DO NOT OPEN THE TEST BOOK UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO!

Nan1e
Last First

__
Middle Initial

PSAT/NMS
Timing
The PSAT/NMSQT®has five sections. You will have 25 minutes each for Sections 1-4 and 30 minutes for Section 5. For each correct answer, you receive one point. For questions you omit, you receive no points. For a wrong answer to a multiple-choice question, you lose a quarter ('A) of a point. For a wrong answer to a math question that is not multiple choice, you do not lose any points. If you can eliminate one or more choices as wrong, you increase your chances of choosing the correct answer and earning one point. If you can't eliminate any choices, move on. You can return to the question later if there is time. You must mark all of your answers on your answer sheet to receive credit. Make sure each mark is dark and completely fills the oval. If you erase, do so completely. You may write in the test book, but you won't receive credit for anything you write there. You may check your work on a particular section if you finish it before time is called, but you may not turn to any other section.

Scoring

~ SATURDAY,
October 21,

2006
(This is the authorized administration date of this test form for entry to scholarship and recognition programs.)

Guessing

Marking Answers

Checking Answers

DO NOT OPEN THE TEST BOOK UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO!
Unauthorized reproduction or use of any part of this test is prohibited.
Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship cosponsored by Qualifying Test

LCollegeBoard
4CPT2

~

/~NATIONALMERIT ...... SCHOLARSHIP CORPORATION

IIlllll

1

-1
SECTIONl
• Time 25 minutes
24 Questions (1-24)

1

Directions: For each question in this section, select the best answer from among the choices glven and fiU in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five words or sets of words labeled A through E. Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, ~ fits the .meaning of the, sentence as a whole. 4. The Eurasian taiga, the world's largest forest, exhibits a remarkablelackof-·-----: it is ------:- in most places by only a few specie$ of conifers. (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) definition .. bordered variety .. dominated space .. covered precision .. dotted thickness .. overrun

ExaJJlple:
Hoping to ------- the dispute, negotiators proposed a compromise that they felt would be ------- to both la~or and management. (A)e,nforce .. useful (B) end .. divisive (C) overcome .. unattractive (O) extend; . satisfactory (E) resolve .. acceptable A diehard soccer fan, Ravi was not just disappointed but completely --.---- when his favorite team lost in the finals. \ (A) indulgent (B) satisfied (C) unmoved (0) crushed (E) deceived Each ------- of the mosaic was individually selected ~d-------according to a preconceivedpatternuntil the entire floor of the villa was decorated.' (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) photograph .. developed color .. studied image .. discussed tile •. removed piece .. positioned

5. The new healthcare legislation was intended as -------, a temporary expedient that would serve until more thorough measures could be instituted. (A) a stopgap (B) a moratorium (C) a portent (0) an admonition (E) an invocation 6. Feeling ------- by a voting process that ultimately led to their votes being invalidated, these citizens ------- their discontent by way of a lawsuit. ' (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) heartened .. voiced emboldened •. denied compromised .. garnered disenfranchised .. registered intrigued •. revoked

7. The manager's. -~.~----shocked her employees, who neitherexpec~nordeserved such bitter, abusive language. ,', (A) diatribe (B)soliloquy (C) repartee (0) quibble (E) . affirmation 8. Peregrine faJc~nsarelltllongthe avianwotld!s great ---.... -, sometimes migrating as much as 18,000 miles

~.y~~.

3. The essays of James Baldwin, which are extraordinarily ------- and worldly, provide insight into this ------- and perceptive man. . (A) (B) \ (C) (0) (E) sophisticated .. profound specialized .. provincial altruistic .. self-centered naive .. masterful volatile .. gentle

(A) mereenarie$.(B)itinerants " (C) eharlatans (0) .recidiYistS (E) provincials

-2-

1
Questions 9-10 are based on the following passage.
Researchers engaged in the study of chimpanzee behavior have recently documented a multitude of distinct patterns across Africa, in actions ranging from Line the animals' use of tools to their forms of communica5 tion and social customs. They have found, for example, that chimps in the Tai.Forest of the Ivory Coast use stone "hammers" to cleave nuts, but that on the opposite bank of a river members of the same species do not crack nuts at all. The required raw materials are available on both 10 sides, but the.river serves as a cultural barrier. 9. The passage implies that for chimpanzees "on the oPPQsjte bank" (line 7) the river is a "cultural barrier" (line J 0) because it prevents them from (A) reaching a distant source of food (B)· maiqng contact with human researchers (C) acquiring the capacity to communicate (D) eXlJloring diverse habitats (E) learning technical skills from other chimps

1

1
Questions 11-12 are based on the following passage.

The passages below are followed by questions based on their content; questions following a pair of related passages may also be based on the relationship between the paired passages. Answer the questions on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passages and in any introductory material that may be provided.

I thought we had finished with the subject of your wanting to become a writer when you passed through New York last April. You asked for what you called Line "an uncle's meddling advice," and we spent an afternoon 5 talking about your chances of commercial or critical success (nil and next to none), about the number of readers that constitutes the American audience for literature (not enough to fill the seats at Yankee Stadium), and about the Q ratings awarded to authors by the celebrity markets 10 (equivalent to those assigned to trick dogs and retired generals). You didn't disagree with the drift of the conversation, and I thought it was understood that you would apply to business school.

U. The tone of the parenthetical comments is best
characterized as (A) ebullient (B) diffident (C) sanguine (D) surly (E) wry 12. The passage suggests that the person being addressed most likely (A) did not expect career guidance (B) chose to defy a categorical command (C) hoped to avoid an intimidating event (D) was unconvinced by the uncle's advice (E) did not feel challenged by college

10. All oftl'te fo~owing could serve as examples of the
kinds of differences discussed in the passage EXCEPT: (A) TO~~tr~ct attention during courtship, chimpanzees inQttpgroup rap their knuckles on tree trunks, ""pil~those in another group do not. (B) To g~tdrinking water, chimpanzees in one group fol<lleaves into "cups" to scoop water, while tb:o$¢in another group use leaves as a "sponge" tOi~ up water. (C) Chimpanzees in one group sit on large leaves whentbe ground is wet, but those in another grQQPdo not. (D) Ch@panzees in one group eat termites, but those in another group have no termites to eat in their area. (E) Chimpanzees in one group use leafy twigs to fan away flies, but those in another group do not.

..

-3-

I

GO ON TO THE NEXT

PAGV

1
Questions 13-24 are based on the following passages.
45

Passage 2 Even in these mercifully emancipated decades, many people seem to be alarmed at the prospect of sleeping away from officially consecrated campsites, with no more equipment than they can carry on their backs. When pressed, they babble about snakes or bears or even bandits. But the real barrier, I'm sure, is the unknown. It was years ago that I came to comprehend the reality of this barrier. I was walking and had come to some natural boundary. It may have been the end of a trail or road, or the fringes of a forest or the rim of a cliff, I no longer remember which. But I know that I felt I had gone as far as a hiker could go. So I just stood there looking out beyond the edge of the world. Except for a wall of thick, dark, undergrowth, I am no longer sure what I saw, but I know it was wild, wild, impossible country. ' All at once, without warning, two men emerged from that impossible country. They carried packs on their backs, and they were weatherbeaten and distilled to muscle and bone. I talked to them briefly and in considerable awe. They had been back deep in the wilderness, they said, away from civilization for a week. "Pretty inaccessible, some of it," admitted one of them. "But there's beautiful country in there-some of the finest I've ever seen." Then they walked away and I was left, still awestruck, looking out once more into the huge, mysterious wilderness. The awe that I felt that day still lingers in my memory. But my present self dismisses it. I know better. Many times in recent years I have emerged from wild country and have found myself face to face with astonished people who had obviously felt that they were already at the edge of the world, and I know that what I have seen on their faces is exactly what those two men must have seen on mine. And I know now that the awe is totally unwarranted. There.is nothing difficult in going into such places. All you need is the right equipment, a reasonable competence in using it, a tolerable degree of physical fitness, and a clear understanding of YOlIT own limitations. Beyond that, a!l you' have to do is overcome the fear of the unknown. 13. In line 5, "Running" most nearly means (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) functioning conducting fleeing hastening extending

Passage 1 is adapted from the introduction to a 1998 book that relates the author's experiences while hiking sections of the Appalachian Trail. Passage 2 isfrom a1968 book on backpacking. Passage 1 Not long after I moved with my family to a small town in New Hampshire, I came upon a path that vanished into a wood on the edge of town. A sign announced that this was no ordinary footpath but the celebrated Appalachian Trail. Running more than 2,100 miles along America's eastern seaboard, the AT is the granddaddy of all hikes. And here it was, quite unexpectedly, meandering in a dangerously beguiling fashion through the pleasant New England community in which I had just settled. It seemed such an extraordinary notion-that I could set off from home and walk 1,800 miles through woods to Georgia. A little voice in my head said: "Sounds neat! Let's do it!" I formed a number of rationalizations. It would get me fit after years of waddlesome sloth. It would be an interesting and reflective way to reacquaint myself with the scale and beauty of my native land after nearly twenty years of living abroad. It would be useful (I wasn't quite sure in what way, but I was sure nonetheless) to learn to fend for myself in the wilderness. When guys in camouflage pants and hunting hats sat around in the Four Aces Diner talking about fearsome things done outdoors, I would no longer have to feel like such a cupcake. I wanted a little of that swagger that comes with being able to gaze at a far horizon through eyes of chipped granite and say with a slow, manly sniff, "Yeah, I've slept in the woods." But then I bought some books and talked to some people and came gradually to realize that this was way beyondway beyond-anything I had attempted before. Nearly everyone I talked to had some gruesome story involving a guileless acquaintance who had gone off hiking the trail with high hopes and new boots and come stumbling back with a bobcat attached to his head. I heard four separate stories (always related with a chuckle) of campers and bears sharing tents for a few confused and lively moments; stories of tents crushed beneath falling trees, or eased off <precipices on ballbearings of beaded rain and sent paragliding on to distant valley floors. Yes, the woods were full of peril. Literally unimaginable things could happen to you out there. It required only a little light reading in adventure books and almost no imagination to envision circumstances in which I would find myself meeting up with a sofa-sized boar with cold beady eyes, a piercing squeal, and a slaverous, chomping appetite for plump, city-softened flesh.

50

Line

55

5

60

10

65

15

70

20

75

25

80

30

35

40

.~.

1

14. In context, the quotation in lines 12-13 chiefly conveys the author's (A) great courage in the face of difficult odds
(B) unbridled enthusiasm for studying the

19. Which of the following statements best describes
the relationship between the two passages? (A) The first presents evidence that persuasively advances the argument made in the second. (B) The first makes a claim that is shown to be idealistic by the second. (C) Tbesecond advocates an environmental ..policy that is ridiculed in the first. (0) The second expresses admiration for the principles outlined in the first. (E) The second challenges an attitude that is exemplified in the first. 20. The rationalization mentioned by the author of Passage _ 1 in lines 14-15 is best supported by which of the following from Passage 2 ? (A) The claim that most people are afraid to sleep in the woods (B) The assertion. that it is possible to venture deep into the wilderness (C) The physical description of the two hikers (0) The importance of understanding one's abilities (E) The necessity of overcoming one's fear of the unknown

natural world (C) childlike desire to escape the pressures of civilization (0) blithe approach to an arduous undertaking (E) brazen disregard for the consequences of his actions 15. Line 14 ("I formed ... rationalizations") primarily suggests that the author of Passage 1 was (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) seeking to explain a common misunderstanding attempting to avoid a physically challenging task trying to justify an impulsive decision giving an honest account of his true motives . acknowledging the difficulty of accomplishing a goal

16. The author repeats a phrase in lines 28-29 in order to (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) stress how impressive his actions were highlight a commonly held. point of view emphasize the magnitude of an endeavor indicate disagreement with some so-called experts suggest that it was too late to reconsider a choice -

17. The initial reaction of the author of Passage 2 to the ''two men" (line 60) is best characterized as (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) trepidation indignation disillusionment exasperation astonishment

21 •. The author of Passage 2 would most likely argue which of the following about the events referred to in lines 36-38 of Passage 1 ("stories ... floors") ? (A) They could largely be avoided through the exercise of good judgment and use of proper equipment. (B) They will unfortunately occur sooner or later to most casual backpackers. (C) They are indicative of some hikers' courage and exuberance. (0) They would not be likely to cause harm even if they did occur. (E) They are beyond human control and therefore not worth worrying about.

18. In line 80, "clear" most nearly means (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) serene smooth transparent innocent keen

·5·

IGO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE>

1
22. The author of Passage 2 would most likely argue that the last paragraph of Passage 1 (lines 27-44) demonstrates (A) a foolhardy willingness to take risks (B) an unreasonable anxiety regarding the hazards of wilderness camping (C) an admirable example of careful preparation (D) a praiseworthy recognition of physical strengths and weaknesses (E) an accurate assessment of different scenarios one should expect in the forest 23. The author of Passage 1 most wants to be like which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The The The The The "many people" (lines 45-46) "bandits" (line 49) "hiker" (line 56) "two men" (line 60) "astonished people" (line 73)

-1
(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Argumentative versus objective Lighthearted versus bitter Caustic versus pompous Conversational versus scholarly Humorous versus earnest

1
24. Which of the following best characterizes the tone of Passage 1 and that of Passage 2, respectively?

STOP
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test.

-6-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

-7-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

-8-

o
SECTION 2
Time - 25 minutes 20 Questions (1.20)

o

o

Directions: For this section, solve each problem and decide which is the best of the choices given. Fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. You may use any available space for scratchwork.

1. The use of a calculator is permitted. ·2. All numbers used are real nurdbers. 3. Figures that accompany problems in this test are intended to provide information useful in solving the problems. They are drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated in a specific problem that the figure is not drawn to scale. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated. 4. Unless otherwise specified, the domain of any function lis assumed to be the set of all real numbers x for which I(x) is a real number.

II)

Ow .... G
·i

5

e

=
1:1

~

~

b

ErJh Sh
l V=lwh V=1rr2h
,"'-

b~ a c2 ::a2 + b2

~, 30°

A=1rr2

x...J3

.

s~

,

45° s

~

.s

e

9::2:Jtr

A= iw

A=!bh

Special Right Triangles

, Tb¢l'lUJDber of degrees of arc in a circle is 360. Tbe,lUtn oltho measures in degrees ofthe angles of a mangle is 180.

"I. Which of the follo\\1ing numbers is NOT between and
(A)

t

y

P (6, 9)

'!t;

5.
0.68 0.78 . R (6, t) 2. In the figure above, OP = OR. What is the value of t ?

(B) 0.10 (C) 0.14
(D)

(E) 0.82

(A) -9
(B) -4 (C) 0 (D) (E) 4 9

·9·

2(A) (B) (C) (0) (E) $0.52 $0.96 $1.04 $1.80 $4.16

o
(A) (B) (C) (0) (E) 8 27 12 27 8 17 8 12 12 17

o

o

3. the cost of 4 pieces of candy is $0.32. At this rate, what is the cost of 13 pieces of this candy?

5'. In a class of 15 boys a,nd 12 girls, 9 boys and 8 girls
speak more than one language. If a representative for student council is to be chosen at random from the class, what is the probability that the representative will be a girl who speaks more than one language?

4. If

18 - xl :::;5,
10 11 12 13 14

which of the following is NOT a ~

ABC

D

possible value of x? (A) (B) (C) (0) (E) Note: Figure not drawn to scale. 6. On the line above, if segments AB, AC, and BD have lengthS of 5, 6, and 8, respectively, what is the length of segment CD ? (A). (B) (C) (0) (E) 4 5

6
7 8

IGO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE;
-10-

2

D
c
3

D
x 3x x+2

2
(A) (B) (C) (0) 2 4

D
9. If lOx = 24 to 6?

D

+ 3tx, for what value of t is x

R-

3

6
8

(E) 10

7. In the figure above, the sum of the quantities in row R is the same as the sum of those in column C. What is the value of x ? (A) 1 2
(B) 1

(C)

2

(0) 3 (E) 4

3,9,27,81,

...

10. In the sequence above, the first term is 3 and each following term is 3 times the term before it. Of the following, which is an expression for the 100th term ofthe sequence?

3(99) 3(100) (C) 3(100) + 3
(A) (B) (0) (E)

3100 1003

8. In the figure above, what is the length of segment XY ? (A) 15 (B) 16 (C) 17
(0) (E)

18 19

I GO ON TO llIE
-11-

NEXT PAGE;

o

o

o
(A) The20th (B) The 21st (C) The 22nd (0) The 23rd (E) The 24th

o

2

13~ The Friends of the Library meet on the third Sunday
of every month. What is the latest possible day of the month that this meeting could take place?

Note: Figure not drawn to scale.

11. In the figure above, lines f, m, and r intersect in a
point. If f 1. m and y

=

110, what is the value of x?

(A) 55 (B) 45 (C) 40
(0) 35 (E) 20

14. If the function f is defined by f(x) l.2~l\?or

= x + 1,

all positive

integers x. let

0 be defined to be
(3

what is f{x)
(A) (B)

-1 ?

tIi~sum of the digits of i multiplied by the number Of digits of x. For example, What is the value of (A) (B) (C)
(0)

-x-l

S

®=

-x+ 1
x-I

+ 1)·2 = 8.

(C)
(0)

?

(E)

x x +1

12 16

18
24

(E) 36

.1 GO ONll>1HE
-12-

NEXT PAGE>

2
,

~'

o

o

2

o
y

o

15. In the figure above, line £ passes through two vertices of the square. Which of the following represents the sum of the areas of the shaded regions?
(A) (B)

17. The figure above shows line £ in the xy-coordinate plane. Linep (not shown) has the equation y = mx + k, where m and k are constants. If p 1.£, which of tbefollowing must be true?
, (A) (B) (C)

x

2 2

+ xy + J2xy + xy
2

x

(C) (0) (E)

2x2

m<O m >0 k<O (0) k=O (E) k>O

XY+l
2x
2

-y

16. Jason uses two different mixtures of windshield washer fluid for his car. In summer the mixture is one part washer fluid to three parts water; in winter the mixture is two parts washer fluid to one part water. How many ounces of washer fluid should Jason add to 24 ounces of the SUmmer mixture in order to produce the winter mixture?
(A) 3 (B) 12 (C) 30 (0) 36

18. In the figure above, 0 is the center of the circle, OABe is a square, and OP = 8 inches. What is the area of the square, in square inches? (A) 32
(B) 36 (C) 64 (0) 16../2 (E) 16.J3

(E) 48

-1'3-

2

D
Hours per Child 6 9 11

D
Number of Children

2
20. If
(A)

D
(x + y)( x2 - y2)=
=y = -y 2 2 x =Y 2 2 x = -y 3 3 x =Y
must be true? x (B) x (D)
(E)

D

2

HOURS OF TELEVISION VIEWING IN A WEEK

0, which ofthe following

14 18

1 4 2 3
5

(C)

19. The table above shows the numbers of hours of television viewing by 15 children last week. What is the median number of hours of viewing per child?
(A) 9

(B) 11
(C) 12 (D) 13
(E)

14

STOP
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test.

