© Tyler J Rowe 2011

Australian College of TCM & Qigong - Certificate of Advanced Qigong Studies Subject Outline Subject Presenter Duration Prerequisites Assessment Anmo Tuina – Chinese Massage Tyler J. Rowe 21 hours (14 x 1.5hr lecture/practical) TCM theory, Acupuncture point location Practical exam 10 x Practical worksheets Practice rice bags Massage cloths Student notes Sun Chengnan (1990) ‘Chinese Massage Therapy’ Shandong Science and Technology Press [reprinted as:- Sun Chengnan (2000) ‘Chinese Bodywork – A Complete Handbook of Chinese Therapeutic Massage’ Pacific View Press]

Materials Needed

Recommended Text

References Chase, Charles & Yang Shou-zhong (1995) ‘The Systematic Classic of Acupuncture & Moxibustion by Huang-fu Mi a translation of the Jia Yi Jing’ Blue Poppy Press Deadman, Peter & Al-Khafaji, Mazin (1998) ‘A Manual of Acupuncture’ Journal of Chinese Medicine Publications Legge, David (1997) ‘Close to the Bone – The Treatment of Musculo-skeletal Disorder with Acupuncture and other Traditional Chinese Medicine’ Sydney College Press Legge, David (2010) ‘Jing Jin – Acupuncture treatment of muscular system using the meridian sinews’ Sydney College Press Maoshing Ni (1995) ‘The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine - A New Translation of the 'Neijing Suwen' with Commentary’ Shambhala Publications Pritchard, Sarah (1999) ‘Chinese Massage Manual’ Piatkus Publishing: London Wang, Ju-Yi & Robertson, J. (2008) ‘Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine: Wang Ju Yi’s Lectures on Channel Therapeutics’ Eastland Press Wu Jing-Nuan (1993) ‘Ling Shu or Spiritual Pivot’ University of Hawaii Press Zhang Enqin (1990) ‘Chinese Massage’ Publishing House of Shanghai University of TCM Zhang Yisheng (2002) ‘Tuinaology’ People’s Medical Publishing House

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© Tyler J Rowe 2011 Timetable Week 1 Lecture Practical Introduction Demonstration An mo Tui na Character meaning Tuina treatment History & context in TCM References in classical texts – 内经素问 Nèijīng Sùwèn 灵枢 Língshū 甲乙经 Jiǎyǐjīng Specialities 痹证学 Bì zhèng xué Rheumatology 外伤学 Wài shāng xué Traumatology Tuina Theory Exercises Characteristics of Tuina Standing postures Functions & effects of Tuina 少林内功 Shàolín Nèigōng ‘Internal Treatment prescription & sequence Cultivation Exercises’ Media – cloth, herbal preparations Massage tools Tuina Physiology Technique Palpation Structures – 筋 sinews, 骨 bones, 经 channels 滚法 Gun Fa Rolling Diagnosis – palpation & assessment Techniques Revision of previous technique 一指禅推法 Yi Zhi Chan Tui Fa One Finger Meditation 摩法 Mo Fa Rubbing 擦法 Ca Fa Scrubbing Techniques Revision of previous techniques 揉法 Rou Fa Kneading 拿法 Na Fa Grasping 按法 An Fa Pressing 推法 Tui Fa Pushing Techniques Revision of previous techniques 击法 Ji Fa Tapping 振法 Zhen Fa Vibrating 搓法 Cuo Fa Foulageing 抖法 Dou Fa Shaking 摇法 Yao Fa Rotating 扳伸法 Ban Shen Fa Stretching Treatment of the Head & Neck Demonstration & practice Assessment – palpation & movement Students to perform sequence in pairs Main treatment sequence with supervision followed by discussion Common ailments & variations Stiff neck Cervical Osteoarthritis Headache Rehabilitative exercises Treatment of the Thoracic Region Demonstration & practice Assessment – palpation & movement Students to perform sequence in pairs Main treatment sequence with supervision followed by discussion Common ailments & variations Intercostal strain Muscular spasm Disc injury Rehabilitative exercises

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© Tyler J Rowe 2011 9 Treatment of the Lower Back Assessment – palpation & movement Main treatment sequence Common ailments & variations Lumbar sprain Disc injury Arthritis Rehabilitative exercises Treatment of the Shoulder Assessment – palpation & movement Main treatment sequence Common ailments & variations Sprain Tendonitis Frozen shoulder Rehabilitative exercises Treatment of the Upper Limb Assessment – palpation & movement Main treatment sequence Common ailments & variations Tendonitis Carpel Tunnel Syndrome Rheumatoid Arthritis Rehabilitative exercises Treatment of the Pelvis & Hip Assessment – palpation & movement Main treatment sequence Common ailments & variations Sciatica / Piriformis Syndrome Arthritis Hamstring / Groin Strain Rehabilitative exercises Treatment of the Lower Limb Assessment – palpation & movement Main treatment sequence Common ailments & variations Tendonitis / Ankle Strain Plantar fasciitis Shin splints Rehabilitative exercises Practical Worksheets 10 Massages to be completed and reported on by this date. Questionnaire and self assessment to be filled on for marking. Demonstration & practice Students to perform sequence in pairs with supervision followed by discussion 10 Demonstration & practice Students to perform sequence in pairs with supervision followed by discussion 11 Demonstration & practice Students to perform sequence in pairs with supervision followed by discussion 12 Demonstration & practice Students to perform sequence in pairs with supervision followed by discussion 13 Demonstration & practice Students to perform sequence in pairs with supervision followed by discussion 14 Practical Exam Demonstration & discussion of random main treatment sequence & variations 3 .

