Wednesday, April 25, 2012

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

Lady ’Cats get 2nd win of season
over Big Green, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-8
Business 9
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World News 12
Index
Mostly cloudy
Thursday
turning
partly cloudy
with high
in mid 60s.
www.delphosherald.com
Real Fruit
Smoothie
APRIL 23
rd
thru 28
th
$
1 SMALL
Only at the Delphos McDonald’s.
No coupon necessary.
Stacy Taff photo
Kindergartners explore the world of dinosaurs
Amber Pohlman’s kindergartners at Franklin Elementary School presented their
dinosaur reports Tuesday afternoon. Each student was given a specific dinosaur to
research and then was paired with a second-grade partner. Above: Kindergartner
Avery Rahrig gives her report on the Iguanodon while Nolan Kunkleman holds her
project.
Romney turns
campaign
toward money,
reconciliation
By STEVE PEOPLES
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Republican presidential
nomination all but in hand,
Mitt Romney is refocusing
his efforts on challenging
President Barack Obama,
raising cash for
the battle ahead
and reconciling
with onetime pri-
mary rival Rick
Santorum.
“Tonight is the
start of a new cam-
paign,” the former
Massachusetts gov-
ernor said Tuesday
night as he cel-
ebrated a sweep
of five primaries.
He blasted Obama as a man
whose time in office has been
marked by “false promises
and weak leadership” in a
time of economic struggle.
The contests were the
first since Santorum conced-
ed the race, and the former
Pennsylvania senator said
he intends to sit down with
Romney’s representatives
today and Romney himself in
the next week or two.
“Mitt Romney is going to
be the nominee,” Santorum
told CNN, “and I’m going to
support the nominee.”
While Santorum’s specific
timeline is unclear, Romney
will privately intensify fund-
raising efforts today and
Thursday to prepare for what
may be the most expensive
presidential contest in the his-
tory of American politics. He
exuded confidence Tuesday
night, but he’s facing a 10-to-
1 cash disadvantage in a gen-
eral election matchup against
the Democratic president.
The presumpt i ve
Republican nominee has at
least six closed-door fund-
raising events in two days in
New York and New Jersey.
They may be among his final
private meetings with donors,
according to campaign offi-
cials who confirmed that
Romney would begin to
open some finance events to
reporters as early
as next week. The
officials requested
anonymity to dis-
cuss internal deci-
sions.
Lifting the cur-
tain on what has
been a private pro-
cess for months
would come less
than 10 days after
reporters outside
a Palm Beach, Fla.,
fundraising event overheard
Romney sharing previously
undisclosed details about his
tax plan. The episode was an
embarrassment for Romney,
who has been facing grow-
ing calls for transparency in
his role as the GOP’s likely
candidate.
While the ground rules
have yet to be finalized,
one campaign official said
Romney would probably
begin inviting a small group
of reporters into larger fund-
raising events — particularly
those in which the candidate
offers remarks — in the com-
ing week. That’s largely the
same policy Obama follows.
While Romney essen-
tially declared the begin-
ning of the general election
Tuesday night, he has been
free to focus on Obama since
Santorum suspended his cam-
paign two weeks ago. That
ended a nasty primary battle
that took a heavy financial
toll and prevented Romney
Romney
Welsh society
sets Ladies Tea
The Welsh Society of
Northwest Ohio in Gomer
will hold its annual Ladies
Tea at 2 p.m. on May 6 in
the Gomer United Church
of Christ Fellowship Hall.
Send reservations with
$7 per person to Linda
Wittington, 2000 W. Lincoln
Hwy., Elida OH 45807 or
call 419-642-5911. Deadline
for reservations is Tuesday.
Ladies of all ages are
welcome. Membership in
the society is not required.
Attendees should bring
their own tea cup.
Delphos Youth Soccer
registrations
Registrations for the
2012 fall soccer season
for children age 5-11 and
junior high school are 9
a.m. to noon Saturday
and 1-4 p.m. Sunday at
the Delphos McDonalds
on Elida Avenue.
Forms can be down-
loaded on the Delphos
Soccer Association’s web
page at: www.delphosohsoc-
cer.com or on Facebook.
St. John’s game resched-
uled
The St. John’s at Versailles
baseball game scheduled for
Tuesday was rescheduled for
Thursday (5 p.m.) due to
lack of umpires.
TODAY
Baseball (5 p.m.):
Crestview at Van Wert,
4:30 p.m.; Jefferson at
Fort Jennings; Ottoville
at Wayne Trace; USV
at Lincolnview.
Softball (5 p.m.):
USV at Lincolnview;
Bath at Crestview.
Tennis: LCC at
Elida, 4:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Baseball (5 p.m.):
Jefferson at Columbus
Grove (NWC); St. John’s
at Versailles (MAC - ppd.
from Tuesday); Continental
at Ottoville (PCL);
Paulding at Spencerville
(NWC); Lincolnview
at Allen East (NWC);
Cory-Rawson at Kalida;
Crestview at Ada (NWC).
Softball (5 p.m.):
Jefferson at Columbus
Grove (NWC); Van Wert
at Ottoville; Paulding
at Spencerville (NWC);
Lincolnview at Allen East
(NWC); Findlay at Elida;
Kalida at Leipsic (PCL);
Crestview at Ada (NWC).
Track and Field:
Jefferson at USV
Invitational, 4:15 p.m.;
Fort Jennings, New
Knoxville and Minster
at Parkway, 4:30 p.m.
Tennis: Elida at
Findlay, 4:30 p.m.
Line, Klaus local MADD ‘top cops’
Mothers Against Drunk
Driving (MADD) of Allen,
Hardin and Putnam Counties
recognized local law enforce-
ment officers at the annual
Top Cop Banquet on Monday
at Dick’s Steak House in
Kalida.
MADD appreciates the
efforts of officers who under-
stand the importance of mak-
ing area roadways safer by
enforcing drunk driving laws.
Therefore, the “top cops”
from each law enforcement
agency in Allen and Putnam
counties were recognized at
this annual event.
Officers Brandon Line and
Kevin Klaus were honored
as the top officers from the
Delphos Police Department.
Line has been an officer for
five years and he had six
OVI arrests in 2011. Klaus
has served as an officer for
11 years and had five OVI
arrests.
Topping the list was Allen
County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Nathan Music with
six years of service and 24
OVI arrests in 2011.
Officers were MADD’s
honored guests for dinner and
were recognized individually
for their efforts toward mak-
ing Allen and Putnam coun-
ties safer places to live.
MADD celebrates the
importance of the task per-
formed by these local heroes.
Line Klaus
See ROMNEY, page 3
Otter accidentally trapped along Auglaize donated to historical society
By CHARLIE
WARNIMONT
Sentinel Sports Editor
KALIDA — An unexpect-
ed find by a Putnam County
trapper will have a permanent
home in the county.
Monday evening, the
Putnam County Historical
Society was given a rare river
otter Ryan Brinkman caught
in western Putnam County
in December. Since local
residents are not allowed to
trap river otters, it was sug-
gested the accidental find be
presented to the Historical
Society so everyone would
have a chance to view the
otter.
Brinkman found the otter
in one of his traps along
the Auglaize River after
December flood waters
receded but it had drowned.
The animal was trapped
under water for three or
four days before Brinkman
could get back to his traps.
Had it not flooded, it might
have survived because it was
caught near its back hips by
the snare trap and could have
been released.
Surprised by what was in
his trap, Brinkman imme-
diately knew what he had
and called wildlife officers
with the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources to report
his catch. River otters have
not been seen in Putnam
County in 100 years.
“I was shocked,”
Brinkman said of his find.
“It was not expected but I
knew what I had. They have
not been in the county in
100 years. Since we do not
have a trapping season here
for river otters, I called the
game warden and told them
what I had and they came
and got it.”
Game Warden Jason
Porinchok took the animal
back to ODNR headquarters,
where it was studied to deter-
mine age and gender; it was
an adult male.
Because otter posses-
sion is illegal, a sugges-
tion was made that it be
displayed at the Putnam
County Historical Museum
in Kalida. The idea went
all the way to ODNR
Headquarters in Columbus
and was approved.
Meanwhile, Brinkman
approached members of the
Kalida Fish and Game Club
about them donating money
to help have the otter pre-
served so it could be shown.
The Kalida Fish and Game
approved the idea and along
with Steve’s Taxidermy,
partnered to share the
expenses of mounting the
otter.
Steve Burgei researched
the river otter’s natural habi-
tat on the internet to make the
display, since he had never
seen one.
Porinchok said river otters
weight between 11-33 pounds
and grow to around 36 inch-
es, though this otter was 43
inches in length.
Since river otters are
not widely-seen in Putnam
County, Brinkman speculates
this one may have made its
way here from Indiana via the
Maumee River to reach the
Auglaize River. He may not
have been alone. Brinkman
said he was along the river
recently and spotted another
set of tracks. Otters pick a
mate and spend their lives
together.
The Historical Museum
is open from 1 to 4 p.m.
Sundays and 9 a.m. to noon
on Wednesdays.
On hand to present a river otter to the Putnam County Historical Society Monday were, from left, trapper Ryan
Brinkman, Kalida Fish and Game Club President Mike Gerding, taxidermist Steve Burgei, Wildlife Officer Jason
Porinchok and Putnam County Historical Society members Janis Lentz and Donna Burgei.
Charlie Warnimont photo
2
ln 2009, the 0hlc Department cf Develcpment deslgnated M^CNLT as the ¨gc tc¨
Ldlscn Teohnclcgy Center servlng the mctcr vehlole and parts manufaoturlng
lndustry statewlde. M^CNLT lccks fcrward tc prcvldlng lts prcven ocnsultlng
expertlse tc that lndustry segment thrcughcut 0hlc whlle ocntlnulng tc serve the
ent|re manufaoturlng ocmmunlty ln Ncrthern 0hlc wlth prcgrams and aotlvltles
deslgned tc lnorease ycur grcwth and lmprcve ycur prcfltablllty.
Mak|ng Manufactur|ng Innevat|ve and Preduct|ve
Ccnslstently suooessful manufaoturers kncw that tcp llne grcwth and greater
prcfltablllty are pcsslble by lnoreaslng prcduotlvlty and maklng enterprlsewlde
lnncvatlcn a hlgh prlcrlty ln thelr ocmpanles.
M^CNLT`s experlenoed lndustry prcfesslcnals have prcven expertlse oapable
cf asslstlng manufaoturers cf all slzes and segments ln thelr effcrts tc aohleve
greater grcwth and prcfltablllty.
we speolallze and are ncted fcr belng able tc oustcmlze prcgrams whloh meet
the unlque needs cf eaoh ollent whc ocmes tc M^CNLT fcr help.
Hcw dc we measure suooess and what oan ycu expeot frcm wcrklng wlth
M^CNLT ocnsultants?
A 66-te-1 Return en Investment
0ur ollents repcrt that fcr every dcllar they spend wlth M^CNLT, they reoelve baok
an average cf 556 thrcugh sales grcwth and/cr ocst savlngs! M^CNLT cffers
manufaoturlng help ln these areas:
MA6N£1-An £d|sen 1echne|egy Center
M^CNLT, deslgnated by the 0hlc Department cf Develcpment
as cne cf the state`s seven Ldlscn Teohnclcgy Centers, ls alsc
the Thlrd Frcntler Center cf Lxoellenoe ln lrcduot lnncvatlcn.
M^CNLT fcouses lts Ldlscn Teohnclcgy Center aotlvltles
cn a varlety cf prcduot and prcoess lnncvatlcn and ocmmerolallzatlcn servloes tc bcth
establlshed and earlystage teohnclcgy based buslnesses.
M^CNLT has partnered wlth the 0hlc State Unlverslty Center fcr ^utcmctlve
Researoh (C^R) tc generate lnoreased grcwth and prcfltablllty fcr that lndustry
thrcughcut 0hlc. Bcth crganlzatlcns are aotlve partlolpants ln the 0hlc ^utcmctlve
lndustry Ccunoll establlshed ln 2009.
MA6N£1-An M£P 5erv|ce Prev|der
M^CNLT ls a prcvlder cf Manufaoturlng Lxtenslcn lartnershlp (MLl)
servloes thrcugh the Natlcnal lnstltute cf Standards and Teohnclcgy (NlST), an agenoy
cf the Unlted States Department cf Ccmmeroe.
MLl ls a natlcnal netwcrk cf speolallsts whc understand the needs cf manufaoturers.
Thrcugh MLl, manufaoturers oan aooess publlo and prlvate rescuroes that enhanoe
grcwth, lmprcve prcduotlvlty and expand oapaolty.
MAPK 5UPAPB0NLAU I5 MAUNL1'5
5LNI0P BU5INL55 U0N5UL1AN1
I0P N0P1PWL51 0PI0
Soharbcneau has mcre than 20 years experlenoe
ln prcjeot management, prcduot englneerlng,
glcbal sales and buslness develcpment wcrklng
wlth ocmpanles suoh as ShellerClcbe, Fcrd,
Tcycta, and Nlssan.
WWW.MAUNL1W0PK.0PU
Fer mere lnfermatlen abeut MAGN£1, centact Mark 5charbeneau
at 419.595.0002 er mark.scharbeneau©magnetwerk.erg
Prcf|tab|||ty Imprcvement
Lean/Slx Slgma Transfcrmatlcn
Çuallty Systems & lrcblem Resclutlcn
Lean lrcduot Develcpment
wcrkfcroe and 0rganlzatlcnal Develcpment
Supply Chaln 0ptlmlzatlcn
Faolllty Laycut & Deslgn
lnventcry lrcduotlvlty ^nalysls
Bus|ness 0rcwth
Crcwth llannlng
Market Dlverslfloatlcn
lDL^ Lnglneerlng
lrcduot Deslgn, Lnglneerlng,
Develcpment and Launoh
Sustalnable Manufaoturlng
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Elizabeth
Vorst.
Congratulations
Elizabeth!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Jessica
Pimpas.
Congratulations
Jessica!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 236
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Corn: $6.18
Wheat: $6.24
Beans: $13.39
Lester Willis
“Pinky” Seibert
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Cloudy.
Showers and thunderstorms
likely in the evening. Then
chance of showers and
thunderstorms overnight.
Lows in the lower 50s. East
winds around 10 mph. Chance
of precipitation 70 percent.
THURSDAY: Mostly
cloudy with a 20 percent
chance of showers in the
morning. Then partly cloudy
in the afternoon. Highs in the
mid 60s. Northwest winds 5
to 15 mph becoming 15 to 20
mph in the afternoon.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Colder. Lows in
the upper 30s. North winds 5
to 15 mph.
FRIDAY: Partly cloudy.
Cooler. Highs in the mid 50s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were drawn
Tuesday:
Mega Millions: 03-09-15-37-
38, Mega Ball: 39
Estimated jackpot: $76 mil-
lion
Megaplier: 4
Pick 3 Midday: 7-0-7
Pick 4 Midday: 2-9-4-6
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $173 mil-
lion
Rolling Cash 5
12-20-29-31-35
Estimated jackpot: $130,000
Ten OH Evening
03-20-23-30-31-44-47-48-
50-51-55-56-58-63-64-67-68-
70-72-80
March 16, 1928-
April 22, 2012
Lester Willis “Pinky”
Seibert, 84, died at 6:05 p.m.
Sunday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center, with his daughters by
his side.
He was born March 16,
1928, on the family farm in
Auglaize County to John and
Doris (Mack) Seibert, who
preceded him in death.
On Sept. 17, 1949, he mar-
ried Rose Marie Prine, who
died Jan. 14, 2005.
Services will begin at
10:30 a.m. Friday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
Pastor Tom Shobe officiating.
Burial will be in New Salem
Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-4
and 6-8 p.m. Thursday and
one hour prior to services
Friday at the funeral home.
Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
Spencerville EMS.
Nov. 1, 1922-April 22, 2012
Julie Veronica Hemker,
89, of Ottoville died at 9:40
p.m. Sunday at St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
She was born November 1,
1922, in Ottoville to Joseph
and Anna (Beining) Hoersten,
who preceded her in death.
On Aug. 19, 1944, she mar-
ried Hubert “Bud” Hemker,
who died Aug. 10, 1993.
She is survived by a daugh-
ter, Ginni (Larry) Sroufe of
Cloverdale; four sons, Ronald
(Anne) Hemker and Richard
(Janet) Hemker of Ottoville,
Gary (Cathy) Hemker of
Delphos and Randy (Carol)
Hemker of Louisville, Ky.;
a sister, Clarann (Herb)
Gerdeman of Delphos; two
sisters-in-law, Rita Hoersten
of Ottoville and Mary Ellen
(Tom) Deffenbaugh of
Delphos; and a brother-in-
law, Bill Hemker of Delphos.
She was blessed with 18
grandchildren, Darren (Janet)
Sroufe of Boonville, Ind.,
Craig (Katrina) Sroufe of
Delphos, Nichole (Judd)
Spencer of Cloverdale,
Gwenn Spencer of Cloverdale,
Brian (Cheryl) Hemker of
Marysville, Michelle (Ron)
Jaross of Bedminster, N.J.,
Sarah Hemker of Columbus,
Joshua Hemker of Ashland,
Terri (Keith) VonLehmden
of Liberty Township,
Dawn (Eric) Schnipke of
Ottoville, Kimberley (Matt)
Wannemacher and Christina
Hemker of Ottoville, Matt
(Sarah) Hemker of Landeck,
Doug (Tricia) Hemker and
Julie (Scott) Horstman of
Columbus, Ryan (Katie Grove)
Hemker of Chicago, Lauren
Hemker of Bloomington,
Ind., and Lexi Hemker of
Louisville, Ky. She was also
a great-grandmother to 23
great-grandchildren, with one
on the way.
She was also preceded in
death by six brothers, Felix,
Lawrence, Vincent, Anthony,
Hugo and Clarence Hoersten;
four sisters, Mathilda Herman,
Elizabeth Wegesin, Barbara
Schneider and Victoria
Luersman; and two great-
grandchildren, Aiden and
Jayce Wannemacher.
Mrs. Hemker was a mem-
ber of Ottoville Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church
and their Altar Rosary
Society. She loved spending
time with her family, baking
cookies, praying the rosary,
and working in her flower
gardens.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10:30 a.m. Friday
at Ottoville Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church,
the Rev. John Stites officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Ottoville.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. on Thursday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, where
there will be a scripture ser-
vice at 2 p.m.
Memorials may be made
to St. Mary’s Cemetery Fund,
for masses or to a charity of
the donor’s choice.
Condolences can be
expressed at: www.lovefu-
neralhome.com.
Julie Veronica
Hemker
Oct. 14, 1924
April 22, 2012
Eugene H.
Wrasman, 87, of
Tennessee and
formerly of Delphos, died
Sunday at his residence.
He was born Oct. 14, 1924,
in Delphos to Edward and
Elizabeth (Klima) Wrasman,
who preceded him in death.
In 1947, he married Anna
Strouth, who died in 1981. In
1986, he then married Margaret
Reynolds, who died in 2003.
Survivors include sons
Gene (Judy) Wrasman,
Bill (Deborah) Wrasman,
Don (Denise) Wrasman and
Bernard (Becky) Wrasman;
daughter Beth (Benny) Bailey;
sisters Irma (Tom) Buettner,
Mary Lou (Bill) Browning,
Alice (Gene) Rayman, Marg
(Charlie) Ashby, Sister Mary
Gail (Dorothy) Wrasman, SND
and Jane (Ron) Goergens;
sisters-in-law Mary and Barb
Wrasman; and grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
He was also preceded in
death by his daughter, Ruth
Harrison; and brothers, Ralph,
Dick and Melvin Wrasman.
Mr. Wrasman was a World
War II veteran of the United
States Navy who served in the
Pacific. He graduated from St.
John’s High School and was a
member of St. Theresa Catholic
Church in Clinton, Tenn.
Mass of Christian Burial
begins at 10 a.m. Saturday at
St. Theresa Catholic Church.
Burial will follow in Sunset
Cemetery in Clinton.
Friends may call from 4-8
p.m. Friday at Holley-Gamble
Funeral Home in Clinton,
Tenn.
Preferred memorials are to
the Sisters of Notre Dame.
Eugene H. Wrasman
July 30, 1925-April 24, 2012
Laurietta M. Kohorst, 86,
of Delphos, died at 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
She was born July 30,
1925, in Van Wert County
to Nathaniel and Eva Nora
(Syler) Diltz, who preceded
her in death.
On April 27, 1942, she
married Harold Kohorst, who
died on Aug. 2, 1997.
Survivors include sons
Gerald (Inice) Kohorst
of Mendon and Tommy
(Barbara) Kohorst of Delphos;
daughters Bonnie (James)
Fuerst of Columbus Grove
and Cora (Rodger) Saum of
Delphos; sisters-in-law Marge
and Dorothy Kohorst, Ruth
Kemper, Ethel Bridgemen and
Dorothy Diltz-Kohler; and 11
grandchildren and 26 great-
grandchildren.
She was also preceded in
death by her brothers, Russell,
Ira, Gerald and Ellis Diltz;
sisters Blanch Bowers, Eunice
Good, Mary Esther Diltz,
Beulah Morris, Velma and
Luella Teman, Anna Belle
Claypool and Irma Martin;
and a grandson.
Mrs. Kohorst was a house-
wife who attended Delphos
Wesleyan Church.
Funeral service begins at
11 a.m. Saturday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home,
the Rev. David Howell offi-
ciating. Burial will follow in
Walnut Grove Cemetery.
Friends may call Friday
from 2-8 and for an hour prior
to the service at the funeral
home.
Memorials are to Delphos
Wesleyan Church.
Laurietta M.
Kohorst
The high temperature
Tuesday in Delphos was 63
and the low was 38. A year
ago today, the high was 63
and the low was 50. The
record high for today is 86,
set in 1994 and the record low
of 24 was set in 1967.
Delphos Weather
1
v
OH Lic #24196
Offers expire 6/15/2012. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox
®
products.
**See dealer for details or visit Lennox.com. ©2012 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating
Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses.
TRUSTED SERVICE TRUSTED SERVICE
TRUSTED PRODUCT TRUSTED PRODUCT
18 Months, No Interest,
Equal Monthly Payments**
through GE Capital
OR
Columbus;Reliable Plbg & Htg;A00238;3x6
205 West Second St.
Delphos, OH 45833
www.reliablePandH.com
Reliable Plumbing & Heating. Our name says it all.
Receive up to $1,375 in Rebates
*
on a qualifying Lennox
®
Home Comfort System
Dealer-12Sp-3x6-b1.indd 13 2/25/12 9:29 AM
Best One Tire & Service of Delphos
Corner of 5th & Main Sts. • Delphos
(419) 695-1060
Quick, Easy,
Extended Financing
Available!
Take home...
BBQ BEEF
for quick meals, sandwiches...
Only
$
3
00
Lb.
Available anytime
SHREDDED CHICKEN...
$
3.00 lb.
Balyeat’s Coffee Shop
133 E. Main St. Van Wert Ph. 419-238-1580
Closed Mondays
SPRING SAVING
SPECTACULAR
APRIL 2012
Pat
Williams
6 years -
still missing you
Love you forever,
Angel
HOLLAND GRILL DEMO DAY
Saturday, April 28 ... 10-2
out back in Garden Center
LIFETIME GUARANTEE ON STAINLESS STEEL
COOKING GRID AND CAST IRON BURNER.
GUARANTEED TO NEVER FLARE UP.
SIMPLY CLOSE LID AND COOK BY TIME.
SPECIAL
SPECIAL
PRICE!
on
HERITAGE
242 North Main St. Ph. 419-692-0921
Open evenings til 6:30; Sat. til 5
Delphos Hardware
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD ON THESE GRILLS
DEMO SPECIAL - WITH PURCHASE OF A
HOLLAND GRILL – FREE SET-UP, DELIVERY, TANK OF
LP GAS EXCHANGE AND THERMOMETER (over $100 value package)
Heritage
Epic
Wrangler
Maverick
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
COLUMBUS — Ohio
hunters harvested a prelimi-
nary total of 2,227 bearded
wild turkeys on the first day
of the spring turkey-hunting
season, which is open state-
wide through May 20, accord-
ing to the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources’ (ODNR)
Division of Wildlife. In 2011,
a preliminary total of 2,646
wild turkeys were killed on
opening day.
Top counties for wild tur-
keys killed on Monday were:
Ashtabula-93, Coshocton-79,
T u s c a r a w a s - 7 8 ,
M u s k i n g u m - 7 4 ,
Guernsey-69, Adams-62,
Highland-57, Knox-56,
Brown-55 and Clermont-54.
The Division of Wildlife
estimates that more than
70,000 people will hunt tur-
keys during the four-week
season. Legal hunting hours
are one-half hour before sun-
rise until noon from April 23
to May 6. Hunting hours May
7-20 will be a half hour before
sunrise to sunset. Ohio’s wild
turkey population was esti-
mated at 180,000 prior to the
start of the spring season.
Only bearded wild tur-
keys may be taken during
the spring hunting season. A
hunter is required to check in
their turkey by 11:30 p.m. on
the day of harvest. Hunters
with the proper permits may
take a limit of two bearded
gobblers during the four-week
season, but not more than one
wild turkey per day.
Hunters must report their
turkey harvest, but they are
no longer required to take
their turkey to a check sta-
tion for physical inspection.
Instead, hunters have three
options to complete the new
automated game check:
— Online at wildohio.com
or ohiogamecheck.com;
— By telephone at
877-TAG-ITOH (877-824-
4864). This option is only
available to those who are
required to have a turkey per-
mit to hunt turkeys; and
— At all license agents.
A list of these agents can be
found at wildohio.com.
Game-check transactions
will be available online and
by telephone seven days a
week including holidays.
License agents’ locations
will be available for turkey
check-in during normal busi-
ness hours. Hunters can call
the license agent for specific
hours of operation. All tur-
keys must be checked in by
11:30 p.m. the day of kill.
Here is a list of preliminary wild
turkey harvest results for the 2012
and (2011) spring season open-
ing day.
Adams: 62 (88); Allen: 4 (7);
Ashland: 22 (24); Ashtabula: 93