-14-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

-15-

3

333

~3
SECTION 3
Time - 25 minutes 24 Questions (25-48)

333

3

Directions: For each question in this section, select the best answer from among the choices given and fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five words or sets of words labeled A through E. Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. Example: Hoping to ------- the dispute, negotiators proposed a compromise that they felt would be ------- to both labor and management. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) enforce .. useful end .. divisive overcome .. unattractive extend .. satisfactory resolve .. acceptable 27. Publishers have Winfrey's Book accrued through that comes with (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) sought the endorsement of Oprah Club not only for the ------- rewards increased sales, but also for the ------such recognition,

fiscal .. money literary .. honor academic .. profit intellectual .. support financial .. prestige

28. Critics complained that the committee charged with the design of the new museum ------- high-profile architects to the exclusion of lesser-known, though often more -------, practitioners. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) displaced .. innovative courted .. accomplished extolled .. celebrated pursued .. reserved rebuffed .. inexperienced

25. Marta expected to ------- sashimi, but she was pleased to find that the spicy sauce made it quite -------. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) enjoy .. fragrant dislike .. flavorful reject .. bitter delight in .. edible give up .. bland

29. Although many people in contemporary times choose to speak explicitly, the tradition of ------- is still very much alive. (A) garrulousness (C) excoriation (E) euphemism (B) exaggeration (D) oration

26. Although the creation of hardy, insulin-producing cells once seemed unthinkable, researchers recently have made ------- progress in this area, which offers hope to type I diabetics. (A) disconcerting (D) considerable (B) irrevocable (C) illusory (E) anticlimactic

-16-

I

GO ONTOlHE

NEXT

PAGV

3
Passage 1

333

3

3·3

3

3

The passages below are followed by questions based on their content; questions following a pair of related passages may also be based on the relationship between the paired passages. Answer the questions on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passages and in any introductory material that may be provided. Questions 30-33 are based on the following passages. 30. Both passages agree on which point? (A) Strachey's biographies misrepresented statements by their subjects. (B) Strachey's work created a new standard for biographers. (C) Strachey's imitators restored objectivity to biographies. (D) Strachey's skills as a researcher were unsurpassed. (E) Strachey's work initially received little recognition.

Line 5

10

As a biographer, Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) thought and said that most British nineteenth-century biography was long-winded humbug. He believed the conventional length of books at that time-two or three volumesto be deliberate padding. He also accused biographers of suppressing evidence because it was unflattering. However, Strachey himself suppressed every bit of historical evidence that did not make for a scandalous story. And it is doubtful whether he ever read one truly first-hand source. Yet Strachey brought back to British biography a liveliness it had lost for over a century. He was excited by human nature,and his essays were supremely readable. Biography designed as literature derives mainly from him. Passage 2

31. Which generalization about Strachey is supported
by both passages? (A) He was an unusually skilled writer. (B) He was a commercially successful biographer. (C) He made biographies accessible to nonscholarly readers. (D) He criticized publishers of nineteenth-century biographies. (E) He encouraged those who imitated his style. 32. Both passages suggest that nineteenth-century biographies, on the whole, were (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) highly innovative meticulously researched unfairly dismissive largely uncritical unaccountably popular

15

20

25

For a considerable time it was unfashionable for a biographer to admire his or her subject; that debunking period lasted a full generation. Lytton .Strachey started it, and on the whole it was a healthy movement. It was generally a wholesome reaction against the laudatory biography of the nineteenth century. But Strachey was a brilliantly talented writer; his imitators and followers had not his genius, and the art of biography suffered. We outgrew the fashion, perhaps because debunking is easy and what is too easy does not hold up over time. But the stigma remained: a biography was not true unless it was malicious.

33. Unlike the author of Passage 1, the author of Passage 2 refers to which aspect of Strachey's work?
(A) Its literary quality (B) Its popularity among modern readers

(C) Its rejection of nineteenth-century conventions (D) Its comprehensive presentation of factual data (E) Its unfortunate influence on later biographers

-17-

I

GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE>

3

333

-

3
50

333

3

Questions 34-40 are based on the following passage. The author of this passage was born in Korea and immigrated to the United Siates with her family at age jour. The allusion in the passage is to the Korean War (1950-1953), which resulted in two Korean nations, North and South, divided by a demilitarized zone. During my early twenties, to placate my parents, and simply to escape, I decided to sojourn in my birthplace, something I'd sworn I would never do. My parents were thrilled. They prayed that I'd come back triumphantly with a picture-perfect bridegroom. That was the furthest thing from my mind as I packed my faded jeans, tank tops, boots, and aglossy photo of my freckle-faced then-boyfriend who was of Scottish descent. The moment I landed in Seoul, I was aware of how much I felt like a misfit. All my life I had tried to blend into the dominant culture and couldn't. And finally, when I was in a place where everyone looked like me, I still stood out. I took it for granted that I'd feel a sense of freedom. I thought I'd blend into the landscape. This wasn't the case. People stared at mewith raking eyes. I became conscious of my American-girl swaggering body movements and inappropriate dress. Collecting my courage, I traveled to the demilitarized zone on my own. I touched the high barbed-wire fence that stretched across the belly of the peninsula, dividing Korea in half. I visited thousand-year-old temples and regal palace gates that had withstood modernization and centuries of battle. I met with distant cousins who welcomed me with outstretched arms into their homes and related heroic tales about my mother and Halmoni (Grandmother) during the war. How Halmoni had led her young children out of communist north to the United Nations-backed south. How my mother, at the age of thirteen, saved the life of her baby sister. I listened with suchan overwhelming, insatiable thirst that when I returned to the States a year and a half later, I began to ask my parents and Halmoni (who had immigrated to the States some time after we did) all about the past. The past was no longer a time gone by, a dead weight. I now saw that it held ancient treasures. And the more I delved and discovered, the more I felt myself being steered toward a future I had never imagined for myself. I began to write. I didn't even know I could write. My family helped ' me knit stories into a bound book using Halmoni's voice. As her powerful words moved through me I was able to reflect and meditate on the delusional life I had fashioned for myself. I could feel my sense of self rising. This sparked a newfound awareness and excitement. I became a spokeswoman on Korean culture, traveling to various college campuses across the country. "Be proud. Embrace

your legacy," I spouted to young Korean American students wearing extra-large, trendy sportswear. But the whole time I was lecturing, thad very little understanding of what that self-concept meant. I was merely talking the talk. I hadn't yet fully embraced my own identity. 34. The author's description of her first impressions of Korea indicates that "a sense of freedom" (line 13) involves feeling (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) independent inconspicuous invulnerable empowered optimistic

Line

5

10

35. In lines 9-17 , the author suggests that her original expectations about visiting Korea were (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) unrealistic and narve misguided and dangerous politicized and idealistic sensible and practical ambitious and lofty

15

36. The author's attitude toward the ancient monuments she visited (lines 21-23) is best described as (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) curiosity about their original functions astonishment at their size admiration for their capacity to endure reverence for their beauty surprise at their excess

20

'25

37. The author's visit to Korea helped change her attitude toward her family's earlier experiences from (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) boredom to tolerance disdain to amusement skepticism to fanaticism indifference to fascination concern to compassion

30

35

38. The passage suggests that the author came to regard Halmoni with great (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) reserve concern envy esteem humility

40

45

-18-

3

333

3

333

:I

39. At the end of the passage, the author implies that a sense of "legacy" (line 46) should be accompanied by a (A) willingness to explain that legacy to others (B) desire to search for historical information (C) realization that people are shaped by their environments (D) genuine understanding of one's personal identity (E) sincere effort to meet others who share that legacy

40. Which statement most closely parallels the author's conclusion about knowledge of the past? (A) It is a treasure that should be jealously guarded. (B) It contributes directly to a sense of national identity. (C) It is often most valued during early adulthood. (D) It can enhance appreciation of ancient cultures. (E) It can help individuals attain deeper self-awareness.