Astrology 1. .2 Eight ‘Branches’ of Chinese Medicine 针灸 Zhēnjiǔ . Protective Qi When the channels are shallow. of yin and yang.3 Historical references in the classics 内经素问 Nèijīng Sùwèn Chapter 1 – The Universal Truth ‘In the past. then needle.Scroll 2 part 7. as represented by the transformations of the energies of the universe. . The Propagation of Disease The round needle has the shape of an egg. They understood the principle of balance. 灵枢 Língshū ‘Spiritual Pivot’ …the conduct of the movement of qi. and meditation to help maintain and harmonise themselves with the universe. fire needling or drinking medicines. press and massage that qi which is excessive in the channels.Acupuncture & Moxibustion 草药 Cǎoyào .Scroll 1 part 4.Massage Therapy 武术 Wǔshù . do not needle until the channel has been massaged so that the essence does not come out.1 The meaning of ‘Chinese Massage’ 按摩推拿 Ànmó Tuīná . They can manifest numbness or paralysis of the extremities. and herb wine in these cases. .Martial Arts 气功 Qìgōng .Dietary Therapy 推拿 Tuīná .Herbal Medicine 食疗 Shíliáo . Thus. To Qi of the Four Seasons 4 .Scroll 8 part 52.’ Chapter 24 – Channel Constituents and Acupuncture Techniques People who are repeatedly startled or traumatised have an obstruction of qi and blood in the channels and collaterals. and breathing to promote energy flow. . they formulated practices such as Daoyin. moxibustion.Scroll 1 part 1. massage.Meditation 风水 Fēngshuǐ .Geomancy 数术 Shùshù . ironing out. needling. to divide and to separate so as not to injure the muscles and flesh.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 1) Introduction 1. . the Way of Life. Of Nine Needles and Twelve Source Points It is necessary to massage the channels first. an exercise combining stretching massaging. people practiced the Dao. by massage. It is used for rubbing and massage. On Governing the Needles To harmonize.Scroll 7 part 42. Noxious Qi’s Disease It is necessary to first massage the locations for as long a time as there is a resonance in hand. Scroll 4 part 19. One should use tuina.Press rub Push grasp 1.

Great Treatise on the Favourable & Unfavourable. massage to finish the pain at this location. Physiographic Characteristics. massage and medication are indicated. cultivation of qi and massage are appropriate. one must perform cultivation of qi and massage to promote circulation. and Configurations & Orientations At this juncture [liver bi]. Assorted Diseases 针灸甲乙经 Zhēnjiǔ Jiǎyǐjīng ‘The Systematic Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion’ Throughout the course of their therapy [foot yangming channel sinew].4 Specialities 痹证学 Bìzhèngxué ‘Arthralgia Syndrome’ (Rheumatology) 外伤学 Wàishāngxué ‘External Injury’ (Traumatology) 正骨 Zhènggǔ ‘Bone Setting’ (Orthopaedics) 5 . . medication. – Book Two verse 6. – Book Six verse 2-3. On the transmission of Disease Among the Five Viscera Producing Cold & Heat In the case of tugging and tension [in the muscles].© Tyler J Rowe 2011 When the needling is finished.Scroll 5 part 26. and ‘fire-branding’ are indicated… At this point [shan conglomeration]. massage and acupuncture are indicated… At this point [spleen wind] massage. Book Eight verse1-1. Root & Branch of Disease. The Contraction of Disease by Yin Causing Bi 1. massage until it is established that the pain has stopped. – Book Ten verse 1-1. When the needling is finished. Channel Sinews To treat them [central region excess]. massage should be applied.

through stimulation or reduction of the channels and pathways. They make the contact area slippery and difficult to handle or control. herbal preparations Traditional media used in Tuina is a cloth. Point manipulations – deep tissue.2 Functions & effects of Tuina Functions  Promote circulation of qi and relieve stagnation  Invigorate xue and dispel stasis  Relax the sinews Indications  Soft tissue injury  Chronic joint pain  Muscular dysfunction & atrophy  Paediatric Illness* Contraindications  Fracture & Dislocation  Open wounds  Deep Vein Thrombosis  Spinal Manipulation* 2. becomes uncomfortable. and in time sebaceous oil and sweat secretions render this 6 . Usually cotton or other natural fibre. elbow or knee. bones and sinews with the hand. Firstly it negates the need for oil. Opening techniques – short duration. Skin on skin contact can lead to damage of the superficial skin layers. and preventing disease.3 Treatment prescription & sequence i. Requirements  Smoothness  Strength  Stability  Rhythm  Flexibility 2.1 Characteristics of Tuina Definition – the manual manipulation of points. muscles. Of the many different techniques or manoeuvres in Tuina. serves three main purposes. gentle methods ii. superficial. specific locations & mobilisations 2. measuring anywhere from 250mm to 2000mm square. for the purposes of alleviating injury and illness.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 2) Theory 2. Channel movements – long duration. Most massage oils are inappropriate for use with Tuina techniques. maintaining health. moderate strength and depth iii. they all retain certain characteristics which are essential to good practice. the cloth.4 Media – cloth.

跌打酒 Die Da Jiu etc… 2. 7 . A student can then perform many of the techniques. it was unlikely they would have been allowed to directly touch the empress for instance. Imperial physicians were the ‘best of the best’ in TCM. They can be useful for weaker practitioners. their practices were more likely to be recorded. True. Tuina techniques can be completed smoothly and most effectively with the cloth. 红花油 Hong Hua You. developing skill. Secondly. The rice bag is a traditional Tuina training device. These are prescribed and used according to functions and indications of the herbal ingredients. her pulse was usually taken through a piece of silk (with her hand passed through the doorway from another room) rather than risk this contact. bamboo or mulberry (though now plastics and rubber are often substituted) the commonly used clubs include clubs shaped like digits. It is considered the best way to practice before moving to a live patient. Commonly used prepared products include 正骨水 Zheng Gu Shui. or when dealing with particularly strong clients. with this device. peanut oil. palms and elbows. vinegar or water bases. is filled with rice and sealed. Most commonly used are herbal formulas to: invigorate xue and dispel stasis  promote qi and disperse stagnation  clear heat and reduce swelling  disperse bruising and alleviate pain  promote regeneration of tissue and mend bone  relax sinews and strengthen joints  alleviate bi syndromes (wind-cold-damp)  release the exterior Most often in sesame oil. strength and rhythm. the palace and a large population there) it can get particularly cold in winter (in excess of -10o) and its acts as somewhat of an insulator. They are usually applied as an adjunct to the therapy (after the massage) rather than used as media. the cloth is a barrier of modesty. usually 200-300mm square. The heavy cotton or canvas bag.5 Massage tools Massage clubs have been used over the years in some schools of Tuina. chopping and patting clubs (shaped like a hand on a stick) and small rubber mallets can also be found in use. The same extends to a degree into Chinese society. Traditionally made of horn. Chinese Massage also utilises a number of herbal oils and liniments. Indeed virtually substituting any part of the arm or hand. Generally they are used to intensify treatments. where they tend to be more conscious of exposing body parts than in the west. Ball-like clubs (with a ball attached to a stick).© Tyler J Rowe 2011 ‘media’ useless. passed on and taught in the early medical schools. rice spirit. Much of the TCM we practice today was in ancient times practiced on the imperial family. Thirdly in the north of China and the capital Beijing (where much of our TCM comes from – they had more works of literature. Some traditional schools believed mastery of Tuina could only be gained once the students rolling had turned the rice within completely to power. Though doctors had respect in the palace.

Perhaps the most commonly used in training of Tuina are the 少林内功 Shàolín Nèigōng ‘Internal Cultivation Exercises’.Sinew Transforming Exercises.6 Basic Training Exercises Physical training of the practitioner has long been a part of the study of Tuina. a) Stances 站步 Zhàn bù ‘Upright stance’ 马步 Mǎ bù ‘Horse stance’ 弓步 Gōng bù ‘Bow stance’ b) Postures 伸臂撑掌 Shēnbì chēngzhǎng ‘Extend arms support palms’ 前推八匹马 Qiántuī bāpǐmǎ ‘Push forward eight horses together’ 倒拉九头牛 Dàolā jiǔtóuniú ‘Pull backward the tail of nine oxen’ 凤凰展翅 Fènghuáng zhǎchì Phoenix spreads its wings’ 霸王举鼎 Bàwáng jǔdǐng ‘Overlord holds up the cauldron’ 顺水推舟 Shùnshuǐ tuīzhōu ‘Push the boat along the current’ 单掌拉金环 Dānzhǎng lājīnhuán ‘Pulling the golden ring with one hand’ 怀中抱月 Huàizhōng bàoyuè ‘Hold the moon in the centre of the chest’ 仙人指路 Xiānrén zhǐlù ‘Immortal points to the road’ 平手托塔 Píngshǒu Tuōtǎ ‘Draw the pagoda in the hand’ 海底捞月 Hǎidǐ lāoyuè ‘Fish out the moon from the bottom of the sea’ 运掌合瓦 Yùnzhǎng héwà ‘Palm covering over the roof tile’ 风摆荷叶 Fēngbǎi héyè ‘Wind sways lotus leaves’ 两手托天 Liǎngshǒu tuōtiān ‘Two hands hold up heaven’ 单风朝阳 Dānfēng cháoyáng ‘Single wind in the rising sun’ 顶天抱地 Dǐngtiān bàodì ‘Sustaining the heaven and holding the earth’ 力劈华山 Lìpī huàshān ‘Strength to split magnificent mountain’ 三起三落 Sānqǐ sānluò ‘Three rising and three sinking’ 乌龙钻洞 Wūlóng zuāndòng ‘Dark dragon dives into the cave’ 饿虎扑食 Èhǔ pūshí 'Hungry tiger pouncing on its prey' 8 .© Tyler J Rowe 2011 2. Many different sets of 气功 Qigong and 武术 Wushu exercises are used including famous sets such as the 八段锦 Ba Duan Jin . All the systems use similar basic stances and hand patterns.Eight Sections Brocade Exercises and the 易筋经 Yi Jin Jing .

The Leg Yang Ming Stomach is the lower eyelid. and then travels to behind the ear. and is attached to the backbone. and connects in the supraclavicular fossa. It continues up along the pinch of the backbone on both sides to the neck. goes through the supraclavicular fossa to come out in front of the Leg Tai Yang Bladder. A straight branch goes up and follows the leg bone to connect with the knee. A branch separates and enters to connect with the root of the tongue. then goes up to meet the Leg Tai Yang Bladder. A straight branch ascends and rises to the depression under the bottom rib. A straight branch connects the neck to the occipital bone to the top of the head. and goes up to connect with the cheekbones. 经 jīng channels. A branch separates beginning on the lateral side of the thigh bone. A lower branch follows the lateral side of the foot to connect at the anklebone. 9 . Another branch enters the armpit. Another branch goes along the upper net of the eye and eyelid. It then travels up to the front side of the armpit. descends to connect with the nose. The Leg Tai Yang Bladder is the upper eyelid. then moves up to connect to the mastoid process. The muscle channel of the Leg Yang Ming Stomach begins in the second toe and connects with the third toe. A branch connection goes along the leg bone and joins the Leg Shao Yang Gallbladder. A separate branch connects to the lateral part of the leg and ascends to the crease of the knee along the medial side. Another branch comes out at the supraclavicular fossa. and goes straight up to connect to the pivot of the thigh. A branch connects in the lateral corner of the eye and is the lateral connective. ascends and connects to the thigh. then assembles in the yin organs. It goes up the neck and the pinch of the mouth on both sides to meet in the cheekbones. and goes diagonally up into the cheekbones. It continues up to connect to the lateral side of the knee. then travels up to the lateral anklebone and ascends along the lateral side of the leg to connect at the lateral side of the knee. It goes up to the corner of the forehead and makes a junction at the top of the head. follows St32. ascends to follow the flanks. then goes diagonally up to connect to the knee. goes up to connect to the anklebone. goes to the top of the foot. descends and travels to the chin. Then it ascends and spreads in the abdomen to reach and connect to the supraclavicular fossa. then descends to connect with the cheekbone. then travels up through the thigh. where in the front it connects with St32 and in the back it connects with the buttocks. A straight branch goes up and comes out at the armpit. then goes from the centre of the crease of the knee to connect to the buttocks. The muscle channel of the Leg Shao Yang Gallbladder begins in the fourth toe. 筋 jīn sinews “The muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yang Bladder begins in the little toe of the foot.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 3) Physiology 3. links with the region of the chest. Another branch goes from behind the armpit on the lateral side to connect at Co15.1 Structures 骨 gǔ bones. then travels down in the space between eyebrows and eyes to connect in the nose. Another branch goes from the cheek to connect with the front of the ear. goes up to emerge at the supraclavicular fossa. Another straight branch goes up. goes diagonally upward and laterally along the leg bone. then mounts and follows the heel to connect in the crease of the knee.

The muscle channel of the Leg Shao Yin Kidney begins in the bottom of the foot on a line with the little toe. It continues to the yin organs. follows the base of the abdomen to connect with the flanks. when snapped. then subordinates the lateral angle of the eye. It ascends along the middle of the arm and connects to the elbow. The muscle channel of the Arm Tai Yang Small Intestine begins on the top of the little finger. mounting a line above the jaw to connect with the corner of the forehead. and joins the muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yang Bladder. A branch travels behind the armpit to ascend and to wind around the shoulder blade. ascends and follows the leg bone. then goes up to subordinate the lateral corner of the eye. then follows the neck to come out and travel to the front of the Leg Tai Yang Bladder. then goes up to connect to the front of the medial anklebone. and ascends to the shoulder. and connects behind the ear on the mastoid process. It goes up the abdomen to connect in the navel. Then it goes up to connect with the medial side of the leg and goes together with the muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yin Spleen to ascend to the yin side of the thigh. ascends to the yin side of the thigh to connect with the upper thigh and assemble in the yin organs. 经筋 jīngjīn channel sinews (灵枢 Língshū ‘Spiritual Pivot’ Scroll 4 part 13) 10 . then continues up along the yin side of the thigh to connect with the yin organs. It continues up along the inside to connect below the tibia. where it connects with all of the muscle channels. Another straight branch comes out above the ear. Then it goes together with the muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yin Spleen and travels diagonally to below the medial anklebone to connect with the heel and join the muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yang Bladder. Another branch goes up to the bend of the teeth and jaws. connects with the wrist. A straight branch makes a path up along the leg bone to the medial side of the knee. The muscle channel of the Leg Jue Yin Liver begins on the top of the big toe. goes along in front of the ear. which.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 The muscle channel of the Leg Tai Yin Spleen begins at the tip of the big toe on its medial side. follows the medial side of the arm to connect with the elbow behind the medial epicondyle. has corresponding sensations on the top of the little finger. Then it goes up to connect to the medial anklebone. descends to connect to the chin and jaws. goes up around the lateral side of the upper arm. It continues by entering and connecting to the bottom of the armpit. then follows the backbone along the inner pinch of the spine along both sides until it reaches the back of the neck and connects to the occipital bone. then spreads in the middle of the breast. A branch from the point at the bend of the jaw enters to connect with the root of the tongue. Another branch enters the middle of the ear. An internal branch is attached to the backbone. The muscle channel of the Arm Shao Yang Sanjiao begins on the tip of the ring finger on the side of the little finger and goes to connect at the wrist. It travels to the neck to join with the Arm Tai Yang Small Intestine. Then it ascends.

Then it goes up to enter the armpit. the ulna. where it spreads and goes through the cardiac orifice.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 The muscle channel of the Arm Yang Ming Large Intestine begins on the tip of the forefinger on the side next to the thumb. The muscle channel of the Arm Tai Yin Lung begins on the top of the thumb. below there is a connection in the base of the chest. then moves to the lateral side of the radial pulse and ascends along the arm to connect to the center of the elbow. A branch winds around the shoulder bone to the pinch along both sides of the backbone. then connects to the pisiform bone. It then ascends the yin side of the upper arm to connect with the bottom of the armpit. mounts to the left comer of the forehead. Then it mounts the medial surface of the upper arm to enter the bottom of the armpit. A straight branch goes along the shoulder bone and ascends the neck. intersects with the Arm Tai Yin Lung. The muscle channel of the Arm Shao Yin Heart begins on the inner side of the little finger. links with the channel of the head. assembles. then travels along the thumb to connect to the rear of the thenar eminence. and connects to the front of the shoulder joint. 3. comes out in the supraclavicular fossa. and moves down to the right chin and jaws. follows the forearm. It connects with the wrist and moves up. and goes up to connect to the medial side of the elbow. On top there is a connection in the supraclavicular fossa.2 Diagnosis 气 Qì (Stagnation) Moving Generalised Dull worse with emotional stress 虚 Xū Empty Chronic aggravated by tiredness alleviated by rest weakness & flaccidity enjoys pressure 血 Xuè Blood (Stasis) fixed localised sharp unaffected by emotions 实 Shí Full acute aggravated by stillness alleviated by movement stiffness & swelling tenderness 11 . The muscle channel of the Arm Jue Yin Pericardium begins in the middle finger. Another branch goes up the cheek to connect the cheekbones. Then it goes along the cardiac orifice and descends to connect with the navel. then goes up to connect with the outside of the elbow. then travels together with the muscle channel of the Arm Tai Yin Lung to connect to the medial side of the elbow. and clasps the base of the nipple to connect with the centre of the chest. and spreads down both to the front and back by clasping the ribs. A straight branch ascends and comes out in front of the Arm Tai Yang Small Intestine. A branch enters the armpit and spreads to the centre of the chest to connect with the cardiac orifice. then goes down to the lowest rib. It ascends the upper arm to connect with the shoulder.

3 Assessment a) Questioning – location. 拨 bō ‘pluck’ sinews 12 . aggravating. frequency. nature. relieving b) Observing – alignment/posture.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 3. skin colour. vasculation. radiation. 扪 mén ‘scan’ temperature. 按 àn ‘press’ ashi-tender points. duration. resistance. 循 xún ‘go-along’ channels. reproducing pain Palpate – passive range of movement.

with a firm hand 13 . 滚法 Gǔn fǎ – Rolling  Frequency 120-180 b/p/m  Intensity light to strong  Penetration deep  Location thick muscled areas. fingers relaxed. taking care not to contact with the knuckles 3. 擦法 Cā fǎ – Scrubbing  Frequency 180-240 b/p/m  Intensity moderate  Penetration superficial  Location systematic. blade of palm  Method vigorously rub longitudinally or horizontally. thenar eminance  Method flex and extend the thumb. with a loose hand 4. invigorate xue and dispel stasis  Tools radial aspect of thumb. dynamic  Action opens channels  Tools palmer aspect of hand  Method circling clockwise or anti-clockwise. 一指禅推法 Yī zhǐ chán tuī fǎ . static or dynamic  Action promote qi and invigorate xue  Tools dorsal aspect of hand  Method roll obliquely from the 5th knuckle towards the root of the thumb. 摩法 Mó fǎ – Rubbing  Frequency 60-90 b/p/m  Intensity light  Penetration superficial  Location systematic. static or dynamic  Action promote qi. hand open 2.One Finger Meditation  Frequency 120-180 b/p/m  Intensity light to strong  Penetration deep  Location points or channels.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 4-6) Techniques 1. dynamic  Action warm channels  Tools palmer aspect of hand.

using a wide grip 6. dynamic or static  Action promote qi and invigorate xue  Tools palmer aspect of fingers  Method pinch and squeeze with the finger and thumb pads. invigorate xue and disperses stasis  Tools thumb or finger pads. 揉法 Róu fǎ – Kneading  Frequency 60-90 b/p/m  Intensity light to strong  Penetration deep  Location ridges. static  Action promote qi and invigorate xue  Tools palmer aspect of hand and fingers  Method clasp the finger pads toward the palm. 推法 Tuī fǎ – Pushing  Frequency 4-12 b/p/m  Intensity strong  Penetration deep  Location thick muscled areas. fist.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 5. root of palm.Grasping  Frequency 1-12 b/p/m  Intensity strong  Penetration deep  Location ridges. lift using a narrow grip 7. elbow  Method obliquely apply firm pressure then slide along the surface 14 . static  Action promote qi. knees  Method apply firm vertical pressure. dynamic  Action promote qi. invigorate xue and dispel stasis  Tools tip of finger/thumb. root of palm. 按法 Àn fǎ . optional circling 8. 拿法 Ná fǎ .Pressing  Frequency 1-12 b/p/m  Intensity strong  Penetration deep  Location points. elbows. knuckle.

static  Action invigorate xue and dispel stasis  Tools finger tips. shake upward and downward 15 . palmer surface of hand  Method place finger tips/palm vertically over area. dynamic or static  Action promote qi and invigorate xue.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 9. fist. shake horizontally and longitudinally 11. neck or costal region. 搓法 Cuō fǎ – Foulageing  Frequency 120-240 b/p/m  Intensity light  Penetration superficial  Location limbs. dorsum of hand. 击法 Jī fǎ – Striking  Frequency 240-360  Intensity moderate  Penetration deep  Location thick muscled areas. relax sinews  Tools palmer surface of hand  Method with palms facing inward to the contact area create a rolling action by alternately moving the hands upward and downward 12. 抖法 Dǒu fǎ – Shaking  Frequency 120-360 b/p/m  Intensity light to moderate  Penetration deep  Location limbs. dynamic or static  Action promote qi and invigorate xue. 振法 Zhèn fǎ – Vibrating  Frequency 240-480 b/p/m  Intensity strong  Penetration deep  Location thick muscled areas. dynamic or static  Action relax sinews  Tools hand  Method firmly grasp the extremity with both or one hand (the other hand can support the joint). thumb pulled in. crane’s beak  Method alternately strike in a drumming action with both hands 10. cupped hand. relax sinews  Tools blade of palm.

knees  Method various passive flexibility exercises depending upon joint 16 .© Tyler J Rowe 2011 13. progress the joint through the normal range of movement. static  Action relax sinews  Tools hands. 14. dynamic  Action relax sinews  Tools hands  Method firmly grasp the extremity with both or one hand (the other hand can support the joint). 扳伸法 Bān shēn fǎ – Stretching  Frequency 1-2 b/p/m  Intensity light to strong  Penetration deep  Location joints. elbows. 摇法 Yáo fǎ – Rotating  Frequency 6-12 b/p/m  Intensity moderate  Penetration deep  Location limbs and neck.

neuropathy. Bailao One finger meditation .Gb39. Yintang Stiff neck: Pressing . Du16 Rolling – neck & nape Pressing – Anmain. spasms. parasthesia. Du16. flexion. light headedness. Arm Taiyang Small Intestine & Arm Yangming Large Intestine • Main Treatment Sequence Foulageing – neck Kneading & Grasping – neck. radiation to the upper limb.60. Co4. nausea. dizziness. Leg Shaoyang Gallbladder. oedema. heat • Assessment observation of asymmetry. stiff neck. rotation. Gb20. nasal discharge or congestion. redness. 13 Scrubbing – Du14 Stretching & Rotating • Modifications Headache: Kneading – scalp Tapping – scalp Pressing – Taiyang. Si3. Bitong.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 7) Treatment of the Head & Neck • Common Ailments headache. palpation of Leg Taiyang Bladder. restricted range of movement. photosensitivity. Bl10. Lv3. cervical osteoarthritis • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain.21. Gb20.Anmain. Luozhen Osteoarthritis: Pressing – Bl11 Pushing – Bailao. flexion and side bending (passive and resited) 17 . Gb20. tenderness. extension and side bending. Bl11 • Rehabilitation Sash rotation. Bl10. rigidity.

tenderness. Sj5 • Rehabilitation Sash cross on back 18 . restricted range of movement. Du Grasping – Bl. extension and side bending. Jiaji. subluxation of vertebrae • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain. Du Pushing .© Tyler J Rowe 2011 8) Treatment of the Thoracic Region • Common Ailments intercostal strain. Du Pressing – Si13. Si3. shortness of breath. Gb25. 46 Subluxation of vertebrae: Pressing – Gb34. dislocation of vertebrae • Assessment observation of symmetry during breathing. Jiaji. Jiaji Striking – Bl Scrubbing – Bl Foulageing – Costal Stretching • Modifications Intercostal strain: Pressing – Lv13. radiation to the head and neck or lumbar region. oedema. Sp21 Muscular spasm: Pressing – Bl17. heat. flexion.Bl. spasms. palpation of Leg Taiyang Bladder. rotation. Du Rolling – Bl. rigidity. redness. Bl. muscular spasm. Jiaji. Leg Shaoyang Gallbladder & Arm Yangming Large Intestine • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – thoracic One finger meditation – Bl.

flexion. 57 Scrubbing . 54. vascular congestion. heat or coldness. Du Pressing – Bl.Bl. Du. neuropathy. Bl23. rigidity. weakness. tenderness. spasms. compensatory curvature deformities. arthritis • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain. Jiaji. lumbar and hamstring stretches 19 .Gao Pushing . Jiaji. parasthesia. restricted range of movement. Du. Jiaji. disc pathology. narrowing of intervertebral spaces. Jiaji Striking – Bl Scrubbing – Bl. constipation • Assessment observation of symmetry.Gao • Rehabilitation Sash assisted four-point core exercises. palpation of Leg Taiyang Bladder & Leg Shaoyang Gallbladder • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – lumbar One finger meditation – Bl. radiation to thoracic or pelvis and lower limb.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 9) Treatment of the Lower Back • Common Ailments acute lumbar sprain. Jiaji. extension and side bending. 31-33. Si3 Pressing – Du4. Yaoyan Rolling – Bl. Yaoytong Pressing – Bl25. Yaoyan Grasping – Bl. redness. oedema. Du. Yaoyan Stretching Rotating • Modifications Lumbar sprain: Disc Injury: Arthritis : Pressing – Bl40. rotation. Du Pushing . tenderness. 60.

flexion. restricted range of movement. worse at night. Jianneiling Frozen shoulder: Pressing – Co4. extension. Bamboo cane stretches 20 . Co15.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 10) Treatment of the Shoulder • Common Ailments supraspinatus tendonitis. palpation of Arm Taiyang Small Intestine. spasms. Co15. heat or coldness • Assessment observation of symmetry. 16. neck. frozen shoulder • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain. oedema. Sj Pressing – Gb21. redness.Bl41 • Rehabilitation Health ball rotations on wall. acromio-clavicular sprain. scaption. Gb34 AC joint sprain: Pressing – Jianqian. nodular masses. radiation to thoracic. Si9-13 Pushing – Co. rigidity. Sj Scrubbing – Co. Sj One finger meditatn – Gb21. atrophy. upper limb. joint luxation. parasthesia. Si. swelling. Si. Arm Yangming Large Intestine. neuropathy. St38 Pushing . Si9-13 Rolling –Co. adduction. tenderness. Sj5. Si. Arm Shaoyang Sanjiao & Arm Jueyin Pericardium • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – shoulder Kneading & Grasping – Co. abduction. Sj14. Sj Foulageing – Co Stretching Rotating Shaking • Modifications Tendonitis: Pressing – Co11. Sj14. Sj Striking– Co. tenderness. internal and external rotation.

5. shangbaxe • Rehabilitation Health ball rotations. tenderness. Ht3. rheumatoid arthritis • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain. tenderness. Lu3. Pc3. Arm Shaoyang Sanjiao. extension. Pc3. abduction. neuropathy. Co One finger meditatn – Co10. atrophy. 4. 5. Sj. radiation to shoulder.tendon Pressing – epichondyle points Carpel tunnel: Pushing – Pc7. redness. Bamboo cane stretches 21 . 8. flexion. Co Stretching Rotating Shaking • Modifications Tendonitis: Plucking . 8. weakness. Sj5 Pressing – Co4. 8 Rolling . 5. parasthesia. Sj4 Arthritis: Pinching – Shixuan Pressing – baxie. adduction. rotation. 4. 11. carpel tunnel syndrome. Sj. 6. 11. joint deformity. Sj2. Pc Foulageing – Lu. 5. swelling. Sj. Co Pushing/Scrubbing . 10.Lu. nodular masses. 10. heat or coldness • Assessment observation of symmetry.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 11) Treatment of the Upper Limb • Common Ailments tendonitis.Lu. 6. oedema. 10. Si3. Co. Arm Yangming Large Intestine. Sj. Arm Shaoyin Heart & Arm Jueyin Pericardium • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – arm Kneading & Grasping – Lu. Arm Taiyin Lung. restricted range of movement. spasms. palpation of Arm Taiyang Small Intestine. Lu3. rigidity.

Gao Muscular strain: Pressing/Pushing – Bl37. plum blossom stake rolling 22 . Leg Yangming Stomach.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 12) Treatment of the Pelvis & Hip • Common Ailments sciatica/piriformis syndrome. Lv8 • Rehabilitation Sash assisted lumbar & hamstring stretch. oedema. abduction. rotation. tenderness. Gb Scrubbing – Bl. Bl40. St31. weakness. Leg Taiyin Spleen • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – hip Kneading & Grasping – Gb. parasthesia. neuropathy. radiation to lower back or lower limb. 11. spasms. 54. extension. Gb41 Arthritis: Pushing/Scrubbing . restricted range of movement. altered gait. Gb Pressing – Bl36. swelling. palpation of Leg Taiyang Bladder. 34 Pushing – Bl. Gb Striking– Bl. adduction. atrophy. flexion.Bl. heat or coldness • Assessment observation of symmetry. St Rolling . Gb Foulageing – Hip Stretching Rotating Shaking • Modifications Sciatic/Piriformis: Pressing – Jiaji. 57. Gb29. rigidity. nodular masses. arthritis. Leg Shaoyang Gallbladder. 30. Sp10. 60. tenderness. redness. muscular strain • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain.

Kd4 Fasciitis: Pressing . extension. palpation of Leg Taiyang Bladder. 3. 9. radiation to lower back or limb. Sp3. Gb. pronation. Gb Stretching Rotating Shaking • Modifications Tendonitis: Pressing – Gb40. crepitus. Gb. rigidity. altered gait. Gb34. 60.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 13) Treatment of the Lower Limb • Common Ailments tendonitis/ankle sprain. Leg Shaoyang Gallbladder. Sp6. 57. neuropathy. weakness. Leg Jueyin Liver • Main Treatment Sequence Rubbing – leg Kneading & Grasping – Bl. Leg Yangming Stomach. St One finger meditatn – Bl37. 9. 10. atrophy. Kd Pushing/Scrubbing – Bl. Sp6. rotation. Kd7 • Rehabilitation Plum blossom stake stepping and rolling Plucking . Kd Foulageing – Lv. tenderness. 10. swelling. supination.Bl. plantar faciitis. 40. St36. 41. St43. Kd1 Pressing – Xiyan. nodular masses.tendon Grasping Striking – St. spasms. restricted range of movement. St41. flexion. Kd2 Shin splints: Pressing/Pushing – Lv5. Leg Shaoyin Kidney. oedema. St. 57. 62. St. Leg Taiyin Spleen. 40.4. redness. Kd3 Rolling . Gb. shin splints • Clinical Manifestations dull ache or sharp pain.Bl61. Lv/Kd 23 . tenderness. vascular congestion • Assessment observation of symmetry. Lv4. heat or coldness. parasthesia. Bl37.

why? Was the massage smooth and consistent? Or irregular/jumpy? Was the massage too heavy or too soft? Was the massage too fast or too slow? Could the massage have been improved in any way? Did the signs and symptoms reduce after the massage? Did you enjoy the massage? Client Signature client to provide this information 24 .© Tyler J Rowe 2011 14) Practical Assessment Sheets Sample Student Name Date Client Name Date of Birth Gender Main Complaint Clinical Manifestation (signs & symptoms) your name of the massage the person massaged the client’s the client Duration History Medications? Nature Location Intensity Frequency Duration Aggravated/Relieved Observation Palpation Testing Qi Stagnation/Xue Stasis Xu/Shi Heat/Cold Techniques Channels Points Duration client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information client to provide this information Assessment Diagnosis Prescription Was the style of massage explained? How is it different? Was the massage appropriate for your needs? If no. why? Was the massage comfortable? Set up well? If not.

med) Clinical Manifestations S&S (nat. int. palp.© Tyler J Rowe 2011 TUINA WORKSHEET # … Student Name Date Client Name Date of Birth Gender Main Complaint (dur. freq. loc. jl. dur) Was the style of massage explained? How is it different? Was the massage appropriate for your needs? If no. rel) Assessment (obs. dur. why? Was the massage smooth and consistent? Or irregular/jumpy? Was the massage too heavy or too soft? Was the massage too fast or too slow? Could the massage have been improved in any way? Did the signs and symptoms reduce after the massage? Did you enjoy the massage? Client Signature 25 . why? Was the massage comfortable? Set up well? If not. pts. hot/cold) Treatment (tech. test) Diagnosis (qi/xue. xu/shi. agg. hist.

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