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Rhapsody Hardware Requirements

Monday, April 16, 2012 12:33 PM

Purpose
The purpose of this document is to provide a set of basic hardware specifications to help with Orion Health product sales/pre-sales and implementation. Each hardware specification is based on hospital size and is intended to give a generic recommendation based on the estimated message load and a simple set of processing requirements. Each recommendation can be further refined as more configuration information about a specific site becomes available. There are Rhapsody sites that do not meet the generic requirements of the hospitals defined in this document (e.g. public health, health insurance etc). It is important in these situations that as much configuration information is obtained a custom hardware recommendation is created based on this information. This document is not intended to replace a formal hardware recommendation created by regional Professional Services Groups (PSG) but should be used as a starting point to create such a recommendation.

Hospital Size Small Hospital Medium Hospital

Number of Beds Received Messages/Day Processed Messages/Day 1-199 200-499 15,000 50,000 100,000 45,000 300,000 1,500,000

Large Hospital (Group) 500-1200

Small Hospital
Assumptions
Assume a 200 (or less) bed hospital. Assume this site receives around 15,000 messages per day or about one message every six seconds. Assume that each message requires mapping from one format to another and performs a simple table

lookup and replace before forwarding to another 3 system.


We base hardware recommendations on the assumption that peak loads are about 4 times the sustained

rate.
Total messages load per day 45,000 (3x15000) or one message every two seconds. Windows Quad Core Intel Xeon 4 GB RAM 200GB hard disk 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Rhapsody Engine Raid 1 recommended Uninteruptable Power Supply (UPS) Linux Quad Core Intel Xeon 4 GB RAM 200GB hard disk 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Rhapsody Engine Raid 1 recommended Uninteruptable Power Supply (UPS)

Medium Hospital
Assumptions
Assume a 200-500 bed hospital. Assume this site receives around 50,000 messages per day or about one message every two seconds. Assume that each message requires mapping from one format to another and per-forms a simple table

lookup and replace before forwarding to another 6 system.


We base hardware recommendations on the assumption that peak loads are about 4 times the sustained

rate. Total messages load per day 300,000 (6x50,000) or three-four message every second.
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Total messages load per day 300,000 (6x50,000) or three-four message every second. Windows 2 x Quad Core Intel Xeon 8 GB RAM 36GB for OS & Applications (Raid 1 recommended) 200GB for Rhapsody data stores (Raid 1 recommended) 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninteruptable Power Supply (UPS) Linux 2 x Quad Core Intel Xeon 8 GB RAM 36GB for OS & Applications (Raid 1 recommended) 200GB for Rhapsody data stores (Raid 1 recommended) 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninteruptable Power Supply (UPS)

Large Hospital
Assumptions
Assume a 1200 bed hospital or a group of 6 200 bed hospitals Assume this site receives around 100,000 messages per day or about one message every two seconds. Assume that each message requires mapping from one format to another and per-forms a simple table

lookup and replace before forwarding to another 15 system.


We base hardware recommendations on the assumption that peak loads are about 4 times the sustained

rate.
Total messages load per day 1,500,000 (15x100,000) or 18 message every second. Linux 4 x Quad Core Intel Xeon 16 GB RAM 36GB disk for OS & Applications (raid-1 recommended) 200GB Raid 10 for message stores 200GB Raid 10 for other data 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Solaris Quad 1.5 GHz UltraSPARC processors 16 GB RAM 36GB disk for OS & Applications (raid-1 recommended) 200GB Raid 10 for message stores 200GB Raid 10 for other data 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) HP-UX 2-4 Dual-Core Intel Itanium 16 GB RAM 36GB disk for OS & Applications (raid-1 recommended) 200GB Raid 10 for message stores 200GB Raid 10 for other data 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) AIX 4-Core Power5+ Processor 16 GB RAM 36GB disk for OS & Applications (raid-1 recommended) 200GB Raid 10 for message stores 200GB Raid 10 for other data 64bit Hardware/64bit Operating System Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)

Fail Over Requirements


Rhapsody can be installed and run in an active-passive cluster providing a high availability solution. In this configuration there are two nodes: one active and one passive. The active and passive nodes are both powered
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In this configuration there are two nodes: one active and one passive. The active and passive nodes are both powered on, but only the active node is running Rhapsody. The two nodes are connected via an Ethernet connection. As soon as the passive node detects the active node is no longer available (has gone down) it will assume the active node's IP address and will start up all services (including Rhapsody) and assume the role of the active node. The Rhapsody message stores must be located on a shared network resource (SAN) which both nodes can access for the fail-over to occur correctly. Additional Server When purchasing a server for fail over it should be to the same specification as the primary server. If needed it must be able to handle the same message volume. Thus if implementing fail over recommend two machines of the same specification as indicated above for the message volume. Fail Over Software Orion Health utilizes cluster functionality supported by the selected operating system environment. This is often implemented using third party software to provide the failover switching. Examples: Veritas Cluster Server HP ServerGuard MS Windows Advanced server The down time expected generally ranges from 20 seconds through to a couple of minutes depending on the complexity of the Rhapsody configuration. Installation Options and License Requirements When running Rhapsody in an active-passive situation, consideration must be given to the licensing requirements. There are two methods for installing and configuring Rhapsody in active-passive mode. SAN Application Installation

In a single installation install, the Rhapsody application files are installed onto the SAN along with the Rhapsody Data directories. This means that each node in the cluster will be running the same set of application files and the same license file. The license check will check the name of the node against that which was licensed. Because the same license file must run on both nodes, Rhapsody includes a slight change to the standard name comparison for active-passive clusters. Rhapsody will remove the last digit (if it is a digit) from the name of the rhapsody server for license comparison, so each node must be named the same, but with a single digit different (eg: Rhap1 and Rhap2, or Rhap 4 and Rhap9 ). If the machines cannot be named in such a way, then the hostname will need to be included as part of the failover and be moved from one node to another when failover occurs. Local Application Installations Both the active and passive nodes could also have the Rhapsody application files instored on each server, while the data directory is stored on the Storage Area Network (SAN). In this scenario, each machine can be independently named, but each machine will need to have a license installed on it independently. If the Rhapsody server fails over and the new node does not include a license, then Rhapsody will run, but no communication points or routes will start.
SAN Installation Instructions

These instructions assume that you are trying to install Rhapsody on two machines for an active/passive cluster. It is recommended that only the Rhapsody data directory (message store and configuration) is stored on the SAN, while Rhapsody program files are stored on the local machine.

1. Run the Rhapsody installer. Specify a local installation location for the Rhapsody application files. 2. Specify a location on the SAN for the data directory when asked by the installer.
If setting up a machine in an active/passive cluster, a second machine will need to be installed that uses the same data directory

1. Ensure the first Rhapsody engine installed is not running and ensure that the second machine has access to the same SAN location as the first Rhapsody engine accessed. 2. Run the Rhapsody installer. Specify a local installation location for the Rhapsody application files. 3. Specify the same location on the SAN for the data directory when asked by the installer. 4. Now you can start either Rhapsody engine and use the other as the passive node. Monitoring software can now be configured to monitor the Rhapsody engines and assume control over the active-passive cluster.

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