-19-

I

GO ON TO THE NEXT

PAGV

-----

~------~

3
Questions 41-48 are based

333
on the foUOWingpassage. ,
45

33

3

3

The following passage is adapted from a 1995 article ~ written by an astrophysicist. Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are, Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky.
line
5 50

If stars did not twinkle, then the above rhyme by Jane Taylor (1783-1824) would not have been Written and the world's astronomers would be very, very happy. Twinkling stars are an active ingredient in both romantic nights and bad data. What actually happens when a star twinkles? Through fine optical devices, such as telescopes and eyeballs, the atmosphere looks like a tapestry of individual "patches" of air that drift across the field of view. Unfortunately, different patches have slightly different temperatures anddensities, and thus different optical properties. Fr()mone patch, alight wave can be,~roken apart, with its segments sent on slightly differentpatbs. The scene resembles a pond in which ripples move across an untidy ridtge of stones-the smooth shape of each ripple is disturbed before. reachint the shore. Under the influence oft;beatmosphere, a stax's image will not only drift to and , fro,butwill also change its brightness from one moment to the next. Your eyes will record a twinkling star ..A timelapse photograph will record a smeared, circular blob. ~ After a swift yet peacefuljoumey, the sharp pinpoint of light from a distant star reaches Earth's lower atmosphere, where it gets juggled and wiggled and smeared into an oversized blob on the detector attached to a telescope. Depending on the air turbulence, some nights are worse than others. With characteristic eloquence, Sir Isaac Newton, in his 1704 tre;itise on optics, worried about how twinkling stars might confound astronomers of the future: If the theory of making telescopes could at length

55

60

65

Newton was right. The sky is, indeed, more serene when viewed from mountaintops, and I agree with him that clouds are gross. But the atmosphere above mountains does not always cooperate. If you seek high-resolution images of your star field or galaxy when the twinkling is bad.then there are two obvious things to do. Plan A: close the telescope dome and go to bed. Plan B: raise $2 billion, build a telescope, launch it into orbit above the disturbing atmospheric layers, and observe the universe from there. Plan B is actually in progress in the form of the Hubble space telescope, which now observes the universe with a leap in resolution from ground-based telescopes that is as impressive as the leap to telescope from the unaided eye. But there now exists a clever, less obvious remedy that is revolutionizipggrounli-based astr~nomy: adaptive optics. In some versions, l~ers are. used to continually monitor the blobbiaess of stars ..An intricate network of software . and hardware corrects for the atmospheric turbulence of the moment. Fifteen years ago, this technology would have been indistinguishable from magic. Today, it produces images that, in. some cases, are almost.as good as what can be obtained from outside the atmosphere. As unromantic as it may sound, we now have the-technology to "de-twinkle" the stars. 41. In lines 5-7 ("If stars ... happy"), the author suggests that astronomers (A) are concerned that most people understand very little about the stars (B) are unfamiliar with Taylor's work (C) do not approve of Taylor's ideas about the stars (D) find the twinkling of the stars frustrating (E) are critical of popular views about why stars twinkle 42. According to the passage, astronomers would be ''very, very happy" (line 7) if (A) more money were devoted to scientific research (B) more people became interested in astronomy (C) a specific barrier to astronomical research did not exist (D) more people understood the importance of scientific work (E) a misleading poem-had not been written

be fully brought into practice, yet there would be certain bounds beyond which telescopes could not perform. For the air through which we look upon the stars, is in aperpetual tremor; as may be seen by the ... twinkling of the fix'd stars. He went on to suggest that a mountain might be a good place to put a telescope: The only remedy i~ a most serene and quiet air, such as may perhaps be found on the tops of the highest mountains. above the grosser clouds.

3

333

3

333

3

43. The purpose of the question in line 10 is to (A) introduce the author's explanation of a phenomenon (B) discredit the romantic reaction to starlight (C) bring up the first of several competing theories (D) acknowledge a gap in scientific understanding (E) cast doubt upon a widely-accepted theory 44. The word "Unfortunately" sizes the author's (line 13) primarily empha-

46. The author's claim that he agrees with Newton "that clouds are gross" (lines 45-46) is best characterized as an (A) attempt to use irony to discredit a famous observation (B) attempt at humor based on two different senses ofa word (C) effort to support a claim by citing an established authority (D) effort to establish a distinction between the author's view and Newton's (E) attempt to communicate a difficult concept in non-scientific terminology 47. The reference to "magic" in line 64 is used to (A) characterize the success of adaptive optics (B) evoke the mystery and beauty of the stars (C) dramatize the achievements of Newton and other early astronomers (D) imply that certain kinds of images are not to be trusted (E) show how the use of lasers can reduce the amount of atmospheric turbulence 48. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) highlight the importance of the telescope in early astronomical research (B) introduce readers to a fundamental issue in astronomy (C) explain the principles of land-based telescopes to nonscientists (D) demonstrate the extent to which modem astronomy has been influenced by eighteenth-century discoveries (E) encourage people to take a new look at the way astronomers go about solving problems

(A) consternation at having to record and keep track of so much continually fluctuating data (B) acknowledgement that there is no solution to a common research problem (C) awareness that atmospheric conditions can make astronomers' work more difficult (D) criticism of the methods most frequently used to record astronomical data (E) disappointment in the quality of some scientific instruments 45. The author uses the phrase "yet peaceful" (line 25) in order to set up a contrast between the (A) views regarding astronomical research in Newton's time and the views regarding that subject in our time (B) quality of the images obtained by the Hubble telescope and the quality of images obtained by traditional telescopes (C) effects of interstellar space and the effects of Earth's lower atmosphere on starlight (D) reaction of astronomers to clear images and the reaction of astronomers to blurred and smeared images (E) romantic reaction to stars and scientific theories about them

Source acknowledgment: With permission from Natural History, September 1995 issue. Copyright the American Museum of Natural History, 1995.

STOP
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test. -21-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

-22-

o

'0

nu
SECTION 4
Time minutes 18~estioDS (21'.38)

Fl. ~WI
-15

non4

DirectioDS: This section contains two types of questions. You have 25 minutes to complete both types. For questions 21-28, solve each problem and decide which is the best of the choices given. Fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. You may use any available space for scratchwork.

rI>

~ Z

1. The use of a calculator is permitted. 2. All numbers used are real numbers. 3. Figures that accompany problems in this test are intended to provide information useful in solving the problems. They are drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated in a specific problem that the figure is not drawn to scale. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise.indicated, 4. Unless otherwise specified, the domain of any function f is assumed to be the set of all real numbers x for which fix) is a real number.
f

G Ow '.:;1

S

.s
~ ~

~
II)

= o = e

~

b A=!bh

U
e
V=fwh

h

E~)
b~ V=1fr2h

~x
a

0

s~
,

A=1l'r2 C=21rr

A == fw

c2 =a2+b2

x~ Special Right Triangles

s

450

The:n\llllber.of degrees of arc in a circle is 360. The sum of the measures in degrees of the angles of a triangle is 180.

22. What is the value of 3x3
p

-

x + 1 when x

=

-1 ?

(A) -2

r

(B) -1 (C) 1 (D) 2 (E) 3

21. In the figure above, film and p II r. What is the value of (w + x + y + z) ? 270 (B) 360 (C) 450 (D) 540
(A)

(E) 720

I GO Or..-rOTHE NEXT PAGE>
..23-

4
(A)

000DI
j .•

'<t-l

oooo4
24. How many positive three-digit integers have the
hundreds digit equal to 7 and the units (ones) digit equal to 5 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Two Five Seven Ten Twelve

23. Bella rode a bike from school, stopped to fix a flat tire, and then continued riding the bike at a faster rate than before she stopped. Which of the following gra\,hs could show the distance Bella traveled as a function of time?

[ GO ON TO THE NEXT

PAGV

':24-

4DDDD4DDDD4
1 in 28. A two-digit number XY, where X and Y are digits, is 3 times the sum of its digits. Which of the following equations could be used to represent the statement above?
(A) (B) 3(X) 3(X) 3(X 3(X 3(X

26. Two cubical blocks, each with l-Inch edges, are glued
together as shown above. What is the surface area, in square inches, of the new block? (A) (B) (C) (D)
(E)

+Y =

10(X)

+Y + Y) +Y

+Y = X +Y + Y) = + Y) =
10(X

18 16 12 10
8

(C)
(0) (E)

10(X)

+ Y) = X + Y

27. If n is positive and 50 equals n percent of 50, what is the value of n ?
(A) 1

n

(B) 5 (C) 10 (0) 50 (E) 100

I GOON TO THE NEXT PAGE>
-25-

4DDDD4DDDD4
Directions for Student-Produced Response Questions
Each of the remaining 10 questions requires you to solve the problem and enter your answer by marking the ovals in the special grid, as shown in the examples below. You may use any available space for scratch work. . A nswer: Write answer --in boxes.

12
Fraction line

7

Answer:

2.5

Answer: 201 Either position is correct.

Grid in ___ result.

CDCD.CD ®®®. ®®®® CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD ®®®® .CDCDCD ®®CD®
CD

CD CD CD CD ®.®® ®®®® CD CD CD CD CD CD CD. ®®®® CD CD CD CD ®®®® ®®®®

+-Decimal point

Note: You may start your answers in any column, space permitting. Columns not needed should be left blank.

• Mark no more than one oval in any column. • Because the answer sheet will be machinescored, you will receive credit only if the ovals are tilled in correctly. • Although not required, it is suggested that you write your answer in the boxes at the top of the columns to help you till in the ovals accurately. • Some problems may have more than one correct answer. In such cases, grid only one answer. • No question has a negative answer. • Mixed numbers such as

• Decimal Answers: If you obtain a decimal answer with more digits than the grid can accommodate, it may be either rounded or truncated, but it must fill the entire grid. For example, if you obtain an answer such as 0.6666 ..., you should record your result as .666 or .667. A less accurate value such as .66 or .67 will be scored as incorrect. Acceptable ways to grid ~ are:

31

must be gridded as

3.5 or 7/2. (If

l~it'l"t~J it will be is gridded,

. 31 31 mterprete d as 2"' not - 2". )

CD CD CD CD ®®®® ®®®® CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD '='-J.,.;;=--l,....;::., CD
30. If each of 12 artists submitted either one or two paintings for an exhibition, and a total of 17 paintings were submitted, how many artists submitted only one painting?

®®®

29. Let n be a positive integer. If 4n is less than 50 and 5n is greater than 50, what is one possible value of n?

'

I
-26-

GO ONTO THE NEXT

PAGV

4DDDD4DDDD4
31. In a group of people, the ratio of the number of children to the number of adults is 1 to 4. If there are 480 children in the group, what is the total number of people in the group? 33. The output at a factory was 40 chairs per hour for the first 3 hours of an 8-hour shift. The output then increased to 60 chairs per hour for the remainder of the 8-hour shift. What was the average (arithmetic mean) number of chairs produced per hour during this shift?

34. If a + b = 140 and ar value of r? 32. The lengths of two sides of a triangle are 2 and 21. What is one possible length of the third side?

+ br = 35, what is the

I
~27·

GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGel

4DDDD4DDDD4
37. In, a certain parking lot that contains 200 cars, 50 percent of the cars are red, 60 percent are four-door cars, and 70 percent have alloy rims. What is the greatest number of cars in the parking lot that could be green two-door cars with alloy rims?

35. In the figure above, .e IIm and segments AB and Be intersect at point B. What is the value of x ?

36. If x > 1 and a3
a 2y 1

= x2,

for what value of y does 38. If the area of a circle is the circle?

+

= x6

?

.!£., what is the diameter of
16

STOP
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test.

-28-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

-29-

5

5

-5
SECTIONS
Time - 30 minutes 39 Questions (1-39)

5

Directions: For each question in this section, select the best answer from among the choices given and fill in the corresponding oval on the answer sheet. The following sentences test correctness and effectiveness of expression. Part of each sentence or the entire sentence is underlined; beneath each sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined material. Choice A repeats the original phrasing; the other four choices are different. If you think the original phrasing produces a better sentence than any of the alternatives, select choice A; if not, select one of the other choices. . In making your selection, follow the requirements of standard written English; that is, pay attention to grammar, choice of words, sentence construction, and punctuation. Your selection should result in the most effective sentence-clear and precise, without awkwardness or ambiguity. EXAMPLE: Laura Ingalls Wilder published her first book and she was sixty-five years old then. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) and she was sixty-five years old then when she was sixty-five at age sixty-five years old upon the reaching of sixty-five years at the time when she was sixty-five 2. The survey found that given the choice, just as many commuters would take the train as would take the bus. (A) commuters would take the train as would take the bus (B) commuters taking the train as the bus (C) trains as buses taken by commuters (D) by commuting would take the train as take the bus (E) commuting and taking the train and the bus 3. Most recognized artists are talented in only a single field: Gordon Parks. however, who has shown considerable talent in music, film, literature, and photography. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) field; field; field, field, field, Gordon Parks, however, who has shown Gordon Parks, nevertheless, showing but Gordon Parks has shown despite which Gordon Parks has shown, with Gordon Parks showing

4. Because Torell was working for three years as a teacher of agriculture, he felt qualified for a position as field representative for the State Department of Agriculture. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Because Torell was working Because Torell had worked Torell, working Because of Torell's working As Torell worked

®.®®®
1. Even though the novel Ulysses closely parallels
Homer's Odyssey and some readers find the novel difficult to follow. (A) Ulysses closely parallels Homer's Odyssey and some readers find (B) Ulysses closely parallels Homer's Odyssey and even though some readers find (C) Ulysses closely parallels Homer's Odyssey, some readers find (D) Ulysses with its close parallels to Homer's Odyssey and with some readers finding (E) Ulysses, a close parallel to Homer's Odyssey, some readers who find

5. British novels of the early twentieth century were often more stylistically innovative than American novelists of the same period. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) American novelists of the same period American novels of the same period Americans whose novels were of the same period that of the same period by Americans the same period of American novels

-30-

I

GO ON TO THE NEXT

PAGV

5

5

5

5

5

6. Timing traffic lights properly is important for routing traffic. preventing delays. and accidents. (A) for routing traffic, preventing delays, and accidents (B) to route traffic, prevent delays, and accidents (C) for routing traffic, prevent delays, and to avoid accidents (D) for routing traffic, preventing delays, and avoiding accidents (E) to route traffic, to prevent delays, and avoiding accidents 7. Mercy Otis Warren. who resented having needlework taught to her while her brothers learned Latin and Greek. arguing that gender-based restrictions on education harmed both men and women. (A) Warren, who resented having needlework taught to her while her brothers learned Latin and Greek, arguing (B) Warren, who resented being taught needlework while her brothers learned Latin and Greek, argued (C) Warren, resenting needlework being taught to her while her brothers learned Latin and Greek, she argued (D) Warren, resenting how she was taught needlework while her brothers learn Latin and Greek, had argued (E) Warren resented to be taught needlework while her brothers learned Latin and Greek, arguing

9. At the beginning of the new school year, the administration announced that all students' backpacks must be kept in their lockers while attending clas§t(s. (A) that all students' backpacks must be kept in their lockers while attending classes (B) that all students attending classes, they must keep their backpacks in their lockers (C) that all students must keep their backpacks in their lockers while attending classes (D) that, while attending classes, all backpacks must be kept in students' lockers (E) that, while they attend classes, all their backpacks must be kept in students' lockers 10. Most of Henry Ford's methods have been so generally adopted and as a result people no longer realize how original they were. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) and as a result and therefore and that resulting in the fact that

11. The skills required for clothing design are much more complex than those involved in making custom alterations. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) those involved in making those involved to make to make making for making

8. In the science textbook my granumother used in high
school it states that an atom cannot be split. (A) In the science textbook my grandmother used in high school it states (B) In my grandmother's high school science textbook they state (C) The science textbook my grandmother used in high school states (D) They state in the science textbook used by my grandmother in high school that (E) When my grandmother was in high school, she used a science textbook, it stated

-31-

I GO ON TOTHE NEXT PAGe)

5

I

5

I

5

5
(A) they estimate to decline (B) they estimated to have declined (C) it is estimated that they have declined (0) are estimated to decline (E) are estimated to have declined

5

12. When, in 1916, F.V. Colville and Elizabeth White developed the first cultivated blueberry, they were more durable than the native New Jersey beny and could be sent to distant markets. (A) they were more durable than the native New Jersey berry and could be sent to distant markets (B) they could be sent to markets at a distance more than the native New Jersey berry because they were more durable (C) being more durable than the native New Jersey berry, they were able to be sent to distant markets (0) they found it to be more durable than the native New Jersey berry, it could be sent to distant markets (E) they found that it was more durable than the. native New Jersey berry and could be sent to distant markets 13. The long-awaited completion of the transcontinental railroad in May of 1869 is why the age of tourism to the American West was ushered in. (A) The long-awaited completion of the transcontinental railroad in May of 1869 is why the age of tourism to the American West was ushered in. (B) What ushered in the age of tourism to the American West was that in May of 1869 they completed the long-awaited transcontinental railroad. (C) The long-awaited completion of the transcontinental railroad in May of 1869 ushered in the age of tourism to the American West.· (0) In May of 1869, the age of tourism to the American West was ushered in, the reason being their long-awaited completion of the transcontinental railroad. (E) After completing the long-awaited transcontinental railroad in May of 1869, the age of tourism to the American West was ushered in.

14. Because of the prices they can fetch, bluefin tuna have been overfished, and their North Atlantic breeding populations they estimate to decline by about 90 percent since 1980.

15. Singer and songwriter Harry Burleigh is noted in the history of twentieth-century American music for both his classical songs and his arrangements of spirituals. (A) music for both his classical songs and his arrangements of (B) music, he wrote classical songs and he also arranged (C) music for both classical songs and arranging (0) music, both for his classical songs and his arranging (E) music, both because of his classical songs and his arrangements of 16. Or. Seuss, whose 44 books have sold more than 500 million copies, have made him probably the best-selling children's author in history. (A) have made him (B) making him (C) and was thereby (0) is (E) are

~32~

I

GO ON 10 THE NEXT

PAGV

5

5

5

5

5

17. The British Factory Act of 1833 forbade employment of children under the age of nine,only the textile industries were affected. (A) only the textile industries were affected (B) children not in textile industries not affected (C) only children in the textile industries were affected (D) but applying only to the textile industries (E) but the act applied only to the textile industries 18. New York's Lincoln Center. some say resembling a shopping mall for the performing arts, with its separate performance halls for opera, theater, and instrumental music. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Center, Center, Center, Center, Center, some say resembling some say, resembles said by some to resemble which some say resembles with its resemblance, some say, to

19. Since nearly all those accused in the 1692 Salem witch trials were women, to discuss the trials without considering issues of gender is neglecting an aspect of the events that is important. (A) is neglecting an aspect of the events that is important (B) is neglecting an important aspect of these events (C) is to neglect an important aspect of the events (D) will have been neglecting an important aspect of the events (E) would have been neglecting an important aspect of these events 20. Meteorites are of great interest to astrophysicists. since this is how they obtain information about the chemical composition of early solar systems. (A) astrophysicists, since this is how they obtain information (B) astrophysicists, who obtain from them information (C) astrophysicists because information is obtained by them (D) astrophysicists; they obtain information this way (E) astrophysicists, which is how they obtain information

-33-

IGO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE>

5

5

I

5

5
23. The mediator, having negotiated a final trade A agreement between the two rival nations, were

5
C

The following sentences test your ability to recognize grammar and usage errors. Each sentence contains either a single error or no error at all. No sentence contains more than one error. The error, if there is one, is underlined and lettered. If the sentence contains an error, select the one underlined part that must be changed to make the sentence correct. If the sentence is correct, select choice E. In choosing answers, follow the requirements of standard written English. EXAMPLE: The other delegates and him immediately

B
D peace. No error E

credited with helping to promote international

24. Not surprisingly, research shows that a fundamental A difference between an introvert and an extrovert

ABC accepted the resolution drafted by the D neutral states. No error E

B
being that one enjoys being alone while the other C D enjoys being around people. No error

E
21. Realizing that a delay could be beneficial ,

A

B

25. The Food and Drug Administration has overlooked the dangers of some drugs that seemed perfectly safe

the director postponed the vote but requested that the subcommittee continue to meet until when the remaining issues C were satisfactorily resolved . No error D 22. Although the Phoenicians E were among the best A C were not equal of the Egyptians. No error D E B C A D B E

until long after they are in general use. No error

26. Although Charlotte Bronte enjoyed painting A as well as writing, she is more widely recognized as B an author than as an artist. No error D E C

navigators of their time, as shipbuilders they

-34-

I GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE>

5
27. Underneath. the baSemelltfioor lies the drainpipes

I

5
A

5
C

31. People are no more likely to become athletic by watching sporting events as they are to become ..

A
that were installed

B
years ago by the original owner

C
of the house. No error E

D

B
healthyby

reading medical books. No error

o
for the most part ,

E

28. Although the' guest list is limited,

32. Until the train stopped at the station, neither the A engineer nor the conductor were aware that one B of the passengers had become ill.·No error D E C

A

B

to the immediate families, it will ~clude Mary and old friends of boththe

!,
C

bride and the groom. No .error

D
29. Inc~easptgty, trial lawyers are callin~ on psyA chologiststo help them predict how particular

E

33. The economy suffered through a recession that A .. was equal , ifnot worse than, the recession that had

B
kinds of people will behave as a member of

B
developed a decade before. No error

C D E

C
a jury, ,No error E

D
34.

The

atmosphereat A

the Wimbledon tennis tournament

30. Plato and Aristotle. tallSiJ,tthat the ideal human A being is the philosopher-the person of reason who B looked upon existence with detachment. No error

is far more sedate and traditional than the tournament

--._
D

B

C

we saw. No error .

E

C

D

E

-35-

5
Directions: The following passage is an early draft of an essay. Some parts ofthe passage need to be rewritten. Read the passage and select the best answers for the questions that follow. Some questions are about particular sentences or parts of sentences and ask you to improve sentence structure or word choice. Other questions ask you to consider organization and development. In choosing answers, follow the requirements of standard written English. Questions 35·39 are based on the following passage. (1) The 1988 Teacher of the Year was Donna Oliver. (2) She was both elated and critical as she accepted her award. (3) She had her ceremony at the White House and thanked the President for an awe-inspiring experience. (4) She also challenged him to make education more important. (5) She turned her energies to recruiting and training African Americans as teachers. (6) Directing a teacher training program, fifty-five students are supervised by her every year. (7) "Unusual" is a word many people use to describe her program. (8) Most student teachers teach right away, but not her students. (9) They spend about 120 hours providing various services in the classroom before they pick up the lesson plans and start to teach. (10) Not many student teachers get to tutor children in different grades. (11) Or take them to the lunchroom. (12) Ms. Oliver wants her student teachers to experience what it means to be a full-fledged teacher. (13) Because teachers need to understand the cultures of their students, Ms. Oliver's student teachers visit pupils at home. (14) She encourages teachers to study poetry by authors with the same backgrounds as their pupils. 35. The fact that Ms. Oliver was "critical" (sentence 2) is best illustrated by (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) sentence sentence sentence sentence sentence 1 3 4 5 14

5

5
36. In context, which of the following is the best way to revise and combine sentences 3 and 4 (reproduced below)?

5

She had her ceremony at the White House and thanked the President for an awe-inspiring experience. She also challenged him to make education more important. (A) She had her ceremony at the White House, and thanked the President for an awe-inspiring experience and then she also challenged him to make education more important. (B) Thanking the President for an awe-inspiring experience at the White House and she challenged him to make education more important. (C) She had her ceremony at the White House, there she thanked the President for an awe-inspiring experience but challenged him to make education more important. (D) During a ceremony at the White House, challenging the President to make education more important while thanking him for the aweinspiring experience. (E) At the White House ceremony, she thanked the President for an awe-inspiring experience and then challenged him to make education more important. 37. Which of the following should be added to the beginning of sentence 5 to provide a transition from the first to the second paragraph? (A) (B) (C) (D) After winning this significant award, On the other hand, Still, she wasn't finished with him yet; She believed it is important for African Americans to teach, (E) It was her dream to win this award,

·36-

I GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE;

5

5

5

5

5

38. Which is the best version of sentence 6 (reproduced below) ? Directing a teacher training program, fifty-five students are supervised by her every year. (A) (As it is now) (B) Directing a teacher training program, there she supervises fifty-five students every year. (C) Fifty-five students in a teacher training program are being supervised by her every year. (D) As director of a teacher training program, she supervises fifty-five students every year. (E) Every year fifty-five students in her teacher training program, which she directs, are supervised.

39. Which of the following is the best way to revise and combine sentences 10 and 11 (reproduced below) ? Not many student teachers get to tutor children in different grades. Or take them to the lunchroom. (A) Not many student teachers get to tutor children in different grades while they take them to the lunchroom. (B) Not many student teachers tutor children in different grades; or take them to the lunchroom. (C) Not many student teachers get to tutor children in different grades or take them to the lunchroom. (D) Student teachers wanting to tutor children in different grades and to take them to the lunchroom. (E) Taking children to the lunchroom or tutoring them when they are in different grades is worthwhile experiences for student teachers.

STOP
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test.

-37-

NO TEST MATERIAL ON THIS PAGE

....

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful