it to be the acceptable chord error. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next. Points in the view.Feature-defined. the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. Selection.

Scallop height has a stepover which depends on the scallop height that you choose. Constant has a maximum stepover distance defined in a plane and projected onto the part. You can modify the stepover distance.The strategy tab has an option that lets you start an automatic pencil operation (defined with a set of default parameters) at the end of the contour driven operation. Scallop height. There are four stepover possibilities: Constant. . Constant on part. Maximum on part. You can also define the maximum and minimum distances that can exist between passes with the scallop height that you defined.

the constant distance between two successive passes.Constant on part is a stepover that has a constant distance on the part itself. . The parameters that you can define are: the distance.

where you want to start machining and where you want to end. with a positive value it will start inside the guide contour. on). outside. the possibilities are: From guide 1 to guide 2 (starts at guide 1 and ends at guide 2) From guide 2 to guide 1 (starts at guide 2 and ends at guide 1). The stepover is of a constant distance along the whole length of the path measured on the part itself. Below is an example of Constant on part use. the tool initial position with respect to the guide contour (inside. From guide to zone center (spiral) starts at guide 1 and spirals towards the center). From guide to zone center (starts at guide 1 and works towards the center of the zone then goes to guide 2 and works towards the center of the zone). starting from Guide 1 and going towards Guide 2. . i. From zone center to guide (starts at the center of the zone and works towards guide 1 then comes back to the center and works towards guide 2). the tool reference. whether the tool end or the tool contact point is used for the computation.e. From zone center to guide (spiral) starts at the center and sprials towards the guide contours). With a negative value the tool path will start outside the guide contour. the tool offset with respect to the guide contour.The sweeping strategy.

Maximum on part defines the stepover with a maximum distance between passes that must be respected. .

The parameters that you can define are: the maximum distance; the constant distance between two successive passes, The sweeping strategy, i.e. where you want to start machining and where you want to end, the possibilities are: From guide 1 to guide 2 (starts at guide 1 and ends at guide 2) From guide 2 to guide 1 (starts at guide 2 and ends at guide 1), From guide to zone center (starts at guide 1 and works towards the center of the zone then goes to guide 2 and works towards the center of the zone), From zone center to guide (starts at the center of the zone and works towards guide 1 then comes back to the center and works towards guide 2), From guide to zone center (spiral) starts at guide 1 and spirals towards the center), From zone center to guide (spiral) starts at the center and spirals towards the guide contours), the tool initial position with respect to the guide contour (inside, outside, on), the tool reference; whether the tool end or the tool contact point is used for the computation, the tool offset with respect to the guide contour. With a negative value the tool path will start outside the guide contour, with a positive value it will start inside the guide contour. Below is an example to illustrate the difference between Constant on part and Maximum on part. We are going to take the same part and use the same parameters and then look at the results. This is the surface we are going to use

When we use Constant on part the result is of an equal distance on the part surface from guide 1 to guide 2. Note the bottom of the machined area and how the paths remain perfectly parallel to each other but because of the shape of the surface they finish gradually on guide 2.

Now see the difference when we use Maximum on part. There is a variation in the distance between the paths on the surface but the paths respect both guide 1 and guide 2. There is no gradual finish on Guide 2 as there was with Constant on part.

At the bottom of the stepover tab are the View Direction buttons. View direction is used to calculate the stepover distance, as if you were looking along an axis.

If you wish to use an axis other than the tool axis to define the stepover, select Other axis. When Other axis is active, there is a box is also displayed where you can choose to check for toolholder-part collisions.

Other axis can only be used with a ball-nose tool.

The icon at the top of the tab for axis selection has changed and you can now select an axis (the oblique axis in the icon) other than the tool axis for the view direction.

Here is an example of View direction use: This is the surface that we are going to machine:

Taking this surface, using a distance of 5, Constant stepover and with this edge (red edge) defined as the other axis:

will give you this result:

This is what you get using a distance of 5, Constant stepover and along the tool axis:

However if you look along the tool axis you will see how the same distance is used for the stepover as in the first operation:

The Machined Zone parameters are used to define the type of area on the part that you wish to machine: All; all of the surfaces are machined, Frontal walls; frontal surfaces of the part are machined, Lateral walls; lateral surfaces of the part are machined, Horizontal zones; horizontal surfaces of the part are machined.

Below the zone selection area are parameters which let you define whether a surface is frontal, lateral or horizontal: Min. lateral slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a lateral wall. Min. frontal slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a frontal wall. Max. horizontal slope gives the maximum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a horizontal area.

Parallel Contours
The Parallel contour option has four active tabs: Machining, Strategy, Stepover, Machined Zone.

You must choose a contour on the part to be the reference for your operation.

Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin.You can also change the tool axis with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. Selection by coordinates has the following options: . Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select.

you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. . Selection. define the machining tolerance value. Zig-zag. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next.Y Feature-defined. Points in the view. Manual. The machining tab lets you: define the tool path style which can be : One-way next. the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass. reverse the tool path direction. consider it to be the acceptable chord error. One-way same. you enter the XYZ coordinates.

Offset side defines the side of the contour where machining will be performed (left or right). the tool will machine on the left side of the guide contour for the Maximum width distance. Initial tool position is where the tool will start with respect to the guide contour (in red). i. either towards the contour (starting at the Maximum width distance from the guide contour) or away from the contour. if you choose Left. Direction is the machining direction.The strategy tab has parameters that concern the tool position and distance: Pencil rework lets you start an automatic pencil operation (defined with a set of default parameters) at the end of the contour-driven operation. Offset on contour is the distance the tool will be from the guide contour at the beginning of the operation Maximum width to machine defines the width of the area to machine starting from the guide contour.e. it can be: to (1) on (2) past (3) There is also an option that lets you start an automatic pencil operation (defined with a set of default parameters) at the end of the contour driven operation. .

Constant has a maximum stepover distance defined in a plane and projected onto the part. .There are two stepover possibilities: Constant. Scallop height. Scallop height has a stepover which depends on the scallop height that you choose. You can modify the stepover distance. You can also define the maximum and minimum distances that can exist between passes with the scallop height that you defined.

select Other axis. there is a box is also displayed where you can choose to check for toolholder-part collisions. as if you were looking along an axis. .At the bottom of the stepover tab are the View Direction buttons. If you wish to use an axis other than the tool axis to define the stepover. Other axis can only be used with a ball-nose tool. View direction is used to calculate the stepover distance. When Other axis is active.

Constant stepover and with this edge (red edge) defined as the other axis: will give you this result: . using a distance of 5.The icon at the top of the tab for axis selection has changed and you can now select an axis (the oblique axis in the icon) other than the tool axis for the view direction. Here is an example of View direction use: This is the surface that we are going to machine: Taking this surface.

This is what you get using a distance of 5. Constant stepover and along the tool axis: However if you look along the tool axis you will see how the same distance is used for the stepover as in the first operation: .

Max.The Zone parameters are used to define the type of area on the part that you wish to machine: All. horizontal slope gives the maximum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a horizontal area. Stepover. lateral slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a lateral wall. lateral or horizontal: Min. all of the surfaces are machined. Frontal walls. Spine Contour The Spine contour option has three active tabs: Machining. Lateral walls. Horizontal zones. lateral surfaces of the part are machined. frontal surfaces of the part are machined. Machined Zone. . frontal slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a frontal wall. Below the zone selection area are parameters which let you define whether a surface is frontal. You must choose a contour on the part to be the reference for your operation. Min. horizontal surfaces of the part are machined.

Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select.You can also change the tool axis with Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates. Selection by coordinates has the following options: . Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin.

There are two stepover possibilities: Constant. you enter the XYZ coordinates. click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis.Feature-defined. Scallop height. Selection. . you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. the tool path alternates directions during successive passes. Points in the view. Zig-zag. consider it to be the acceptable chord error. One-way same. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and goes diagonally from the end of one tool path to the beginning of the next. Manual. reverse the tool path direction. define the machining tolerance value. The machining tab lets you: define the tool path style which can be : One-way next. the tool path always has the same direction during successive passes and returns to the first point in each pass before moving on to the first point in the next pass.

Constant has a maximum stepover distance defined in a plane and projected onto the part. Scallop height has a stepover which depends on the scallop height that you choose. . You can modify the stepover distance. You can also define the maximum and minimum distances that can exist between passes with the scallop height that you defined.

there is a box is also displayed where you can choose to check for toolholder-part collisions. When Other axis is active. View direction is used to calculate the stepover distance. . Other axis can only be used with a ball-nose tool. as if you were looking along an axis. If you wish to use an axis other than the tool axis to define the stepover. select Other axis.At the bottom of the stepover tab are the View Direction buttons.

Here is an example of View direction use: This is the surface that we are going to machine: Taking this surface. Constant stepover and with this edge (red edge) defined as the other axis: will give you this result: .The icon at the top of the tab for axis selection has changed and you can now select an axis (the oblique axis in the icon) other than the tool axis for the view direction. using a distance of 5.

. all of the surfaces are machined.This is what you get using a distance of 5. Horizontal zones. Frontal walls. frontal surfaces of the part are machined. horizontal surfaces of the part are machined. Constant stepover and along the tool axis: However if you look along the tool axis you will see how the same distance is used for the stepover as in the first operation: The zone parameters are used to define the type of area on the part that you wish to machine: All. Lateral walls. lateral surfaces of the part are machined.

Below the zone selection area are parameters which let you define whether a surface is frontal, lateral or horizontal: Min. lateral slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a lateral wall. Min. frontal slope gives the minimum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a frontal wall. Max. horizontal slope gives the maximum angle between the tool axis and the part surface normal for the surface to be considered to be a horizontal area.

Contour-driven Machining - Macro Data
The Macro tab defines the tool approach and retract data. There is a button where you can optimize retracts. This means that if no collisions are detected, the tool will not rise to the safety plane. It will only rise as high as necessary in order to clear the part. The result is a faster machining process. In some cases (where areas of the part are higher than the zone you are machining and when you are using a safety plane), the tool will cut into the part. When this happens, deactivate the Optimize retracts button. High speed milling parameters are: Transition radius is the radius of the arc that joins successive passes, Discretization angle is a value which, when reduced, gives a smoother tool path. Safety distance is the clearance distance that the tool over over at the feedrate in order to disengage the tool from cutting between passes The approach/retract mode can be: along tool axis; the tool moves along the tool axis, along a vector; the tool moves along a vector that you define with the Approach/Retract direction: X/Y/Z boxes, normal; the tool moves in a direction perpendicular to the surface being machined, tangent to movement; the approach/retract is tangent at its end to the rest of the tool path. and none; no approach/retract.

Back; the tool doubles back like an arrow above the cutting tool path. You can either define this type with two lengths or a length and an angle. The parameters that you can modify are: the length (1) the height (2) the ramp angle (3).

Circular; the tool moves towards/away from the part in an arc. The parameters that you can set are: the length (1), the angle (2) the radius (3). If you do not use Part autolimit, the curve will be below the surface of the part. If you use the manual plane computation mode, the approach/retract arc will be normal to the plane that you select.

Box, the tool moves across the diagonal of an imaginary box, either in a straight line or in a curve (Linking mode). The Length(4) is the distance that the tool will move in once it has crossed the box. The box is defined by three distance values: the distance along the normal axis (1), the distance along the tangent (2), the distance (can be a negative value) along the tool axis (3), The direction of the box diagonal is defined by whether you want to use the normal to the left or the right of the end of the tool path. Left or right is determined by looking along the tool path in the direction of the approach/retract. In the image, it is the the right side that is used. In the Linking tab, check the Island skip box if you want to use intermediate approaches and retracts (i.e. those that link two different areas to machine and that are not at the beginning nor the end of the tool path).

With Island skip turned on:

With Island skip turned off:

Island skip length is the height that the tool will rise to on intermediate approaches and retracts. The Feedrate length defines the distance beyond which tool path straight lines will be replaced by intermediate approaches and retracts. In the picture below, the Feedrate length was set to 45 mm. Note that the gaps that were less than 45 mm are crossed by a straight line tool path and those that are greater than 45 mm are crossed with a standard intermediate tool path with an approach and a retract.

Feedrate length is only active if the Island skip length is 0 mm. Your guide contour(s) must be closed.

Create a Profile Contouring Operation This task explains how to create a profile contouring operation on a part. Between two curves The tool follows the trajectory defined by the top and bottom guide curves while respecting user-defined geometry limitations and machining strategy parameters. Between a curve and surfaces The tool follows a trajectory defined by a top guide curve and the bottom surfaces while respecting user-defined geometry limitations and machining strategy parameters. . A profile contouring operation can be created from machining: Between two planes The tool follows a contour between the top and bottom planes while respecting user-defined geometry limitations and machining strategy parameters.

Pencil operations Reworking operations .Reworking Operations These are the operations that you will use to rework an area on a part where there is residual material. Before using one of these operations. compute the areas that you want to rework.

Pencil Operations
This task shows you how to insert a pencil operation into the program. A pencil operation is one where the tool remains tangent in two places to the surface to be machined during the cycle. It is often used to remove crests along the intersection of two surfaces that were left behind by a previous operation. To create the operation you define: the geometry of the part to machine the parameters of the machining strategy , , or conical tools

the tool to use ; you have the choice of end mill for this operation, the feedrates and spindle speeds, the macros .

Only the geometry is obligatory, all of the other parameters have a default value. Either: make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree if you want to define an operation and the part/area to machine at the same time, or select a machining feature from the list if you have already defined the area to machine and now you want to define the operation to apply to it. Below we are going to see how to do the first of these. 1. Open file gets2.CATPart. A Pencil entity and a default tool are added to the program. Select the Pencil icon . .

The dialog box opens at the geometry page

This page includes a sensitive icon to help you specify the geometry to be machined.

2. Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies)

and click on the part in the viewer. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box.

3. Press Replay to compute the tool path for the operation. You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion.

Pencil - Geometric Components
In the geometric component tab you can define the area to machine either: by clicking on the face definition area and using the face selection wizard, by passing the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it, or by choosing a pre-defined area like this:

You can also use an Offset Group on the part. The other geometric components that you can select in the view (but that are not obligatory) are: the check element. The check is often a clamp that holds the part and therefore is not an area to be machined. an area to avoid if you do not wish to machine it (light brown area in the corner near part selection). the safety plane. The safety plane is the plane that the tool will rise to at the end of the tool path in order to avoid collisions with the part. The safety plane contextual menu allows you to define: an offset safety plane at a distance that you give in a dialog box that is displayed, and the tool retract mode which may be either normal to the safety plane or normal to the tool axis. the limiting contour which defines the outer machining limit on the part. the offset on the part. the offset on the check element.

The picture is slightly different if you are using a rework area and will have fewer parameters.

There is also an Info button that, when pressed, gives the details on the parameters that were defined with the rework area. Use a tool that is either the same size as (or larger than) the one defined in the rework area. If you decide to use a tool that is smaller than the one that is defined in the rework area itself, there will be no tool path generated for the rework area. In this case it is

. Part autolimit and the limiting contour can be used individually or together to define the area you want to machine. In the pictures. You can also define the following parameters: Stop position defines where the tool stops: outside stops the tool outside the limit line. Offset is the distance that the tool that the tool will be either inside or outside the limit line depending on the Stop mode that you chose. the yellow part is the area that will be machined. whether it is the contact point or the tool tip. on stops the tool on the limit line. Part autolimit. the tool will not go beyond the edge of the part. inside stops inside the limit line.preferable to consider the rework area to be a set of limiting contours and use a contour-driven operation rather than a pencil operation. Stop mode defines which part of the tool is considered at the Stop position. If you activate Part autolimit. the blue outline is the part edge. the whole part is machined. the black line is the limiting contour: If you use Part autolimit.

If you use Limiting contour. tool data. only the area inside the limiting contour is machined. store the operation that you have just defined or define other parameters in the machining strategy. . You can now either run the operation on the part. or macro data tabs first. speeds and rates.

Machining Strategy In the machining strategy tab. Selection by angle lets you choose the tool axis by rotation around a main axis. Angle 1 and Angle 2 are used to define the location of the tool axis around the main axis that you select. you can define the machining tolerance. There is also a button that lets you reverse the direction of the axis with respect to the coordinate system origin. the cutting mode the axial direction. the minimum change length and the size of the smallest areas to be machined.e. you select a 3D element such as a plane that will serve to automatically define the best tool axis. The sensitive icon illustrates a pencil tool path. You can also choose the tool axis. i.Pencil . . Selection by coordinates has the following options: Feature-defined. one that is tangent to two surfaces at the same time. In the sensitive icon you can change the tool axis via Select in the contextual menu which will display a dialog box where you can choose between selection by angle and selection by coordinates.

There is also a button that reverses the tool path direction. I In the machining tab. consider the machining tolerance value to be the acceptable chord error. . click on two points anywhere in the view to define the tool axis.Selection. you select a 2D element such as a line or a straight edge that will serve to define the tool axis. Manual. you enter the XYZ coordinates. Points in the view.

Either means that the direction which is most suitable to the current cutting action will be used. if a portion of the pass is shorter than this value. The cutting mode can be: Conventional where the back of the advancing tool cuts into the material first. Minimum change length is the minimum distance for a change of axial direction or cutting mode. down or either. . the tool will ignore it and continue in the same direction or mode.The axial direction can be: up.e. Climb where the front of the advancing tool cuts into the material first. i. Either where either of the two possibilities may be used depending on which is most suitable to the current cutting action.

the tool will not rise to the safety plane (because it is not necessary) and the operation will take less time. and none. This means that if no collisions are detected. the tool will not rise to the safety plane.Macro Data The Macro tab defines the tool approach and retract data.Pencil . the tool moves along a vector that you define with the X. The result is a faster machining process. There is a button where you can optimize retract distances. There is a button where you can optimize retracts. the tool moves in a direction perpendicular to the surface being machined for a given Length. It will only rise as high as necessary in order to clear the part. along a vector. . the tool moves along the tool axis for a given Length. no approach/retract.Y and Z directions for a given Length. the approach/retract is tangent at its end to the rest of the tool path and is of a given Length. normal. tangent to movement. this means that if no obstacle is detected between two passes. The approach/retract mode can be: along tool axis.

The parameters that you can modify are: the length (1) the height (2) the ramp angle (3). If you use the manual plane computation mode.Back. You can either define this type with two lengths or a length and an angle. the angle (2) the radius (3). Circular. If you do not use Part autolimit. The parameters that you can set are: the length (1). the curve will be below the surface of the part. the tool moves towards/away from the part in an arc. the tool doubles back like an arrow above the cutting tool path. the approach/retract arc will be .

The Length(4) is the distance that the tool will move in once it has crossed the box. the tool moves across the diagonal of an imaginary box. The direction of the box diagonal is defined by whether you want to use the normal to . the distance (can be a negative value) along the tool axis (3). Box. the distance along the tangent (2). The box is defined by three distance values: the distance along the normal axis (1). either in a straight line or in a curve (Linking mode).normal to the plane that you select.

Left or right is determined by looking along the tool path in the direction of the approach/retract. it is the the right side that is used. In the image.the left or the right of the end of the tool path. .

The dialog box opens at the geometry tab Select the roughing icon 2. You will see that a first roughing operation has already been effected. You must have defined a rough stock in the part operation. Select Rough stock in the Product list and hide it using the Hide/Show option in the contextual menu. and click on the part in the viewer. . 4. In order to simplify the scenario. Select that operation. The rough stock used for a program where you insert a reworking operation must be topologically closed. Press Replay. Go to the tool tab . each working on the residual material left by the operation before it. You must have computed at least one machining operation prior to this one in the manufacturing program. Press MB3 over the red area in the sensitive icon and choose Body(ies) .Roughing Rework Operations This task explains how to rework a part. 1. and choose the tool called T2 End Mill D 5 in the dialog box Click on this button that is displayed. Then double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Open the Basic. . it cannot be formed by a set of faces. the sample given below already contains a rough stock. 3.CATProcess file. Filly expand the manufacturing program. that is. A rough stock that is defined in the part operation before starting the definition of the manufacturing program will be used for all of the successive operations.

You can. in the dialog box but this is not obligatory as they all have default values. modify any of the other parameters: geometry.You can cancel tool path computation at any moment before 100% completion. if you wish. speeds and rates. . macro data. machining strategy. the type or size of tool used. 5.

Machining Features Machining features are areas that you define on a part. you can also decide to define a specific offset on an area of a part or a group of varied offsets on a part. Area to machine Area to rework Offset area Group of offset areas . Besides this. You may want to define an area where you want to use a specific type of operation or you may want to define an area to rework because there is too much residual material on the part.

A machining area can be: the whole part (for example.CATPart. a subset of the faces on the part. in roughing). This is a useful approach if. First you define the machining areas and then you assign an operation to each of them. you are aware that the part has areas that will require different types of operation. Open file gets2. before you start machining. . 1.Defining an Area to Machine Machining areas can be used to define different zones on a part. Click the Machining area icon . a subset of faces on the part with a limiting contour.

3.2. Change the check element by clicking on it in the sensitive icon and making your selection in the viewer. Press OK to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. Press OK to create the machining area. . Open the manufacturing view and you will see that the machining area has been created. Click the red area and select these faces in the viewer. Change the name to MyMachiningArea. do not press OK but follow the steps below. If you wish to use any of the non-obligatory parameters. 4.

You can either click on the part body area (red) and then make your selection with the face selection wizard or you can use the contextual menu: Body(ies) lets you select the whole part. Part selects the surfaces that were defined in the selected machining area as part surfaces. lets you use existing machining areas or offset areas to define a new machining area. Repeat these steps until you have acquired all of the surfaces that you want. Check selects the surfaces that were defined in the selected machining area as part of the check element. ..5. To load from a machining area: Choose a machining area from the list. Click either Part or Check. Analyze lets you analyze the selected geometry.. Load from. Press Apply. Remove cancels the selection that you have made.

Press Apply. double click on its name in the Manufacturing feature view.Press OK to end the definition of the new machining area. Repeat these steps until you have acquired all of the surfaces that you want. click the area to avoid to define a zone on the part that you do not want to machine. The operation dialog box opens at the machining strategy tab and not the geometric components tab because the area to machine is already defined. This creates a machining area. simply click on its name in the Manufacturing feature view and then click the icon for the operation that you want to use. 7. 6. Press OK to end the definition of the new machining area. The area is displayed in blue on the part in the viewer. When you want to assign an operation to one of these areas. If you want to edit a machining area. Click OK. To load from an offset area: Choose an offset area from the list (note that an offset area is identified by its name and the name of the offset group it belongs to). . If required. 7.

the Corner radius to 5 mm and the name to Rework. This task explains how to define. Defining a rework area allows you to focus only on the areas where there is residual material and this gain time.Defining an Area to Rework Once you have machined a part and visually checked it. you may decide to rework certain areas where residual material remains. 2. . Before creating a rework area you must have executed a manufacturing program. Click the Rework Area icon In the dialog box that is displayed. . change the Entry diameter to 10 mm. edit and use an area to rework. Open gets2. 1.CATPart.

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. 4. The following steps are not obligatory. There is a Load from button at the top of the dialog box that can be used to simplify the creation of a rework area by loading all of the appropriate data from an existing operation. Click on the button and then select an operation and/or a tool in the specifications tree and/or select a machining area in the manufacturing view. The rework area is created and can be seen in the Manufacturing feature view . Press OK to compute the rework area.3. tool or area.

. 7.5. Define the limit line in order to restrict the area to be reworked. enter a positive cutting angle. In the General tab. leave the default value of 0 degrees. and the minimum depth. or pass the mouse over the face definition area and choosing Body in the contextual menu if you wish to machine a whole part and not just an area on it. click the red area and either: use the face selection wizard to choose the faces that you want to make up the area to machine. Enter the tool data that you used to machine the rest of the part. length and width parameters to filter out areas that you wish to ignore because they are not deep. long or wide enough. Press Compute. If you wish to use a conical tool. You can use a filter line to define a smaller area. Select the tool axis that you used to machine the rest of the part. For an end mill. 6. If you find that there are too many areas to be reworked or if you decide to concentrate on only a part of the rework area. go to the Advanced tab and define other parameters to restrict the area to rework.

When you want to assign an operation to a rework area. The area is displayed in blue on the part in the viewer. .Tolerance is the machining tolerance that you want to use for the rework area. The operation dialog box opens at the machining strategy tab and not the geometric components tab because the area to machine is already defined. reducing the operation one until you obtain satisfactory results as regards the finish that you require. simply click on its name in the Manufacturing feature view and then click the icon for the operation that you want to use. double click on its name in the Manufacturing feature view. Press OK to close the dialog box. For the sake of speed you should use the same value as for the machining tolerance in the operation that the rework area is going to be used in. 9. Overlap is the distance that you allow the tool to go beyond the boundaries of the rework area and is defined as a percentage of the tool radius. To edit a rework area. You may decide to use a smaller tolerance in the machining area and a larger one in the operation. 8. Click Compute to create a rework area. Part offset is the offset that is computed for the rework area with respect to the part.

no tool path will be generated for the rework area.Use the same size of tool in a pencil operation as that defined in the rework area in order to reduce computation time. You can also use a larger tool with pencil operations. If you use a smaller tool with a pencil operation. If you choose to use a tool that is smaller than the one defined in the rework area. . consider the rework area to be simply a set of limiting contours and use a contour-driven operation.

For example. Offset groups can be used to machine upper and lower dies using a single set of geometry. .CATPart then select NC Manufacturing > Surface Machining in the Start menu. An offset area must belong to a group of offset areas. In the dialog box that is displayed. change the name of the group to Group1 and press OK. An offset area is a group of faces (at least one) with a n offset value (with respect to the original part) and a color to identify it. if you assign an offset of 10 mm to a group and within that group there is an area that has a thickness of 5 mm and an area that has no thickness assigned to it. Open file Basic1. Click the Offset group icon . the first area will still have an offset of 5mm and the second area will have an offset of 10 mm. 1.Defining Offsets This task shows you how to define offset areas and groups of offset areas. Offset in the dialog box is the overall offset that will be applied to the group in general. 2. An Offset group must include at least one offset area. It is applied only to areas in the offset group that do not have their own specific offset.

Open the manufacturing view and you will see that the group has been created. As Group1 is still the current object. Enter a value of 10 mm for the thickness and leave green as the color you want to display the offset area in. . The thickness of the offset can be negative. If you want to use a negative value. Click the Offset area icon A dialog box is displayed. you are going to create two offset areas there. 3. . the tool corner radius must be greater than 2mm.

Click OK in the Offset Area creation dialog box. . This time enter a thickness of 20 mm and change the color. Click on the Offset Area creation icon again. Click on the red area in the dialog box and select these three faces in the viewer: Click OK in the Face Selection wizard.4. 5.

Click on the red area in the dialog box and select these two faces in the viewer. Click OK in the Face Selection wizard.6. . one with an offset of 10 mm and the other with an offset of 20 mm. Click OK in the Offset Area creation dialog box. So now you have Group 1 containing two areas.

Note the effect of the two offset areas (on the left in the picture. you must create a new group for the second value.7. select Group1 as Offset Group. Click the Sweeping icon . At the top of the geometry tab. Using MB3 over the red area. Offset groups can be used with Sweeping. you will not be able to modify the offset group. 8. If you are using a rework area that includes an offset group in an operation. Press Replay.) The same face cannot be used in two separate offset areas in the same group. Pencil and Contour-driven operations. They can also be used with rework areas. choose Body(ies) in the contextual menu and click on the part in the viewer. . Double click anywhere in the viewer to confirm your selection and redisplay the dialog box. If you wish to have two different offsets on any given face.

you must have computed a tool path. All of the functions are accessed via the tool path contextual menu.Tool Path Editor This is where you can find the functions you need to edit tool paths. Editing a Point Editing an Area Transformations Connecting Tool paths Reversing a Tool path Tool Path Approaches and Retracts Packing and Unpacking a Tool Path Checking for Tool Holder Collision . Before using any of the functions below.

The tool path is displayed. A dialog box that lets you either remove or move the point is displayed. 1. You must have computed a tool path and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity.Editing a Point This task explains how to either move or remove a point on a tool path. As you pass the mouse cursor over it you will notice that a small white square moves along the tool path.CATProcess. 2. Open Block. Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation. Select Point modification in the tool path contextual menu. . Click where you want to select a point.

To move a point. .3. You can only move or remove a point if you have one selected. click the cut button. You can then either pull it to the place you want it to be in the viewer or enter the coordinates where it should be in the spin boxes. click the move button. 4. To remove a point.

The tool path editor has options that let you select an area using: one point two points a contour a polyline . Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation. or cut . 2. . the area. or by swapping the selection for the area that is not selected so that you can then choose whether you what to move You can also predefine the selection value . two points and deciding whether you want to use the part of the tool path that is between the two points or outside of the two points.Editing an Area This task explains how to edit an area on a tool path. The tool path and the tool path editor are displayed. a polyline and deciding whether you want to use the part of the tool path that is inside or outside of the contour. . a contour and deciding whether you want to use the part of the tool path that is inside or outside of the contour. . Open Block. You must have computed a tool path and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity. Select Area modification in the tool path contextual menu. 1. .CATProcess. You can select areas of the tool path by using: one point on the tool path and deciding whether you want to use the portion before or after it.

This selects the area of the tool path that is within the contour. by selecting an existing closed contour on the part. by selecting two points on the tool path.3. This selects the portion of the tool path that falls between the two points. First select the area that you want to modify: by selecting one point on the tool path. . This selects the portion of the tool path after the point.

Double click to end selection.by clicking on the part to define a polyline. .

Clicking the swap icon a second time will give you the original selection. Whichever of the buttons you choose its effect will be applied to the next tool path selection action. 5.4. a contour the part of the tool path that is outside the contour is now selected. . You can also double click on the word distance and enter a value in the dialog box. Click it and this dialog box is displayed: Depending on the button you pick. To move it. or move it with . grab the point at the end of the arrow beside the word distance and pull. you will see the word "open" after the tool path name in the specifications tree. you can choose whether the part of the tool path selected is before or after the single point or inside or outside the two points or contour. . So if you selected the area with: You can swap the selected area by clicking one point the part of the tool path that is before the point is now selected. two points the part of the tool path that is outside the two points is now selected. Use to change the default value of the selected areas. Now you can either cut the area of the tool path with If you cut an area and you do not reconnect the points. Distance reflects the distance that you move the area.

. use the contextual menu over the word Distance and choose an axis.If you wish to translate the area along an axis other than the (default) tool axis. 6. Click OK to close the tool path editor.

The tool path is displayed on the part. Choose whether you want to translate. Click OK in the tool path translation dialog box to validate and exit the action. the Y axis. 3. 2. Translation Choose Translation in the tool path contextual menu. Open Block. You can: translate a tool path. rotate or mirror-reflect the tool path.Transformations This task explains how to apply transformations to a tool path. Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation. rotate a tool path. . mirror a tool path. You can also double click "Distance" and enter a value in the distance dialog box that is displayed. the Z axis. You must have computed a tool path and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity. The contextual menu over the word "distance" lets you choose whether you want to translate the tool path along: the X axis.CATProcess. clicking either on the approach or the retract and dragging. 1. and then pulling the tool path. You can also translate the tool path by selecting it in the viewer. or the tool axis.

The tool path is displayed on the part. . As you move the mouse over the tool path. the normal to the face defines the rotation axis. For instance. the elements that can be used for the rotation are highlighted in red. a plane. By default the rotation is effected around the tool axis. a rotation of 90 will give you this result: Click OK to validate and exit the action. the normal to the plane defines the rotation axis. Change the angle by double-clicking on the word Angle in the viewer (you can also drag the direction arrow in the viewer). or a face. A dialog box is displayed. You can define the rotation you want with respect to: a point. this defines the origin for the rotation.Rotation Choose Rotation in the tool path contextual menu. Enter the number of degrees you want to rotate the tool path by. an edge this defines the rotation axis.

Choose a plane or a face to be the mirror plane. Double click to validate and exit the action. .Mirror Choose Mirror in the tool path contextual menu.

You must have computed a tool path. removed an area and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity. 2.Connecting Tool Paths This task explains how to connect a tool path. Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation.CATPRocess. Choose Connection in the tool path contextual menu. . Open BlockB. 1. You can either have the tool path connection go: from one point to its connecting point by raising it to a DZ distance (if you enter a value of 0 the tool path will go straight from one point to the other) or from one point to its connecting point by passing through the safety plane. Choose a connection option.

choose the operation that you used to create it and press Replay. You will see that the gap in the tool path is now closed. . If you want to check the tool path. Click OK.3.

Reversing a Tool Path This task explains how to reverse a tool path. You will see that the tool approach and retract points have been exchanged. The tool path is reversed but not displayed. If you want to check the tool path. 1.CATProcess. You must have computed a tool path and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity. Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation Choose Reverse in the tool path contextual menu. . Open Block. choose the operation that you used to create it and press replay.

Choose the Approach tab. passes between paths.CATProcess. You must have computed a tool path and have selected it in the PPR making it the current entity. retracts. 1. You can delete: approaches. linking passes. 3. . from the whole tool path or from a polygon that you draw on the tool path. Open Block. Choose Change approach and retract in the contextual menu. Expand the manufacturing process completely and select the tool path for the sweeping operation. Enter a value of 20 mm for the Length.Tool Path Approaches and Retracts This task explains how to add or remove approaches and retracts in a tool path. Distance and Height. 2. Change the type to Back.

. Press Apply.4. continue to make changes to the approach and retract tabs until you are. Check the appropriate boxes and press the Remove from whole tool path if you want to remove all occurrences. You can also modify existing approaches or retracts. Check the appropriate boxes and press Remove from area inside polygon if you want to remove only the occurrences in a specific area. If not. 5. If you are satisfied with the results press OK. Then define the polygon in the viewer and double click to confirm and end it.

. Back. Back. The parameters that you can modify are: the length (1) the height (2) the ramp angle (3). The approach/retract mode can be: Along tool axis. modify the settings if necessary. the tool doubles back like an arrow above the cutting tool path. Use Apply to see your modifications. You can either define this type with two lengths or a length and an angle. Circular. Box or None). If you are not satisfied with the result press Undo and modify the settings until you are. the tool moves along the tool axis.Use the Approach and Retract tabs to modify the existing approaches and retracts on the whole tool path. Choose the type that you wish to use (Along tool axis.

The parameters that you can set are: the length (1). the angle (2) the radius (3). If you use the manual plane computation mode. The box is defined by three distance values: . If you do not use Part autolimit. the tool moves towards/away from the part in an arc. Box. either in a straight line or in a curve (Linking mode). The Length(4) is the distance that the tool will move in once it has crossed the box. the curve will be below the surface of the part. the tool moves across the diagonal of an imaginary box. the approach/retract arc will be normal to the plane that you select.Circular.

it is the the right side that is used.the distance along the normal axis (1). Left or right is determined by looking along the tool path in the direction of the approach/retract. . the distance along the tangent (2) . The direction of the box diagonal is defined by whether you want to use the normal to the left or the right of the end of the tool path. the distance (can be a negative value) along the tool axis (3). In the image.

. no approach/retract.None.

Select the Output tab. Make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree. 1. . This computes a tool path. Open the Basic1. Select the whole body as the part to machine.Packing and Unpacking a Tool Path This task explains how to reduce the size of your CATProcess by packing the tool paths in it and then unpacking them when used later. It is advisable to create a directory for each new CATProcess. Select Surface Machining from the Start menu. Choose the Sweeping icon. Press Replay. Go to the Tools > Options > NC Manufacturing option. Start by defining a directory for your new CATProcess.CATPart in the Samples directory. Enter a directory for Tool Path Location.

. In the contextual menu.2. You must pack each tool path for each individual operation in order to obtain a CATProcess that requires as little memory as possible when it is saved. Select the computed sweeping operation in the specifications tree. A message is displayed giving you the name of the file created and the name of the directory it is created in (i. the one you defined in the options). 3. choose Pack Tool Path.e.

Unpack the tool paths in the same manner when you open a stored CATProcess. and use Unpack Tool Path in the contextual menu. one after the other.4. Select each operation in the specifications tree. .

Select the whole body as the part to machine. Press Replay. 1. Additional geometry may be a face or a clamp that you would rather avoid using in the computation and that is not defined in the operation. Open the Basic1. Select the tool path. This computes a tool path. Make the Manufacturing Program current in the specification tree.CATPart in the Samples directory. Choose Check Tool Length in the tool path contextual menu. . Select Surface Machining from the Start menu. Choose the Sweeping icon.Checking for Tool Holder Collisions This task explains how to check a tool path to identify all the points where the tool holder collides with the part. Extra geometry allows you to add additional geometry to the part in the operation where the tool path was computed. A dialog box is displayed.

There are other parameters that you may choose to modify: When you select Use part. Click Apply. 2. A small dialog box is displayed that gives the number of collision points on this tool . The tool path is displayed on the part. the part you defined in the operation is used to compute the collision points. Collision tolerance defines the distance within which the tool holder is considered to be in collision. The points where the tool holder is in collision with the part are shown in red. Offset on tool holder radius and Offset on tool length define the tolerance distances specific to the tool holder radius and tool length.

Select the tool path again in the specifications tree. The tool path is displayed. Click Cancel. 3. 6. Choose Area modification in the contextual menu. 5.path. . If you want to change the tool length you must create a new tool or select another tool. Change the parameter values if you wish. You can also display the tool on the tool path. The same dialog box as above is displayed. Click the Select collision points icon . 4. the minimum tool length that is required in order to avoid having collision points and the coordinates of the current point (move the mouse over the tool path to see the coordinates change for each point) plus reference data on the tool length and the offset on the tool length. You can then cut ( ) the collision points from the tool path. Close the dialog box This is only a visual check to let you see where the collision points are and find the tool length that is required to avoid them. You now have the choice of either changing the tool length or editing the tool path in order to get rid of the collision points. Press apply to display the collision points in red on the toolpath.

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Importing files There are two types of files that can be imported into the Surface Machining workbench: STL Files NC Code Files .

Reading STL files This task shows you how to open STL files into your Surface Machining session. Navigate to the samples directory and select the Basic. Go to the Wireframe and Surface Design workbench. Display the Surface Machining Tools via View > Toolbars > Surface Machining Tools.stl file. . Press Open. 1. . 3. Click the Inserts an STL file icon 2.

You can now machine the part that you have just opened. .

. then select Import APT source in the contextual menu. Select the Manufacturing Program entity in the tree.Importing NC Code Files This task shows you how to import NC code files into your Surface Machining session. 1.

NC-Example). The Input File button allows you to browse to the directory where the file is located. For information on generating NC files. In the NC File Import dialog box: choose NCCode as the NC data type. choose the same post processor file as was used to create the file to import.2. see the chapter on generating NC code in batch mode. . enter the name of the file you want to import (here. Press OK.

Menu bar description Toolbar description Specification tree .Workbench Description This section describes the menu commands and icon toolbars that are specific to the 3 Axis Surface Machining workbench. This is what the 3 Axis Surface Machining workbench looks like.

Insert menu Machining Operations Machining Features Auxiliary Operations Accesses all machining operations Accesses the definition of machining areas Accesses auxiliary operations Machining Features Milling Features Machining Pattern Milling Features Machining Area Rework Area Machining Axis System Defines a machining area Defines an area to rework Defines a machining axis system Defines milling areas Defines machining patterns Machining Operations Sweep Roughing Roughing Sweeping Pencil Defines a sweep roughing operation Defines a roughing operation Defines a sweeping operation Defines a pencil operation .Menu Bar This is the menu bar for the 3 Axis Surface Machining workbench. Below are the menus that specifically concern 3 Axis Surface Machining. Start File Edit View Insert Tools Window Help Tasks corresponding to general menu commands are described in the Version 5 Infrastructure User's Guide.

ZLevel Contour-driven Spiral milling Profile Contouring Axial Machining Operations Defines a ZLevel operation Defines a contour-driven operation Defines a spiral milling operation Defines a profile contouring operation Defines a hole-making operation .

Toolbars These are the specific icon toolbars that belong to the Surface Machining workbench. Manufacturing Program Toolbar Machining Operations Toolbar Auxiliary Operations Toolbar Tool Path Management Toolbar Tool Path Editor Toolbar Manufacturing Features Toolbar Machining Areas Toolbar Geometry Selection Toolbars Edge selection Toolbar Face Selection Toolbar .

Machining Operations Toolbar This toolbar has the icons you need to create machining operations. . See Roughing operations See Sweep roughing operations See Sweeping operations See Pencil operations See ZLevel operations See Contour-driven operations See Spiral milling operations See Profile contouring operations See Axial machining operations.

See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to select an area using a contour. See checking for tool holder collisions for information on how to check for collisions between the tool holder and the part to machine on a tool path. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to cut a point or an area. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to define the default value for the next selection operation. .Tool Path Editor Toolbar This toolbar has the icons you need to edit tool paths that you have created with machining operations See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to move a point or an area. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to select an area using a contour. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to select an area using two points. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to swap the selected area. See editing an area of a tool path for information on how to select an area using one point.

Machining Areas Toolbar This toolbar is used to define areas to either machine or to rework. The areas can be defined independently of machining operations. See Defining offsets (offset area) See the use of manufacturing feature views with machining areas. See Defining an area to machine See Defining an area to rework See Defining offsets (offset group). .

Edge Selection Toolbar The edge selection toolbar contains icons to help you select edges of contours when specifying geometry in machining operations. Set the constraints below. If the distance between the two points is shorter than this then the two points are considered to be in the same place. . Selects all edges that are in continuity with each other according to the constraints below. Select an edge and then click this icon. Chains edges. If the angle between the two edges is smaller than this then the edges are considered to be tangent and can be chained. Angle is the minimum angle between two edges. Defines the constraints that can be used with the chaining edges icon: Tolerance is the minimum distance between two points. Select an edge and click this icon. Selects all edges that are tangent to the one you have selected. Step is the number of edges that will be selected in a given chaining operation.

Click OK to accept all selections made with the edge selection toolbar and to exit the action.Close contour lets you decide whether or not you want to close the contour. Resets all selections. Click Cancel to refuse all selections made with the edge selection toolbar and to exit the action. Closes a contour with a line. . Select one point as the beginning of the line and then select a second point for the end of the line. Select a contour or series of lines to form a contour and click on this icon. Click on this icon to erase all selections made with the edge selection toolbar. Creates a line between two points. A straight line is inserted from the beginning of the contour to the end of it. Reverse contour lets you decide whether or not you want to reverse the contour.

Double click to end corner definition. Select a face and then click this icon.Face Selection Toolbar Selects all faces which are tangent to a given face. . Lets you select faces that are: normal to a main axis. Select the faces around which you want to define the line. Click this icon. Click the places in the viewer where you want the corners of the polygon to be. Choose Boundary of faces in the contextual menu for the line you want to define. Click this icon. Previews a contour. parallel or perpendicular to a face that you select as reference. The contour is highlighted. Selects all faces that are situated entirely within a polygon.

The reference body is No selection. Click OK to select these faces. Click OK. This tab selects flat faces with reference to a face that you choose.This tab selects all of the flat faces that are normal to a main axis. The faces normal to the axis you chose in the viewer are selected. Click OK in the Face selection wizard to confirm your selection. Choose an axis. Make sure it is selected (as in the image) and click on the part to machine in the viewer. Choose whether you want the faces that are perpendicular or parallel to that face. Select a face of a given color and then click this icon. Click OK in the Face selection wizard to confirm your selection Selects all faces of a given color. Click the face on the part in the viewer that you want to use as reference. All faces of that color are selected. . Click in the reference face box. Select that part as the reference body.

Click Cancel to refuse all selections made with the face selection toolbar and to exit the action. This action is a shortcut to the Selection Sets item in the Edit menu.You can define the color of a face via the Edit/Properties menu item when the face is selected. Click on this icon to erase all selections made with the face selection toolbar. Click on this icon and select the selection set you want to use in the dialog box. Resets all selections. Click OK to accept all selections made with the face selection toolbar and to exit the action. . Manages selection sets. Press Close.

The ProcessList is a plan that gives all the activities.Specification Tree Below is an example of a specification tree for Surface Machining. The ResourcesList gives all of the tools that can be used in the program. The ContourDriven operation has not been computed and does not have all of the necessary data (indicated by the exclamation point). The Sweep Roughing operation is complete and has been computed. operations. etc. Pocess Product Resources. The Manufacturing Program is the list of all of the operations and tool changes performed. The ProductList gives all of the parts to machine. The Sweeping operation is complete but has not been computed. required to transform a part from a rough to a finished state. The Part Operation defines the manufacturing resources and the reference data. manufacturing resources. .

. Look for a red zone on that tab.The red light indicates where data is missing.

Check element Geometry that represents material that is not to be machined in an operation. C Climb milling A cutting mode where the front of the tool (advancing in the machining direction) cuts into the material first. . It often represents a clamp that holds the part to machine in place.Glossary A Approach Approach feedrate The part of a tool path that ends where the tool begins to cut the material The speed of linear advancement of the tool during its approach. before cutting.

The point where the tool will start cutting in a roughing operation when the surface to machine has pockets. See Climb milling. between contours where the tool sweeps between two guide contours along a tool path that is obtained by interpolating between the guide contours. See Contour-driven machining. An area of the part surface that forms an inclined wall that the advancing tool will climb or descend. A contour that is used to delimit the areas to machine in an operation. The ends of each pass lie on two stop contours. The maximum depth of the cut effected by the tool at each pass. There are three types of contour driven machining: parallel contours where the tool sweeps out an area by following progressively distant (or closer) parallel offsets of a given guide contour. This option is useful for machining parts that have grooves or steps and when you want to make sure that these areas are cut. . I Imposed plane Inner point A plane that the tool must pass through. F Feedrate Frontal wall The speed of linear advancement of the tool into the material while cutting.Contour-driven machining Conventional milling Cut depth This type of machining uses a contour as guide. A cutting mode where the back of the tool (advancing in the machining direction) cuts into the material first. G Guide contour A contour used to guide the tool during an operation. spine contour where the tool sweeps across a contour in perpendicular planes. L Lateral wall Limit line Lower plane An area of the part surface that forms an inclined wall that the tool will advance along laterally instead of climbing or descending. One of the two planes normal to the tool axis that confines the area to machine. The operation will only machine between this plane and the upper plane.

P Pencil operations A pencil operation is one where the tool remains tangent in two places to the surface to be machined during the cycle. A movement where the tool plunges deeper into the material. . The maximum allowable height of the crests of material left uncut after machining. An internal depression is one that does not extend to the outside edge of the part. An operation which touches up zones that are left completely unmachined by previous operations. a subset of the faces on the part. An area on a part surface that represents an internal depression (in Z) relative to the surrounding part surfaces. The block of raw material to be machined to produce a part. advancing along the (negative) tool axis. An area that cannot be machined with a given tool. Plunge Pocket P. A machining area can be: the whole part (for example. It is often used to remove crests along the intersection of two surfaces that were left behind by a previous operation.R. Process Product Resources. S Safety distance Scallop height Spindle speed Start point A horizontal clearance distance that the tool moves over at the feedrate in order to disengage the tool from cutting between passes. or before an operation. The speed of the spinning tool around its axis.M Machining area An area defined on a part either: during an operation as part of the machining geometry .P. the operation being assigned to a machining area afterwards. in roughing). The point where the tool will start cutting in a roughing operation where the surface to cut is accessed from the outside of the part. R Retract Rework area Reworking Roughing Rough stock The part of a tool path that begins where the tool stops cutting the material. a subset of faces on the part with a limiting contour. An operation where a part is rough-machined by horizontal planes.

The ends of each pass lie on the stop contours. The tool paths are executed in vertical parallel planes. The operation will only machine between this plane and the lower plane. An operation where a part is rough-machined by vertical planes. U Upper plane One of the two planes normal to the tool axis that confines the area to machine.Stepover distance Stop contours Sweeping operations Sweep roughing The width of the overlap between two successive passes. Sweeping operations machine the whole part and are used for finishing and semi-finishing work. The two contours connecting the ends of two guide contours in contour-driven machining (between contours option). . Z ZLevel machining An operation where the tool progressively follows the part surface at different constant Z values (heights).

Index A Along tool axis Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Spiral milling Sweeping parameters Approach distance Roughing parameters ZLevel parameters Approach modes Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Area to avoid Contour-driven parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters .

horizontal slope Maximum on part stepover Min. lateral slope One closed contour .Area-oriented machining Getting started Area-oriented machining methodology Assigning an operation Defining machining areas Automatic rough stock Automatic surface selection Spiral milling Avoiding Tool holder collisions Axial direction Pencil operation parameters Axial safety distance Roughing parameters B Between contour parameters Along tool axis Constant on part stepover Constant stepover Four open contours Guide contour Machining tolerance Max. frontal slope Min.

Other axis Pencil rework Reverse tool path Scallop height stepover Tool path style Zone Between contours Contour-driven parameters Body Defining machining areas Bottom plane Spiral milling By chaining continuous edges Selecting edges By color Selecting faces C Changing approach and retract types Tool path editor Changing selection defaults Tool path editor Check element Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters .

Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Checking for Collisions Closing a contour with a line Selecting edges Collisions Checking for Color Offset area parameters Connecting an open tool path Tool path editor Constant on part stepover Between contour parameters Constant stepover Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Contour-driven operations Contour-driven parameters Approach modes Area to avoid Between contours Check element Discretization angle Feedrate length Geometric components Guide contour .

High speed milling Island skip Island skip length Limiting contour Linking Lower plane Offset Offset groups Offset on check Offset on part Optimize retract Part autolimit Retract modes Safety distance Safety plane Stop contours Stop mode Stop position Transition radius Upper plane Corner radius Spiral milling Cutting mode Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling ZLevel parameters .

D Defining Machining areas Offset areas Offset groups Rework areas Defining continuity constraints Selecting edges Defining machining areas Assigning an operation Body Load from Deleting approaches Tool path editor Deleting linking passes Tool path editor Deleting passes between paths Tool path editor Deleting retracts Tool path editor Direction Parallel contour parameters Discretization angle Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters .

E Editing a point Tool path editor Editing an area Tool path editor End plane Sweeping parameters End point Spiral milling F Feedrate length Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters Filter Rework areas Finishing and semi-finishing operations Four open contours Between contour parameters G Geometric components Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters .

Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Getting started Area-oriented machining Operation-oriented machining Guide contour Between contour parameters Contour-driven parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters H High speed milling Contour-driven parameters Spiral milling Sweeping parameters I Importing NC Code files STL files Importing files Importing NC code files Imposed plane Roughing parameters ZLevel parameters Initial tool position .

Parallel contour parameters Inserting a line between two points Selecting edges Inside a polygon Selecting faces Island skip Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters Island skip length Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters L Limit line Rework area parameters Limiting contour Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Linking Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters Linking pass ZLevel parameters Load from Defining machining areas Rework areas Lower plane .

Contour-driven parameters Roughing parameters Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters M Machining areas Defining Machining direction Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters Machining features Machining mode Roughing parameters ZLevel parameters Machining tolerance Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spine contour parameters Spiral milling Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Manual surface selection Spiral milling Max. horizontal slope .

lateral slope Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters Minimum change length . frontal slope Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters Min. area Roughing parameters Min.Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Maximum angle Spiral milling Maximum cut depth Roughing parameters Sweep roughing parameters Maximum distance Spiral milling Sweeping parameters Maximum on part stepover Between contour parameters Maximum width to machine Parallel contour parameters Min.

Pencil operation parameters Minimum distance Sweeping parameters Mirror translation of the tool path Tool path editor Moving a point Tool path editor Moving an area Tool path editor N NC Code files Importing Normal to an axis Selecting faces O Offset Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Offset area parameters Color .

Thickness Offset areas Defining Offset group parameters Thickness Offset groups Contour-driven parameters Defining Pencil operation parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Offset on check Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Offset on contour Parallel contour parameters Spiral milling Offset on part Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters .

ZLevel parameters Offset side Parallel contour parameters One closed contour Between contour parameters Operation-oriented machining Getting started Operation-oriented machining methodology Optimize retract Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Roughing parameters ZLevel parameters Optimize retracts Sweeping parameters Other axis Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Spiral milling Sweeping parameters Overlap Rework areas Overshoot Roughing parameters P Packing and unpacking a tool path Tool path editor .

frontal slope Min. lateral slope Offset on contour Offset side Other axis Pencil rework Reverse tool path Scallop height stepover Tool path style Zone Parallel contours Parallel to a face Selecting faces Parameters Tool holder collisions Part autolimit Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Spiral milling . horizontal slope Maximum width to machine Min.Parallel contour parameters Along tool axis Constant stepover Direction Guide contour Initial tool position Machining tolerance Max.

Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Part contouring Roughing parameters Part offset Rework areas Pass overlap ZLevel parameters Pass overlap (length) Roughing parameters Pass overlap (ratio) Roughing parameters Pencil operation parameters Approach modes Axial direction Check element Cutting mode Geometric components Limiting contour Machining tolerance Minimum change length Offset Offset groups Offset on check Offset on part Optimize retract Part autolimit Retract modes .

Reverse tool path Safety plane Stop mode Stop position Tool axis Pencil operations Pencil rework Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Perpendicular to a face Selecting faces Plunges Sweeping parameters Position Roughing parameters Previewing a contour Selecting faces Profile contouring operations R Radial safety distance Roughing parameters Radial strategy distance Sweep roughing parameters Reading STL files Reducing the size of a tool path Saving space Remove from area inside polygon Tool path editor .

Remove from whole tool path Tool path editor Removing a point Tool path editor Resetting selection Selecting edges Selecting faces Retract modes Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Reverse tool path Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Pencil operation parameters Spine contour parameters Spiral milling ZLevel parameters Reversing a tool path Tool path editor Rework area parameters Limit line Tool Rework areas Defining Filter .

Load from Overlap Part offset Tolerance Tool axis Reworking operations Rotating the tool path Tool path editor Rough machining operations Rough stock Roughing parameters Roughing operations Roughing parameters Approach distance Approach modes Area to avoid Axial safety distance Check element Cutting mode Geometric components Imposed plane Lower plane Machining mode Machining tolerance Maximum cut depth Min. area Offset Offset on check .

Offset on part Optimize retract Overshoot Part contouring Pass overlap (length) Pass overlap (ratio) Position Radial safety distance Rough stock Safety plane Start point Tool axis Tool core diameter Tool path style Upper plane Roughing rework operations Roughing type Sweep roughing parameters S Safety distance Contour-driven parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Safety plane Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters .

Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Saving space Reducing the size of a tool path Scallop height Sweeping parameters Scallop height stepover Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Selecting an area with a closed contour Tool path editor Selecting an area with a polyline Tool path editor Selecting an area with one point Tool path editor Selecting an area with two points Tool path editor Selecting edges By chaining continuous edges Closing a contour with a line Defining continuity constraints Inserting a line between two points Resetting selection Tangent to an edge .

frontal slope Min. lateral slope Other axis Reverse tool path Scallop height stepover Tool path style Zone Spiral milling Along tool axis .Selecting faces By color Inside a polygon Normal to an axis Parallel to a face Perpendicular to a face Previewing a contour Resetting selection Selection sets Tangent to a face Selection sets Selecting faces Spine contour Spine contour parameters Along tool axis Constant stepover Guide contour Machining tolerance Max. horizontal slope Min.

Approach modes Area to avoid Automatic surface selection Bottom plane Check element Corner radius Cutting mode End point Geometric components High speed milling Machining tolerance Manual surface selection Maximum angle Maximum distance Offset Offset on check Offset on contour Offset on part Other axis Part autolimit Retract modes Reverse tool path Safety plane Start point Stop mode Stop position Tool axis Tool path style .

Top plane Start plane Sweeping parameters Start point Roughing parameters Spiral milling ZLevel parameters Stepover side Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters STL files Importing Stop contours Contour-driven parameters Stop mode Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Stop position Contour-driven parameters Pencil operation parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Swapping selection .

Tool path editor Sweep roughing operations Sweep roughing parameters Approach modes Area to avoid Check element Geometric components Lower plane Machining direction Maximum cut depth Offset Offset on check Offset on part Part autolimit Radial strategy distance Retract modes Roughing type Safety plane Stepover side Stop mode Stop position Tool axis Tool path style Upper plane Sweeping operations Sweeping parameters Along tool axis Approach modes .

frontal slope Min.Area to avoid Check element Constant stepover Discretization angle End plane Feedrate length Geometric components High speed milling Island skip Island skip length Limiting contour Linking Lower plane Machining direction Machining tolerance Max. horizontal slope Maximum distance Min. lateral slope Minimum distance Offset Offset groups Offset on check Offset on part Optimize retracts Other axis Part autolimit Plunges .

Retract modes Safety distance Safety plane Scallop height Scallop height stepover Start plane Stepover side Stop mode Stop position Tool axis Tool path direction Tool path style Transition radius Upper plane Zone T Tangent to a face Selecting faces Tangent to an edge Selecting edges Thickness Offset area parameters Offset group parameters Tolerance Rework areas Tool Rework area parameters .

Tool axis Pencil operation parameters Rework areas Roughing parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Tool core diameter Roughing parameters Tool holder collisions Avoiding Parameters Tool holder collisions Tool path direction Sweeping parameters Tool path editor Changing approach and retract types Changing selection defaults Connecting an open tool path Deleting approaches Deleting linking passes Deleting passes between paths Deleting retracts Editing a point Editing an area Mirror translation of the tool path Moving a point Moving an area .

Packing and unpacking a tool path Remove from area inside polygon Remove from whole tool path Removing a point Reversing a tool path Rotating the tool path Selecting an area with a closed contour Selecting an area with a polyline Selecting an area with one point Selecting an area with two points Swapping selection Transformations Translating an area along an axis Translating the tool path Tool path style Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Roughing parameters Spine contour parameters Spiral milling Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters Top plane Spiral milling Transformations Tool path editor Transition radius Contour-driven parameters .

Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters Translating an area along an axis Tool path editor Translating the tool path Tool path editor U Upper plane Contour-driven parameters Roughing parameters Sweep roughing parameters Sweeping parameters ZLevel parameters W What's new? Z ZLevel operations ZLevel parameters Approach distance Approach modes Area to avoid Check element .

horizontal slope Offset Offset groups Offset on check Offset on part Optimize retract Part autolimit Pass overlap Retract modes Reverse tool path Safety distance Safety plane Scallop height stepover Start point Stop mode Stop position Tool axis Transition radius .Constant stepover Cutting mode Discretization angle Geometric components Imposed plane Limiting contour Linking pass Lower plane Machining mode Machining tolerance Max.

Upper plane Zone Between contour parameters Parallel contour parameters Spine contour parameters Sweeping parameters .