(70); Athens: 41 (69); Auglaize: 5
(4); Belmont: 38 (73); Brown: 55
(71); Butler: 27 (30); Carroll: 38
(41); Champaign: 9 (14); Clark:
2 (4); Clermont: 54 (54); Clinton:
10 (9); Columbiana: 41 (56);
Coshocton: 79 (79); Crawford: 10
(15); Cuyahoga: 0 (1); Darke: 4
(3); Defiance: 22 (19); Delaware:
16 (20); Erie: 7 (8); Fairfield: 11
(21); Fayette: 0 (0); Franklin: 6
(4); Fulton: 12 (9); Gallia: 35 (64);
Geauga: 34 (42); Greene: 1 (6);
Guernsey: 69 (94); Hamilton: 13
(30); Hancock: 3 (5); Hardin: 11
(8); Harrison: 50 (67); Henry: 5
(4); Highland: 57 (59); Hocking: 41
(44); Holmes: 41 (30); Huron: 16
(31); Jackson: 49 (43); Jefferson:
32 (62); Knox: 56 (79); Lake: 14
(11); Lawrence: 14 (29); Licking:
52 (67); Logan: 26 (24); Lorain:
22 (15); Lucas: 9 (3); Madison: 0
(0); Mahoning: 21 (24); Marion:
7 (4); Medina: 7 (11); Meigs: 45
(69); Mercer: 2 (3); Miami: 2 (5);
Monroe: 43 (55); Montgomery: 1
(1); Morgan: 37 (54); Morrow: 29
(31); Muskingum: 74 (81); Noble:
43 (31); Ottawa: 2 (0); Paulding:
10 (7); Perry: 37 (38); Pickaway:
6 (4); Pike: 48 (46); Portage: 32
(29); Preble: 16 (10); Putnam: 8
(3); Richland: 50 (53); Ross: 46
(58); Sandusky: 1 (3); Scioto: 33
(36); Seneca: 17 (22); Shelby: 5
(6); Stark: 24 (27); Summit: 1 (4);
Trumbull: 41 (47); Tuscarawas: 78
(85); Union: 5 (7); Van Wert: 0 (3);
Vinton: 32 (33); Warren: 15 (17);
Washington: 35 (72); Wayne: 7
(15); Williams: 33 (24); Wood: 3
(4); Wyandot: 13 (14). Total: 2,227
(2,646).
Ashtabula youth also lead state
with 73 wild turkeys checked dur-
ing the annual youth spring turkey
season held Saturday and Sunday.
Hunters age 17 and under har-
vested 1,632 wild turkeys during the
special two-day season, compared
to 1,490 wild turkeys last year.
Counties reporting the greatest
number of wild turkeys checked
were Ashtabula-73, Muskingum-60,
Tuscarawas-53, Carroll and
Monroe-49, Highland-48,
Washington-46, Jackson-42,
Harrison-41 and Knox and
Trumbull-39.
All participants were required
to possess a valid Ohio youth hunt-
ing license and youth spring turkey
permit, as well as be accompanied
by a non-hunting adult 18 years of
age or older. The young hunters’
turkey season was open statewide
with the exception of Lake La Su
An State Wildlife Area in Williams
County, which required a special
hunting permit.
Details on youth hunting oppor-
tunities and hunting seasons can
be found in the 2011-2012 Ohio
Hunting Regulations, available
where licenses are sold. It can also
be viewed online at wildohio.com.
A list of wild turkeys checked
by young hunters during the 2012
two-day youth spring turkey sea-
son follows. Numbers for 2011 are
listed in parentheses.
Adams: 30 (38); Allen: 7 (5);
Ashland: 22 (23); Ashtabula: 73
(49); Athens: 23 (22); Auglaize: 2
(6); Belmont: 30 (26); Brown: 34
(49); Butler: 21 (18); Carroll: 49
(43); Champaign: 7 (9); Clark: 3 (0);
Clermont: 24 (35); Clinton: 10 (6);
Columbiana: 38 (26); Coshocton:
29 (28); Crawford: 9 (4); Cuyahoga:
0 (0); Darke: 11 (17); Defiance:
22 (23); Delaware: 12 (8); Erie:
6 (2); Fairfield: 9 (7); Fayette: 0
(1); Franklin: 1 (1); Fulton: 13
(8); Gallia: 36 (25); Geauga: 20
(15); Greene: 2 (1); Guernsey: 31
(37); Hamilton: 4 (10); Hancock:
1 (2); Hardin: 6 (7); Harrison: 41
(28); Henry: 0 (2); Highland: 48
(47); Hocking: 24 (28); Holmes:
23 (27); Huron: 23 (18); Jackson:
42 (40); Jefferson: 28 (25); Knox:
39 (37); Lake: 5 (2); Lawrence:
21 (19); Licking: 31 (46); Logan:
9 (18); Lorain: 11 (11); Lucas:
5 (3); Madison: 0 (0); Mahoning:
23 (9); Marion: 4 (3); Medina: 11
(7); Meigs: 36 (35); Mercer: 4 (2);
Miami: 1 (2); Monroe: 49 (35);
Montgomery: 1 (0); Morgan: 34
(34); Morrow: 23 (19); Muskingum:
60 (47); Noble: 37 (34); Ottawa:
0 (0); Paulding: 14 (6); Perry: 25
(20); Pickaway: 3 (1); Pike: 14
(15); Portage: 21 (20); Preble: 6
(2); Putnam: 6 (6); Richland: 31
(30); Ross: 18 (21); Sandusky: 2
(1); Scioto: 16 (16); Seneca: 18
(14); Shelby: 4 (9); Stark: 17 (14);
Summit: 2 (0); Trumbull: 39 (32);
Tuscarawas: 53 (47); Union: 2 (0);
Van Wert: 3 (2); Vinton: 26 (20);
Warren: 6 (9); Washington: 46 (39);
Wayne: 13 (6); Williams: 22 (20);
Wood: 1 (3); Wyandot: 6 (8). Total:
1,632 (1,490).
Ashtabula County leads turkey harvest on opening day
Romney
(Continued from page 1)
from stockpiling cash to use
against his Democratic oppo-
nent.
Largely an afterthought
in the Republican contest,
former House speaker Newt
Gingrich vowed to keep cam-
paigning in North Carolina
through the week.
“Over the next few days,
we are going to look realis-
tically at where we’re at,”
Gingrich told supporters
Tuesday night in Concord,
N.C.
Gingrich and Santorum
have aggressively questioned
Romney’s conservative cre-
dentials in recent months.
Santorum said last month
that Romney is the worst
candidate to face Obama.
But Tuesday night, asked on
CNN if Romney was “the
right guy” to represent the
Republican Party, Santorum
said he was.
But Romney’s success
will depend, at least in part,
on his ability to compete with
Obama’s bank account.
Romney’s campaign had
only about $10 million in the
bank at the end of March,
according to federal filings.
All told, Obama reported
more than $104 million in
his account, having already
spent nearly $90 million on
the general election. Election
Day is Nov. 6.
Romney was eager to
turn the political page after
Tuesday’s primary wins in
New York, Pennsylvania,
Connecticut, Rhode Island
and Delaware.
“After 43 primaries and
caucuses, many long days
and not a few long nights,
I can say with confidence
— and gratitude — that you
have given me a great honor
and solemn responsibility,”
he told supporters gathered in
New Hampshire. He urged all
who are struggling in a shaky
economy to “hold on a little
longer — a better America
begins tonight.”
Obama set the modern
fundraising record in 2008,
when he and his Republican
rival, Sen. John McCain,
spent more than $1 billion
combined — with Obama
spending more than $730 mil-
lion. In 2004, the two major-
party candidates set a record
of $700 million.
Obama opened his finance
events to press coverage
in June 2008, shortly after
becoming his party’s pre-
sumptive nominee. As presi-
dent, he largely plays by
the same rules. If he makes
remarks during the event
— no matter how big or
small — the press is allowed
in.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney addressed the
policy last week with report-
ers.
“We open fundraising
remarks on a regular basis. If
he’s not making remarks and
he’s just visiting with folks,
then they tend to be closed
press,” Carney said.
The Romney campaign
has refused to provide the
specific times and locations
of this week’s fundraising
events.
Fossil find
in Kentucky
stumps experts
DAYTON (AP) — Experts
are trying to figure out what
a fossil dubbed “Godzillus”
used to be.
The 150-pound fossil
recovered last year in north-
ern Kentucky is more than 6
feet long and 3 feet wide. The
Dayton Daily News reports
scientists at a Geological
Society of America meet-
ing viewed it Tuesday at the
Dayton Convention Center in
Ohio.
Scientists say the fos-
sil is 450 million years old.
University of Cincinnati
geologist Carl Brett told
The Cincinnati Enquirer that
it’s the largest fossil ever
extracted from that era in the
Cincinnati region, once cov-
ered by water.
Amateur paleontologist
Ron Fine of Dayton spotted
the fossil on a hillside last
year. He gave it a “primordial
beast” name, but said it could
be an early form of seaweed
or kelp.
“Hang On Sloopy” is the official state rock song of Ohio.
“I think it is all a matter of love: the more you love a memory, the stronger and
stranger it is.” — Vladimir Nabokov, Russian-born author (1899-1977)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Republicans controlling the
House are opting for the
politically safe route as they
follow up their tightfisted,
tea party-driven budget with
less controversial steps to cut
spending.
Instead of big reductions
in Medicaid and Medicare,
top GOP lawmakers are stick-
ing mostly with familiar pro-
posals like cutting money for
President Barack Obama’s
health care overhaul and fed-
eral employee pensions while
reaching out to Democrats
to help pass annual spending
bills.
At issue is follow-up
legislation to the sweeping
budget document that passed
the House last month. Under
Congress’ arcane budget pro-
cess, it’s simply a nonbinding
blueprint that sets the terms
for follow-up legislation.
The broader GOP plan, by
Budget Committee Chairman
Paul Ryan, R-Wis., also calls
for cutting day-to-day oper-
ating budgets for domestic
agencies $19 billion below
last summer’s bipartisan bud-
get and debt deal.
Republicans strongly
backed the Ryan plan last
month as a first step in tack-
ling out of control deficits.
It’s also a campaign docu-
ment that casts in stark relief
the differences between
Republicans and Democrats
on spending and deficits with
an election little more than
six months away.
But steps to actually try to
pass the full Ryan budget into
law aren’t happening; with
Obama in the White House
and Democrat controlling the
Senate, any attempt to follow
up the Ryan plan with binding
legislation is doomed to fail.
So GOP leaders like Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio,
appear to have decided that
there’s no sense in making
GOP lawmakers walk the
plank and cast numerous
politically dangerous votes
on issues like Medicare.
What the Republicans are
doing now is hardly unusu-
al. Democrats in the Senate
aren’t pressing ahead at all on
the budget, fearful of politi-
cally risky votes.
But the differences
between the Ryan budget and
the follow-up legislation are
dramatic nonetheless. First
up is legislation to cut $261
billion from benefit programs
over the coming decade. The
budgets for such programs are
generally on autopilot, deter-
mined by eligibility criteria
instead of by annual spending
bills. The cuts pale compared
to the $5 trillion in spending
the GOP budgets proposes to
whack from Obama’s propos-
als over the same period.
To be sure, some of
today’s cuts are controversial.
There’s $36 billion in cuts to
food stamps over a decade,
and an effort to eliminate the
Social Services Block Grant
program, which helps fund a
wide variety of programs like
child care, adoption assistance
and help for the disabled.
And Republicans are trying
to ease Medicaid “mainte-
nance of effort” regulations
that would allow states to
drop hundreds of thousands
of people from the program.
Such cuts have Democrats
howling. They see a pattern
of cutting programs for the
poor to beef up the Pentagon.
The New York Times edito-
rial page weighed in Tuesday
with an editorial assaulting
Republicans for such “callous
choices.”
The Ryan budget, how-
ever, would cut far more
deeply, proposing to turn
Medicaid and food stamps
into programs that would be
delivered to states as a block
grant, steps that would cost
millions of poor people health
care and food assistance. It
also calls for transforming
Medicare from a program in
By SAM HANANEL
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — In a
first-of-its-kind ruling, the
agency that enforces the
nation’s job discrimination
laws has ruled that transgen-
der people are protected from
bias in the workplace.
The decision late last week
from the Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission said
that a refusal to hire or other-
wise discriminate on the basis
of gender identity is by defini-
tion sex discrimination under
federal law.
While some federal courts
have reached the same con-
clusion in recent years,
employment law experts say
the EEOC decision is ground-
breaking because it sets a
national standard of enforce-
ment that offers employers
clear guidance on the issue.
“This decision is impor-
tant because the EEOC is the
agency with lead authority
to interpret and enforce the
nation’s employment rights
laws,” said Jennifer Pizer,
legal director of the UCLA
School of Law’s Williams
Institute on Sexual Orientation
and Gender Identity Law and
Public Policy.
The case involved a
California woman who
claimed she was denied a
contractor job with the federal
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives after
the contractor learned she
had undergone a procedure
to change her gender from a
man to a woman.
Mia Macy, an Army vet-
eran and former police detec-
tive, initially applied for the
position as a man and was
told that she was qualified for
the job as a ballistics techni-
cian. Then she informed the
contractor that she was chang-
ing her gender. After that,
she was told funding for the
job was cut. She later learned
someone else was hired for
the position.
Macy filed a complaint
with the ATF, which told
her that federal job discrim-
ination laws did not apply
to transgender people. The
Transgender Law Center, a
legal rights advocacy group
in San Francisco, took up her
case.
The ruling does not yet
determine that she was dis-
criminated against, but that
she can bring a charge of dis-
crimination under the law.
EEOC spokeswoman
Justine Lisser said the unani-
mous ruling from the five-
member agency does not cre-
ate a new cause of action. It
clarifies that charges of gen-
der stereotyping are consid-
ered claims of sex discrimina-
tion under existing law.
Until now, Pizer said, it was
common for transgender work-
ers to have their complaints
rejected by EEOC regional
offices and state civil rights
agencies due to confusion about
the state of the law.
“This is a confirmation
that the courts are correct, so
public and private employers
coast to coast now have the
benefit of the EEOC making
this clear,” she said.
Peter Sprigg, senior fel-
low for policy studies at the
Washington-based Family
Research Council, said the
EEOC’s decision is misinter-
preting Title VII of the Civil
Rights Act.
“”Those who are discrimi-
nated against because they
are transgender are not dis-
criminated because they are
male or female, it is because
they are pretending to be the
opposite of what they really
are, which is quite a different
matter,” he said.
Currently 16 states and
the District of Columbia have
laws prohibiting discrimina-
tion based on gender iden-
tity. Mark Snyder, a spokes-
man for the Transgender Law
Center said that EEOC offices
in the remaining states would
now have to heed the new
decision.
One Year Ago
• Cody Wright, 11, son of David and Jenny Wright of
Delphos, harvested a 22-pound turkey on opening day of
Ohio’s Spring Youth Turkey Season in Morgan County. The
cobbler had a 10 1/2-inch beard and one-inch spurs. This was
Wright’s second turkey and his first adult turkey.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Irvin Trentman, co-manager at Chief’s Supermarket, pre-
sented a puppet of McGruff the crime dog, recently donated
by Chief’s to Landeck, Franklin and St. John’s elementary
schools. Accepting the puppets were Mark Fuerst, principal
of Franklin Elementary School, Terry Moreo, principal of
Landeck Elementary School and Sister Joan Francis, principal
of St. John’s Elementary School.
• The grand opening of Kendrick Woods has been set for
May 29, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and guest speaker
among the attractions. Kendrick Woods is the latest develop-
ment of the Johnny Appleseed Metropolitan Park District. The
270-acre park is located on Defiance Trail, midway between
Delphos and Spencerville.
• Brian Heitz pitched and hit St. John’s to a 4-3 win over
Fort Jennings Thursday. Heitz delivered the game-winning hit
in the bottom of the seventh with two outs. Dave Etgen walked
with one out and stole second. Following a walk by Bruce
Odenweller and a pop out, Heitz hit a double to score Etgen.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• The Cub Scouts of Pack 65, dens 1, 2 and 3 met Tuesday
night at Trinity Methodist Church. Three wolf badges were
presented. Mrs. Robert Turner made the presentations to Bobby
and Billy Turner, and Mrs. William Daulbaugh presented one to
Doug Daulbaugh. Mrs. Jim Wiltsie, directing Den 2, presented
“King Arthur’s Code” and Mrs. Phillip Gressel, in charge of
Den 1, gave “The Minstrel and the Knights.”
• Members of the Delphos Lions Club recently saw a dem-
onstration by Walter Doran, instructor from Pilot Dog, Inc. The
Lions Clubs of Ohio, including the local Lions, are among the
contributors to Pilot Dog, Inc. This is one of the phases of the
sight conservation program of the local Lions who plan to have
a candy sale May 3-5 to help finance the program.
• St. John’s Blue Jays, behind the 8-hit pitching of Jim Lang,
and outstanding fielding on the party of Dusty Laudick and Dan
Cramer, routed undefeated Gomer 4-1, Tuesday evening in a
game played on the Gomer diamond. Cramer and Lang drove in
all four for the Jays, Cramer’s smash hit bringing in two Jays in
the second inning and Lang’s drive bringing two in the third.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• The Delphos Merchants will meet the Ottoville Merchants
at the City athletic field Sunday afternoon. It will be the first
game of the season for Ottoville and consequently little is
known of the strength of the Putnam County aggregation. Team
manager Charles Sterling has been busy rounding up local base-
ball talent. Two new pitchers will probably be given a tryout in
the game. Casterline, owner of the Bluedot, will probably pitch.
Jimmy Noonan, former St. John’s High School star, will also
probably be given a chance on the mound.
• The members of the Woman’s Home and Foreign
Missionary Society of the Presbyterian Church held their
regular monthly session at the church Thursday afternoon with
Mrs. Samuel Roberts presiding. Refreshments were served.
The following were the hostesses: Mrs. E. B. Mauk, Mrs. F. C.
Meads, Mrs. W. H. Stemen, Mrs. F. J. Miller and Mrs. Thomas
Alspach.
• Jefferson High School baseball team went down to defeat
again Friday afternoon when the Kenton Wildcats clawed their
way to a 9 to 1 victory over the Red and White in a Western
League contest. Thompson started on the mound for Jefferson.
He was relieved in the middle of the fifth by Erickson. The
only Jefferson run was scored in the fourth inning when Adams
crossed the plate on an error.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The Senate rejected a
Republican attempt Tuesday
to overturn new regulations
designed to give unions quick-
er representation elections in
their effort to organize more
workplaces.
The 54-45, largely party
line vote against a resolution
of disapproval leaves intact
National Labor Relations
Board rules that are scheduled
to take effect April 30. Unions
had sought the rules changes
while business groups opposed
them. Senate Democrats
unanimously supported the
new regulations. Alaska Sen.
Lisa Murkowski was the only
Republican supporting them.
Under the existing regu-
lations, workers typically
vote within 45-60 days after
a union gathers enough sig-
natures from workers saying
they want to hold an election.
The new rules could cut that
time by days or even weeks
by simplifying procedures and
putting off some challenges
until after the election is held,
cutting back hearings and
reducing legal delays.
Unions call the changes a
modest fix to prevent compa-
nies from using stalling tactics
to delay a vote while workers
can be subject to harassment,
threats and even illegal firing.
Republicans argue the new
rules will lead to “ambush”
elections that barely leave
company managers enough
time to respond or counsel
against forming a union.
The NLRB has been the
focus of intense partisan bick-
ering since President Barack
Obama gave the independent
agency its first Democratic
majority in nearly a decade.
The board has issued a number
of rules and decisions that tend
to favor unions over business
interests.
WASHINGTON — Either
President Obama has wings
of Kevlar — or he has the
most incompetent scheduling
staff in White House history.
What president flies pur-
posefully into the eye of a
perfectly awful, two-front
political storm, especially
one as sordid as that plagu-
ing North Carolina this week?
Obama’s arrival in the Tar
Heel State coincided with for-
mer Sen. John Edwards’ trial,
as well as an exploding sexual
harassment scandal involving
the state’s Democratic Party
leader. Jay Parmley recently
resigned as executive direc-
tor of the state party after
an employee accused him of
showing him a lewd photo-
graph and making inappropri-
ate sexual remarks.
Talk about the audacity of
hope. Or is it the incompe-
tency of arrogance?
Trouble is one thing presi-
dents typically don’t seek out
— especially during a tough
re-election season. And North
Carolina is nothing but trou-
ble these days.
Edwards’ trial, which
began Monday, not only
promises resurrection of all
the salacious details of his
doomed tryst with Rielle
Hunter, with whom he
fathered a child while his
wife, Elizabeth, was dying of
cancer, but several high-pro-
file Washington Democrats,
including Obama’s deputy
communications director, will
likely be called as witnesses.
Perhaps the president is
merely displaying confidence
in his incumbency, or soli-
darity with his staff mem-
bers. On the other hand, is he
perhaps clueless? As Dana
Perino, former communica-
tions director for George W.
Bush, remarked: “Over my
dead body would I have sent
President Bush to a state like
that to do an event.”
It isn’t that Obama has
anything to do with either
Edwards or Parmley, but he
risks being dragged into the
fray. You don’t want to be
in the same camera frame
or news cycle with the least
attractive members of your
party. Moreover, plenty of
media will be on hand to
ask uncomfortable questions,
such as, for example: “Mr.
President, will you be visit-
ing the grave of Elizabeth
Edwards while in the state?”
As unappealing as such
a question seems, it isn’t
out of the realm of possi-
bilities. Obama ran against
the Edwardses and knew
Elizabeth. Such questions are
never posed for the answer
but are proffered for the
express purpose of creat-
ing an awkward moment to
which there really is no good
answer. In other words, to
trap the responder.
Bush staffers were well
familiar with this routine,
which is why they never
would have allowed him to be
in such a situation. Perhaps,
as another close political
observer suggested to me,
the Obama White House
has no such concerns. The
media simply do not come
after Obama in the same way
they did Bush, notwithstand-
ing recent research showing
that Obama received the most
negative coverage of any
presidential candidate during
the Republican primary. The
Bush White House was under
siege and conducted itself
accordingly. No T’s went
uncrossed.
This sort of attention to
detail, as well as to decorum,
characterized the tight ship
known as the Bush White
House. Whatever one thought
of Bush’s policies, his admin-
istration’s management was a
tribute to precision.
These distinctions are
worth noting as they speak
to top-down executive acu-
ity. The CEO sets the bar and
managers stand on their toes.
What were Obama’s people
standing on?
Obama’s trip was part of
a three-state, three-university
tour to make a case for keep-
ing low-interest rates on stu-
dent loans. Although some
Republicans disagree with
the president’s position, Mitt
Romney agrees. It’s a pretty
popular stance on university
campuses, as one can imag-
ine. The youth vote, which
has been slipping away from
Obama as job opportunities
continue to be scarce, needed
a little tweaking.
To that end, Obama was
taping a show with late-night
host Jimmy Fallon while in
Chapel Hill. He was also
scheduled to pre-tape with
Jimmy Kimmel in advance
of Saturday’s White House
Correspondents’ Association
dinner. But why North
Carolina during this time?
White House scheduling
concerns may seem like so
much political arcana to the
world beyond the Beltway.
But just as questions some-
times reveal more than the
answers they elicit, small
details can reveal larger flaws
in the infrastructure of an
administration.
Either Obama’s staffers are
so consumed with other mat-
ters that they failed to focus
on what was happening down
South. Or, they know they
don’t have to worry about
untoward treatment by the
media.
Alternatively, this avoid-
able risk suggests a standard
of laxity in the midst of a cam-
paign tour masquerading as a
policy parade. Revealingly,
the president’s target audi-
ence consists of unwitting
metaphors for the state of the
union — unemployed and
deep in debt.

Kathleen Parker’s email address
is kathleenparker@washpost.com.
Icarus 2.0
Transgender people protected under law
GOP pulls budget punches
Measure to null
union rules is
axed in Senate
The following students
were honored at Xavier
University’s All Honors Day
on April 21:
Jonathan W. Burgei of
Delphos received the Silver
X-Key Achievement Award,
which recognizes students’
well-rounded co-curricular
involvement and contributions
to the Xavier community.
First-year and sophomore
students are eligible for the
Silver X-Key based upon
the breadth of their campus
involvement and academic
achievement.
Tracy E. Mueller, also of
Delphos received the Gold
X-Key Achievement Award,
which recognizes students’
well-rounded co-curricular
involvement and contributions
to the Xavier community.
Junior and senior students
are eligible for this Gold
X-Key based upon the breadth
and depth of their campus
involvement and academic
achievement.
1
20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
Authorized CIub Car DeaIer ª SaIes and Service
Parts for: Ez-go ª Yamaha ª HarIey Davidson
LSV Street Legal
Go Green All Electric
20-30 Mile range on a single
charge
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive
Made in the U.S.A.!
20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
Authorized CIub Car DeaIer ª SaIes and Service
Parts for: Ez-go ª Yamaha ª HarIey Davidson
LSV Street Legal
Go Green All Electric
20-30 Mile range on a single
charge
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive
Made in the U.S.A.!
Authorized Club Car Dealer • Sales and Service
Parts for Ez-go • Yamaha • Harley Davidson
20913 Hauss Rd. • Cridersville, Oh. • (2 miles west of I 75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 • M-F 8-6; Sat. 8-Noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
Authorized CIub Car DeaIer ª SaIes and Service
Parts for: Ez-go ª Yamaha ª HarIey Davidson
LSV Street Legal
Go Green All Electric
20-30 Mile range on a single
charge
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive
Made in the U.S.A.!
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive Made in the U.S.A.!
BETTER WINDOW * BETTER PRICE * BETTER SERVICE
SUPER WINDOW SALE
30% TAX CREDIT! UP TO $1,500 AVAILABLE!
“48 Years Experience”
419-424-931û º 1-877-274-3464
www.cherokeeconstinc.com
Showroom 9-5 Daily
CHEROKEE
Construction
345 Center St., Findlay
GOOD BETTER BEST
$199.95
Installed
Up to 101 UI
Double Hung
Does Not Qualify For Tax Credit
$260.00
Installed
Up to 101 UI
Double Hung
$350.00
$320.00
Installed
Up to 101 UI
Double Hung
Special
Offer!
“DON’T SIGN WITH ANYONE ‘TIL YOU GET MY QUOTE”
VINYL SIDING
$
1899
00
Free 3/8 Fanfold as
Insulation
Choice of Color & Design
1000 Ft.
Installed

WE CAN SAVE YOU HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS
Financing
Available
REVIVAL
SERVICE
The church is located at
470 South Franklin Street, Delphos.
The services on Friday and Saturday will
start at 7:00 p.m.
and on Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
Reverend Anderson is a
gifted speaker and musician.
All are invited to come and be blessed
by the family in music and message.
The Delphos
Christian Union
Church
will be having
Revival
Services with
Mike and Becky
Anderson
and family on
April 27-29.
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Columbus Grove
City Building
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are tax-free, and
distributions can be taken free of penalties or taxes.
*
You may
even benet from converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
Tax-free Income Ie the
Beet Gift You Can Give
YoureeIf at Retirement.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting to know your goals
so we can help you reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense for you, call or
visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a 10% penalty if the
account is less than ve years old and the owner is under age 59½.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
April 26
Dawn Mansfield
Craig Wreede
T.J. Rode
Josh Sherrick
TODAY
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
7:30 p.m. — American
Legion Post 268, 415 N. State
St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store, North Main
Street.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
5 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club hosts a
chicken fry.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.

WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
Elizabeth, friend Timothy
witnesses to wedding
BY LOVINA EICHER
We attended the wedding
on Thursday of Matthew and
Leanna. Daughter Elizabeth
and her friend Timothy
were witnesses at the wed-
ding. Matthew is a brother to
Timothy.
The bride chose
the color navy that
the two girl witness-
es and herself wore
along with a white
cape and apron. In
this community the
bride gets married
wearing a black
head covering and
after she is mar-
ried, she switches
to white and will never wear
a black covering again.
At Amish weddings there
are usually two couples that
are witnesses at a wedding,
one for the bride and one
for the one groom. Usually
it is a brother or sister or
close friend of the bride and
groom.
Services start about 9 a.m.
and usually the couples are
married by 11:30 or noon.
Afterward, a big dinner is
served to all the guests.
The menu on Thursday was
mashed potatoes, gravy,
green beans, dressing, poor
man’s steak, cabbage salad,
homemade bread, butter and
jam, a variety of colorful
cakes, key lime, chocolate-
vanilla pudding pie and grape
jello pudding.
Tables are set up in a big
building that can seat quite
a few people at one time. It
varies on how big the build-
ing is as to how many tables
can be set up. The couple has
around 12 to 16 couples who
serve as table-waiters — usu-
ally sisters, brothers, cousins,
or close friends of the bride
and groom.
Yesterday our church
services were held at our
neighbor’s home. We have
Communion twice a year and
yesterday was one of those
occasions. It was a nice and
chilly day. Seems the weather
has been staying cool and we
don’t get very warm days.
I started a fire in the stove
in the basement this morning.
The house feels better with
some heat in it. We burn our
coal during the winter months
but on days like this we burn
wood. That is an extra chore
to keep going downstairs and
adding more wood. I guess I
am spoiled as during the win-
ter when we are burning coal
I only have to add coal once
a day. Our stove
has a coal hopper
and it only has
to be filled twice
a day during the
winter months, I
usually fill it in the
morning and Joe at
night. We got quite
a bit of wood from
the trees which
were uprooted in
our yard earlier this
spring. We also sold 3 of the
big logs to the local sawmill.
We still need to get someone
to move the big tree stumps.
One of the branches of the
oak tree was stuck down into
the ground 3 1/2 to 4 feet. We
are thankful no one was close
to it when it fell.
Sister Liz, Levi and four
of their children stopped in
on Saturday for a short visit.
They had my sisters Susan
and Verena with them. They
had been to one of Levi’s
brothers in this community
for dinner. They bought a
covered buggy from him at
an auction. Levi was tak-
ing the buggy back home to
Berne, Ind. They will sell
their open buggy, which they
bought from us when we
moved to Michigan, and use
the covered one from now
on. I am sure they will like it
a lot better in the cold winter
months and when it rains.
The community in Berne
has open buggies but now
several churches are allow-
ing covered buggies. When
we lived in Berne, we had
to drive in open buggies. I
thought I would have a hard
time getting used to a covered
buggy. Now I think I would
have to get used to driving
in the open buggy during the
cold winter months. We use
a lot fewer coats driving in
the covered buggy. When it
rained our coats would get
dirty from the wheels splat-
tering mud up on us. Some
people in this community
have small propane heaters in
their buggies but we still do
not have one.
Today after the laundry
is done we plan to can some
rhubarb juice. My rhubarb is
really big already. Try this
delicious recipe for home-
made rhubarb juice!
RHUBARB JUICE
8 pounds rhubarb, diced
8 quarts water
2 (12-ounce) cans of fro-
zen orange juice
2 (46-ounce) cans of pine-
apple juice
4 cups sugar
2 (3-ounce) boxes straw-
berry gelatin
Combine rhubarb and
water and cook until rhu-
barb is soft. Drain, discarding
rhubarb, and add the rest of
ingredients to the juice. Stir
until sugar is dissolved. Put
hot juice into jars, seal and
cold pack for five minutes.
AMISH COOK FRIEND
CLUB: Thank you for keep-
ing The Amish Cook in your
hometown newspaper by
joining the Friend Club. We
are seeking new Friend Club
members from now through
May 4. Joining The Amish
Cook Friend Club is a fun
way to keep the column pub-
lishing. There are several lev-
els of support that you can
offer to the column:
BASIC ONE-YEAR
MEMBERSHIP $10: thank
you note and recipe for “mar-
riage meatloaf.”
ONE-YEAR SILVER
$25: thank you note and a
packet of 25 unpublished rec-
ipes from The Amish Cook
recipe archives. ONE-YEAR
GOLD $50: all of the above,
plus an 8 X 10 photo of a sup-
pertime scene at Lovina’s and
a copy of The Amish Recipe
Project Cookbook.
SUPER SUPPORTER
$100: all of the above, plus
a complimentary copy of
Abraham’s Redemption when
it is released.
You can join in three
ways, send payment to Oasis
Newsfeatures, PO BOX 157,
Middletown, Ohio 45042, go
online atwww.oasisnewsfea-
tures.com/friendclub or call
1-800-224-3032 Allow
two to four weeks for deliv-
ery of thank you notes and
recipes.
The Lima branch of
American Association of
University Women (AAUW)
is now accepting applications
from Allen County women for
$1,000 scholarships.
High school seniors, under-
graduate students and graduate
students are invited to apply if
they are permanent residents
of Allen County.
Contact guidance depart-
ments at high schools or col-
leges for applications and
more information.
AAUW taking
scholarship
applications
CAMPUS NOTE
Local students receive awards
Photo submitted
Grothous shares recent trip
Tom Grothous, left, a member of the Delphos
Optimist Club, gave a presentation on his recent trip
to Australia and New Zealand to his fellow Optimist
members. He shared pictures, stories and other memo-
rabilia. Grothous is also Dean-college of technologies at
UNOH and “Mr. Wheels” on the call-in “all about your
car” radio program on WIMA on Saturday mornings.
Fellow Optimists member Claude Bergfeld presents
Grothous with a mug.
If YOU want to SEE your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
Call 419-695-0015 to subscribe.
6 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE (4)
ab-r-h-rbi
Haley Landwehr lf 3-1-1-1, Robyn
Turnwald 2b/dp 3-0-1-3, Megan
Riesner dp/2b 3-0-1-0, Lindsey Eickholt
ss/1b 0-0-0-0, Kelsey Hoersten c 3-0-
1-0, Krista Schimmoeller 3b 2-0-0-0,
Angie Keeran ph 1-0-0-0, Marissa
Nienberg cf 3-1-1-0, Morgan Beining
rf 1-1-0-0, Paige Lucas rf 1-0-1-0,
Eden Schlagbaum pr/rf 0-0-0-0, Nicole
Burgei 1b 2-0-0-0, Stephanie Horstman
ph/1b 1-0-0-0, Courtney Von Sossan p
1-1-0-0. Totals 24-4-6-4.
JEFFERSON (14)
ab-r-h-rbi
Samantha Thitoff ss 4-3-1-0,
Corrine Metzger 2b 5-2-2-1, Fallon Van
Dyke cf 5-2-2-2, Cassidy Bevington
c 4-1-3-3, Taylor Branham p 2-0-1-
0, Alexis Cook cr 0-2-0-0, Destiny
Thompson dp 4-1-0-0, Sarah Thitoff
3b 0-0-0-0, Kimber Kill lf 4-0-2-4, Kayla
Kill 1b 3-1-1-0, Whitney Hohlbein ph
1-0-1-0, Rachel Miller rf 3-1-1-1. Totals
35-14-14-11.
Score by Innings:
Ottoville 0 4 0 0 0 0 - 6
Jefferson 5 2 4 0 2 1 - 14
Two outs in sixth when game-
ending run scored
E: Turnwald 2;, Schimmoeller 2,
Eickholt 2, Hoersten; LOB: Ottoville
4, Jefferson 8; 2B: Turnwald; 3B:
Van Dyke 2, Bevington, Kim. Kill; SB:
Nienberg 2, Metzger 2, Van Dyke; Sac:
Sam. Thitoff.
IP H R ER BB SO
OTTOVILLE
Von Sossan(L, 0-11) 5.0 14 14 7 2 2
JEFFERSON
Branham (W, 2-12) 6.0 6 4 4 2 5
WP: Von Sossan 5, Branham 2;
HBP: Miller (by Von Sossan); PB:
Hoersten.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@celphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Jefferson’s
softball team got off to a fast
start for the second time in
three games, scoring five
times in the bottom of the
first, then went on to a 14-4
6-inning non-conference vic-
tory on a windy Tuesday after-
noon at Lady Wildcat Field in
Delphos.
Ottoville (0-11) got two
runners on versus Delphos
right-hander Taylor Branham
(2-12; 6 innings, 6 hits, 4
earned runs, 2 bases-on-balls,
5 strikeouts; 84 pitches, 55
strikes) with two down in the
first: a bloop single to left
center by Megan Risner and
a blooper down the right-field
line by Kelsey Hoersten that
put runners on the corners.
However, Branham induced a
pop-up to end the inning.
Samantha Thitoff (3 runs
scored) started the Wildcat
first against Courtney Von
Sossan (0-11; 5 2/3 IPs, 14
hits, 14 runs, 7 earned, 2 BBs,
2 Ks; 95 pitches, 66 strikes)
by getting aboard via an error
and Corrine Metzger (2-for-5,
2 runs) singled to left. Both
stole a base and another error
on a pop-up hit by Fallon Van
Dyke (2-for-5, 2 runs, 2 runs
batted in) plated Thitoff and
put runners on the corners.
Metzger stole second. Both
runners came home as Cassidy
Bevington (3-for-4, 3 RBIs)
slapped a 2-run liner to left.
Branham slapped a knock to
left. Destiny Thompson forced
Bevington at third. However,
Kimber Kill (2-for-4, 4 RBIs)
went the opposite way for a
2-run triple to the fence in
right center to bring home
courtesy-runner Alexis Cook
(2 runs) and Thompson for a
5-0 edge. She was stranded
there as Von Sossan set down
the final two batters.
The Lady Green retali-
ated in the top of the second.
Marissa Nienberg hit a liner to
right and stole second. Morgan
Beining walked. An out later,
Von Sossan walked to load the
bases. With the infield drawn-
in, lefty-swinging Haley
Landwehr placed an infield
hit that ticked Branham’s
glove and handcuffed Thitoff
that scored Nienberg. Robyn
Turnwald slapped a bases-
clearing double to right cen-
ter that plated Beining, Von
Sossan and Landwehr to make
the score 5-4, Wildcats. A
fielder’s-choice grounder by
Risner got Turnwald to third
but she remained there as
Hoersten was retired.
“It was nice to get off
to another good start. We
allowed them to bounce
right back; we weren’t quite
as focused on defense, even
though we didn’t commit any
errors,” Jefferson coach Dave
Wollenhaupt explained. “We
regrouped and came right
back. That was good to see.
I felt we played five great
innings overall and only had
one bad inning where we lost
some concentration.”
Those two outs started
a string of 13 straight outs
recorded by Branham.
Ottoville coach Joe Modica
pointed out his team’s defen-
sive shortcomings at this
point.
“Courtney didn’t pitch a
bad game but we have to
play defense behind her. We
made too many errors,” he
explained. “We work at it and
we move girls around to see
what we can do. I tell the girls
that every spot is open but this
has been a struggle for us all
season.”
The Red and White got
two of those tallies back in
the home second. Thitoff was
again safe on an error and
advanced on a 1-out wild pitch
and scored as Van Dyke went
the opposite way to the right-
field corner for a triple. In
turn, she scored on a 2-out
wild pitch as Branham walked.
Cook was left stranded.
Delphos extended its lead
to 11-4 in the third. With one
out, Kayla Kill looped a hit
to left, advanced on two wild
tosses and scored as Rachel
Miller beat out an infield hit.
Thitoff bunted her way aboard
and in the process, an error
allowed Miller to score and
moved the batter to third base,
from where she scored on
another infield hit by Metzger.
A bounceout put Metzger at
second, a wild pitch moved
her to third and she scored as
Bevington ripped a triple to
right center that rightfielder
Paige Lucas couldn’t cut off.
Jefferson had a chance to
add more runs with two down
in the fourth as pinch-hitter
Whitney Hohlbein went oppo-
site way to left field. Errors on
grounders hit by Miller and
Thitoff loaded the bases but
the Wildcats left them that
way.
The hosts made it 13-4 in
the home half of the fifth as
Bevington lined a 1-out knock
to right and Branham worked
a walk. An error on a strikeout
moved Bevington and Cook
up, from where they scored
on Kimber Kill’s liner to left
center. However, she was left
on base.
The Green and Gold final-
ly got a runner aboard with
two down in the sixth as Paige
Lucas lined a knock into right
but she was the last of four
Lady Green runners left on
base.
“We started out hitting the
ball pretty well but then we
stopped,” Modica added. “I
think it came down to frustra-
tion; the girls were frustrated
with the fielding and that car-
ried over to the plate.”
Miller was plunked to
commence the home sixth and
Thitoff sacrificed. Miller was
caught at third on Metzger’s
bouncer to short; however, a
passed ball and stolen base
put the speedy Metzger at
third, from whence she scored
the game-ending run on Van
Dyke’s triple to deep left.
“This was the best we’ve
played overall this year. Taylor
pitched as well as I’ve seen her
in a long time,” Wollenhaupt
added. “Defensively, we did
the same. At the plate, we’re
getting more consistency from
the bottom of our order and
that makes us more dangerous
top to bottom.”
Both teams return to
action Thursday (5 p.m.) as
Jefferson is at Columbus
Grove for an NWC game and
Ottoville invades Van Wert.
Lady Wildcats punish Big Green
Kayla Kill runs down a pop-up in foul territory off
the bat of Ottoville’s Megan Risner for the second out in
the fifth inning Tuesday night in Delphos. The host Lady
Wildcats grabbed a 14-4 victory over the Lady Green.
Tom Morris photo
By BOB WEBER
The Delphos Herald
weberbtz@bright.net
OTTOVILLE — This year
has seen the Ottoville Big
Green baseball team come
up on the short end on the
scoreboard in 11 of its first 14
contests.
However, with a
big Putnam County
League game win
over the Ft. Jennings
Musketeers Monday,
the Big Green came
into Tuesday night’s
contest with Perry
on a very upbeat feeling that
maybe the tide was turning on
their season. The Big Green
didn’t disappoint with a thrill-
ing comeback win over the
Commodores, 6-5, in non-
league play.
Ottoville head coach Tony
Castronova was all smiles and
really heaped the praise on his
team: “My hat’s off to these
kids. We’ve strug-
gled all year with all
aspects of our game.
Many games this year
so far, we simply have
given them away with
our defensive effort.
Tonight (1 error) and
last night (no errors)
against Ft. Jennings allowed
us to compete against two
very good and well-coached
teams in Ft. Jennings and
Lima Perry.”
The Big Green took the
early lead in the bottom
of the first inning. Luke
Schimmoeller had a 2-out sin-
gle and stole second. Bryan
Hohlbein, swinging a hot bat
for the Big Green in recent
games, tripled to deep right
field, scoring Schimmoeller to
give the hosts a 1-0 lead.
The Commodores in their
half of the second inning tied
the game 1-1. Cory Smith and
Ben Sanders singled to start
and Andrew Russell was hit
by a pitch, loading the bases.
Leadoff batter T.J. Sloan drew
a walk, scoring Smith with the
Commodores’ first run.
The visitors took the lead
4-1 in the third, sending eight
batters to the plate. Baylor
Buettner singled, Drew Smith
reached first after an error by
the Big Green’s shortstop and
both were sent home with a
triple off the bat of (Cory)
Smith, who then scored as
Andrew Gipson singled.
With the weather getting
colder and the wind still gust-
ing at times to 20-30 mph,
the Big Green dug deep to
score three game-tying runs
in their bottom of the sixth
inning. Craig Odenweller sin-
gled to lead off the inning.
Cory Fischer walked and
freshman Joel Beining lashed
a single down the left-field
line, scoring Odenweller to
make the score 4-2. Jacob
Turnwald laid down a per-
fect bunt and reached first
safely after a throwing error.
On the play, Fischer scored to
make it 4-3. Alex Horstman
grounded out to second base,
allowing Beining to score the
game-tying run to knot the
score 4-4.
As good teams do, the
Commodores came right back
in the top of the seventh inning
and retook the lead. After a
1-out single by (Cory) Smith,
Gipson sacrificed him to sec-
ond and Sanders sent him
home with the Commodore’s
fifth run with a deep double to
center field.
The Big Green, facing
another possible tough loss,
came to the plate in the bot-
tom of the seventh needing
a run to tie or two to win.
Hohlbein followed up his
first-inning triple with a drive
to center field for a double.
Austin Markward followed
with a walk and both runners
moved up a base on a wild
pitch. After a groundout to
the shortstop by Odenweller,
Cory Honigford drew a walk,
loading the bases. Beining
was called out on strikes for
the second out. Up to the plate
strolled the junior Turnwald:
struggling at the plate this
year, he reversed his fortunes
with a walk-off game-winning
single to left-center field, plat-
ing Hohlbein and Markward
to give the Big Green a come-
back 6-5 win.
Sophomore Austin
Horstman went seven
innings, getting the win for
the Big Green: 35 batters
faced, five runs (4 earned),
11 hits, two strikeouts and
two walks. Senior Cory Smith
took the tough loss for the
Commodores: 36 batters
faced, six runs, seven hits,
striking out seven and walk-
ing eight.
Castronova expressed his
happiness with his pitch-
ers over the last two nights:
“(Travis) Maag and
(Alex) Horstman really
pitched well for us the
last two nights. With
six games this week, we
needed both of them to
give us as many innings
as they could and they
didn’t let us down.”
The Big Green (4-11) were
led in hitting by the junior
Hohlbein with two extra-base
hits. Schimmoeller had two
hits, three stolen bases and a
run scored.
Castronova sees the Big
Green bats coming alive:
“Bryan is really seeing and
hitting the ball really well
for us. What can you say for
the lower part of our
lineup? Cory and Joel
coming up with clutch
hits for us against Ft.
Jennings last night and
tonight, Jacob coming
into the game late and
leading us with a big
game-winning hit. The
hard work of the entire team
is starting to show up this
week. With six games this
week, I hope we can take this
momentum and finish strong
in the next couple of weeks,
preparing us for tournament
play.”
The Commodores (15-5)
were led by Cody Smith with
three hits, three runs scored
and two RBIs. Sanders also
had three hits (2 singles and a
double) for the game.
Ottoville visits Wayne
Trace tonight and hosts
Continental 5 p.m. Thursday.
Monday night, the
Musketeers found out it’s
never easy to win any baseball
game in the tough PCL, not to
mention beating a team twice
in the same season, as visiting
Ottoville grabbed a 7-3 win at
Fort Jennings Village Park.
Both teams have struggled
this season with scoring runs
and playing consistent defense
in the field. With seniors Cody
Warnecke of the hosts and
Maag for the Big Green on
the mound, the game looked
to be very low-scoring. That
was the case for the first four
innings of play as both pitch-
ers were in control of the
game and the defense behind
them helped out with excel-
lent plays in the field.
In the top of the fifth
inning, Odenweller start-
ed with a walk for the Big
Green. However, as quick-
ly as he reached first base,
Warnecke erased him off the
basepath with a pick-off play;
Warnecke caught several Big
Green runners leaning at first
throughout the game. With
one out, Fischer, Beining,
Turnwald and Alex Horstman
all singled, with Fischer scor-
ing the first run of the game.
Warnecke worked out of the
inning with a ground ball to
shortstop by Schimmoeller,
forcing Beining out at the
plate, and a strikeout of
Hohlbein.
The sixth inning allowed
the Big Green to open their
lead to 3-0. Austin Markward
and Maag opened the inning
with bases-on-balls. After
a strikeout of Odenweller,
Fischer doubled to right-cen-
ter field, plating Markward
and Maag. Warnecke got the
final two outs with no more
damage.
Not to be outdone, the
Musketeers rallied in the bot-
tom of the sixth to tie the
game 3-3, capitalizing on
Maag’s wildness as he walked
three of the first four batters
he faced in. Nolan Neidert
and Troy Hellman walked
and Cody Warnecke drove
home Neidert with a single.
Nick Verhoff drew the third
walk. Josh Wittler singled to
center, scoring Warnecke and
Verhoff to tie the game 3-3.
Maag finished the remainder
of the inning off scoreless
with strikeouts.
In the seventh inning, the
Big Green sent 10 batters
to the plate and broke the
game open with four runs.
Back-to-back doubles by
Schimmoeller and Hohlbein
extended the lead to 4-3. After
a strikeout by Markward and
Maag reaching base safely on
Ottoville rallies
in 7th to nip Perry
See BIG GREEN, page 7
See KALIDA, page 7
By Jim Cox
MIDDLE POINT - After
a shaky first three innings,
Miller City pitcher Ross
Kaufman, a junior left-hander,
pitched a perfect last three,
mastering Lincolnview 11-1
in a 6-inning run-rule win for
the Wildcats. Miller City is
now 10-7, while the Lancers
are 6-12.
Kaufman was the epitome
of efficiency, throwing only
62 pitches (42 strikes) during
his six innings of work. He
gave up one run (earned) and
four hits, striking out three
and walking one. Nine of
Lincolnview’s 18 outs were
on fly balls to the outfield.
“He (Kaufman) isn’t
gonna throw very hard -- he
has to throw strikes,” said
Wildcat coach Dusty Pester.
“Hopefully, he can work the
corners and our defense has to
be playing behind him because
he pitches to contact. I thought
Lincolnview hit the ball really,
really well early and didn’t
have a lot to show for it. Then
Ross kind of settled down and
had them hitting the ball on
the wrong part of the bat. With
the wind blowing out like this,
you don’t really want a lot of
fly balls but he’s a kid that
just battles. He pitched a really
good game tonight.”
Miller City jumped on
Lancer starter Tyler Lovett
right away, scoring three
(1 earned) in the top of the
first. Those came on a leadoff
booted bouncer off the bat of
Brady Niese, a walk to Brent
Hermiller, a couple of steals,
a 2-RBI single through the
third/short hole by Jared Kern
and an RBI single through
that same hole by Jared
Fuka. As it turned out, that
was all Kaufman would need,
although it didn’t look like it
in the early going.
Lancer Kyle Williams
started the bottom of the first
with a long fly to left that was
misjudged into a double, went
to third on a ground out, then
scored on a sacrifice fly by
Nick Leeth. Thus, it was 3-1,
Miller City, after one inning.
The ’Cats added two more,
both earned, in the second -- lead-
off double down the left-field
line by Adam Drummelsmith,
walk to Niese and a misjudged
triple to deep right by Hermiller,
as the wind continued to wreak
havoc on the outfielders. That
made it 5-1.
Lincolnview Connor
McCleery doubled to left cen-
ter to start the bottom of the
second. Lovett followed by
crushing a liner right at Niese
in left for the first out. Michael
Klausing drew a walk but both
McCleery and Klausing were
left stranded.
After the Wildcats went
scoreless in the third, the only
time that happened in the
game, the Lancers stranded
two more -- Williams and
Leeth having singled -- in the
bottom of third. There would
be no more base-runners for
the home team after that.
Miller City pretty much
sealed it in the fourth with
three more runs, two of which
were earned. Niese started it
by reaching on a throwing
error, and four straight singles
-- Kaufman, Kern, Chandler
Shafer (RBI) and Fuka (2
RBIs) -- made it 8-1.
The Wildcats had at least
two base-runners in every
inning, including the fifth,
during which they scored two
more on a single (Niese), single
(Hermiller), walk (Kaufman),
RBI walk (Kern) and RBI sac
fly (Shafer).
Miller City put it into a
run-rule situation in the top
of the sixth on a 1-out walk
to Drummelsmith, two wild
pitches and an RBI single by
Cody Gable.
Lancer pitchers Lovett
and Eli Farmer threw three
innings apiece, with Lovett
taking the loss. He yielded
five runs, three earned, on four
hits, walking four and striking
out two. Farmer’s line was
six runs, five earned, on eight
hits, with two walks and one
strikeout.
The Wildcats had hitters
aplenty, led by Niese (4 runs),
Hermiller (2-for-4, a triple, 2
runs, 2 RBIs), Kern (2-for-3,
2 runs, 3 RBIs), Fuka (2-for-4,
3 RBIs) and Drummelsmith
(2-for-3, a double, 2 runs).
Lincolnview’s hits came from
Williams (2-for-3, a double,
1 run), Leeth (1-for-2, 1 RBI)
and McCleery (1-for-3, a dou-
ble).
After a 3-game winning
streak, the Lancers now find
themselves having lost four
in a row.
“Offensively, we put our-
selves in bad spots by getting
too far out front against a
guy who isn’t gonna throw
it by us,” said Lincolnview
coach Brad Mendenhall. “We
get too much weight out front
and just sweep through. We’re
not very sound fundamentally.
When we did hit the ball hard,
it was right at them. There’s
nothing you can do about that
but what you can do is be
a little more fundamentally
sound, stay on top of the ball
and hit some line drives and
hard ground balls.”
Miller City, on the other
hand, is playing well and is
in the thick of a battle for the
Putnam County League title.
“We’ve been playing well,”
added Pester. “We got off to a
slow start but we’re hitting the
ball better, we’re fielding the
ball better and our pitching
has been there all year. Even
with the losses, it hasn’t been
our pitching as far as throwing
strikes. Usually our defense
has let us down but we’ve
been playing a lot better the
last couple of weeks.”
Lincolnview hosts USV
tonight and visits Allen East 5
p.m. Thursday.
Miller City (ab-r-h-rbi)
Brent Niese lf 4-4-1-0, Hermiller
ss 4-2-2-2, Kaufman p 3-1-1-0,
Kern c 3-2-2-3, Shafer 1b 2-0-1-
2, Fuka 3b 4-0-2-3, Riepenhoff rf
4-0-0-0, Drummelsmith 2b 3-2-2-
0, Gable cf 4-0-1-1. Totals 31-11-
12-11.
Lincolnview (ab-r-h-rbi)
Williams 2b 3-1-2-0, Longstreth
cf 3-0-0-0, Leeth ss 2-0-1-1, Brady
Niese c 3-0-0-0, McCleery 3b 3-0-
1-0, Lovett p-lf 2-0-0-0, Klausing
1b 1-0-0-0, Friesner rf 2-0-0-0,
Brant lf 1-0-0-0, Farmer p 1-0-0-0.
Totals 21-1-4-1.
Score by Innings:
Miller City 320 321 - 11 12 0
Lincolnview 100 000 - 1 4 2
WP - Kaufman; LP - Lovett.
LOB - Miller City 9, Lincolnview
4. 2B - Drummelsmith (MC),
Williams (LV), McCleery (LV). 3B
- Hermiller (MC).
Miller City overwhelms Lincolnview 11-1
By Charlie Warnimont
Sentinel Sports Editor
KALIDA — To stay in the
Putnam County League race
Kalida had to defeat Leipsic
Tuesday afternoon.
The Vikings entered the
game undefeated in league
play, while Kalida had one
loss. With a possible league
title in the balance, the
Wildcats and Vikings went
right down to the wire.
For the second straight
league game, Kalida scored
in its final at-bat to post
an exciting 4-3 win over
Leipsic. With the outcome,
both teams are 5-1 in league
play. Kalida is 10-5 over-
all and Leipsic is 17-2. The
Wildcats’ final league game
is against Ottoville on May
3, while Leipsic plays Miller
City Saturday.
Kalida took a 3-2 lead to
the seventh inning but saw
the Vikings tie the game on
an error.
Brady Schroeder opened
Kalida stays in PCL baseball race with win
1
FISH
Pick-up Dates: April 21, 28, May 5, 12, 19
FREE DELIVERY WITH MINIMUM ORDER
West of Kalida on U.S. Route 224
remlingerfishfarm.com
POND STOCKING and SUPPLIES
Amur, minnows, BLUE TILAPIA and other
varieties. Aeration Systems, Windmills, Fountains
Free Brochure
419-532-2335
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
Curtis Miller scoops the one-hopper throw from fellow
Jefferson senior Tony George to complete the double play
to end the 5th inning MOnday night versus Bluffton. The
host Wildcats grabbed a 7-6 NWC baseball win.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delpho-
sherald.com
DELPHOS — Jefferson
was cruising along behind
sophomore starter Ross
Thompson on a windy
Monday afternoon/evening
against a youthful Bluffton
baseball 9, leading 6-0 to start
the fifth frame at Wildcat
Field.
The Pirates sent 10 to the
dish in the top of the inning to
tie it up at 6.
However, the Wildcats
regrouped and scored a run
in the bottom of the sixth and
junior reliever Zach Ricker
set down the Pirates in order
in the seventh to grab a 7-6
Northwest Conference vic-
tory over the guests.
Senior Tony George,
returning to the leadoff spot,
set the Wildcat (8-11, 3-3
NWC) table with a 2-for-
2 performance, also walking
twice, scoring four times and
knocking in one. Thompson
helped his cause with a
2-for-3 contest (3 runs bat-
ted in).
“We had the one bad
inning again. It was a cou-
ple of bad decisions with the
ball on our part, the little
things we talk about a lot,”
Jefferson coach Doug Geary
explained. “We let them back
in the game when we had the
chance to put them away.
They are a young, struggling
team and we allowed them to
stick around.”
Thompson threw 4-plus
innings for the hosts (4 hits,
6 runs, 4 earned, 1 base-on-
balls, 2 strikeouts) and Ricker
(1-1; 3 IPs, 2 hits, 1 BB) got
the win in relief.
The Pirates’ (4-11, 1-4
NWC) Jordan Skilliter took
the loss with 2 1/3 innings
of relief, ceding one hit and
an earned run, walking three
and fanning three. He was
pitching in relief of southpaw
starter Nate Risner (3 2/3 IPs,
5 hits, 6 earned runs, 5 BBS,
4 Ks).
The Wildcats led 6-0
before the Pirates rallied
in the fifth. They pieced
together four hits, includ-
ing a 2-run single by Drake
Lugibuhl and an RBI hit by
Trent Phillips that chased
Thompson (6 batters in the
fifth, getting none out), as
well as two fielder’s-choice
RBIs (Skilliter and Jeremy
Basinger). The Wildcats com-
mitted three errors as well as
the Pirates tied it at 6-6 but a
double play ended any more
damage.
The Pirates left two run-
ners on in the sixth: Michael
Sheehan on third (infield hit
and passed ball) and Austin
Bricker on second (1-out
walk) after a 2-out groundout
by Basinger. However, they
could get no further.
The hosts got the win-
ning run in home half. With
one out, George walked and
stole second (4 steals for the
game). Austin Jettinghoff
reached out and lined a shot
down the right-field line that
plated him. Thompson walked
and so did Zach Kimmett an
out later to load the bases.
However, they remained that
way.
Ricker set down the Pirates
in order in the seventh on
three ground balls to end the
contest.
The Pirates got the first
two on in the top half of
the first inning: Basinger
and Phillips; but they only
reached the next base before
being stranded.
George led off the game
for the hosts with a single to
center, stole second, advanced
on a wild pitch and scored on
a 1-out bounceout to short by
Thompson.
A double play helped
the Wildcats short-circuit a
leadoff wind-aided double to
right by Tyler Belcher in the
second.
That would be the last of
the Bluffton base-runners
until the fifth.
The Wildcats got a leadoff
walk to Kimmett in the sec-
ond and pinch-runner Drew
Kortokrax stole second on a
strikeout. Seth Wollenhaupt
walked but those two could
get no further.
George again led off an
inning, the third, with a free
pass, stole two bases (the
second with one down) and
scored on a 1-out liner to
center by Thompson.
Delphos batted around
in the fourth. Justin Rode
walked but was eliminated on
a ground ball by Wollenhaupt.
He stole second. Mike Joseph
was hit by a pitch and both
moved up on a wild pitch.
Evan Neubert walked to load
them up. George lined an
RBI knock to left center to
get Wollenhaupt home. An
out later, Thompson beat
out a nibbler to third, plating
Joseph. Curtis Miller lined a
2-run shot to center to score
Neubert and George for a
6-0 edge, finishing Risner
and bringing in Skilliter, who
recorded the final out.
“We have to find ways
to get it done, at the plate
and in the field. We moved
Tony back up to the leadoff
spot; he’s been our best hitter
the last four games and we
wanted to take some pressure
off of Austin,” Geary added.
“We have to create a lot of
our offense and we did that
tonight; Tony did what you
want your leadoff hitter to do.
Our pitching has generally
been solid all season. Zach
came in and threw strikes. He
hit all four spot we want our
pitchers to hit.”
Jefferson visits Fort
Jennings at 5 p.m. today.
Tom Morris photo
BLUFFTON (6)
ab-r-h-rbi
Jeremy Basinger c 3-1-0-1, Trent
Phillips ss 4-1-1-1, Matt Gillett cf 4-0-
0-1, Drake Lugibuhl lf 4-0-1-2, Chris
McClain 1b 4-0-0-0, Tyler Belcher
dh 3-1-1-0, Zach Kuhlman 3b 0-0-0-
0, Michael Sheehan rf 3-1-2-0, Nate
Risner p 1-0-0-0, Jordan Skilliter p 2-1-
0-1, Austin Bricker 2b 2-1-1-0. Totals
30-6-6-6.
JEFFERSON (7)
ab-r-h-rbi
Tony George 3b 2-4-2-1, Austin
Jettinghoff ss 4-0-1-1, Ross
Thompson p/2b 3-0-2-3, Curtis Miller
1b 4-0-1-2, Zach Kimmett dh 2-0-0-
0, Drew Kortokrax pr 0-0-0-0, Zach
Ricker 2b/p 0-0-0-0, Justin Rode c
3-0-0-0, Seth Wollenhaupt rf 1-1-0-0,
Kyle Anspach lf 1-0-0-0, Mike Joseph
cf 2-1-0-0, Evan Neubert lf/rf 2-1-0-0.
Totals 24-7-6-7.
Score by Innings:
Bluffton 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 - 6
Jefferson 1 0 1 4 0 1 x - 7
E: George 2, Gillett, Thompson,
Ricker; DP: Jefferson 2; LOB: Bluffton
5, Jefferson 8; 2B: Belcher; SB: George
4, Kortokrax, Wollenhaupt.

IP H R ER BB SO
BLUFFTON
Risner 3.2 5 6 6 5 4
Skilliter (L, 1-2) 2.1 1 1 1 3 3
JEFFERSON
Thompson 4.0 4 6 4 1 2
Ricker (W, 1-1) 3.0 2 0 0 1 0
Thompson pitched to 6 batters in
5th
WP: Risner 2; HBP: Joseph (by
Risner); PB: Rode.
Wildcats score in 6th
to sink Pirates 7-6
(Continued from Page 6)
a fielder’s choice, Odenweller
added a base hit to load the
bases. Fischer added to his
3-hit night with a single, scor-
ing Hohlbein and Markward.
The fourth run of the inning
came when Horstman singled
home Odenweller to give the
Big Green a 7-3 lead heading
into the bottom of the seventh.
Maag started the bottom
of the seventh inning but after
a base hit by leadoff batter
Kurt Warnecke, Castronova
brought in Alex Horstman
to finish the game with the
Musketeers going quietly.
The senior Maag got the
win for the Big Green: 28 bat-
ters faced, three runs, six hits,
11 strikeouts and three walks.
Senior Cody Warnecke took
the loss: 38 batters faced,
seven runs on 12 hits, striking
out six and walking five.
The Big Green (1-4 PCL)
were led in hitting by the
junior Fischer with three hits,
four RBIs and a run scored.
(Alex) Horstman, Hohlbein
and Beining all had two hits.
The Musketeers (6-11,
1-5 PCL) were led by junior
Kurt Warnecke with three hits
(double and 2 singles).
TUESDAY
Perry (5)
T.J. Sloan 3-0-1-1, Brey Buettner
4-0-0-0, Baylor Buettner 4-1-2-0,
Drew Smith 4-1-0-0, Cory Smith 4-3-
3-2, Andrew Gipson 3-0-1-1, Ben
Sanders 4-0-3-1, Andrew Russell
3-0-0-0, Seth Ewing 3-0-0-0. Totals
32-5-11-5.
Ottoville (6)
Alex Horstman 4-0-0-1, Travis
Maag 4-0-0-0, Luke Schimmoeller
4-1-2-0, Bryan Hohlbein 4-1-2-1,
Austin Markward 1-1-0-0, Craig
Odenweller 4-1-1-0, Cory Fischer
1-1-0-0, Cory Honigford 0-0-0-0, Joel
Beining 2-1-1-1, Brandon Boecker
1-0-0-0, Jacob Turnwald 2-0-1-2.
Totals 27-6-7-5.
Score by Innings:
Perry 0-1-3 0-0-0 1-5
Ottoville 1-0-0 0-0-3 2-6
Two outs in 7th when winning
run scored
WP – Alex Horstman; LP – Cory
Smith.
MONDAY
Ottoville (7)
Alex Horstman 5-0-2-2, Luke
Schimmoeller 5-1-1-0, Bryan
Hohlbein 4-1-2-1, Austin Markward
3-1-0-0, Travis Maag 3-2-0-0, Craig
Odenweller 3-1-1-0, Cory Fischer
4-1-3-4, Joel Beining 2-0-2-0, Jacob
Turnwald 4-0-1-0. Totals 33-7-12-7.
Ft. Jennings (3)
Kurt Warnecke 4-0-3-0, Nolan
Neidert 3-1-0-0, Troy Hellman 2-1-
0-0, Cody Warnecke 4-1-1-1, Nick
Verhoff 2-0-0-0, Zach Schuerman
3-0-0-0, Josh Wittler 3-0-1-2, Dylan
VanLoo 3-0-0-0, Mark Metzger 3-0-
1-0 Totals 27-3-6-3.
Score by Innings:
Ottoville 0-0-0 0-1-2 4-7
Ft. Jennings 0-0-0 0-0-3 0-3
WP – Travis Maag; LP – Cody
Warnecke.
Big Green
(Continued from Page 6)
the Leipsic half of the seventh
with an infield single, took
second on a groundout and
scored as Travis Schroeder’s
ground ball to shortstop was
misplayed. Wildcat starter
Paul Utendorf prevented any
further damage as he struck
out the next batter and got a fly
ball to center to keep the game
tied at 3-3.
Kalida’s half of the seventh
started with a fly ball to cen-
ter for an out. Ben Schroeder
started the Wildcats’ winning
rally by lining a single to left
and Jordan Ellerbrock fol-
lowed with a single to left.
The Wildcats inserted Connor
Schmenk into the lineup to
run for Schroeder at second
base. Leipsic relief pitcher Ty
Maag settled down after the
two singles to strike out the
next batter he faced and he had
Nate Jorrey down to his final
strike. After striking out in his
two previous at-bats, Jorrey
didn’t let his teammates down
as he lined a single into cen-
ter field. Leipsic centerfielder
Devin Mangas got to the ball
quickly but his throw to home
plate was off line, allowing
Schmenk to slide home safely
with the winning run.
“It was station-to-station
baseball,” Kalida coach Jim
McBride said. “I had some
guys that had outstanding at-
bats that don’t get a lot of rec-
ognition. Ben Schroeder had a
couple of hits, Tyler Heitmeyer
had a double in his first at-bat
and Paul turned in a gutty per-
formance trying to spot pitches.
I tip my hat to an excellent
Leipsic team. That team has
only lost a couple of times
in the last two years and to
have us mentioned in the same
breath with them as having a
win, in the position we were in,
is a credit to my kids.”
Utendorf struggled early as
the Vikings had scoring oppor-
tunities in each of the first four
innings but could only push
across two runs.
Leipsic left runners strand-
ed at third base in the first,
third and fourth innings.
Utendorf (5-0) finished the
night allowing three runs on
six hits with 10 strikeouts and
just one walk.
After both teams stranded
a runner in scoring position in
the first inning, Leipsic scored
a run in the second inning after
Mangas opened the Viking sec-
ond with a triple to the right-
center field fence. Utendorf
struck out the next two batters
before Nate Mangas poked a
single between third and short
to score Devin.
Kalida didn’t wait long to
respond as they came up with
three runs in the bottom of the
second inning.
Heitmeyer opened the
Kalida second with a double
down the left-field line. He
was sacrificed to third by
Schroeder before Ellerbrock
was hit by a pitch. A Nate
Kortokrax single scored one
run and a ground ball to short-
stop by Jorrey gave Kalida a
2-1 lead. Neil Recker followed
with a walk and Utendorf
helped his own cause with a
single. Nick Guisinger was hit
by a pitch to load the bases
before Leipsic starter Travis
Schroeder left the bases loaded
with a strikeout.
Leipsic came right back
with a run as Trevor Schroeder
singled but was forced at sec-
ond base on an excellent play
by Kortokrax at short when
he dove to his right to snare
a ground ball in the hole by
Travis Schroeder. Kortokrax
got up and forced Trevor
Schroeder at second base. After
a strikeout, Ty Maag kept the
inning alive as he reached on
an error before Devin Mangas
plated the run with a single
to right. A ground ball back
to the mound left two Leipsic
runners on base.
The Vikings threatened to
tie the game in the fourth as
Brady Schroeder walked with
two outs and stole second base.
Trevor Schroeder reached on
an error to put runners on the
corners. A fly ball to right field
ended the threat and Utendorf
retired the next six batters to
keep Kalida in the lead.
Kalida tried to extend its lead
in the fifth as Heitmeyer singled
with one out that ended Travis
Schroeder’s day on the mound.
Maag came in and struck out
the first batter he faced before
Ellerbrock was hit by a pitch. A
passed ball had runners at sec-
ond and third base before a pop
foul hauled in by Maag ended
the threat.
Maag took the loss for
Leipsic as he went 2 2/3
innings, allowing a run on
four hits with three strikeouts
and a walk. Travis Schroeder
allowed three runs on five hits
with four strikeouts.
Trevor Schroeder and
Devin Mangas both had two
hits for Leipsic.
Utendorf, Schroeder and
Heitmeyer all had two hits for
Kalida.
Kalida entertains Cory-
Rawson 5 p.m. Thursday.
* * *
Leipsic 011 000 1 - 3 6 2
Kalida 030 000 1 - 4 9 3
(Winning run scored with two
outs.)
WP-Utendorf (5-0). LP-Tra.
Schroeder.
Kalida
By Brian Bassett
Times Bulletin Sports Editor
sports@timesbulletin.com
MIDDLE POINT -
Lincolnview High School was
home to a cold and windy
Van Wert County track meet
Tuesday evening and when
the dust set-
tled the Van
Wert Cougar
boys and girls
both claimed
c ha mpi on-
ships.
The Cougar boys racked
up 69.5 points, just ahead
of Crestview with 59.5. The
Lancers were third with 46
points. The Lady Cougars
won my a much wider margin.
They racked up 81 points, with
Li nc ol nvi e w
second scor-
ing 48 points.
Crestview took
third with 45
points.
“The kids
performed well
tonight,” Van Wert coach
Mark Collins said of his teams.
“They stepped up to the chal-
lenge in the running events.
We struggled somewhat in the
field events and we need to get
better on that.”
The Cougar boys were led
almost solely by their running
events. They won the 4x800
(8:50.5), 4x200 (1:37.5) and
4x400 (3:43.9) relays.
Tyson Crone won the 110-
meter hurdles for the Cougars
with a time of 17.3. Reggie
Phillips took the 100-meter
dash with a time of 11.2 and
Jared Fleming won the 1,600-
meter run in 4:45. Chadd
Phillips claimed the 400-meter
dash title for the Cougars in
52.1, just ahead of teammate
Seth Kopp, who clocked in
at 52.4.
Crone picked up his second
win with a 43.9 finish in the
300-meter hurdles and Fleming
won the 800-meter run in 2:04.
Kopp edged Chadd Phillips to
win the 200-meter dash in a
time of 23.3. Kase Schalois won
a closely-contested 3,200-meter
run race in a time of 10:13, just
ahead of Crestview’s Mycah
Grandstaff, who finished in
10:18.
The Lady Cougars took the
4x800 (11:13.6) and the 4x100-
meter (54.0) relay titles. They
had more success in the field
events than the boys team did,
also, with Alexis Dowdy win-
ning the shot put (33-5) - edg-
ing teammate Haley Ramey
(30-6). Haley Sinning took the
girls discus title with a throw
of 90-8.
Amanda Clay won the 100
(12.7) and 200 (27.0) meter
dashes for the Lady Cougars
and Andi Foster won the
1,600-meter run with a time of
6:00.4. Jacey
Ei kenberry
took the 800-
meter run
title by post-
ing a 2:42,
just ahead
of Lincolnview’s Hannah
McCleery who finished in
2:43.
Schealissa Williams placed
first in the 3,200-meter run in
a time of 13:02 and teammate
Erin Dingle took second in
13:45.
“The girls did a nice job.
Amanda Clay had a nice meet;
she’s our iron woman. Alexis
almost broke the freshman
record in shot put, Amanda
broke the record in the 100 -
and the county record. That’s
a lot of good things on the girls
side,” Collins added.
The Knight boys were just
behind the Cougars. They took
a very competitive 4x100-
meter relay title in 46.8. Chase
Walters won the discus throw
for Crestview with a distance
of 132-9. Walters also won the
shot put with a throw of 48-9.
McCleery led the Lady
Lancers with a first-place fin-
ish in the high jump, as she
cleared 4-8. Crystal Protsman
won the girls long jump for
Lincolnview with a jump of
14-5.
The Lady Knights took
4x200 (1:52.6) and 4x400
(4:25.5) meter relay titles.
Erika Frey won the 100 meter
hurdles for Crestview in a time
of 15.6 and Layne Callow won
the 400-meter dash in 1:02.6.
Frey claimed her second title
in the 300-meter hurdles in
48.4 seconds. Jamie Moore
also picked up a first-place
finish for the Lady Knights
in the pole vault, with a vault
of 7-3.
“We had a lot of PRs
tonight, a lot of kids going
home with T-shirts,” said
Crestview coach James
Lautzenheiser. “When we
look at the data, we’ll see
a lot of PR finishes. The
competition level was high
tonight; I’m proud with how
my teams stacked up against
the Cougars. I think this has
been one of the more competi-
tive Van Wert County meets
we’ve seen in a while. That’s
good for track and field when
it comes to our county.
“We and Lincolnview
want to push Van Wert. Not
so much as a rivalry but for us
to say we can hang with the
bigger school. That makes us
and Lincolnview better in the
NWC because Van Wert has
such a good program.”
The Lancer boys picked up
a trio of field-event victories.
Sloan Whitaker won the high
jump with a jump of 5-10.
Austin Treesh jumped 19-6
in the long jump and Brandon
Jacomet won the pole vault
with a vault of 12 feet.
“We performed well
tonight; I thought we fought
really hard. There were some
events in which our strengths
are the same as Van Wert
and Crestview’s strengths. In
a small meet there were a
couple of events which we
just had a hard time scoring
points in,” said Lincolnview
coach Matt Langdon. “I am
proud of the way my teams
performed in the field events.
Our kids there did a nice job
tonight. We scored a lot of
points in those events.”
Crestview is at Archbold
4 p.m. and Van Wert is in the
New Haven Relays 4:45 p.m.
Friday, while Lincolnview is in
the New Bremen Invitational
9 a.m. Saturday.
Cougars grabbed competitive county meet
2
AVAILABLE FOR RENT:
º 15, 12 and 8 passenger Chevrolet Express Vans
º 7 passenger Chevrolet Express Conversion Van
º 7 passenger Chevrolet Uplander Regular
& Extended Minivans
º 6 passenger Chevrolet Impala, HHR Sport Wagon,
Malibu, Cavalier and Pontiac G-6 Sedans
º Full-size GM Pickup Truck w/8’ bed
º Chevrolet Express 12’ Box Truck w/appliance ramp
º Vehicle Tow dolly w/brakes and lights
602 W. £kVIN kD. º VAN W£kI, OHIO
SPECIAL DEALS & FREQUENT CUSTOMER DISCOUNTS
CALL NOW: 419-238-5902 | AFTER HOURS: 419-203-1142
EASY AUTO CREDIT
906 W. Main St. • 419-238-5255 • Van Wert
Hours: Mon/Wed/Thurs/Fri 9-6; Sat 9-1
Save up to $500
Free Give-a-Way with purchase
Stop in or call for more details
$
199
00
It’s Our 5th Anniversary
Sell-A-Bration
Going on now thru May 31, 2012
Down
NEW... Now available at 4-K Tire
and
K
TIRE
4
226 S. Pierce St.
Delphos
419-692-2034
Dick Cepek Mud County
Nitto Terra Grappler
We can also get Aluminum Wheels
Open Mon-Fri 8-6; Sat. 8-1
8 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7)
Tuesday’s Result
New Jersey 3, Florida 2, OT,
series tied 3-3
Today’s Game
Washington at Boston, 7:30
p.m., series tied 3-3
Thursday’s Games
Ottawa at NY Rangers, TBD,
series tied 3-3
New Jersey at Florida, TBD
NHL PLAYOFF
GLANCE
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 38 27 .585 —
x-New York 34 30 .531 3 1/2
x-Philadelphia 34 30 .531 3 1/2
New Jersey 22 43 .338 16
Toronto 22 43 .338 16
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 46 19 .708 —
x-Atlanta 39 26 .600 7
x-Orlando 36 28 .563 9 1/2
Washington 18 46 .281 27 1/2
Charlotte 7 57 .109 38 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-Chicago 48 16 .750 —
x-Indiana 42 23 .646 6 1/2
Milwaukee 31 33 .484 17
Detroit 24 41 .369 24 1/2
Cleveland 21 43 .328 27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
z-San Antonio 48 16 .750 —
x-Memphis 40 25 .615 8 1/2
x-Dallas 36 29 .554 12 1/2
Houston 33 32 .508 15 1/2
New Orleans 21 44 .323 27 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma City 47 18 .723 —
x-Denver 36 28 .563 10 1/2
x-Utah 35 30 .538 12
Portland 28 37 .431 19
Minnesota 26 39 .400 21
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Lakers 41 24 .631 —
x-L.A. Clippers 40 25 .615 1
Phoenix 33 32 .508 8
Golden State 23 42 .354 18
Sacramento 21 44 .323 20
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
———
Tuesday’s Results
Atlanta 109, L.A. Clippers 102
Oklahoma City 118, Sacramento 110
Boston 78, Miami 66
New Orleans 83, Golden State 81
Utah 100, Phoenix 88
Today’s Games
Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New York, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 8 p.m.
New York at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30
p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 13 4 .765 —
Atlanta 11 7 .611 2 1/2
New York 9 8 .529 4
Philadelphia 8 10 .444 5 1/2
Miami 7 9 .438 5 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 11 7 .611 —
Milwaukee 9 9 .500 2
Cincinnati 8 9 .471 2 1/2
Pittsburgh 7 9 .438 3
Chicago 6 12 .333 5
Houston 6 12 .333 5
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 13 5 .722 —
San Francisco 9 8 .529 3 1/2
Arizona 9 9 .500 4
Colorado 8 8 .500 4
San Diego 5 13 .278 8
———
Tuesday’s Results
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 4
N.Y. Mets 2, Miami 1
Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 2
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 2, 10
innings
Milwaukee 9, Houston 6
Philadelphia 8, Arizona 5
Washington 3, San Diego 1
Atlanta 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
Today’s Games
Colorado (Nicasio 1-0) at Pittsburgh
(Ja.McDonald 0-1), 12:35 p.m., 1st
game
Houston (Happ 1-1) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 3-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Volstad 0-2), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 2-1) at Arizona
(Cahill 1-1), 3:40 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 0-1) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 0-1), 4:05 p.m., 2nd game
Washington (Zimmermann 0-1) at
San Diego (Wieland 0-2), 6:35 p.m.
Miami (Buehrle 1-2) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 1-0) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 2-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Lilly 2-0), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1) at
Cincinnati (Bailey 1-2), 12:35 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 2-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 2-0), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (E.Jackson 1-1) at San
Diego (Volquez 0-2), 10:05 p.m.
----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 10 7 .588 —
New York 10 7 .588 —
Tampa Bay 10 7 .588 —
Toronto 10 7 .588 —
Boston 6 10 .375 3 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 9 6 .600 —
Chicago 10 7 .588 —
Detroit 10 7 .588 —
Minnesota 5 13 .278 5 1/2
Kansas City 3 14 .176 7
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 14 4 .778 —
Oakland 9 10 .474 5 1/2
Seattle 8 10 .444 6
Los Angeles 6 11 .353 7 1/2
———
Tuesday’s Results
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 3
Seattle 7, Detroit 4
Baltimore 2, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 5, L.A. Angels 0
Texas 2, N.Y. Yankees 0
Boston 11, Minnesota 2
Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 0
Today’s Games
Chicago White Sox (Sale 2-1) at
Oakland (Parker 0-0), 3:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 1-1) at
Cleveland (Jimenez 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-1) at Detroit
(Wilk 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Drabek 2-0) at Baltimore
(Hammel 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-1) at Tampa
Bay (Hellickson 2-0), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 1-2) at
Texas (Feldman 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Boston (Buchholz 1-1) at Minnesota
(Hendriks 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Kansas City (Mendoza 0-2) at
Cleveland (Tomlin 1-1), 12:05 p.m.
Seattle (Noesi 1-2) at Detroit (Porcello
1-1), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Williams 1-1) at Tampa
Bay (Moore 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 1-0) at Baltimore
(Matusz 0-3), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 0-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 1-0), 8:10 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
Austin Etzler, left, Ian Dukehart and Theran Carroll made it official in announcing
their decisions of where they will be playing sports at the collegiate level next fall. Etzler is
heading to Valparaiso to play football, as is Carroll (Heidelberg), while Dukehart will try
his hand in wrestling and track first at Hope before going out for football his sophomore
year. At right is Elida gridiron coach Jason Carpenter.
Jim Metcalfe photo
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delpho-
sherald.com
ELIDA — Three Elida
senior student-athletes for-
mally decided on their athletic
futures Monday after signing
national letters-of-intent.
Austin Etzler will head
to Valparaiso University
(Valparaiso, Ind.) to play
football for the Football
Championship Subdivision
(former Division I-AA) unit.
Ian Dukehart is heading
to Hope College (Holland,
Mich.) to play for their foot-
ball team.
Theran Carroll will start
out with the Heidelberg
(Tiffin, Ohio) University
wrestling and track and field
teams for his freshman season
in 2012-13 before trying his
hand at football and track in
his sophomore campaign.
“I wanted to play at a
Division I school and they are
that in the Pioneer League.
I also was considering West
Virginia and Northwestern as
a preferred walk-on but I liked
a smaller school, just like
here,” Etzler noted. “Toledo
was also of interest to me but
in the end, they weren’t too
interested in me. As members
of the All-Academic League,
they cannot give out athletic
scholarships but they will
help make up for that with
more academic help. Plus, I
am applying for anything and
everything I can get.
“I plan on going into civil
engineering and they have
one of the 12 best programs
in the nation. I’ll be able to
either go right into the work
force or on to higher educa-
tion. That’s the other reason I
chose Valpo; their great aca-
demics. The final reason is
that it’s close enough for my
family to come and watch
games but also far enough
away that I can’t just come
back on the drop of a hat.”
At this point, the plan is
to come in and play wide
receiver and maybe do a little
punting.
“I watched their spring
game and felt that I could
help out right away. As long
as I can get the plays down,
the coaches assured me that I
would get time immediately,”
he added. “I am running track
right now and that is keep-
ing me in shape. Once that is
over, I will get into their pro-
gram and work out two times
a day three times a week. I
know I have to get bigger,
faster and stronger no matter
where I would have gone to
college but especially at that
level.”
Dukehart knows the same
thing, even though he is going
to a smaller college.
“Especially since I will
likely be competing at defen-
sive end right away next fall.
They are telling me that per-
haps, down the road, they
might convert me to out-
side linebacker but for now,
I will stay on the line,” he
explained.
Academics also drew
Dukehart to the Michigan
program.
“They have a good physi-
cal therapy program; I know
that after going through that, I
will be accepted by any mas-
ter’s program in the nation,”
he continued. “It just felt
comfortable for me when I
visited and got to talk to the
coaches and players in the
program.
“Right now, I’m on my
own as far as working out.
I am doing the program we
have here at Elida. Soon, I
will send them my maxes and
I will get their program and
a nutrition plan. They don’t
have too many people that
stay there in the off-season to
work out but that is a possibil-
ity for next summer. I don’t
have to report until Aug.
10, so I will have plenty of
time to get myself physically
ready.”
As will Carroll — simply
because he won’t be playing
football this fall.
“I want to play two sports
at college and they felt that
wrestling and track would
be better to start with. They
wanted to see how I would
handle the academics first
before they allowed me to
play football and likely track,”
he explained. “I like all three
sports. I think they all help
each other. As an offensive
lineman, a wrestler and as a
thrower in track, it’s all about
explosion, leverage, stay low
and good body control. I have
a choice in wrestling between
190 pounds and 285 but
because I want to get bigger
for football as a sophomore,
I’ll go for the heavyweight.”
That love of sports is behind
his double-major choice of
sports management and phys-
ical education for the Bulldog
senior, who also had options
at Ohio Northern University,
Bluffton University and
Defiance College.
“I plan to eventually get
into coaching wherever I land.
I’d like to be able to start
coaching now,” he added. “I
will have a lot of time to
get into top-notch shape for
wrestling next winter and will
have over a year to get bigger
and stronger for football.”
Elida grid coach Jason
Carpenter feels that all three
will contribute at the next
level.
“These guys know what
it’s like to help rebuild a pro-
gram, especially Austin going
to Valpo; they are trying to
build that program up,” he
added. “What all three, plus
a couple of others that will
play football at the next level
in Jeremy Newby (Defiance
College) and Nathan Jenkins
(Ashland), bring to the table
is a great work ethic. They
will be good student-athletes
on and off the field, in the
classroom and in the com-
munity.”
Elida trio decide athletic futures
Bearcats get 10th win,
down Musketeers
SPENCERVILLE — The
Spencerville varsity baseball
team defeated Fort Jennings
10-7 Tuesday night at home.
It was the 10th win of
the season for the Bearcats,
which is the
most wins
since 1993.
J o e l
Shimp (1-2;
3 1/3 innings,
2 hits, 2 earned runs, 1 walk,
4 Ks) was the winning pitch-
er in relief and the offensive
leaders were: Jared Rex, who
was 2-for-3 with 2 runs batted
in, Joel Shimp (2-for-4 with
3 RBIs) and Cory Rieman
(2-for-4). The team is now
10-8 for the season and has a
home Northwest Conference
home game on Thursday ver-
sus Paulding at 5 p.m.
The Musketeers (6-12)
out-hit the Bearcats 11-9.
Troy Hellman took the loss
(3 1/3 IPs, 8 hits, 9 earned
runs, 6 BBs, 1 hit batter,
4 Ks). Cody Warnecke had
a pair of triples and Kurt
Warnecke and Nolan Neidert
had doubles.
Fort Jennings hosts
Jefferson tonight and Kalida
5 p.m. Friday.
Ft. Jennings 0 0 4 1 0 2 0 - 7 11 0
Spencerville 1 3 0 5 1 0 x - 10 9 2
WP: Joel Shimp (1-2); LP: Troy
Hellman. 2B: Kurt Warnecke (F),
Nolan Neidert (F), Joel Shimp (S),
Bubba Shimp (S). 3B: Cody Warnecke
2 (F), Jared Rex (S).
-----
Minster girls
whip Bearcats
SPENCERVILLE —
Minster’s softball team
improved to 17-5, whipping
Spencerville 13-3 in five
innings Tuesday night at
Spencerville.
The Wildcats scored five
times in the first inning and
never looked back as Kayla
Richard (6 strikeouts) threw
a 5-hitter.
Kaytlynn Warnecke took
the loss (3 Ks) as the visitors
pounded out 16 hits.
Spencerville (4-11) hosts
Paulding 5 p.m. Thursday.
Minster 5 3 3 0 2 - 13 16 1
Spencerville 0 0 3 0 0 - 3 5 1
WP: Kayla Richard; LP: Kaytlynn
Warnecke. 2B: Haleigh Mull (S). 3B:
S. Hosey (M).
-----
Burd’s grand slam propels
Kenton over Lady’ Dawgs
KENTON — Kenton
scored four times in the bot-
tom of the first on Kaylee
Burd’s grand slam to propel
themselves to a 10-2 Western
Buckeye League softball win
over Elida Tuesday night in
Kenton.
Brooke Ellis also went
yard for the victors, knock-
ing in two runs, while Jackie
Stadler, Dowing and Rostorfer
knocked in one each.
Caitlin Shroyer (2-7) took
the loss for the Lady Bulldogs
(4-11, 1-6
WBL). She
fanned five
and walked
six, as well as
ceding only
four hits to the Wildcats.
Elida out-hit their hosts
7-4 as Shroyer had a multi-
hit game.
Morgan Goecke (5 Ks, 1
walk) got the win for the
home team.
Elida hosts Findlay 5 p.m.
Thursday.
Elida 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 - 2 7 2
Kenton 4 0 0 4 0 2 x - 10 4 2
WP: Morgan Goecke; LP: Caitlin
Shroyer. 2B: Jessica Guerrero (E),
Jackie Stadler (K). HR: Kaylee Burd
GS (K), Brooke Ellis (K).
LOCAL ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — Joe
Johnson scored 28 points,
including a wild 3-pointer
in the final minute, and the
Atlanta Hawks held on for a
109-102 victory over the Los
Angeles Clippers on Tuesday
night, moving a step closer
to wrapping up home-court
in the first round of the play-
offs.
Blake Griffin scored a
season-high 36 points, while
Chris Paul added 34 in a
back-and-forth game that was
never in double figures until
the Hawks went on a 15-2 run
at the end of the third quarter,
sparked by Jeff Teague and
Josh Smith.
Johnson clinched it with
a pair of 3s, knocking down
a desperation shot with 38
seconds remaining and the
shot clock running down. He
threw up a two-handed heave
that somehow banked in, giv-
ing the Hawks a 103-96 lead.
THUNDER 118, KINGS 110
OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin
Durant scored 32 points, reserve
Daequan Cook had all 19 of his
points in the fourth quarter and
Oklahoma City won its first game
since top reserve James Harden
took an elbow to the head.
Durant extended his lead in a
tight NBA scoring race with the
Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant
despite sitting out the entire fourth
quarter in a close game. Durant is
averaging 27.97 points per game
to Bryant’s 27.86 with each hav-
ing one game left.
Cook filled the scoring void,
scoring Oklahoma City’s first 14
points of the final period to put the
Thunder ahead for the first time
since the first quarter.
DeMarcus Cousins, who was
allowed to play only after his 13th
technical foul was rescinded ear-
lier in the day, led Sacramento
with 32 points.
CELTICS 78, HEAT 66
BOSTON — Sasha Pavlovic
scored 12 of his of his season-
high 16 points in the fourth quar-
ter, leading a group of Boston
reserves as both teams rested
their top players.
LeBron James, Dwyane Wade
and Chris Bosh were out for the
Heat. Ray Allen, Kevin Garnett
and Rajon Rondo didn’t play for
the Celtics.
Dexter Pittman had 12
points, James Jones scored 11
and Udonis Haslem grabbed 13
rebounds for the Heat, whose 25
turnovers were a season high.
Marquis Daniels finished with
13 points, Brandon Bass had
eight points and eight rebounds
for the Celtics. Boston’s Paul
Pierce finished with eight points.
He started the game but sat out
the fourth quarter.
Miami’s loss gave the Chicago
Bulls the No. 1 seed in the East.
HORNETS 83, WARRIORS
81
OAKLAND, Calif. — Golden
State’s Chris Wright was called for
goaltending on Marco Belinelli’s
layup with 1.5 seconds remaining,
giving New Orleans the win.
Greivis Vazquez blocked
Charles Jenkins’ layup to start a
fast break in the final seconds.
He pushed the ball ahead to a
wide-open Belinelli, whose layup
touched the backboard and was
on its way down before Wright
hustled over for the illegal swat.
In an odd scene, many
Warriors fans were actually cheer-
ing for the Hornets.
Golden State has to finish in
the bottom seven of the league
after the draft lottery to keep its
protected first-round pick, acquired
by Utah in a previous trade. The
Warriors are eighth-worst in the
league entering Thursday night’s
season finale at home against
San Antonio.
JAZZ 100, SUNS 88
SALT LAKE CITY — Paul
Millsap scored 26 points and Al
Jefferson went on a personal
8-0 fourth-quarter run as Utah
clinched a Western Conference
playoff spot.
The victory halted Utah’s
7-game losing streak to the Suns,
dating to March 2010.
Jared Dudley and Michael
Redd scored 15 apiece for
Phoenix and Hakim Warrick had
12 for the Suns, who were without
forward Channing Frye because
of a shoulder injury.
The Suns won the season
series but can’t catch the Jazz
with just one game remaining.
Utah can still claim the No. 7
seed if Denver loses its final two
games.
The Suns trailed 85-80 when
Jefferson scored eight straight to
put the game out of reach.
Jefferson finished with 18
points and 16 rebounds.
NBA CAPSULES
1
THE PROFESSIONALS
• Garage Doors & Operators • Entrance & Storm Doors
• Wood • Steel • Painting Available • Insulation • Aluminum Railing
• Awnings • Rubber Roofing • Decks • Fence
1034 Westwood Dr., Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: (419) 238-9795 Fax: (419) 238-9893
Toll Free: (800) 216-0041
YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE
419-238-9795
S
i
n
c
e

1
9
6
0
WINDOWS • ROOFING • SIDING • FENCING
The Quality Door Place
EOE M/F/D/V
schneiderjobs.com/newjobs
1-800-44-PRIDE
MAKE 2012 YOUR YEAR:
UPGRADE TO ORANGE!
Schneider National is Now
Hiring Experienced Truck Drivers
For Regional Intermodal and
Dedicated Positions Throughout Ohio
HOME WEEKLY
Consistent Freight | Predictable Work
Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance Available
401(k) Plan | Quarterly Performance Bonus
You Lost a Chunk of Change Last
Year...Billions in Fact
Report Medicare/Medicaid
Fraud in Ohio.
Call: 1-800-488-6070
You can stop Medicare fraud.
It’s as easy as 1..2...3
* PROTECT your Medicare Number
* DETECT Read your Medicare
Summary Notice
* REPORT Your Concerns to 1-800-488-6070
ProSeniors.Org
Find the Best Deals
In Ohio Now!
800-286-4981
www.DLDeals.com
STOP PAYING TOO MUCH!
PLUS GIFT CARD REWARDS!
HIGH SPEED INTERNET TRIPLE PLAY BUNDLES
$20
/mo
Starting at less than
$100
/mo
Starting at less than
CAßL£ - IN7£RN£7 - PH0N£ - AND M0R£
EASYBATHINC.COM
Toll Free 1-866-425-5591
NEW WALK-IN
TUB OR SHOWER
LOCAL COMPANY
ONE DAY INSTALL
FACTORY CLOSEOUT!
CALL FOR PRICES
TROUBLE BATHING?
FREE
basic computer training for adults
Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226)
for local class information
Feel comfortable using a computer and
learn how to browse the Internet
Classes are FREE and forming
NOW at community
organizations in your area.
Corvettes
Wanted
1-800-850-3656 or
www.corvettebuyer.com
1952 - 1972
Any Condition! Competitive Buyer!
WEBB
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
)0.&t"650t#64*/&44t-*'&t)&"-5)
1-800-727-1113
212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 The Herald — 9 www.delphosherald.com
BUSINESS
DEAR BRUCE:
What are the rules, if
any, about whom you
can leave something
to after you pass away,
whether it be money or
a possession? I have a
nosy neighbor who keeps
telling me that I can leave
things in my will only
to an immediate family member. (I told her I had a very close
friend that I was thinking of adding to my will.) I would like to
remember my friend with something, but now this neighbor, who
offered her opinion where it wasn’t asked, has me thinking.
Can I leave something to whomever I wish? I don’t want to
be wrong and then mess everything up for my family when the
time comes. -- Sarah in North Carolina
DEAR SARAH: In most states, you are obliged to leave at
least one-third of your assets to your spouse, but what you do
with the other two-thirds is entirely up to you. If you want to give
the other two-thirds to a charity, so be it. If you want to leave
$1,000 to your massage therapist, go for it. There is no prohibition
against remembering someone’s kindness in your will.
It is important to have a competent attorney draw up the will,
reflecting your wishes as much as possible, in conformance with
the laws of the state where you live. This is a very important step,
just in case a family member decides to contest the will. Once
you are gone, there is no one to speak for you.
DEAR BRUCE: I am in the process of selling a rental
property, and I am told I will have to pay capital gains taxes.
Someone told me there are ways around that. Any thoughts? --
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I don’t know of any direct method to
avoid the taxes. You can, of course, reinvest the money under the
like-kind exchange rule and thereby postpone paying the taxes.
The operative term here is “postpone.” When that property is
sold, the tax man will get his due.
Given the information you have provided, I know of no other
way for you to avoid the taxes. The best way to find out exactly
is to consult an accountant who is familiar with your income,
finances, etc. He or she will be able to give you a better picture
than I can of how much you will pay, if anything. Be glad you
made a profit; it could have been a loss.
DEAR BRUCE: I am estranged from my family. I found out
that my last living parent, my mother, died. Of course I have not
heard a thing from my siblings and would like to know if I was
remembered in her will. I probably was not, but still I would like
to know. Is it true that I can get a copy of the will as it is public
knowledge? I understand it has to have been probated first. --
P.T. in Arizona
DEAR P.T.: In most cases, the answer is yes. I am reluctant
to say this is true in every instance. Since you are not on good
terms with your family members, check with the surrogate in the
county where your mother’s will has been probated. Wills are
on file for a good many years with the Surrogate Court. Wills,
as you know, are public documents, and for a very modest fee,
copies can be purchased.
(Send your questions to Smart Money, P.O. Box 2095, Elfers,
FL 34680. Send email to bruce@brucewilliams.com. Questions
of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to
the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided.)

Copyright 2012, United Feature Syndicate
BRUCE WILLIAMS
Smart
Money
Bequeath your stuff
to whomever you want
Aero Printing in running for
Small Business of the Year award
DELPHOS — The Lima/
Allen County Chamber of
Commerce is holding its
Small Business of the Year
contest and Aero Printing is
in the running. Owner Carl
Core says he thinks his com-
pany is worthy of winning
but feels his hard work is
sternly-validated by the mere
nomination.
“We’re one of the three
finalists and they’ll announce
the winner on May 2. I
think it’s a pretty neat thing
because I wasn’t expecting it
but I’ll sure take it. I think we
deserve it because we’ve been
exemplary for 55 years and
Mr. Rohr would be proud,”
he said.
The other two businesses
are The Ayers Incorporated
Photography and Sielschott,
Walsh, Keifer & Regula
CPAs, Inc.
Core said he inherited the
legacy of the former Herald
employee who started the
company.
“In January 1957, Arthur
E. Rohr, a journeyman print-
er at The Delphos Herald,
opened AER-O Printing. He
named it using his initials so
the business name would be
first in the yellow pages,”
he said. “We have changed
a lot from the letterpress
days of yore but one thing
has remained the same and
that’s quality. Mr. Rohr was
a craftsman. He lived it and
stressed it and so do we. We
carry on the tradition today as
we know he would have. Oh,
and we are still first in the yel-
low pages.”
Core said he owes his
career to Rohr.
“We inherited the name
and have honored it. He was
a darn good printer and taught
me everything I know. He
passed away in 1985 and we
moved in 1986 to where the
old Hardees was before they
moved in. We built at our cur-
rent location and opened it on
Aug. 13, 1988,” he recalled.
In addition to offset
printing and copying, Aero
Printing is connected to high
volume, high resolution black
and white and color digital
printers. Core said they can
read files from either Mac
or Windows formats and can
also reproduce pre-printed
files.
Nancy Spencer photo
Aero Printing owner Carl Core pulls up a print job on his
computer.
Stacy Taff photos
Roselawn celebrates grand re-opening, 70th anniversary
Roselawn Manor in Spencerville celebrated it’s Grand
Re-Opening and 70th anniversary Thursday afternoon
with a ribbon cutting and dedication. Tours were offered
after the celebration to showcase the completed renova-
tions, which began in August 2010. The facility contains
54 beds and 8 assisted living units. Cutting the ribbon
are, from left, Doris Proctor, President of Spencerville
Community Improvement Corp., Spencerville Mayor P.J.
Johnson, Roselawn Administrator Shanna Holland, and
President of Lima/Allen County Chamber of Commerce
Jed Metzger.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 13,001.56 +74.39
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,961.60 -8.85
S&P 500 INDEX 1,371.97 +5.03
AUTOZONE INC. 379.36 -2.64
BUNGE LTD 66.25 +0.68
EATON CORP. 48.46 +1.06
BP PLC ADR 41.91 -0.04
DOMINION RES INC 50.81 -0.04
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 38.27 +0.22
CVS CAREMARK CRP 43.42 +0.17
CITIGROUP INC 33.42 +0.17
FIRST DEFIANCE 16.46 +0.60
FST FIN BNCP 17.05 +0.28
FORD MOTOR CO 11.39 +0.04
GENERAL DYNAMICS 70.06 +0.79
GENERAL MOTORS 22.89 -0.06
GOODYEAR TIRE 11.19 -0.08
HEALTHCARE REIT 55.06 +0.94
HOME DEPOT INC. 51.23 +0.13
HONDA MOTOR CO 35.49 +0.49
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.54 +0.12
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 63.77 +0.40
JPMORGAN CHASE 43.28 +0.43
KOHLS CORP. 49.34 -0.64
LOWES COMPANIES 31.38 +0.26
MCDONALDS CORP. 94.59 -0.60
MICROSOFT CP 31.92 -0.20
PEPSICO INC. 66.51 +0.33
PROCTER & GAMBLE 67.00 +0.35
RITE AID CORP. 1.41 -0.07
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.47 +0.13
TIME WARNER INC. 36.42 +0.15
US BANCORP 31.62 +0.41
UTD BANKSHARES 7.31 +0.46
VERIZON COMMS 39.50 +0.93
WAL-MART STORES 57.77 -1.77
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 24, 2012
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
10 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your special
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND- SMALL black
and white dog found out in
the country Friday 4/20.
Call 419-692-1075
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
095

Child Care
CHILDCARE PROVIDER
Openings available for
children age 6 months and
older in my smoke-free,
pet-free, Delphos home.
Lunch and afternoon
snack provided. Available
from 7:45 A.M. to 5:00
P.M. Monday thru Friday.
Many years experience.
References available. Feel
free to call Stacy at
419-236-1358
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
340

Garage Sales
18069 ROAD 24-R, Fort
Jennings. Dvd’s, TV’s,
furniture, toys, video
games, household items,
clothing, lots more.
April 26&27- 8am-8pm.
April 28- 8am-1pm
8225 DEFIANCE Tr.
RV supplies and LOTS of
misc. Thurs. April 26 thru
Sat. April 28 - 8am-5pm.
904 N. Washington.
April 26&27 - 9am-?.
Christmas, ATV helmets,
baby items, furniture, tree
stand, lots of misc.
MULTIPLE FAMILIES
458 S. Pierce St.
Thurs & Fri 9am-7pm,
Sat 9am-2pm.
Desk, TV stand, computer
desk, electronics, printer,
fax machine, etc., many
small kitchen appliances,
dishes, pictures, luggage,
Elvis Presley memorabilia,
clothing, toys, bedding,
wood handle golf clubs, so
much more!
560

Lawn & Garden
NEW MOWER - used 6
times, 5ft x 10ft trailer,
14in tires.
Call 567-204-5536
590

House For Rent
HOME FOR RENT
2BR plus office,
basement, garage,
$650/month +deposit.
References is a must!
Call Krista Schrader with
Schrader Realty
419-233-3737
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
820

Motorcycles
& Mopeds
2006 HONDA Helix.
Excellent shape. Low
mileage. $2900.00 firm.
Call 419-695-6178
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
Answer to
Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Tower over
5 “-- -Man Fever”
8 Rum cake
12 “Fernando” band
13 Turkish official
14 Malevolent
15 “Who’s Who” entries
16 Hull
18 Break away
20 Woods insect
21 Santa -- winds
22 Vandal
23 Jungle warnings
26 Bank, often
29 Machu Picchu builder
30 Sentry’s cry
31 Indent key
33 Snacked on
34 Lacking energy
35 Points of convergence
36 Coveted awards
38 Dazed, with “out”
39 Reuben bread
40 Mr. Voight
41 Roll of stamps
43 Hollow rocks
46 Keel clinger
48 Reindeer herder
50 Boast
51 Caveman from Moo
52 Happily -- after
53 Store lure
54 Location technique
55 Fresh
DOWN
1 Chem room
2 Geishas’ apparel
3 Woodwind
4 Lash darkener
5 Bamboo muncher
6 Feverish chill
7 Feline
8 In arrears
9 With, to Yves
10 Swindle
11 Each and every
17 Dwarf
19 Jr. naval officer
22 Tide over
23 Estuary
24 Not fooled
25 Does well
26 Escapes
27 007’s alma mater
28 Compete at Indy
30 Rent, as a limo
32 Proposal
34 Clapton classic
35 Caressed
37 Shrink in fear
38 Elephant quarters
40 Army wheels
41 Irene -- of “Fame”
42 Kind of hygiene
43 Mashed potato serv-
ing
44 A-frame feature
45 Hurl forth
46 Small shot
47 Part of a gearwheel
49 Apply a jimmy
DEAR DOCTOR K:
During the colder months,
I’m prone to “attacks” in
which my fingers and toes get
very cold and then go blue
and numb. Although they do
eventually return to normal, it’s
a recurring problem. Could I
have Raynaud’s disease?
DEAR READER:
Raynaud’s is certainly one
cause of cold fingers and
toes. You mention that your
symptoms come and go. This,
coupled with the fact that your
fingers and toes lose color,
leads me to believe you may
have Raynaud’s. In addition to
causing your digits to feel cold
or even painful, Raynaud’s
causes the top part of the fingers
and toes to get very white or
blue-purple.
The most common trigger
for Raynaud’s is cold air. So
for most sufferers, it’s more
of a problem in winter. But
Raynaud’s can strike even in
summer. If you move from
outdoors to a very well-air-
conditioned building, the
change in temperature can
set it off. Emotional stress or
being startled can also trigger
an attack of Raynaud’s. Most
attacks of Raynaud’s end if you
get out of the cold air and also
take certain steps that I discuss
below.
In anyone, cold causes the
tiny blood vessels (arterioles)
in and under the skin to clamp
down. In Raynaud’s, they
clamp down very hard, more
than they need to. As a result,
the fingers and toes don’t get
enough blood or oxygen. This
causes the symptoms.
Your doctor definitely should
be able to diagnose or rule out
the condition -- particularly if
you see your doctor during an
attack.
The most important thing to
do to protect against Raynaud’s
is to avoid situations that trigger
an attack. Avoid cold air. If you
have to get out in cold weather,
bundle up. Keep your whole
body warm (not just your
hands and feet). Buy a hat that
protects the forehead (wind
on the forehead can trigger
Raynaud’s). Protect your hands
when handling items from
refrigerators and freezers at
home or at the grocery store.
Wear warm clothing when
you’re in air-conditioning,
if air-conditioning brings on
attacks.
There are other triggers to
consider. Avoid cigarette smoke
-- chemicals in cigarettes can
irritate your blood vessels and
cause them to clamp down.
Too much caffeine can make
some people with Raynaud’s
get attacks more easily. And if
you think stress triggers your
Raynaud’s, try deep breathing
or meditation.
What’s the best way to end
an attack? Get out of the cold
air, and soak your hands or feet
in warm (not hot) water. If you
can’t get out of cold air quickly,
put your hands in a warm place
-- your armpits. Then rotate
your arms like a windmill.
(Every time I demonstrate this
to a patient, they look at me
funny.) Yes, I know you may
look like you’re trying to fly.
But you’re also increasing the
flow of warm blood to your
armpits.
It sounds as if you have
Raynaud’s. As it turns out,
I have it, too. It can really be
aggravating. And if you really
want to know, yes, sometimes
on a very cold day I do put my
hands in my armpits and look
like I’m trying to fly. I don’t
care what people may think:
My hands feel better.
(Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard
Medical School. Go to his
website to send questions and
get additional information:
www.AskDoctorK.com.)
Distributed by Universal
UClickf or UFS
Come in from the cold to stop Raynaud’s attack
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
Cook meat and poultry, stick
it in the freezer and pull it out
for quick meals. For example,
chicken can be roasted and
shredded for sandwiches,
quesadillas, soups or casseroles.
The first reader tip shares her
method of freezing ground
beef:
Pre-cook ground beef:
Freeze browned hamburger in
meal-sized portions. I freeze
it in pint jars, which works in
any recipe that calls for a pound
of hamburger, and I throw in
onions, bell peppers, celery, etc.
depending on what I need to use
up at the time. It helps the meat
go further and adds flavor. It’s
a big time-saver because you
can thaw and use it in so many
recipes without having to fry it
up and then clean up the mess
after. -- S.D., Minnesota
Note from Sara: Do not fill the
jar to the top when freezing in
canning jars, to avoid breakage.
Leave room for expansion and
use straight wide-mouthed jars
rather than jars with curved
“shoulders”. Many wide-
mouthed canning jars have a fill
line marked on the jar. Plastic
freezer storage jars from Ball
are an option, too. Also, you
can boil ground beef. To learn
more about boiling ground
beef rather than frying it, visit:
frugalvillage.com/2007/01/04/
t hri ft y-t hursday-quest i on-
hamburger-crumbles.
Small welding repair: For
small welding jobs, check
your local hardware store for
a product called J-B Weld. It
comes with two ingredients
that, when mixed together, form
a clay-like ball that hardens
after you make the repairs. We
fixed my daughter’s iron bed
with it. It works great and looks
like metal when it cures. -- Gert,
email
Free garbage bags, plus
mulch: Every fall, people
around my neighborhood set out
garbage bags full of leaves to be
picked up. When I tap on their
door and ask if I may have their
bags of leaves for my garden,
they are usually delighted to
see them go! I don’t have to buy
garbage bags all winter, and I
just mow/mulch the leaves into
my garden. -- Suzan, New York
Weekly school clothes plan: I
have a great system for making
sure my kids’ school clothes
are ready each week. I put all
of their clothes for the week in
their own laundry basket, socks
and all. Just a few minutes of
preparation on Sunday saves
valuable time before school
each day. -- Stacia, forums
Easy baked potato: Here’s
a faster way to make a baked
potato. First, wash the potato
and rub it with oil and salt.
Next, cook the potato in the
microwave for about 5 to 10
minutes (depending on the size
of the potato), making sure to
poke holes in it first, which
speeds up the cooking. Then
put it in the oven for about five
minutes to make the skin crispy.
Takes a lot less time, and tastes
no different. -- Shana, email
Eggshells, and the animals
that love them: I saved up
eggshells two years ago, then
crushed and scattered them
around my green pepper plants.
The next day all of the plants had
been dug up and were laying on
the ground. Turns out we had
a skunk living under our shed,
and skunks love eggshells! She
dug up every plant near them.
Needless to say, I won’t be
using eggshells in my garden
again. -- P.T., Colorado
Eggshells in chicken feed:
When we had chickens, we
would feed them eggshells
for extra calcium. We learned
the hard way, however, that
if you aren’t careful in your
preparation, the chickens will
acquire a taste for eggs. It’s
a very frustrating problem,
having to deal with egg-eating
chickens. To avoid the trouble,
dry the eggshells, grind them up
and add them to the chickens’
mash. -- Jo S., forums
(Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
City, MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.)

Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
Make-ahead and freeze for quick meals
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Michael L. Osting, Jeanne M.
Osting to Alma D. Rhodes, inlots
323, 324, Middle Point.
Phil McClure Family Living
Trust, Bonnie J. McClure Family
Living Trust to Tina M. Drake, lot
9-2, Van Wert subdivision 5.
Bonita Z. Agnew, Marta Z.
Leroy, Hilda J. Zeigler to Zion
Farms LLC, Zion Farms VW
LLC, portion of section 27,
Pleasant Township, portion of
section 28, York Township.
Albert V. McConnell, Charles
McConnell, Charles E. McConnell
to Douglas L. Coplin, Meisa M.
Coplin, inlot 1244, Van Wert.
Charles W. Albright to William
C. Albright, portion of section
15, Pleasant Township (Albright
subdivision lots 5, 6 and 7).
Grace Bible Church of VA
to Robert D. Moser, Leslie Ann
Moser, portion of inlots 70, 69,
Van Wert.
RHK Farms Inc. to Klausing
Ltd., portion of section 18,
Jennings Township, portion of
sections 13, 24, York Township.
William A. Develvis, Brenda
K. Develvis to Anthony J.
Finkhousen, Darcy E. Vaske,
portion of section 17, York
Township.
Jeremy L. Hileman, Robin L.
Spencer to Jeremy L. Hileman,
Jeremy Hileman, portion fo
section 30, Willshire Township.
Estate of Waltraud McMichael
to Keith Myers, Pamela J. Myers,
portion of inlot 939, Van Wert.
Estate of Clarence J. Klausing,
Jean A. Klausing to Darryl L.
Banks, portion of section 15,
Pleasant Township.
Beryl Grubaugh Living Trust
to Kurt J. Grubaugh, Rebecca
Grubaugh, portion of section
12, Union Township, portion
of sections 7 and 6, Hoaglin
Township.
Douglas S. Eshleman, Belinda
J. Eshelman, Sheriff Stan D.
Owens to Chester M. Straley,
portion of section 24, Willshire
Township.
10 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your special
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND- SMALL black
and white dog found out in
the country Friday 4/20.
Call 419-692-1075
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
095

Child Care
CHILDCARE PROVIDER
Openings available for
children age 6 months and
older in my smoke-free,
pet-free, Delphos home.
Lunch and afternoon
snack provided. Available
from 7:45 A.M. to 5:00
P.M. Monday thru Friday.
Many years experience.
References available. Feel
free to call Stacy at
419-236-1358
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
340

Garage Sales
18069 ROAD 24-R, Fort
Jennings. Dvd’s, TV’s,
furniture, toys, video
games, household items,
clothing, lots more.
April 26&27- 8am-8pm.
April 28- 8am-1pm
8225 DEFIANCE Tr.
RV supplies and LOTS of
misc. Thurs. April 26 thru
Sat. April 28 - 8am-5pm.
904 N. Washington.
April 26&27 - 9am-?.
Christmas, ATV helmets,
baby items, furniture, tree
stand, lots of misc.
MULTIPLE FAMILIES
458 S. Pierce St.
Thurs & Fri 9am-7pm,
Sat 9am-2pm.
Desk, TV stand, computer
desk, electronics, printer,
fax machine, etc., many
small kitchen appliances,
dishes, pictures, luggage,
Elvis Presley memorabilia,
clothing, toys, bedding,
wood handle golf clubs, so
much more!
560

Lawn & Garden
NEW MOWER - used 6
times, 5ft x 10ft trailer,
14in tires.
Call 567-204-5536
590

House For Rent
HOME FOR RENT
2BR plus office,
basement, garage,
$650/month +deposit.
References is a must!
Call Krista Schrader with
Schrader Realty
419-233-3737
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
820

Motorcycles
& Mopeds
2006 HONDA Helix.
Excellent shape. Low
mileage. $2900.00 firm.
Call 419-695-6178
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
Answer to
Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Tower over
5 “-- -Man Fever”
8 Rum cake
12 “Fernando” band
13 Turkish official
14 Malevolent
15 “Who’s Who” entries
16 Hull
18 Break away
20 Woods insect
21 Santa -- winds
22 Vandal
23 Jungle warnings
26 Bank, often
29 Machu Picchu builder
30 Sentry’s cry
31 Indent key
33 Snacked on
34 Lacking energy
35 Points of convergence
36 Coveted awards
38 Dazed, with “out”
39 Reuben bread
40 Mr. Voight
41 Roll of stamps
43 Hollow rocks
46 Keel clinger
48 Reindeer herder
50 Boast
51 Caveman from Moo
52 Happily -- after
53 Store lure
54 Location technique
55 Fresh
DOWN
1 Chem room
2 Geishas’ apparel
3 Woodwind
4 Lash darkener
5 Bamboo muncher
6 Feverish chill
7 Feline
8 In arrears
9 With, to Yves
10 Swindle
11 Each and every
17 Dwarf
19 Jr. naval officer
22 Tide over
23 Estuary
24 Not fooled
25 Does well
26 Escapes
27 007’s alma mater
28 Compete at Indy
30 Rent, as a limo
32 Proposal
34 Clapton classic
35 Caressed
37 Shrink in fear
38 Elephant quarters
40 Army wheels
41 Irene -- of “Fame”
42 Kind of hygiene
43 Mashed potato serv-
ing
44 A-frame feature
45 Hurl forth
46 Small shot
47 Part of a gearwheel
49 Apply a jimmy
DEAR DOCTOR K:
During the colder months,
I’m prone to “attacks” in
which my fingers and toes get
very cold and then go blue
and numb. Although they do
eventually return to normal, it’s
a recurring problem. Could I
have Raynaud’s disease?
DEAR READER:
Raynaud’s is certainly one
cause of cold fingers and
toes. You mention that your
symptoms come and go. This,
coupled with the fact that your
fingers and toes lose color,
leads me to believe you may
have Raynaud’s. In addition to
causing your digits to feel cold
or even painful, Raynaud’s
causes the top part of the fingers
and toes to get very white or
blue-purple.
The most common trigger
for Raynaud’s is cold air. So
for most sufferers, it’s more
of a problem in winter. But
Raynaud’s can strike even in
summer. If you move from
outdoors to a very well-air-
conditioned building, the
change in temperature can
set it off. Emotional stress or
being startled can also trigger
an attack of Raynaud’s. Most
attacks of Raynaud’s end if you
get out of the cold air and also
take certain steps that I discuss
below.
In anyone, cold causes the
tiny blood vessels (arterioles)
in and under the skin to clamp
down. In Raynaud’s, they
clamp down very hard, more
than they need to. As a result,
the fingers and toes don’t get
enough blood or oxygen. This
causes the symptoms.
Your doctor definitely should
be able to diagnose or rule out
the condition -- particularly if
you see your doctor during an
attack.
The most important thing to
do to protect against Raynaud’s
is to avoid situations that trigger
an attack. Avoid cold air. If you
have to get out in cold weather,
bundle up. Keep your whole
body warm (not just your
hands and feet). Buy a hat that
protects the forehead (wind
on the forehead can trigger
Raynaud’s). Protect your hands
when handling items from
refrigerators and freezers at
home or at the grocery store.
Wear warm clothing when
you’re in air-conditioning,
if air-conditioning brings on
attacks.
There are other triggers to
consider. Avoid cigarette smoke
-- chemicals in cigarettes can
irritate your blood vessels and
cause them to clamp down.
Too much caffeine can make
some people with Raynaud’s
get attacks more easily. And if
you think stress triggers your
Raynaud’s, try deep breathing
or meditation.
What’s the best way to end
an attack? Get out of the cold
air, and soak your hands or feet
in warm (not hot) water. If you
can’t get out of cold air quickly,
put your hands in a warm place
-- your armpits. Then rotate
your arms like a windmill.
(Every time I demonstrate this
to a patient, they look at me
funny.) Yes, I know you may
look like you’re trying to fly.
But you’re also increasing the
flow of warm blood to your
armpits.
It sounds as if you have
Raynaud’s. As it turns out,
I have it, too. It can really be
aggravating. And if you really
want to know, yes, sometimes
on a very cold day I do put my
hands in my armpits and look
like I’m trying to fly. I don’t
care what people may think:
My hands feel better.
(Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard
Medical School. Go to his
website to send questions and
get additional information:
www.AskDoctorK.com.)
Distributed by Universal
UClickf or UFS
Come in from the cold to stop Raynaud’s attack
Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D.
Ask
Doctor K
Cook meat and poultry, stick
it in the freezer and pull it out
for quick meals. For example,
chicken can be roasted and
shredded for sandwiches,
quesadillas, soups or casseroles.
The first reader tip shares her
method of freezing ground
beef:
Pre-cook ground beef:
Freeze browned hamburger in
meal-sized portions. I freeze
it in pint jars, which works in
any recipe that calls for a pound
of hamburger, and I throw in
onions, bell peppers, celery, etc.
depending on what I need to use
up at the time. It helps the meat
go further and adds flavor. It’s
a big time-saver because you
can thaw and use it in so many
recipes without having to fry it
up and then clean up the mess
after. -- S.D., Minnesota
Note from Sara: Do not fill the
jar to the top when freezing in
canning jars, to avoid breakage.
Leave room for expansion and
use straight wide-mouthed jars
rather than jars with curved
“shoulders”. Many wide-
mouthed canning jars have a fill
line marked on the jar. Plastic
freezer storage jars from Ball
are an option, too. Also, you
can boil ground beef. To learn
more about boiling ground
beef rather than frying it, visit:
frugalvillage.com/2007/01/04/
t hri ft y-t hursday-quest i on-
hamburger-crumbles.
Small welding repair: For
small welding jobs, check
your local hardware store for
a product called J-B Weld. It
comes with two ingredients
that, when mixed together, form
a clay-like ball that hardens
after you make the repairs. We
fixed my daughter’s iron bed
with it. It works great and looks
like metal when it cures. -- Gert,
email
Free garbage bags, plus
mulch: Every fall, people
around my neighborhood set out
garbage bags full of leaves to be
picked up. When I tap on their
door and ask if I may have their
bags of leaves for my garden,
they are usually delighted to
see them go! I don’t have to buy
garbage bags all winter, and I
just mow/mulch the leaves into
my garden. -- Suzan, New York
Weekly school clothes plan: I
have a great system for making
sure my kids’ school clothes
are ready each week. I put all
of their clothes for the week in
their own laundry basket, socks
and all. Just a few minutes of
preparation on Sunday saves
valuable time before school
each day. -- Stacia, forums
Easy baked potato: Here’s
a faster way to make a baked
potato. First, wash the potato
and rub it with oil and salt.
Next, cook the potato in the
microwave for about 5 to 10
minutes (depending on the size
of the potato), making sure to
poke holes in it first, which
speeds up the cooking. Then
put it in the oven for about five
minutes to make the skin crispy.
Takes a lot less time, and tastes
no different. -- Shana, email
Eggshells, and the animals
that love them: I saved up
eggshells two years ago, then
crushed and scattered them
around my green pepper plants.
The next day all of the plants had
been dug up and were laying on
the ground. Turns out we had
a skunk living under our shed,
and skunks love eggshells! She
dug up every plant near them.
Needless to say, I won’t be
using eggshells in my garden
again. -- P.T., Colorado
Eggshells in chicken feed:
When we had chickens, we
would feed them eggshells
for extra calcium. We learned
the hard way, however, that
if you aren’t careful in your
preparation, the chickens will
acquire a taste for eggs. It’s
a very frustrating problem,
having to deal with egg-eating
chickens. To avoid the trouble,
dry the eggshells, grind them up
and add them to the chickens’
mash. -- Jo S., forums
(Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
City, MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.)

Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
Make-ahead and freeze for quick meals
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Michael L. Osting, Jeanne M.
Osting to Alma D. Rhodes, inlots
323, 324, Middle Point.
Phil McClure Family Living
Trust, Bonnie J. McClure Family
Living Trust to Tina M. Drake, lot
9-2, Van Wert subdivision 5.
Bonita Z. Agnew, Marta Z.
Leroy, Hilda J. Zeigler to Zion
Farms LLC, Zion Farms VW
LLC, portion of section 27,
Pleasant Township, portion of
section 28, York Township.
Albert V. McConnell, Charles
McConnell, Charles E. McConnell
to Douglas L. Coplin, Meisa M.
Coplin, inlot 1244, Van Wert.
Charles W. Albright to William
C. Albright, portion of section
15, Pleasant Township (Albright
subdivision lots 5, 6 and 7).
Grace Bible Church of VA
to Robert D. Moser, Leslie Ann
Moser, portion of inlots 70, 69,
Van Wert.
RHK Farms Inc. to Klausing
Ltd., portion of section 18,
Jennings Township, portion of
sections 13, 24, York Township.
William A. Develvis, Brenda
K. Develvis to Anthony J.
Finkhousen, Darcy E. Vaske,
portion of section 17, York
Township.
Jeremy L. Hileman, Robin L.
Spencer to Jeremy L. Hileman,
Jeremy Hileman, portion fo
section 30, Willshire Township.
Estate of Waltraud McMichael
to Keith Myers, Pamela J. Myers,
portion of inlot 939, Van Wert.
Estate of Clarence J. Klausing,
Jean A. Klausing to Darryl L.
Banks, portion of section 15,
Pleasant Township.
Beryl Grubaugh Living Trust
to Kurt J. Grubaugh, Rebecca
Grubaugh, portion of section
12, Union Township, portion
of sections 7 and 6, Hoaglin
Township.
Douglas S. Eshleman, Belinda
J. Eshelman, Sheriff Stan D.
Owens to Chester M. Straley,
portion of section 24, Willshire
Township.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening April 25, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Suburg. Mod Fam Apt. 23 Revenge Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Survivor: One World Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC Betty BFF Rock Center Law & Order: SVU Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX American Idol Local
ION Cold Case Cold Case Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Dog Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Storage Storage
AMC North Country Legends of the Fall
ANIM Tanked River Monsters River Monsters Tanked River Monsters
BET Baby Boy The Game The Game Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/OC Interior Therapy Million Dollar Happens Interior Therapy Million
CMT Extreme-Home Ace Ventura Ace Ventura
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Key South Pk South Pk South Pk Ugly Amer Daily Colbert South Pk Ugly Amer
DISC American Guns American Guns Auction Auction American Guns Auction Auction
DISN Jessie Phineas Shake It Jessie Jessie Austin Wizards Good Luck Wizards Wizards
E! Legally Blonde The Soup The Soup Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN NBA Basketball NBA Basketball
ESPN2 MLB Baseball Baseball Tonight SportsCenter SportsCenter
FAM Paul Blart: Mall Cop The Pacifier The 700 Club Prince Prince
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Chopped All-Stars Restaurant: Im.
FX Ghost Rider 1408
HGTV Income Kitchen Property Brothers Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers Property Brothers
HIST American Restoration Sold! Sold! American American Sold! Sold! American Restoration
LIFE Wife Swap Wife Swap Wife Swap Wife Swap Wife Swap
MTV 16 and Pregnant America's Best Dance America's Best Dance America's Best Dance Hip-Hop Malibu
NICK George George George George George George Friends Friends Friends
SCI Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Total Blackout Ghost Hunters Total Blackout
SPIKE Auction Auction Auction Auction Am Digger Am Digger Am Digger Am Digger Auction Auction
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Conan Office Office
TCM Sweepings Jalna Little Lord F.
TLC Obsession Obsession Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras
TNT Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order CSI: NY CSI: NY
TOON NinjaGo Level Up King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Boondocks
TRAV Secrets Secrets Man v Fd Man v Fd Baggage B Baggage B Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd
TV LAND Home Imp. Home Imp. Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced King King King King
USA NCIS NCIS NCIS Fairly Legal NCIS
VH1 La La La La Behind the Music Couples Therapy Behind the Music Couples Therapy
WGN Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine 30 Rock Scrubs Scrubs Death
Premium Channels
HBO Losers Speaking Veep Girls Game of Thrones Real Time/Bill Maher Fast Five
MAX The Accused Get Him to the Greek Lingerie Usual
SHOW Red Scream 4 Piranha Square
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, April 25, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Woman
worried about
sister’s pets
Dear Annie: My sister has
seven cats, three dogs, two
turtles and a lizard. They are
overrunning her house. There
are random bits of garbage
all over the floor, along with
used dishes -- both human
and pet. When the dogs do
their business in the house,
she lets it stay there for hours
while she gets other work
done. The last time I was
there, I wiped some food off
of the wall, and she said I was
being rude.
Two months ago,
one of her dogs died.
A week later, she
bought a new one
for $750. I happen
to know she now
has less than $100
in her bank account.
And I worry she
might lose her job.
Her co-workers
have complained
that her clothing is
sloppy and covered
in dog hair.
I’ve told her many times
that she has too many pets.
She replies that it’s not my
business and storms off. I
suggested she give me one of
her dogs or cats and she told
me she would simply buy
more. I believe her.
How can I make her see
the light? -- Concerned
Sister
Dear Concerned: To some
extent, your sister is right:
This isn’t your business. A
messy home and dog-haired
clothing may not be your
preference, but they aren’t
necessarily a health risk. She
is depleting her bank balance
in order to purchase animals,
but then, some people do that
with shoes.
There can be a fine line
between eccentric behav-
ior that is within acceptable
boundaries and behavior
that indicates mental illness.
We don’t think your sister
has crossed that line, but
she bears watching. So stop
criticizing her choices, but
keep an eye on whether her
appearance and the condition
of her house substantially
deteriorate, whether she goes
into debt and whether the
animals are well treated. And
let her know you will be a
sympathetic shoulder if she
ever needs help managing.
Dear Annie: Our neigh-
bor, “Harvey,” is a homo-
sexual and frequently has
various men stay at his house
overnight -- sometimes more
than one at a time.
Here’s the problem: We
have an 11-year-old son, and
though Harvey is nice to him
and a good neighbor to us,
should we keep our son from
any association with Harvey?
My husband doesn’t seem to
think there’s any problem,
but one can never be too safe
when it comes to protecting
your children. -- Sleepless in
Seattle
Dear Seattle: Harvey
should be treated no differ-
ently than any adult neighbor
who has frequent overnight
guests, male or female, pre-
sumably for intimate purpos-
es. You wouldn’t want his
casual promiscuity (if that’s
what it is) to be something
your son emulates in his own
life, but we assume you would
discuss such things with your
child as a normal part of
transmitting your
values and morals.
It has nothing to do
with Harvey’s sex-
ual orientation, nor
does it make him a
greater risk to your
son’s welfare. And
if your real worry is
whether association
with Harvey will
make your son gay,
the answer is no.
Dear Annie:
This is for “Not a
Mommy,” the woman who
doesn’t care to hold some-
one’s infant.
I, too, am not fond of
babies (except for my grand-
children), but I have found
myself in the same awkward
situation when an employee
brings her baby to visit the
office. Two tips that work for
me: Never go alone into the
room where the baby is on
display. And don’t put your-
self in the front tier. Touch
the baby so the parent doesn’t
think you are a complete ogre,
but when asked, “Don’t you
want to hold him?” reply,
“Oh, let So-and-So. I can see
that she’s dying to.” Then
quietly make your exit. --
Chris from Maine
Dear Chris: Good advice
for the baby-averse. Thanks.
Dear Readers: Today is
Administrative Professionals
Day. If you have assistants
who make your job easier, let
them know how much they
are appreciated.
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012
If the year ahead appears to be
a bit topsy-turvy, it will be because
endeavors that you think would be big
winners aren’t apt to pan out, while
the notions that you deem duds will
produce some impressive rewards.
Take what you can get and run with
it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Your inability to properly evaluate
information that is essential to your
plans could be due to not having all
the necessary information at your
disposal. Don’t try to make a call
without all the facts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Disappointment is likely if you build
your expectations upon questionable
premises. It’s good to be optimistic,
but only if you’re also in touch with
reality.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If
you want others to accept you and treat
you nicely, you must first reach out to
them. Keep being warm and friendly,
even when you get the cold shoulder.
Eventually they’ll come around.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The
only person you have to genuinely
please is you. If you think you’ve done
your best to be warm and giving, you
don’t need any additional applause.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be
careful not to commit any selfish acts
or act indifferently to someone who
is nice to you. If you do so, it will be
quite a while before you can look at
yourself in the mirror again.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be
observant, because someone you
recently met might not be everything
that he or she pretends to be. When this
person has to perform under pressure,
this will become apparent to you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Should a friend come to you for
advice, instead of telling your pal what
you think she or he wants to hear, tell
the truth. Be kind about it, and you’ll
do a world of good.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Your ability to recognize a real
bargain might not be operating very
well. If something is expensive, sleep
on it for a while before committing a
sizable chunk of change.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Something might arise that
could force you to choose between
feathering your own nest or helping
out a friend, partner or loved one. You
can’t have your cake and eat it too.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
Be extremely selective of your choice
of companions, because what they do
will reflect on you for either good or
ill. Don’t gain a bad reputation based
on your friends.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
You could find yourself involved in
a social event where everybody but
you knows one another, leaving you
feeling like an outsider. If you can,
take a friend along.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Your personal ambitions and your
abilities might not complement one
another. It’s OK to want certain things
but only if you have the ability to get
what you desire.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Annie’s Mailbox
12 – The Herald Wednesday, April 25, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
2
T
H
U
R
S
D
A
Y
9
-
S
F
R
l
D
A
Y
9
-
8
S
A
T
U
R
D
A
Y
9
-
S

Answers to Monday’s
questions:
Marie Antoinette and
King Louis XVI had four
children — two daughters
and two sons. Only the
firstborn, Marie Therese
Charlotte, survived the
French Revolution.
The acronym MSRP
represents Manufacturer’s
Suggested Retail Price to
a car buyer. It’s the list
price set by the automobile
manufacturer that dealers
are legally required to post
on window stickers of all
new cars.
Today’s questions:
What is the only hard
part of an octopus’s body?
How tall is actress
Meryl Streep, who por-
trayed 6-foot-2 Julia Child
in the 2009 film Julie &
Julia?
Answers in Thursday’s
Herald
Today’s words:
Eucrasy: a normal state
of good health
Vinegarroon: a scor-
pion of Mexico and the
southwestern US
Today’s joke:
Four best friends
met at the hospital since
their wives were giving
births to their babies.
The nurse comes up to
the first man and says,
“Congratulations, you
got twins.” The man said
“How strange, I’m the
manager of Minnesota
Twins.”
After awhile the
nurse comes up to the
second man and says,
“Congratulations, you
got triplets.” Man was
like “Hmmm, strange I
worked as a director for
the “3 Musketeers.”
Finally, the nurse comes
up to the third man and
says “Congratulations,
you got twins times 2.”
Man is happy and says,
“Ironic, I work for the
hotel “Four Seasons.”
All three of them
are happy until they see
their last buddy jumping
all over the place, curs-
ing God and banging his
head on the wall. They
asked him what’s wrong
and he answered, “What’s
wrong? I work for 7up!”
By CAIN BURDEAU and
MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS — By
arresting a former BP engi-
neer Tuesday, federal pros-
ecutors for the first time
showed their hand in the
Gulf oil spill case, saying
they were probing whether
BP PLC and its employees
broke the law by intention-
ally lowballing how much oil
was spewing from its out-of-
control well.
Two years and four days
after the drilling-rig explo-
sion that set off the worst
offshore oil spill in U.S. his-
tory, Kurt Mix, 50, of Katy,
Texas, was arrested Tuesday
and charged with two counts
of obstruction of justice for
allegedly deleting about 300
text messages that indicat-
ed the blown-out well was
spewing far more crude than
the company was telling the
public at the time.
The charges are not likely
to affect a proposed class-
action settlement that would
resolve more than 100,000
claims by people and busi-
nesses who blame economic
losses over the spill. A feder-
al judge is expected today to
consider granting preliminary
approval of the $7.8 billion
civil settlement between BP
and a committee of plaintiffs.
The case against Mix
brings the first criminal charg-
es in the Justice Department’s
Deepwater Horizon probe. If
convicted, Mix could get up
to 20 years in prison and
a $250,000 fine on each
count. Mix was released on
$100,000 bail.
In an affidavit, the U.S.
Department of Justice said
it was investigating whether
BP and its employees broke
the law “by intentionally
understating” how much oil
was leaking.
Legal experts said this
was likely just the first move
by the Justice Department.
The federal agency made it
clear the investigation still is
ongoing and suggested more
people could be arrested.
“Did anyone else know
about this? Was this gentle-
man, shall we say encouraged
or pushed to do this? Did
he do it under orders? Did
he do it under duress?” said
Anthony Michael Sabino,
a professor at St. John’s
University School of Law in
New York and an expert in
white-collar crimes.
“When you’re a prosecu-
tor you start with the little
fish and you hope the little
fish helps you catch a medi-
um-sized fish; then you go
after the big fish until you
get the biggest fish of all,”
Sabino added. “It’s going up
the food chain ... If you jump
the gun, and you don’t have
the pieces in place, you ruin
the case.”
Seth Pierce, a Los
Angeles-based commercial
defense lawyer, said the
Justice Department’s move
was “almost like you would
see in a mafia case, where
they go and try to apply a lot
of pressure on really low-lev-
el guys in the hopes of turn-
ing them, or flipping them,
into witnesses for the state.”
Pierce called Mix a “weak
spot” prosecutors might try to
exploit because he no longer
works for BP.
“He might not have as
much loyalty to the compa-
ny,” he said.
An attorney for Mix, Joan
McPhee, described the charg-
es as misguided and that she
is confident Mix will be
exonerated.
“The government says
he intentionally deleted text
messages from his phone, but
the content of those messages
still resides in thousands of
emails, text messages and
other documents that he
saved,” she said. “Indeed, the
emails that Kurt preserved
include the very ones high-
lighted by the government.”
Federal investigators have
been looking into the causes
of the blowout and the actions
of managers, engineers and
rig workers at BP and its sub-
contractors Halliburton and
Transocean in the days and
hours before the April 20,
2010, explosion.
It is now clear that pros-
ecutors also are looking at the
aftermath of the blast, when
BP scrambled for weeks to
plug the leak.
In outlining the charges,
the government suggested
Mix knew the rate of flow
from the busted well was
much greater than the com-
pany publicly acknowledged.
Prosecutors also said BP
gave the public an optimis-
tic account of its May 2010
efforts to plug the well via a
technique called a “top kill,”
even though the company’s
internal data and some of
the text messages showed the
operation was likely to fail.
An accurate flow-rate esti-
mate is necessary to deter-
mine how much in penalties
BP and its subcontractors
could face under the Clean
Water Act. In court papers,
prosecutors appeared to sug-
gest the company was also
worried about the effect of the
disaster on its stock price.
In a statement, BP said
it is cooperating with the
Justice Department.
“BP had clear policies
requiring preservation of evi-
dence in this case and has
undertaken substantial and
ongoing efforts to preserve
evidence,” the statement
said.
The FBI said in court
papers that Mix repeated-
ly was notified by BP that
instant messages and text
messages needed to be pre-
served.
In public statements, the
company professed optimism
that the top kill would work,
giving it a 60 to 70 percent
chance of success.
On May 26, the day the
top kill began, Mix estimated
in a text to his supervisor
that more than 15,000 barrels
of oil per day were spilling
— three times BP’s public
estimate of 5,000 barrels and
an amount much greater than
what BP said the top kill
could probably handle.
At the end of the first
day, Mix texted his supervi-
sor: “Too much flow rate —
over 15,000 and too large an
orifice.” Despite Mix’s find-
ings, BP continued to make
public statements that the top
kill was proceeding accord-
ing to plan, prosecutors said.
On May 29, the top kill was
halted and BP announced its
failure.
BP stock closed at $41.91
Tuesday, a drop of just 4
cents. Analysts said inves-
tors evidently recognized the
charges involved just one,
low-ranking employee and
saw no hint yet of any kind
of larger cover-up on BP’s
part.
The explosion aboard the
Deepwater Horizon drilling
rig killed 11 workers. More
than 200 million gallons of
crude oil leaked from the
well off the Louisiana coast
before it was capped.
Under the Clean Water
Act, polluters can be fined
$1,100 to $4,300 per bar-
rel of spilled oil, with the
higher amount imposed if
the government can show the
disaster was caused by gross
negligence.
Engineer arrested, feds probe BP’s spill response
Firefighters from Middle Point, Delphos and Ohio
City responded to a barn reported engulfed in flames
at 21902 Jennings Delphos Road Monday afternoon.
Around 1 p.m., firefighters arrived on the scene but
the heavy winds made saving the structure impossible.
In addition, the wind carried burning debris from the
barn into neighboring fields which started many small
fires in that area. The investigation into the cause of the
blaze is continuing.
Barn leveled by Monday afternoon blaze

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful