Friday, April 27, 2012

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Scout leader ousted in Ohio, p3

Locals face losses on diamonds, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Church 8
Classifieds 9
TV 10
World News 11
Index
70 percent
chance of
rain Saturday.
High in
upper 30s.
See page 2.
MAGAZINE
A S u p p l e m e n t T o T h e D e l p h o s H e r a l d • A p r i l 2 0 1 2
www.delphosherald.com
Don’t miss The Herald’s
Showcase of Homes in
Monday’s newspaper.
Glenn to receive
Presidential
Medal of Freedom
WASHINGTON, D.C.
– Former Ohio senator
John Glenn will receive
the Presidential Medal of
Freedom. The ceremony
will take place at a date to
be determined this spring.
In June 2011, U.S. Senator
Sherrod Brown spoke to
President Obama and person-
ally handed him a letter nom-
inating Glenn for the award.
“Now 90 years old—and
having served as a Marine
aviator, an astronaut, a United
States Senator, and a noted
educator—John Glenn has
received quite a few recogni-
tions and awards. But wheth-
er he was flying a fighter jet
or floating in space, he has
always remained grounded
in his New Concord roots,”
Brown said. “Those of us
fortunate to know him well
know that there is so much to
his life: his devotion for his
wife Annie; his fierce advo-
cacy of science, technology,
and NASA; and finally, his
deep patriotism and love for
his country. He is a worthy
recipient for the Presidential
Medal of Freedom and it is a
privilege to congratulate him
on this tremendous honor.”
Glenn became the first
American to orbit the Earth
on Feb. 20, 1962. Born in
Cambridge and raised in
New Concord, Glenn is
a veteran of World War
II and served as an Ohio
senator for 24 years.
Primary
won by big
spenders
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
While a total of 12 Putnam
County candidates only spent
$4,438 between them in the
March primary, the Allen
County numbers reflect a
national trend: The winners
were the ones who spent the
most.
Many candidates spent
no money but the seven
Allen County candidates
who did spent $46,416.92.
Half of it was spent by Cory
Noonan alone, to the tune
of $23,654.41 filed in three
reports with the county elec-
tions board. Noonan will
face Connie Miller and Don
Kissick in one commission-
er race in November. The
other will see Jay Begg vie
for the other commissioner
seat up for grabs, having
spent $18,695.73 to defeat
Lynn Mohler in the primary.
Mohler spent just $724.89.
Neither Noonan or Begg had
big windfalls from a small
number of donors; the bulk
of their contributions were
moderate and from long lists
of supporters.
Door-to-door visits can
be effective in local cam-
paigns where fewer voters are
involved compared to nation-
al campaigns. Nonetheless,
the Allen County primary
reflected the role campaign
cash plays in national races.
University of Northwestern
Ohio political science profes-
sor Dr. Phil McMurry says
much of the spending is for
advertising, which is tied to
name-recognition and image-
creation. He also thinks many
American voters pay more
attention to image than to
substance.
“Our politics is based
largely on image and less on
substance. So, we see money
going toward things that put
the candidate’s image out
there — we see them more,”
he said.
McMurry said the 1960
presidential race was the first
time debates were televised,
making that election a pivot
point.
“This goes back to the
Kennedy/Nixon debates.
Before the first televised
By JOHN ROGERS
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — An
ex-Marine filmmaker whose
unit carried pocket digital
cameras into some of the
worst fighting in Iraq is using
that footage, and post-war
interviews, to open viewers’
eyes about combat and help
himself deal with the lasting
emotional impact.
The videos are stark. One
Marine is so badly hurt he
filmed himself giving himself
the Last Rites.
Some of the fighters seem
unaffected years later in civil-
ian life, while others have
gone through severe bouts
of post-traumatic stress and
one man, who in Iraq saved
fellow Marines’ lives, wound
up in prison back home.
Garrett Anderson hopes
to show this all up close
with “And Then They Came
Home,” a documentary he
is making from footage he
and his comrades gathered
on Nov. 22, 2004, one of
the bloodiest days of fighting
during Iraq’s second battle of
Fallujah.
One of Anderson’s com-
rades died that day and six
others in his platoon were
wounded as they fought
building to building in the
city of Fallujah, searching
for snipers. One of those shot
was so badly wounded that
he pulled out his digital cam-
era and hit the record button
as he gave himself the Last
Rites so his family would
have a record of it. Anderson
plans to include that footage
in his film.
“We were probably the
first group of people who
were allowed to go into com-
bat with a digital camera in
your pocket,” Anderson said
recently from his home in
Portland, Ore.
The Marines carried their
own pocket cameras from
their private lives and never
saw a reason to leave them
behind. Anderson said their
commanders never said any-
thing about it or tried to stop
them.
“And so the whole battle
was documented from the
perspective of the guys who
fought it, and we’re going to
be able to use some of that
footage,” he said.
Anderson and his col-
leagues hope it will be a heal-
ing experience for them, as
well as an eye-opening one
for those who have never
seen war.
“I hope that they see how
it really affects these young
men that come back,” said
Nathan Douglass, who was
badly wounded on that day
and is one of the 12 Marines
who will recount their experi-
ences in interviews Anderson
plans to film this summer.
“It’s not just a video
game,” Douglass added.
“There are long-term effects,
whether you are physically
wounded or not. Sometimes
I think the mental effects can
be so much worse.”
Several of those to be fea-
tured suffered severe bouts
of post-traumatic stress dis-
order, some even attempting
suicide. One of the worst
afflicted, a Marine who saved
the lives of several comrades
when he shot to death a
would-be suicide bomber, is
now in a Texas prison, serv-
ing a lengthy sentence for
sexual assault.
Others, like Lance Cpl.
Luis Munoz, who gave him-
self the Last Rites, seem large-
ly unaffected by what they
experienced. The naturalized
U.S. citizen has returned to
his native Mexico, where he
works now as a police officer
in the state of Coahuila, a
region plagued by drug cartel
violence.
To those who have known
Anderson for years, the
26-year-old filmmaker also
appears, at least on the sur-
face, to have been largely
unaffected.
Since returning to civilian
life in 2007, he has shed his
Marine buzz cut, grown a
beard and is engaged to be
married in the fall. He works
for a private company that
enforces parking regulations
in Portland, and he likes to
take in Trailblazers games
in his free time, although he
laments with good humor
that it will likely be years
before the team contends for
an NBA title.
Truth is, though, he was
one of the most seriously
affected.
“He was never the same
boy afterward,” says his
father, Dennis Anderson,
longtime editor of the
Antelope Valley Press in
the Los Angeles suburb of
Palmdale, where the younger
Anderson grew up.
Old friends say they did
notice upon his return that he
was drinking heavily. They
initially dismissed that as
just an ex-Marine blowing
off steam. That was until he
ended up in a hospital follow-
ing a mental breakdown after
a night of binge drinking.
To this day, he says, the
first thing he thinks of each
morning is the name of the
fellow Marine who was killed
on Nov. 22, 2004.
“This documentary is
going to be a healing process
for me,” he says.
Anderson and his col-
leagues have talked for years
Ex-Marine aims camera at self to heal
“I hope that they
see how it really
affects these
young men that
come back. ... It’s
not just a video
game. There
are long-term
effects, whether
you are physi-
cally wounded or
not. Sometimes I
think the mental
effects can be so
much worse.”
— Nathan Douglass,
who was badly
wounded on that day
See VIDEO, page 11
See PRIMARY, page 11
TODAY (5 p.m.)
BB: NB at St.
John’s (MAC); Kalida
at Ft. Jennings (PCL);
Spencerville at Ottoville;
O-G at Elida (WBL).
SB: Spencerville at ML;
Lincolnview at Kalida;
Elida at O-G (WBL).
T & F: Ottoville at
Edgerton, 4 p.m.; St.
John’s/Elida in AC Inv.
(Shawnee), 4:30 p.m.
SATURDAY (noon)
BB: Elida at P’ding
(DH), 10 a.m.; Spencerville
at St. John’s (DH);
LTC at Ottoville.
SB: Spencerville at
MC (DH); Lincolnview
at Leipsic (DH).
T & F: Spencerville/
Lincolnview at NB
Inv., 9 a.m.
Coming home
Photos submitted
Optimists plant trees for those lost
In celebration of Arbor Day, a tree was planted at Stadium Park today in memory
of Delphos Optimist Club member Sue McMahon, who passed away in March. Her
son, Rob Czerwinski, right of tree, and granddaughter, Hailey Czerwinski, next to
him, assisted in planting the tree. Also assisting were Optimist Club members Lisa
Williams, left, Maggie Wannemacher and Optimist Club President Harry Flanagan,
along with Chad Luersman, right, from Elite Naturescapes, that donated supplies and
labor for the planting. Below: Another tree was planted in the park in memory of
Delphos Optimist Club member Doris Dickman’s husband, Dale, who passed away in
2011. Assisting in planting were Doris Dickman, great-grandson Michael Friedrich,
Flanagan and Jimmy Mox from Mox Nursery Company, that donated supplies and
labor for the planting.
Nancy Spencer photo
City filling swimming pool
With repairs and maintenance completed at the
Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool, water is now being
added for the upcoming season. Parks Superintendent
Craig Mansfield said the pool will fill at 70,000 gallons
per day and should be full by Thursday.
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Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Carleigh
Ankerman.
Congratulations
Carleigh!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Kaleb
Helms.
Congratulations
Kaleb!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Friday, April 27, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY FUNERALS
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WINNERS
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 238
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
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Van Wert Cinemas
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Apr|| 27 - Nay 3
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Wrath of the Titans PG13
Screen 2:
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Mirror Mirror PG
Screen 3:
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21 Jump Street R
Box office opens at 8 pm. Showtime at Dark
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Thursday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $88
million
Pick 3 Evening
2-1-5
Pick 4 Evening
0-1-7-4
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $40
million
Rolling Cash 5
04-13-27-30-36
Estimated jackpot:
$153,000
Ten OH Evening
01-10-16-24-25-26-27-32-
37-38-40-43-46-47-53-63-75-
78-79-80
Corn: $6.16
Wheat: $6.26
Beans: $14.60
WRASMAN, Eugene H.,
87, of Tennessee and for-
merly of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial begins at 10
a.m. Saturday at St. Theresa
Catholic Church. Burial will
follow in Sunset Cemetery
in Clinton. Friends may
call from 4-8 p.m. today at
Holley-Gamble Funeral Home
in Clinton, Tenn. Preferred
memorials are to the Sisters
of Notre Dame.
KOHORST, Laurietta
M., 86, of Delphos, funeral
service begins at 11 a.m.
Saturday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, the
Rev. David Howell officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Walnut Grove Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
today and for an hour prior
to the service at the funer-
al home. Memorials are to
Delphos Wesleyan Church.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of rain show-
ers in the evening and cloudy
with rain showers likely over-
night. Lows in upper 30s. East
winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of
precipitation 60 percent.
SATURDAY: Rain show-
ers likely. Colder. Highs in the
mid 40s. East winds 10 to 15
mph. Chance of precipitation
70 percent.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. Areas of frost
overnight. Lows in lower 30s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
SUNDAY: Mostly sunny.
Not as cool. Highs in the
upper 50s. Northeast winds
10 to 15 mph.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Lows in the upper 30s.
MONDAY: Partly cloudy.
Slight chance of showers and
isolated storms in the afternoon.
Highs in the lower 60s. Chance
of precipitation 20 percent.
MONDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a chance
of showers and isolated
storms. Lows in the upper
40s. Chance of measurable
precipitation 30 percent.
TUESDAY, TUESDAY
NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with
a 40 percent chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms. Highs
in the lower 70s. Lows in the
upper 50s.
ST. RITA’S
A girl was born April 25 to
Natasha Boyer and Anthony
Miller of Spencerville.
A boy was born April 26 to
Elizabeth Williams and Gabe
Brooks of Eldia.
Ruth O. Mihm
Ruth O. Mihm, 96, died
today at Van Wert Manor.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home.
By The Associated Press
Today is Friday, April 27,
the 118th day of 2012. There
are 248 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On April 27, 2011, power-
ful tornadoes raked the South
and Midwest. According
to the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
more than 120 twisters result-
ed in 316 deaths across parts
of Mississippi, Alabama,
Tennessee, Virginia and
Georgia.
On this date:
In 1521, Portuguese
explorer Ferdinand Magellan
was killed by natives in the
Philippines.
In 1777, the only land bat-
tle in Connecticut during the
Revolutionary War, the Battle
of Ridgefield, took place,
resulting in a limited British
victory.
In 1805, during the First
Barbary War, an American-led
force of Marines and mercenar-
ies captured the city of Derna,
on the shores of Tripoli.
Police search for woman
who fled on crutches
MENTOR (AP) — Police
in northeastern Ohio say they
are searching for a woman
who escaped from a Lake
County hospital on crutches
while under their custody.
Mentor Police Sgt. Ken
Willis says Olivia Weber of
Painesville fled on crutches
from Lake West Medical
Center around 11 p.m.
Thursday night.
Willis says police had
arrested 34-year-old Weber
on a warrant for a probation
violation. He says she then
became ill and was taken to
the hospital in Willoughby.
He said Weber left out the
front door of the hospital.
Weber now faces an addi-
tional felony escape charge.
Auditor: Transportation
agency could save $6M
COLUMBUS (AP) — A
report by the state’s audi-
tor has found that the Ohio
Department of Transportation
could save more than $6 mil-
lion by selling underused
heavy equipment and vehicles
and closing two rest stops in
eastern Ohio.
Auditor Dave Yost on
Thursday released his perfor-
mance review of the transpor-
tation agency. He says about
42 percent of Ohio’s back-
hoes, excavators and other
equipment are used only 5
percent of the time.
Yost said selling 178
underused and redundant
heavy-equipment pieces
would generate $3.1 million
and avoid $885,000 in main-
tenance costs over 10 years.
The audit also found that
nearly $500,000 could be
saved annually by closing two
rest areas in Muskingum and
Guernsey counties that are
close to other alternatives.
The state’s transportation
director says he’s open to the
auditor’s ideas for savings.
Fort Jennings
Park Give-away
Week 1 — Cheryl
Hellman
Week 2 Carrie McNamara
Week 3 — Kenn Beining
Week 4 — Luke Bohn
Week 5 — Jerome Hoehn
Week 6 — Michelle Buss
Week 7 — Michael
Gallmeier
Week 8 — Dale Vorst
Week 9 — Ann Kaverman
Week 10 — Joan
Schimmoeller
Week 11 — Tina Good
Week 12 — Larry and
Charlie Streets
Look to the Delphos Herald for all the latest in
•LOCAL NEWS •LOCAL SPORTS
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STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
From the Vantage Point
Photo submitted
Vantage Medical Office Management senior Tiffany Mozingo (Lincolnview), with her
teacher, Linda Bales, at the annual bloodmobile.
Vantage holds 32nd bloodmobile
On April 19 and 20, the 32nd annual
Vantage bloodmobile was held. The blood-
mobile is a team effort with students and
staff from several different programs work-
ing together to get organized and set up for
a bloodmobile. The bloodmobile has grown
so much in recent years, that it has become a
two-day event!
It takes many people to put together a
successful high school blood drive. Special
thanks to Josh and Daniel from Building and
Grounds for unloading the Red Cross truck at
6:30 in the morning and being happy about it.
The members of the junior and senior Health
Technology classes set up the donor room.
Junior and senior Health Technology students
served as Red Cross volunteers, handling reg-
istration, first aid, and escort duties. The stu-
dents and Mrs. Myers staffed the canteen and
provided cookies, sandwiches and beverages
to everyone who donated a unit of blood.
Vantage is one of the largest high school
bloodmobiles in the region and has one of
the highest numbers of first time donors. This
year’s blood drive was outstanding. There were
just over 174 students and staff members who
registered to donate blood. A total of 128 pints
of blood were collected over the two days.
JOHN SEEWER
Associated Press
The first-graders in Ohio
Pack 109’s Tiger Scouts
didn’t know or care their den
mother was a lesbian — at
least not until the Boy Scouts
of America threw her out
over the organization’s ban
on gays.
Now, parents who were
aware of Jennifer Tyrrell’s
sexual orientation well
before she took the boys on
campouts and helped them
carve race cars for the annual
Pinewood Derby have rallied
to her defense in a case that
has re-ignited the debate over
the Scouts’ policy.
“I teach my children
to judge people on their
actions,” said Rob Dunn, a
father in Bridgeport, a vil-
lage of about 2,000 across the
Ohio River from Wheeling,
W.Va. “Whether you agree
with their lifestyle or not.”
The Boy Scouts of
America, whose oath calls
for members to be “morally
straight,” maintains that as
a private organization it has
the right to exclude gays and
atheists from its ranks.
That stance was upheld by
the U.S. Supreme Court in
2000 but has led many state
and local governments to
deny support for the Scouts.
Male scout leaders who are
gay have long been barred,
but instances of women being
excluded are not well-doc-
umented and probably rare.
A lesbian couple in Vermont
were told two years ago
that they could no longer
be involved with their son’s
Scout troop.
Because of the policy,
Tyrrell said she only reluc-
tantly allowed her 7-year-old
son to join up in Bridgeport,
where she lives with her part-
ner and their four children.
Told, she said, by the local
cub master that it didn’t mat-
ter that she is a lesbian, she
was drafted to lead the pack
in September.
Tyrrell told parents at their
first meeting about her sexual
orientation. Some already
knew her because she had
coached youth baseball and
volunteered at school, orga-
nizing class parties and read-
ing to children.
“She wasn’t trying to hide
anything,” said Dunn, whose
son is among the dozen or
so members of the boys-only
pack. “Nobody I know of has
ever made a single complaint
against her.”
Tyrrell said she was
removed in April, right after
she was asked to take over
as treasurer of the local Boy
Scout troop — which oversees
Tiger Scouts, Cub Scouts and
Boy Scouts — and she raised
questions about finances.
She said the Boy Scout
Council for the region told
her she had to resign because
she is gay.
“In this case, the policy
was understood by her and
her fellow volunteers but
not followed,” said Deron
Smith, a spokesman for the
Boy Scouts of America at its
headquarters in Irving, Texas.
“When a fellow pack leader
made a complaint about it, to
a local Scouting professional,
they followed the policy.”
The organization said it
believes Scouting is not the
right place for youngsters to
be exposed to issues of sexual
orientation.
Tyrrell said she is not cer-
tain who complained, but she
felt betrayed.
So did parents, who orga-
nized a protest last week
outside the church where the
pack held its meetings. They
demanded Tyrrell be rein-
stated.
Crystal Sabinsky said:
“My son asked me last night,
‘Why did Jen leave? Why is
she in trouble?’ He doesn’t
understand.”
“The only people who
were hurt were the kids,”
Dunn said “They’re asking
questions they shouldn’t have
to ask at this point.”
Parents of the Tiger Scouts,
a program for first-grade boys
before they become Cub
Scouts, said they never heard
Tyrrell mention her sexual-
ity to the children. Club rules
require a parent or other adult
to accompany each child to
every meeting.
“I had no clue she was a
lesbian. It doesn’t really make
a difference to me,” said Don
Thomas, whose grandson is in
the pack. “She did a fantastic
job, and the kids loved her.
You couldn’t ask for a better
den leader.”
Gay rights groups have
taken up Tyrrell’s cause, start-
ing an online petition to get
the Scouts to change their
policy.
“The extent that people
care is amazing,” Tyrrell
said. “We’re a perfectly nor-
mal family. We’re not dan-
gerous. We’re not predators.
We’re just normal, everyday
people.”
Scout leader ousted in
Ohio; parents upset
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The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015
By ANN SANNER and
ANDREW WELSH-
HUGGINS
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — The U.S.
Department of Agriculture
said Thursday it has no
plans to further investigate
the death of a spotted leop-
ard held under a state-issued
quarantine at an Ohio zoo
after an exotic animal escape.
Spokesman Dave Sacks said
the agency sees it as a closed
matter.
A Columbus zookeep-
er was moving the leopard
between enclosures in late
January when it unexpectedly
turned back and got caught
under a door that was being
lowered. The leopard was
injured, and the state veteri-
narian decided to euthanize
it.
The leopard was one of
six surviving exotic animals
being cared for by the zoo
after their owner freed them
and several other animals last
fall, then committed suicide.
The other five — two leop-
ards, two primates and a bear
— remain at the zoo, though
their future there is uncertain.
Police killed dozens of other
animals after they were freed
by the owner.
A USDA inspector cited
the Columbus zoo in February
for improper handling of the
leopard and for not having
enough trained staff present
for shifting the animal.
A recently released USDA
report regarding a follow-up
inspection in March shows the
zoo has properly addressed
those issues.
Also Thursday, a TV sta-
tion obtained a 2008 video
that provides glimpses into
the lives of the exotic ani-
mals while owned by Terry
Thompson of Zanesville.
Thompson, apparently
despondent over his mar-
riage and debt, released
them before committing sui-
cide. Police responding to
the property in rural Ohio
as night fell were forced to
kill 48 animals, including 18
endangered Bengal tigers.
The video shows a bear
being fed, as well as shots of
a caged monkey, and caged
lions, tigers and a black leop-
ard. It also shows several
guns, as well as several gui-
tars. Thompson had taught
himself to play guitar as an
adult.
No USDA investigation expected in leopard’s death
“Fear not those who argue but those who dodge.”
— Dale Carnegie, American writer-lecturer (1888-1955)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Friday, April 27, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• This year’s Delphos Relay for Life will still be held at
Jefferson High School, just not at the Community Track. With
renovations of the infield planned, school officials asked the
committee to move the event to the east side of the school
along State Route 66 where the girls’ softball diamond is
located.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Three of the original members of the Arnold C. Dienstberger
Foundation Inc. which was formed in 1963 participated in
ground-breaking ceremonies for the new apartment complex.
They are John Horine, now treasurer of the foundation; Richard
Thompson and Tom Archdeacon, president of the foundation.
• Alice Gengler, widow of Ollie Gengler, presented the
Ollie Gengler Awards to three members of the Delphos Lions
Club youth bowling program at Delphos Recreation Center.
First place winner was David Ripley. Other winners were
Doug Moenter, second, and Stefanie Kraft, third.
• Jefferson Senior High School choir members Michelle
Buettner and Tom Sampson were the recipients of the National
School Choral Award, according to choral music director
James Shisler. Sampson and Buettner, both seniors, were
presented a certificate and trophy, and their names will be
engraved on the National Choral Award plaque which hangs
in the high school choir room.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• The Home-Ec Class of Fort Jennings High School will
hold its annual Mother-Daughter Tea May 1 in the grade
school auditorium. Mary Crabill, home economic teacher, will
be in charge of the event and the girls of the senior class will
be the guests of honor. Carole Rekart and Virginia Saum will
be the moderators for the style show to be given by the students
of the home-ec class.
• Margaret Stemen was installed as president of the
Auxiliary to the Walterick-Hemme Post No. 3035, Veterans
of Foreign Wars Thursday night during ceremonies conducted
in the post club rooms. Other officers installed were: Kathy
Gladen, senior vice president; Margaret Koester, junior vice
president; Jane Fiedler, chaplain; Loretta Hesseling, conduc-
tress; Gertrude Fetzger, guard, and Carolyn German, Harriet
McClung and Gwendolyn Fetzger, trustees.
• The Jefferson Wildcats bombarded two Beaverdam pitch-
ers for 11 hits in a game played there Thursday to wind up on
the long end of a 14-10 score. Jack Koch, on the mound all
the way for the local team, allowed five hits, got a third strike
past nine and issued passes to two. In the extra-base hit depart-
ment, Dave Hittle, Gordie Vogt, Kock, and Jim Feathers all
connected for doubles.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• Preliminary plans are being completed for the presenta-
tion of the annual Senior class play which will be presented at
the Jefferson High School auditorium on May 7. The seniors
who will serve as ushers are as follows: Juanita Nollan, Elmer
Beckman, Edna Minnick, Velma Hanley, Grace Miller, Garnet
Snyder, Dorothy Rigdon, Dorotha Smith, Dorothy Stirn,
Barbara Watt, Mary K. Bower and Richard Osting.
• A large attendance is anticipated for the St. John’s Alumni
May dance to be held at the Hummer, southwest of this city on
Tuesday evening of next week. Dancing will begin at 9 p.m.
Frankie Schenk and his orchestra will play. Tickets may be
secured at the Rustic, King and Stallkamp, Rosselit Drug Store
and the Old National Bank.
• Eleanore Wittler placed first and Ruth Kohls, second,
in the typing contest conducted as part of the commercial
contest at Glandorf on Saturday. Arthur Kramer placed sixth
and Ruth Kohls, eight, in bookkeeping. These young people
are students at the high school in Fort Jennings and it is likely
that the four will take part in the Bowling Green contest to be
held on May 8.
WASHINGTON (AP) — A
federal judge Thursday denied
a request to release photos
and video taken of Osama bin
Laden during and after a raid
in which the terrorist leader
was killed by U.S. commandos
last year.
“The court declines plain-
tiff’s invitation to substitute
its own judgment about the
national-security risks inherent
in releasing these records for
that of the executive-branch
officials who determined they
should be classified,” wrote
U.S. District Judge James E.
Boasberg in rejecting a lawsuit
filed by Judicial Watch, a con-
servative watchdog group.
The group, which had
sought the records under the
Freedom of Information Act,
filed an appeal on Thursday.
Boasberg said that the
Defense Department didn’t
turn up anything responsive to
the FOIA, while the CIA found
52 responsive records. The
agency withheld all of them,
citing exemptions for classi-
fied materials and information
specifically exempted by other
laws.
Judicial Watch had sued
both agencies after they said
they would be unable to pro-
cess the FOIA requests within
the time permitted by law. The
agencies finished processing
the requests after the lawsuit
was filed.
“A picture may be worth a
thousand words. And perhaps
moving pictures bear an even
higher value,” wrote Boasberg,
an appointee of President
Barack Obama. “Yet, in this
case, verbal descriptions of the
death and burial of Osama Bin
Laden will have to suffice, for
this court will not order the
release of anything more.”
In court papers, the Justice
Department had said that the
images of the deceased bin
Laden are classified and are
being withheld from the pub-
lic to avoid inciting violence
against Americans overseas
and compromising secret sys-
tems and techniques used by
the CIA and the military.
John Bennett, director of
the CIA’s National Clandestine
Service, said in a declaration
included in the court papers
that many of the photos and
video recordings are “quite
graphic, as they depict the fatal
bullet wound to (bin Laden)
and other similarly gruesome
images of his corpse.”
By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Republican leaders are ready
to try pushing legislation
through the House holding
down interest rates on federal
loans to millions of college
students.
Democrats say that’s a
goal the GOP has adopted
only lately, but the top House
Democrat is opposing the
measure anyway in a fight that
highlights how election-year
politics is coloring Congress’
work.
The House planned to
vote today on the bill, which
would keep interest rates at
3.4 percent for subsidized
Stafford loans, instead of ris-
ing as scheduled to 6.8 per-
cent on July 1. The GOP-
written package would cover
its $5.9 billion cost by pluck-
ing money from a preven-
tive health fund established
in President Barack Obama’s
2010 health care overhaul law
— a cut many Democrats are
reluctant to make.
Today’s vote comes with
congressional Republicans
and Democrats, as well as
Obama and his near-certain
GOP opponent this fall, Mitt
Romney, competing at every
turn over who has the best pre-
scription to wring jobs out of
the still-struggling economy.
The student loan battle fits
nicely into that theme, with
7.4 million low- and middle-
income students and their
parents reliant on Stafford
loans and a college education
symbolizing the ticket to eco-
nomic success.
The vote also follows days
of campaign-style road trips
that Obama used to get in
front of the issue and portray
Republicans as foot-draggers
on it. The week began with
Romney saying he favored
keeping loan rates low,
remarks he hopes will prevent
Obama from making the mat-
ter a campaign fight but may
have helped prod congressio-
nal Republicans into action.
On Thursday, House
Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, tried putting the
focus on Obama’s travel this
week to three college cam-
puses, where the president
used rousing rallies to talk up
his student loan effort.
“Our country’s facing
some major economic and
fiscal challenges, yet here’s
the president wasting time on
a fake fight to try to gain
his own re-election,” Boehner
told reporters. He called the
college visits “political stunts
and, frankly, they aren’t worth
it and worthy of his office.”
He said Obama should repay
taxpayers for the use of Air
Force One for the trip.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney defended the trav-
el, saying it helped win over
Republicans.
“This is official business.
And he did it effectively,”
Carney said.
Democrats noted that
Republicans previously had
questioned the wisdom of
keeping students’ interest
rates low. They also accused
Republicans of reversing
themselves, after voting ear-
lier this month for a 2013 fed-
eral budget that let Stafford
loan rates double as sched-
uled.
For House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the
emphasis was the GOP’s
cuts in the preventive health
program, whose initiatives
she said include breast can-
cer screening and children’s
immunizations. She contrast-
ed that with a Democratic
bill extending the low student
rates by cutting subsidies to
oil and natural gas compa-
nies, which is opposed by the
GOP.
Pelosi characterized the
Republican view as, “’We
prefer tax subsidies for big
oil rather than the health of
America’s women.”’
Republicans noted that
many Democrats had voted
earlier this year to take
money from the preventive
health fund to help pay to
keep doctors’ Medicare
reimbursements from drop-
ping. Obama’s own budget in
February proposed cutting $4
billion from the same fund to
pay for some of his priorities.
The higher interest rates,
if triggered, would affect
the 7.4 million undergradu-
ates expected to borrow new
Stafford loans beginning July
1. This year, 8 million stu-
dents took out such loans,
averaging $3,568, according
to the Education Department.
CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Supreme Court, suddenly at
the heart of presidential poli-
tics, is preparing what could
be blockbuster rulings on
health care and immigration
shortly before the fall elec-
tion.
The court, sometimes an
afterthought in presidential
elections, is throwing a new
element of uncertainty into
the campaign taking shape
between President Barack
Obama and presumptive
Republican nominee Mitt
Romney.
Sharply divided between
four conservatives, four liber-
als and one conservative-lean-
ing swing justice, the court
already is viewed as being
nearly as partisan as Congress.
Within weeks it will rule on the
contentious 2010 Democratic-
crafted health care overhaul
and a Republican-backed
Arizona law that’s seen as a
model for cracking down on
illegal immigrants.
Obama sometimes seems
to be running against the
court, or at least its conserva-
tive members. Whether that
will sway voters in November
is unclear. The public receives
far less information and visual
imagery of the Supreme Court
than it does of the White
House and Congress.
An anti-court strategy by
Obama “will fire up his base,
but I doubt it will make any
bigger impact on swing vot-
ers,” said Republican consul-
tant John Feehery.
Meanwhile, strategists in
both parties are hoping they
can turn the upcoming deci-
sions to their advantage — for
instance, possibly boosting
Democratic turnout among
Hispanic voters unhappy with
GOP immigration policies or
emboldening the Republican
base if Obama’s landmark
health care law is ruled uncon-
stitutional.
The Supreme Court
already has played a huge and
direct role in U.S. presiden-
tial politics. Its 5-4 ruling in
Bush v. Gore settled the bit-
ter 2000 contest by barring a
Florida ballot recount, which
Democrats hoped would pre-
vent George W. Bush’s elec-
tion.
And the 2010 Citizens
United case, also decided 5-4,
greatly eased political spend-
ing restrictions on corpora-
tions and unions. It gave birth
to the “super PACs” that are
reshaping campaigns by rais-
ing millions of anonymously
donated dollars for TV ads
attacking Obama, Romney
and targeted congressional
candidates.
By holding well-publicized
hearings on the health care
and immigration cases — and
now writing keenly awaited
decisions — the court is stir-
ring passions on key issues
in this year’s elections. Less
clear, however, is how the
politics might play out.
Many court-watchers
expect the justices to throw
out most or all of the health
law, which Republicans deri-
sively call “Obamacare.”
During public oral arguments,
the most conservative justices
questioned Congress’ author-
ity to require all Americans to
obtain health insurance.
Romney may be poorly
positioned to exploit such a
ruling, however. The simi-
lar “individual mandate” that
he successfully pushed as
Massachusetts governor was
a model for Obama’s federal
plan.
“I don’t think the Romney
campaign will want to make
health care a major issue,”
said Democratic strategist
Doug Hattaway. “Every time
Romney criticizes the presi-
dent’s health care reform, he
opens himself up to the Etch
A Sketch attack.”
Hattaway was referring to
claims that Romney switches
back and forth on important
policies, erasing and redraw-
ing pages when convenient.
Republican strategist Terry
Holt said a court decision
overturning the health care
law would be an unmistak-
able setback for Obama.
“It repudiates the singular
achievement of this adminis-
tration,” Holt said.
By ANNE GEARAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Obama administration wants
to trademark the term “GI
Bill” in an effort to shield
veterans and military families
being swindled or misled by
schools that target their fed-
eral education benefits.
President Barack Obama is
signing a wide-ranging order
today that partially addresses
growing complaints about
fraudulent marketing and
recruiting practices aimed at
military families eligible for
federal education loans under
the GI Bill.
The president and first
lady Michelle Obama were
expected to talk to troops at
the Fort Stewart Army post in
Georgia, where Obama will
sign an executive order man-
dating several new education
protections for military ser-
vice members.
There is little the federal
government can do to shut
down diploma mills, but the
new protections would make
it harder for post-secondary
and technical schools to mis-
represent themselves to mili-
tary students.
The main target of the
White House action is for-
profit colleges and universi-
ties that market heavily to
military families because of
the easy availability of fed-
eral loan money under the
GI Bill.
Some post-secondary
schools target current and
former military service mem-
bers using deceptive military-
themed websites that appear
to be government-run or con-
nected to the GI Bill benefit
system, administration offi-
cials said.
The financial regulation
overhaul that Obama signed
in 2010 included the creation
of a Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau with spe-
cific authority to protect
members of the military from
predatory financial practices.
The law set up an Office
of Service Member Affairs
to help members of the mili-
tary and their families “make
better informed decisions
regarding consumer financial
products and services.”
Bills pending in Congress,
largely backed by Democrats
and unlikely to become law
soon, would do many of
the same things Obama was
ordering today.
Obama’s order will also
set a new gauge that poten-
tial students can use to cal-
culate how much a school
will really cost in tuition and
fees. Schools are asked to
voluntarily participate in the
“Know Before You Owe”
system this school year and
would be required to do so
next year.
Federal money, most of
it through the financial aid
students receive, accounts for
up to 90 percent of for-profit
colleges’ revenue — even
more if veterans attend the
school on the GI Bill.
Some schools spend
a quarter or more of their
revenue on recruiting, far
more than traditional col-
leges. In some cases, recruit-
ing expenses approach what
these institutions spend on
instruction.
A recent Senate report on
15 large, publicly traded for-
profit education companies
said they got 86 percent of
their revenue from taxpayers
and have spent a combined
$3.7 billion annually on mar-
keting and recruiting.
Military veterans are par-
ticularly attractive recruiting
targets because they come
with generous federal tuition
support and also don’t count
toward a limit called the
“90/10” rule, which requires
colleges to get at least 10
percent of their revenue from
nonfederal sources.
The Association of
Private Sector Colleges and
Universities, which repre-
sents for-profits, said in a
statement it was “disappoint-
ed” that Obama “decided to
bypass the Congress” with an
executive order.
“Career-oriented institu-
tions proudly serve military
and veteran populations, and
work with congressional
leaders in a bipartisan man-
ner to address concerns about
veteran education across all
sectors of higher education,”
the lobbying group said.
Obama targets diploma mills that market to veterans
House Republicans set to
curb student loan costs
High court at center of presidential race
Judge refuses
to release Bin
Laden photos
1
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“To honor
and remember”
On Memorial Day our nation pays tribute and
remembers all those from our country who paid
the ultimate sacrifice in defense of freedom for
our nation ... and locally we want to honor those
who are actively serving in our military
Send us the names of active military
personnel as well as where they are serving,
spouse and/or parents’ name to the Herald
by May 22. Send info by
email to:nspencer@delphosherald.com,
mail to: 405 N. Main St., Delphos OH 45833 or
drop off at the office.
Publications date Sat., May 26.
Friday, April 27, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Columbus Grove
City Building
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store, North Main
Street.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
5 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club hosts a
chicken fry.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.

WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
April 28
Judy Averesch
Brook Hodgson
Amy Martin
Dick Dukes
Jacob Sterling
Timothy Kill
At the movies . . .
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
The Lucky One (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.:
5:00/7:00
The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.:
5:00/7:00
Cabin in the Woods (R) 5:00/7:00/9:00; Sat.-
Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:00
The Hunger Games (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/7:45; Sat.-
Sun.: 2:00/4:45/7:30; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:45
The Pirates! Band of Misfits (PG) Fri.:
5:00/7:00/9:00; Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00;
Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:00
Van-Del Drive In
19986 Lincoln Hwy.
Middle Point
Friday and Saturday
Screen 1
The Hunger Games (PG-13)
Wrath of the Titans (PG-13)
Screen 2
The Lorax (PG)
Mirror Mirror (PG)
Screen 3
The Vow (PG-13)
21 Jump Street (R)
Gates open at 7 p.m.; showtime at dusk.
American Mall Stadium 12
2830 W. Elm St., Lima
Saturday and Sunday
The Five-Year Engagement (R) 1:00/4:30/
7:20/10:15
The Pirates! Band of Misfits 3D (PG)
1:45/4:50/7:10/9:25
The Pirates! Band of Misfits (PG) 1:10/4:20
The Raven (R) 1:20/5:00/7:40/10:05
Safe (R) 1:40/4:15/6:55/9:35
Chimpanzee (G) 1:55/4:35/7:15/9:20
The Lucky One (PG-13) 1:30/4:40/7:30/9:55
Think Like a Man (PG-13) 1:15/4:10/7:00/9:50
The Cabin in the Woods (R) 4:45/10:10
The Three Stooges (PG) 2:00/4:25/6:50/9:30
American Reunion (R) 1:35/4:55/7:35
Titanic 3D (PG-13 7:45
Wrath of the Titans 3D 10:20
Hunger Games (PG-13) 1:05/4:05/7:05/10:00
21 Jump Street (R) 1:50/7:25
Eastgate Dollar Movies
2100 Harding Hwy. Lima
Saturday and Sunday
October Baby (PG-13) 1:00/3:05/5:05/7:15/(Sat.
only 9:20)
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) 1:00/3:00/5:00/7:00/
(Sat. only 9:00)
Act of Valor (R) 1:00/3:20/7:00/(Sat. only 9:15)
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG)
1:00/3:00/5:00/7:30/(Sat. only 9:20)
Shannon Theater
119 S. Main St., Bluffton
The Three Stooges (PG) Show times are every
evening at 7 p.m. with 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday matinees.
21 Jump Street (R) Show times are every
evening at 9:30 p.m. only.
CAMPUS NOTE
Local Students named to
UNOH president’s, dean’s lists
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud
to acknowledge its President’s
List for Winter Quarter 2012
for students in the College
of Business. The following
full-time students received a
grade point average of 4.0:
Spencerville
Brandi Hendricks
Delphos
Shannon Hoersten
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud
to acknowledge its President’s
List for Winter Quarter 2012
for students in the College
of Business. The following
part-time students received a
grade point average of 4.0:
Elida
Bethany Fricke
Fort Jennings
Daniel Saum
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud to
acknowledge its Dean’s List for
Winter Quarter 2012 for stu-
dents in the College of Business.
The following full-time students
received a grade point average
of 3.5 or better:
Cloverdale
Brittany Beining
Jason Horstman
Delphos
Emily Fernandez
Justin Frysinger
Amy Grothouse
Jennifer Moyer
Bert Redmon
Jacklyn Winegardner
Fort Jennings
Patricia Hipsher
Amanda Maye
Dawn Murphy
Glen Schroeder
Ottoville
Christopher Plescher
Spencerville
Jessica Conley
Ashleigh Eutsler
Venedocia
Alex Smith
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud to
acknowledge its Dean’s List for
Winter Quarter 2012 for students
in the College of Business. The
following part-time students
received a grade point average
of 3.5 or better:
Delphos
Fred Newhouse
Corey Martin
William Kramer
Lori Silette
Cloverdale
Ashley Horstman
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6 – The Herald Friday, April 27, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
JEFFERSON (1)
ab-r-h-rbi
Samantha Thitoff ss 3-0-0-1,
Corrine Metzger 2b 4-0-2-0, Fallon Van
Dyke cf 1-0-1-0, Destiny Thompson rf
3-0-1-0, Cassidy Bevington c 3-0-1-0,
Taylor Branham p 3-0-1-0, Samantha
Branham cr 0-0-0-0, Kimber Kill lf 3-0-
0-0, Alexis Cook dp 3-0-0-0, Sarah
Thitoff 3b 0-0-0-0, Kayla Kill 1b 1-1-0-0,
Whitney Hohlbein ph 1-0-0-0, Rachel
Miller rf/cf 3-0-1-0. Totals 28-1-7-1.
COLUMBUS GROVE (7)
ab-r-h-rbi
Deanna Kleman cf 3-1-0-0, Cece
Utendorf 2b 4-1-2-0, Katie Roose c 3-0-
1-1, Glass cr 0-1-0-0, Hope Schroeder
3b 3-2-2-2, Haley Grigsby rf 2-1-0-0,
Ashley Langhals 1b 2-1-1-2, Micah
Stechschulte lf 3-0-2-0, Sarah Bogart
dp 2-0-0-0, Bobbi Heckel p 0-0-0-
0, Katelyn Scott ss 1-0-1-0, Andrea
Blankemeyer ph 1-0-0-0. Totals 24-7-
9-4.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 - 1
Col. Grove 5 2 0 0 0 0 x - 7
E: Bevington, Miller, Utendorf;
LOB: Jefferson 8, Columbus Grove 6;
SB: Bevington, Schroeder, Grisgby,
Stechschulte; CS: Sam. Thitoff (by
Roose); Sac: Roose.
IP H R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
T. Branham (L, 2-12) 6.0 9 7 6 4 5
COL. GROVE
Heckel (W, 10-7) 7.0 7 1 0 1 7
WP: Heckel 3, Branham 2; HBP:
Miller (by T. Branham), Kayla Kill (by
Heckel).
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS GROVE —
It took a while for Jefferson
junior softball pitcher Taylor
Branham to get into a rhythm
on a windy Thursday after-
noon at Columbus Grove’s
2-year-old Bulldog Athletic
Complex.
Unfortunately, she
and her Lady Wildcat
team couldn’t afford
it as the Lady
Bulldogs — behind
the 7-hit pitching of
Bobbi Heckel — took
advantage for a 7-1 Northwest
Conference triumph.
“We had 20 minutes to
warm up and Taylor only did
it for five. No excuses but that
was the difference,” Jefferson
coach Dave Wollenhaupt
explained. “She wasn’t loose
and she was high in
the strike zone; as
good teams do, they
hit the ball and ran
the bases well. Once
Taylor settled into
her rhythm, she did
the job. It was a 2-1 game
after the first inning.”
The Lady Wildcats (2-13,
1-6 NWC) had the first chance
in the top of the first. Samantha
Thitoff got aboard via an
error but was caught stealing
by catcher Katie Roose. An
out later, Fallon Van Dyke
and Cassidy Bevington lined
singles to right, putting run-
ners on the corners. After
Bevington burgled second,
Heckel (7 innings, 1 unearned
run, 1 base-on-balls, seven
strikeouts; 89 pitches, 65
strikes) got the third out.
“Bobbi locates her pitches
well. She isn’t throwing as
hard now as she was ear-
lier this season,” Grove coach
Ryan Schroeder said. “She
throws a nice breaking ball to
complement her fastball and
does a nice job keeping bat-
ters off-balance. She doesn’t
strike out many but she’s been
effective for us.”
In the home half, Deanna
Kleman was hit by a pitch
to lead off. Cece Utendorf
(2-for-4) bunted her way
aboard and Roose sacrificed.
Both came home on Hope
Schroeder’s (2-for-3, 2 runs)
line single to right; an error
on the play put the batter at
third. After a walk to Haley
Grigsby and her stolen base,
Schroeder scored on a wild
pitch, with Grigsby now at
third. Ashley Langhals walked
and stole second; on that play,
an error allowed Grigsby to
touch home for a 4-0 spread.
Micah Stechschulte’s bounce-
out advanced Langhals, who
eventually scored on a wild
pitch after Sarah Bogart and
Katelyn Scott both walked.
However, Branham got the
final out for a 5-0 deficit.
The hosts (10-10) made it
7-0 in the second. With one
down, Roose grounded a sin-
gle into center and Schroeder’s
single that hugged the first-
base line into right put cour-
tesy-runner Glass at third.
Schroeder stole second and
both runners plated on a 2-out
liner by Langhals that just was
too high for leaping shortstop
Samantha Thitoff to keep from
going into left; the batter took
second on the throw home.
Micah Stechschulte (2-for-3)
singled into center but Van
Dyke threw a strike home to
Bevington to nail Langhals
at home.
However, Van Dyke had
to leave the game with an arm
injury.
Branham set down the next
eight before Grove got anoth-
er base-runner.
Jefferson mounted a threat
in the third. With two down,
Corrine Metzger (2-for-4)
singled to center and Destiny
Thompson singled to right
to put runners at second and
third. However, the Wildcats
couldn’t convert on the oppor-
tunity.
Jefferson got on the board
in the fifth. Kayla Kill was
plunked and Rachel Miller
singled to right. After a wild
pitch advanced both run-
ners, Thitoff bounced out to
first to plate Kill and
move Miller to third.
However, she could not
score.
With two down
in the Grove fifth,
Stechschulte bunted
her way aboard and stole sec-
ond but she was left there.
The Red and White mount-
ed another challenge in the
sixth. Branham lined a shot to
center with one down. Kimber
Kill’s comebacker advanced
courtesy-runner Samantha
Branham to second
and a wild pitch got
her to third but she
was left there.
Grove got a leadoff
grounder into right by
Scott to commence the
sixth and a 1-out bunt single
by Utendorf. However, they
became the fifth and sixth
Lady Bulldog runners left on
base.
Jefferson had one final
chance. With two down in the
seventh, Thitoff walked and
Metzger lined a knock into
center. A wild pitch moved
them both up but they were
the seventh and eighth Lady
Wildcats left stranded as
Heckel fanned the final bat-
ter.
“We hit the ball well but
couldn’t come up with the
big hit enough. That is the
consistency we’ve been striv-
ing for all year as we mature,”
Wollenhaupt added. “That is
the next development for us;
when we get the people on
base, we have to drive them
in. Their pitcher had a nice
breaking ball that threw it
when she had two strikes and
we couldn’t time it up. We
also played solid in the field;
we only had one fielding error
on a hard-hit ball.”
Grove hosts PCL foe
Pandora-Gilboa 5 p.m. today
and hosts Waynesfield-Goshen
for an 11 a.m. Saturday twin-
bill.
“We talked to the girls
before the game about jump-
ing on top early and putting
runs up on the board. We did
that the first two innings and
then seemed to lose energy,”
Coach Schroeder added. “Of
course, Branham is much bet-
ter as a pitcher this year than
last. She has added pitches to
her game and has improved
because of it. That’s part of
why we did struggle after she
settled in.”
Jefferson hosts Crestview
5 p.m. Monday.
Lady Bulldogs’ fast
start dooms Jeffcats
Jefferson second baseman Zach Ricker makes a div-
ing stop during the Wildcats’ baseball clash at Columbus
Grove. The visitors out-hit the host Bulldogs 10-8 but
couldn’t take advantage enough, falling 8-5 in NWC
action.
Charlie Warnimont/Putnam County Sentinel photo
By Charlie Warnimont
Sentinel Sports Editor
COLUMBUS GROVE —
Jefferson out-hit Columbus
Grove during their Northwest
Conference baseball game
Thursday night.
Although the Wildcats
banged out two more hits
than the Bulldogs, Jefferson
couldn’t go home with a win
as Columbus Grove held
on for an 8-5 victory. The
Bulldogs move to 6-1 in the
conference and 16-6 over-
all on the season, while the
Wildcats are 3-4 in the league
and 8-12 overall.
“I felt we hit the ball hard
tonight; both teams did,”
Jefferson coach Doug Geary
said. “I was pleased with the
way we played against a very
good team. The difference in
the game was that they were
able to do more with their hits
than we did and that helped
them to a lead. We fought
back and made it interesting. I
was pleased with the way the
guys kept battling tonight.”
After the Wildcats went
down in order in the top of
the first, the Bulldogs pushed
two runs across the plate in
the bottom of the first inning.
Blake Hoffman reached on an
infield single to start before
Brandon Benroth laid down a
bunt that Jefferson third base-
man Ross Thompson fielded.
Thompson threw Benroth out
at first base but no Wildcat
covered third for Thompson
and Hoffman hustled there
before scoring on a wild pitch.
A Matt Jay home run over
the right-center field fence
made it a 2-0 game. After
a strikeout, the Bulldogs put
two more runners on base as
Zach Barrientes and Brady
Shafer singled to left field.
The Wildcats escaped further
damage when Barrientes was
tagged out after being caught
in a rundown after starting
pitcher Jeff Schleeter picked
him off second base.
“I was really pleased that
first inning how we execut-
ed the bunt-and-run,” Grove
coach Cory King said. “Being
able to execute a play like
that gives all the guys confi-
dence they can execute and do
well. Then Matt Jay pops one
out and things start rolling.
I thought we hit the ball real
well all night.”
Jefferson collected its first
hit in the second inning on
a long single to left by Zach
Kimmett. Tony George added
a single in the third inning
but neither runner was able to
advance past first base.
Columbus Grove extended
its lead in the third inning as
they scored three times to take
a 5-0 lead. Hoffman opened
by working a walk and took
second base on a slow roller
by Benroth to short. Hoffman
scored on a double down the
right-field line by Jay. Trey
Roney followed with a sink-
ing liner to right that Kimmett
made a diving attempt at but
couldn’t come up with and the
ball bounced past him all the
way to the fence, allowing Jay
to score and Roney to reach
third base despite having
problems running with a sore
quad muscle. Barrientes was
hit by a pitch in the left arm
and stole second base before
Shafer lifted a sacrifice fly to
right that allowed Roney to
score. Kody Griffith followed
with a walk and the two base-
runners moved up a base on
an errant pickoff attempt at
second. The Wildcats avoided
further damage with a fly ball
to center field.
After stranding two base-
runners in the first three
innings, the Wildcats struck
for two runs in the fourth
inning. Thompson was hit by a
pitch to start the inning. After
a fly ball, Kimmett laced a
double down the left-field line
to put runners at second and
third. Singles by Zach Ricker
and Drew Kortokrax plated
the runs before the Bulldogs
turned a double play to end
the inning.
The Bulldogs added to
their lead in the fifth inning
with two outs. Jay walked
to start and Roney lined a
smash to first base that Curtis
Miller grabbed and stepped
on the base to complete a
double play. Pinch-hitter Clay
Diller walked and stole sec-
ond before Shafer doubled to
right-center to make it a 6-2
game.
Jefferson mounted a rally
in its half of the sixth as
Thompson was hit by a pitch
for the second time in the
game. After an out, Kimmett
sent a ground ball to third; the
Bulldogs’ Josh Verhoff fielded
the ball cleanly but his throw
to second was high and sailed
into right field. Kyle Anspach
came on as a pinch-runner for
Kimmett before Ricker lined a
single to left to load the bases.
Kortokrax then sent a long fly
ball towards right field that
fell in for a hit, only scoring
Thompson as the base-runners
had to hold and see if the ball
was caught. Bulldog right-
fielder Riley Brubaker got the
ball to the infield quickly and
Grove caught Anspach too far
off third base, tagging him
out after a rundown. A single
by Seth Wollenhaupt scored
Ricker before an infield pop-
up ended the inning.
Columbus Grove came
back with two runs in the bot-
tom of the sixth as Verhoff
singled and took second
as Aaron Vorst laid down
a 2-strike bunt. Hoffman
walked before a passed ball
and wild pitch allowed pinch-
runner David Bogart to score.
After Benroth walked, Jay hit
a ground ball to shortstop that
allowed Vorst to score as the
Wildcats forced the runner at
second base.
Jefferson made things
interesting in the seventh as
they scored a run and had two
more runners on base. George
opened by reaching second
base on an error. After a fly-
out, Thompson and Miller
singled to score George. A
fly ball to center and a ground
ball to shortstop ended the
game.
“Delphos Jefferson can
certainly hit the ball,” King
added. “They have some big
strong kids that can hit the ball
well. I thought our defense
played very well tonight.
Brandon Benroth had a great
game defensively at third base
early as they hit some shots at
him. And our outfielders did
a good job of tracking down
some fly balls. I have been
pleased with the way our out-
fielders have played this sea-
son. Trey was anxious to get
back in the game after hurting
his quad and I thought he did
a good job of working through
some situations tonight.”
Roney (3-2) picked up the
win as he worked six innings,
allowing four runs on eight
hits with four strikeouts. Vorst
pitched the seventh inning,
allowing a run on two hits.
Jay had two hits and three
RBIs for the Bulldogs and
Shafer had two hits and two
RBI.
Schleeter took the loss for
Jefferson as he went three
innings, allowing five runs on
six hits with two strikeouts
and two walks. Ricker worked
2 2/3 innings, allowing three
runs on two hits with five
walks, and George retired the
only batter he faced.
Kimmett, Ricker and
Kortokrax all had two hits for
the Wildcats.
Grove visits Lima Senior
for an 11 a.m. Saturday twin-
bill. Jefferson hosts Crestview
5 p.m. Monday.
* * *
Jefferson 000 202 1 - 5 10 2
Col. Grove 203 012 x - 8 8 2
WP-Roney. LP-Schleeter. 2B:
Alex Shafer (C). 3B: Matt Jay (C). HR:
Matt Jay (C).
Bulldogs hold off Wildcats
in NWC hardball
By Brian Bassett
Times Bulletin Sports Editor
sports@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT - The Van
Wert Lady Cougar softball
team hosted the Lady Green
from Ottoville at Jubilee Park
Thursday evening and came
away with an 11-6 non-con-
ference victory.
The Lady Cougars scored
five runs in the first inning
and four more in the fourth
to help them past the winless
Lady Green.
“A win is a win. We’ve
been kind of slumping here
lately. We had a few balls hit
pretty hard tonight, which is
a Pretty good sign,” said Van
Wert coach Mike McClure.
Ottoville got on the board
first in the top of the first
inning, striking for two runs.
Leftfielder Haley Landwehr
opened the game with a walk
and designated player Robyn
Turnwald followed with a
single. Both came around to
score to give the Lady Green
an early 2-0 lead.
The Ottoville lead van-
ished as quickly as it came,
however, as the Lady Cougars
answered with a 5-spot in
their half of the frame. Second
Van Wert subdues Ottoville in softball
See VAN WERT, page 7
Mistakes cost Jays
undisputed MAC lead
VERSAILLES — The St.
John’s baseball team had to
make its second long trek to
Versailles Thursday in three
days after Tuesday’s matchup
was postponed due to only
having one umpire.
They didn’t play a solid
defensive game and it cost
them in a 6-5 loss that threw the
Midwest Athletic Conference
into a 3-way tie with the Blue
Jays (14-4, 4-1), the Tigers
(16-5, 4-1) and New Bremen.
Junior starter Curtis Geise
(3-3) was the hard-luck loser,
giving up six runs (none
earned) and only five hits. He
walked three and hit two bat-
ters while fanning four in his
91-pitch outing (61 strikes).
Bruns got the win with six
innings of 7-hit ball, ceding
fine runs (4 earned), hitting
two batters and walking one
and whiffing five.
The Jays stranded Troy
Warnecke in the first after his
2-out single.
The Tigers got the first run
in the home half on a hit bat-
ter (Kindell), a fielder’s choice
and an error.
The Jays took their only
lead with a 3 spot in the sec-
ond. Austin Reindel got aboard
via the Tigers’ only miscue,
followed by a single from
Jordan Bergfeld and a sacrifice
bunt by Ryan Buescher to put
runners at second and third.
Cody Kundert (2-for-2) singled
Reindel home and put run-
ners on the corners. He stole
second. A passed ball scored
Reindel and placed Kundert
at third, from where he scored
as he beat the throw home
on Ryan Densel’s grounder.
Densel stole second but was
left there.
The Tigers scored five runs
in the bottom of the second on
a hit batter (W. Borchers), two
walks (M. Gigandet and A.
McNeilan) — all three scoring
from the bottom of the order —
a pair of crucial miscues that
extended the frame and a pair
of run-scoring knocks by Z.
Niekamp and Dominic Richard
to make it 6-3.
“In the game of baseball,
you really want to limit your
opponent’s free bases, whether
that be errors, walks or hit bat-
ters. And when you do all three
in one inning, it usually means
a big inning for the other team;
that is what happened to us
in the second inning tonight,”
St. John’s coach Dan Metzger
noted.
After that inning, Geise and
his teammates settled down.
“Outside of the second
inning, where Curtis threw 38
pitches, he threw real well. He
did a nice job of going right at
their hitters and got ahead in
the count on most of them,”
Metzger continued.
A defensive gem by the
Jays kept the Tigers at six runs:
after McNeilan got aboard via
an error with two down and he
stole second, he tried to score
on Rutschilling’s knock to right
but junior Andrew Metzger cut
him down.
The Jays got within 6-5 with
two in the fourth. With one
out, Buescher singled, as did
Kundert, Densel and Tanner
Calvelage, plating Buescher.
Geise forced Kundert at home
but Warnecke was plunked,
getting Densel home. However,
the Jays left the bases juiced.
The only other base-runner
for the visitors was Kundert,
who was hit by a pitch to
commence the sixth but was
caught stealing by catcher
Rutschilling.
“I was pleased to see that
our guys did not hang their
heads after that inning and kept
battling for the entire game.
Unfortunately for us, we just
dug ourselves a hole too big
to get out of,” Coach Metzger
added. “This throws us into a
tie for the MAC lead. We need
to learn from our mistakes and
put this game behind us as we
have New Bremen coming to
town (tonight).”
First pitch is 5 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S (5)
ab-r-h-rbi
Tanner Calvelage cf 4-0-1-1, Curtis
Geise p 4-0-0-0, Troy Warnecke ss
3-0-1-0, Isaac Klausing 1b 3-0-0-0,
Josh Rode ph 1-0-0-0, Austin Reindel
c 3-1-0-0, Jordan Bergfeld dh 3-1-1-
0, Andrew Metzger rf 0-0-0-0, Ryan
Buescher lf 2-1-1-0, Cody Kundert
3b 2-1-2-1, Ryan Densel 2b 3-1-1-1.
Totals 28-5-7-4.
VERSAILLES (6)
ab-r-h-rbi
Rutschilling c 4-0-1-0, Kindell rf
3-2-1-1, Bruns p 4-1-0-2, Z. Niekamp
ss 3-0-1-1, Dominic Richard 1b 2-0-1-
1, K. Niekamp 2b 3-0-1-0, W. Borchers
dh 2-1-0-0, Damien Richard 3b 0-0-0-
0, M. Gigandet cf 2-1-0-0, A. McNielan
lf 2-1-0-0. Totals 25-6-5-5.
Score by Innings:
St. John’s 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 - 5
Versailles 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 - 1
E: Kundert 2, Klausing, Reindel,
Z. Niekamp; DP: ; LOB: St. John’s 5,
Versailles; 2B: ; 3B: ; HR: ; SB: Kundert,
Densel, McNeilan; CS: Kundert (by
Rutschilling); POB: Sac: Buescher.
IP H R ER BB SO
ST. JOHN’S
Geise (L, 3-3) 6.0 5 6 0 3 4
VERSAILLES
Bruns (W) 6.0 7 5 4 1 5
Verhoff (S) 1.0 0 0 0 0 0
HBP: Warnecke (by Bruns),
Kundert (by Bruns), Kindell (by Geise),
Borchers (by Geise); PB: Rutschilling.
----
Jefferson girls capture
USV invite, boys third
MCGUFFEY — The
Jefferson girls track and field
team took first place over run-
ner-up Cory-Rawson 121.5-
116.5 at the Upper Scioto
Valley Invitational Thursday.
The boys placed third
behind Riverdale and
McComb 146-128.5-105.5.
Winners for the Lady Wildcats:
3,200 relay (Kenidi Ulm, Stephanie
Koenig, Kennedy Boggs, Rebekah
Geise); 400 relay (Jenna Moreo,
Brooke Culp, Heather Pohlman,
Breanna Strayer); 400 dash (Boggs);
200 dash (Rileigh Stockwell); and the
1,600 relay (Geise, Stockwell, Brooke
Teman; Boggs).
For the boys: 110 and 300 hurdles
(Cody Biglow); 200 and 400 dashes
(Nick Gallmeier); 100 dash (Tyler
Mox); and 400 relay (Biglow, Mox,
Chris Triesdale, Gallmeier).
-----
Thursday not a good one
for Spencerville diamond 9s
SPENCERVILLE —
Thursday was not a good day
for either of the Spencerville
diamond units in their
Northwest Conference clash-
es with invading Paulding.
On the baseball grounds,
the Panthers’ Javier Gonzales
threw a no-hitter, limiting the
Bearcats (10-9, 3-4 NWC)
to only two base-runners via
walks and fanning one, in a
2-0 victory.
Matt Youngpeter threw a
pretty good game himself for
the Black Attack, giving up
only five hits and two runs
but neither was earned. He
walked none and whiffed six.
Paulding is now 5-12 (3-4
NWC).
Spencerville visits Ottoville
at 5 p.m. tonight and visits St.
John’s for a noon-day double-
header Saturday.
On the softball field,
Kristen Beck tossed a 5-hitter
and got enough help to shut
out the Lady Bearcats 11-0.
Tori Johnston took the
loss.
The Lady Bearcats (4-12,
2-5 NWC) visits Marion
Local this afternoon (5 p.m.)
and Miller City for a noon-
time twinbill Saturday.
Paulding is 8-11 (4-3
NWC).
Baseball:
Paulding 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 - 2 5 0
Spencerville 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 2
WP: Javier Gonzales; LP: Matt
Youngpeter.
Softball:
Paulding 4 0 3 4 0 - 11 8 0
Spencerville 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 5 5
WP. K. Beck; LP T. Johnston. 2B:
Kristen Beck (P), Tori Johnston (S). 3B:
A Shelmadine (P), J. Lamb (P).
-----
Pirates belt Big Green
OTTOVILLE —
Continental’s Luke Sullivan
twirled a 2-hitter to down
host Ottoville 8-1 in Putnam
County League baseball
action Thursday in Ottoville.
The Pirates (10-5) went up
3-0 in the top of the first and
went on as they handed Luke
Schimmoeller the loss.
Neither team played good
defense, combining for nine
errors (5 by Ottoville), but
the Big Green’s were most
costly as the Pirates only had
seven hits.
The Big Green (5-12) host
Spencerville tonight (5 p.m.)
and Lima Temple Christian at
noon Saturday.
Continental 3 1 0 1 2 1 0 - 8 7 5
Ottoville 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 - 1 2 4
WP: Luke Sullivan; LP: Luke
Schimmoeller. 3B: Brandon Burke (C).
LOCAL ROUNDUP
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419-695-0660
Friday, April 27, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
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20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
Authorized CIub Car DeaIer ª SaIes and Service
Parts for: Ez-go ª Yamaha ª HarIey Davidson
LSV Street Legal
Go Green All Electric
20-30 Mile range on a single
charge
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive
Made in the U.S.A.!
Authorized Club Car Dealer • Sales and Service
Parts for Ez-go • Yamaha • Harley Davidson
20913 Hauss Rd. • Cridersville, Oh. • (2 miles west of I 75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 • M-F 8-6; Sat. 8-Noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
20913 Hauss Rd. ª CridersviIIe, Oh. ª (2 miIes west of I75, exit 118)
PH: (419) 645-4288 or 419-645-4688 ª M-F 8-6; Sat 8-noon
stech@bright.net or stechparts.com
Authorized CIub Car DeaIer ª SaIes and Service
Parts for: Ez-go ª Yamaha ª HarIey Davidson
LSV Street Legal
Go Green All Electric
20-30 Mile range on a single
charge
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive
Made in the U.S.A.!
XRT950 Utility Vehicles
4 Wheel or 2 Wheel Drive Made in the U.S.A.!

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 13,204.62 +113.90
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 3,050.61 +20.98
S&P 500 INDEX 1,399.98 +9.29
AUTOZONE INC. 393.72 +10.89
BUNGE LTD 65.69 -1.75
EATON CORP. 48.97 +0.19
BP PLC ADR 43.29 +1.10
DOMINION RES INC 51.89 +0.65
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 38.61 +0.12
CVS CAREMARK CRP 44.58 +0.78
CITIGROUP INC 33.88 +0.20
FIRST DEFIANCE 16.82 +0.24
FST FIN BNCP 16.84 -0.26
FORD MOTOR CO 11.87 +0.14
GENERAL DYNAMICS 67.05 -0.51
GENERAL MOTORS 23.72 +0.41
GOODYEAR TIRE 11.93 +0.33
HEALTHCARE REIT 56.64 +0.65
HOME DEPOT INC. 51.87 -0.04
HONDA MOTOR CO 35.97 +0.36
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.69 +0.03
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 64.75 +0.32
JPMORGAN CHASE 43.80 +0.64
KOHLS CORP. 50.27 +0.51
LOWES COMPANIES 31.43 -0.30
MCDONALDS CORP. 95.83 +0.61
MICROSOFT CP 32.11 -0.09
PEPSICO INC. 66.37 -0.30
PROCTER & GAMBLE 66.87 -0.02
RITE AID CORP. 1.44 +0.01
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.37 -0.06
TIME WARNER INC. 37.88 +0.70
US BANCORP 32.10 +0.42
UTD BANKSHARES 8.00 0
VERIZON COMMS 40.14 +0.66
WAL-MART STORES 58.95 +1.59
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 26, 2012
The Associated Press
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7)
Thursday’s Results
NY Rangers 2, Ottawa 1, NY Rangers
wins series 4-3
New Jersey 3, Florida 2, 2OT, New
Jersey wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Friday’s Game
Nashville at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Washington at NY Rangers, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Monday’s Game
Washington at NY Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday’s Game
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Nashville, 9 p.m.
Thursday’s Game
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Friday, May 4
Phoenix at Nashville, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 5
NY Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 6
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 3 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 7
Washington at NY Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8
New Jersey at Philadelphia, TBD
Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBD
Wednesday, May 9
NY Rangers at Washington, TBD
Phoenix at Nashville, TBD
Thursday, May 10
Philadelphia at New Jersey, TBD
St. Louis at Los Angeles, TBD
Friday, May 11
Nashville at Phoenix, TBD
Saturday, May 12
Washington at NY Rangers, TBD
New Jersey at Philadelphia, TBD
Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBD
NHL PLAYOFF
GLANCE
The Associated Press
Final
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 39 27 .591 —
x-New York 36 30 .545 3
x-Philadelphia 35 31 .530 4
Toronto 23 43 .348 16
New Jersey 22 44 .333 17
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 46 20 .697 —
x-Atlanta 40 26 .606 6
x-Orlando 37 29 .561 9
Washington 20 46 .303 26
Charlotte 7 59 .106 39
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-Chicago 50 16 .758 —
x-Indiana 42 24 .636 8
Milwaukee 31 35 .470 19
Detroit 25 41 .379 25
Cleveland 21 45 .318 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
z-San Antonio 50 16 .758 —
x-Memphis 41 25 .621 9
x-Dallas 36 30 .545 14
Houston 34 32 .515 16
New Orleans 21 45 .318 29
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma City 47 19 .712 —
x-Denver 38 28 .576 9
x-Utah 36 30 .545 11
Portland 28 38 .424 19
Minnesota 26 40 .394 21
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Lakers 41 25 .621 —
x-L.A. Clippers 40 26 .606 1
Phoenix 33 33 .500 8
Golden State 23 43 .348 18
Sacramento 22 44 .333 19
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
———
Thursday’s Results
Toronto 98, New Jersey 67
Utah 96, Portland 94
Chicago 107, Cleveland 75
Houston 84, New Orleans 77
Denver 131, Minnesota 102
Memphis 88, Orlando 76
Atlanta 106, Dallas 89
Boston 87, Milwaukee 74
New York 104, Charlotte 84
Detroit 108, Philadelphia 86
Washington 104, Miami 70
San Antonio 107, Golden State 101
Sacramento 113, L.A. Lakers 96
End of regular season
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 14 5 .737 —
Atlanta 12 7 .632 2
New York 11 8 .579 3
Philadelphia 9 10 .474 5
Miami 7 11 .389 6 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 12 7 .632 —
Cincinnati 9 10 .474 3
Milwaukee 9 10 .474 3
Pittsburgh 8 10 .444 3 1/2
Houston 7 12 .368 5
Chicago 6 13 .316 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 13 6 .684 —
San Francisco 10 9 .526 3
Colorado 9 9 .500 3 1/2
Arizona 9 10 .474 4
San Diego 6 14 .300 7 1/2
———
Thursday’s Results
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 5
N.Y. Mets 3, Miami 2
San Diego 2, Washington 1
Today’s Games
Chicago Cubs (Maholm 1-2) at
Philadelphia (Halladay 3-1), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 1-1) at Miami
(Zambrano 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-2) at Cincinnati
(Leake 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 1-0) at Atlanta
(Hanson 2-2), 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 2-1), 8:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Schwinden 0-0) at Colorado
(Pomeranz 0-1), 8:40 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 2-0) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 1-0), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 2-1) at San
Francisco (Hacker 0-0), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0) at St. Louis
(Lohse 3-0), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 1-1) at Cincinnati
(Cueto 2-0), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 0-0) at
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-3), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 3-0) at Miami
(A.Sanchez 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Bedard 0-4) at Atlanta
(Delgado 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-2) at Colorado
(Guthrie 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
San Diego (Bass 1-2) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 1-2), 9:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 2-0) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 2-1), 9:10 p.m.
----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 12 7 .632 —
Tampa Bay 12 7 .632 —
New York 10 8 .556 1 1/2
Toronto 10 9 .526 2
Boston 8 10 .444 3 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 9 8 .529 —
Chicago 10 9 .526 —
Detroit 10 9 .526 —
Kansas City 5 14 .263 5
Minnesota 5 14 .263 5
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 15 4 .789 —
Oakland 10 10 .500 5 1/2
Seattle 10 10 .500 5 1/2
Los Angeles 6 13 .316 9
———
Thursday’s Results
Kansas City 4, Cleveland 2
Seattle 5, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 3
Baltimore 5, Toronto 2
Boston 10, Chicago White Sox 3
Today’s Games
Detroit (Verlander 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 3-0), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 3-0) at Cleveland
(Masterson 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 0-3) at Baltimore
(Arrieta 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 1-2) at Toronto
(R.Romero 3-0), 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 3-0) at Texas
(M.Harrison 3-0), 8:05 p.m.
Boston (Bard 1-2) at Chicago White Sox
(Danks 2-2), 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Teaford 0-1) at Minnesota
(Pavano 1-2), 8:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
L.A. Angels (Haren 0-1) at Cleveland
(J.Gomez 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 0-2) at Minnesota
(Marquis 1-0), 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (Smyly 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees
(F.Garcia 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
Seattle (Millwood 0-1) at Toronto
(Morrow 1-1), 4:07 p.m.
Oakland (T.Ross 1-0) at Baltimore
(W.Chen 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 0-2) at Chicago White
Sox (Peavy 3-0), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 1-2) at Texas
(Lewis 2-0), 8:05 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
By RICHARD ROSENBLATT
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Once
the NFL draft got past quar-
terbacks Andrew Luck and
Robert Griffin III, it was
like a day on Wall Street.
Everybody wanted to make
a trade.
The wheeling and
dealing started even
before the Colts
opened the proceed-
ings as expected
Thursday night by
taking Luck and the
Redskins followed by
selecting RG3.
Behind closed doors, gen-
eral managers around the
league were gabbing away,
jockeying to position their
teams to land the most cov-
eted player on their draft
board.
When it was over, there
were eight trades involving 12
of the league’s 32 teams and
draftniks breathlessly trying
to keep up with the organized
mayhem. It all started when
Minnesota swapped its No. 3
choice for Cleveland’s No. 4
pick. The Browns, who also
gave up a fourth, fifth and
seventh-rounder, desperately
wanted Alabama running
back Trent Richardson. The
Vikings still got the guy they
sought in Southern California
tackle Matt Kalil.
“Unfortunately, we had to
make a little trade to secure
the pick,” said Browns coach
Pat Shurmur, who later added
QB Brandon Weeden with
the No. 22 selection. “We
knew as we went through
the process that he was our
guy and so we did what we
had to do to secure it. We
had pretty good knowledge
that there were teams behind
that wanted him as well, so
we gave up a couple of picks
to make sure we got him.
We’re thrilled a bunch about
Trent.”
The move allowed the
Vikings to deal for anoth-
er first-round pick, gaining
the No. 29 spot in a trade
with Baltimore and choosing
Notre Dame safety Harrison
Smith.
The Jaguars, Cowboys and
Eagles also traded up and the
Patriots did it twice to select
players they wanted.
Credit the rookie wage
scale for so much buying and
selling, with GMs making
last-minute moves knowing
that extravagant salaries for
top picks have been replaced
by a compensation plan.
There were no such con-
cerns for Indianapolis and
Washington.
Stanford’s Luck heads for
Indianapolis and the burden
of replacing Peyton Manning,
who merely won four MVP
awards and a Super Bowl.
Baylor’s RGIII answers the
call in Washington, where he
will try to soothe a devout but
highly critical fan base.
“You don’t really replace
a guy like that,” Luck said.
“You can’t. You just try to do
the best you can. Obviously,
he was my hero growing
up.”
His selection as
the top pick was
hardly a stunner.
The Colts informed
Luck last week that
Commissioner Roger
Goodell would
announce his name
first. Right behind
him was Griffin; no suspense
attached to that pick, either.
After being loudly booed
at the start, Goodell told a
raucous crowd at Radio City
Music Hall that “the season
begins tonight, so let’s kick
itoff.”
Luck left the stage,
slapped hands with some fans
in Colts’ shirts and headed to
the interview room.
To get Griffin, Washington
had dealt a second-round
pick this year and its first-
rounders in 2013 and ‘14 to
St. Louis to move up four
spots. They wound up with
the QB that beat out Luck for
the Heisman Trophy.
RG3 sang the team’s fight
song during a conference
call: “Hail to the Redskins!
Hail vic-tor-y! That’s how I
felt. It felt that good.”
After Minnesota took
Kalil, Jacksonville jumped
up two spots to No. 5, trading
with Florida neighbor Tampa
Bay to get Oklahoma State’s
Justin Blackmon, the top
receiver in this crop.
St. Louis must have liked
dealing down because the
Rams did it again, trading
with Dallas, which was 14th
overall. The Cowboys select-
ed LSU’s Morris Claiborne,
the top cornerback, adding
him to free-agent signee
Brandon Carr and shoring up
what was a Swiss cheese sec-
ondary.
St. Louis got a second-
rounder in the deal.
Tampa Bay finished off a
wild 30 minutes of bartering
by grabbing Alabama safety
Mark Barron seventh overall.
A third quarterback went
eighth where Miami stayed
put. The Dolphins took Texas
A&M’s Ryan Tannehill, who
played wide receiver for
most of his time in college.
His coach at A&M, Mike
Sherman, is the Dolphins
offensive coordinator.
Carolina selected Boston
College linebacker Luke
Kuechly, the nation’s leading
tackler. Buffalo chose cor-
nerback Stephon Gilmore of
South Carolina and Memphis
defensive tackle Dontari Poe
went to Kansas City before
the next trade occurred.
Philadelphia moved up
from 15 to 12, giving Seattle
two later picks, then took
Mississippi State defensive
tackle Fletcher Cox.
Notre Dame receiv-
er Michael Floyd went to
Arizona, then the Rams
got involved, taking LSU
defensive tackle Michael
Brockers.
New England’s first deal
was with Cincinnati to get
Syracuse DE Chandler Jones
at No. 21; the second was with
Denver to draft Crimson Tide
linebacker Dont’a Hightower
at No. 25.
Like Minnesota, Tampa
Bay also got back into the
first round, at No. 31 after
dealing with Denver. The
Bucs took Boise State run-
ning back Doug Martin.
The Super Bowl cham-
pion Giants concluded a swift
but hectic round by choosing
Virginia Tech running back
David Wilson.
Bengals coach Marvin
Lewis may have summed up
the first of three draft ses-
sions.
“I guess maybe this one-
night format is a good thing,”
he added. “Everybody was
fired up to do something on
the night.”
2012 NFL Draft First-Round
Selections
1. Indianapolis, Andrew Luck, qb,
Stanford.
2. Washington (from St. Louis),
Robert Griffin III, qb, Baylor.
3. Cleveland (from Minnesota), Trent
Richardson, rb, Alabama.
4. Minnesota (from Cleveland), Matt
Kalil, ot, Southern Cal.
5. Jacksonville (from Tampa Bay),
Justin Blackmon, wr, Oklahoma State.
6. Dallas (from Washington through
St. Louis), Morris Claiborne, db, LSU.
7. Tampa Bay (from Jacksonville),
Mark Barron, db, Alabama.
8. Miami, Ryan Tannehill, qb, Texas
A&M.
9. Carolina, Luke Kuechly, lb, Boston
College.
10. Buffalo, Stephon Gilmore, db,
South Carolina.
11. Kansas City, Dontari Poe, nt,
Memphis.
12. Philadelphia (from Seattle),
Fletcher Cox, dt, Mississippi State.
13. Arizona, Michael Floyd, wr,
Notre Dame.
14. St. Louis (from Dallas), Michael
Brockers, dt, LSU.
15. Seattle (from Philadelphia), Bruce
Irvin, de, West Virginia.
16. N.Y. Jets, Quinton Coples, de,
North Carolina.
17. Cincinnati (from Oakland), Dre
Kirkpatrick, db, Alabama.
18. San Diego, Melvin Ingram, lb,
South Carolina.
19. Chicago, Shea McClellin, de,
Boise State.
20. Tennessee, Kendall Wright, wr,
Baylor.
21. New England (from Cincinnati),
Chandler Jones, de, Syracuse.
22. Cleveland (from Atlanta), Brandon
Weeden, qb, Oklahoma State.
23. Detroit, Riley Reiff, ot, Iowa.
24. Pittsburgh, David DeCastro, g,
Stanford.
25. New England, (from Denver),
Dont’a Hightower, lb, Alabama.
26. Houston, Whitney Mercilus, lb,
Illinois.
27. Cincinnati (from New Orleans
through New England), Kevin Zeitler, g,
Wisconsin.
28. Green Bay, Nick Perry, lb,
Southern Cal.
29. Minnesota (from Baltimore),
Harrison Smith, db, Notre Dame.
30. San Francisco, A.J. Jenkins, wr,
Illinois.
31. Tampa Bay (from New England
through Denver), Doug Martin, rb, Boise
State.
32. N.Y. Giants, David Wilson, rb,
Virginia Tech.
Luck, RG3 go 1-2 as expected,
deal-a-thon follows
(Continued from Page 6)
baseman Gretchen Klinker
started things off with a
single and first baseman
Brittany Bigham followed
with a walk. Centerfielder
Maggie Allmandinger plated
Klinker with a single and
Bigham scored when pitch-
er Jessica Klausing hit into
a fielder’s choice. Catcher
Kelsey Saylor then brought
Allmandinger and Klausing
home with a 2-run double and
Saylor scored on an RBI sin-
gle by leftfielder Saige Royer
to give the Lady Cougars a
5-2 lead after one.
Van Wert went back to
work in the bottom of the
second: Klinker walked, stole
second, advanced to third on
an error and came in to score
when rightfielder Melissa
Roop hit into a fielder’s
choice as the Lady Cougar
led 6-2.
Ottoville finally answered
with a run in the top half of
the fourth. Pitcher Courtney
Von Sossan walked and
scored on an RBI single by
Landwehr.
The Lady Cougars coun-
tered with four in the bottom
of the frame. Roop picked
up a 1-out single before
three consecutive doubles by
Bigham, Allmandinger (scor-
ing Roop and Bigham) and
Klausing (Allmandinger).
Saylor brought Klausing
home with an RBI single to
make the score 10-3 after
four complete.
The Lady Green would
not go away quietly and put
up three runs in the top of the
fifth inning. Shortstop Megan
Risner opened with a single
and scored on an RBI triple
off the bat of centerfielder
Marissa Nienberg. First base-
man Krista Schimmoeller
then plated Neinberg with an
RBI single and Schimmoeller
came in to score on a single
by rightfielder Paige Lucas,
bringing Ottoville within
four, 10-6.
Van Wert picked up an
insurance run in the home
half of the fifth, when third
baseman Alyssa Bowen sin-
gled, stole second and scored
on a sac fly off the bat of
Bigham.
Klausing held the Lady
Green scoreless in the sixth
and seventh innings to seal
the Lady Cougar win.
McClure credited
Klausing with keeping nine
Lady Green base-runners
stranded on the night: “She
threw the ball like she was
throwing at the beginning of
the season. If she throws the
ball like that, we can win ball
games.”
Klausing picked up the
win. She went all seven
innings, allowing six earned
runs on 11 hits. She walked
four and struck out three.
Von Sossan took the loss
for Ottoville. She went six
innings, allowing 11 earned
runs on 14 hits. She walked
five and struck out one.
Saylor and Allmandinger
led the Lady Cougar charge
on offense, each with three
hits. Allmandinger added a
pair of RBIs and a pair of
runs scored.
Landwehr led the Lady
Green at the plate. She went
3-3 with a walk, a run scored
and an RBI.
With the win, the Lady
Cougars (who host Defiance
this evening) pull back to
.500 on the season (10-10).
Ottoville is 0-12 and visits
O-G 5 p.m. Monday.
Ottoville 200 103 0 - 6 11 1
Van Wert 510 401 x - 11 14 0
WP - Klausing; LP - Von Sossan.
2B - (VW) Bigham, Allmandinger,
Klausing, Saylor. 3B - (O) Nienberg.
Van Wert
PITSENBARGER
SUPPLY
234 N. Canal St.
Delphos, O.
Ph. 692-1010
Professional Parts People
RAABE FORD
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11260 Elida Road
DELPHOS, OH 45833
Ph. 692-0055
Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
HARTER
& SCHIER
FUNERAL
HOME
209 W. 3rd St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-8055
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
•CARPET
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Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
Vanamatic
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AUTOMATIC
AND HAND
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PRODUCTS
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service -
Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast;
8:30 a.m. TDTR Retreat
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School;
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
Monday - 7:00 p.m. SW Conference
Delegate Meeting
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. Altar Guild
Wednesday - 11:00 a.m. Good
Morning/Good Shepherd; 7:00 p.m.
InReach/OutReach Meeting
Thursday - 12:00 p.m. National Day
of Prayer at City Building
Friday - 1:30 p.m. Church Women
United
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 10:00 a.m. Worship Service;
11:00 a.m. Pot Luck Dinner

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of
Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery
provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at
The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Discipleship
in The Upper Level
For more info see our website: www.
delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Saturday - 8:45 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Youth-Trash-A-Thon
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE No
Kidmo/Communion Service; 1:30
p.m. Jubilee Class Leading Worship
Service
Tuesday - 9:00 a.m. - MUMS
Wednesday - 6:45 p.m. Calvary
Youth, AWANA; 7:00 p.m. Men’s Bible
Study

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s minis-
try - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Service/Vorst Baptism; 9:30 a.m. Church
School for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship
Service; 11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on
WDOH: 4:00 Confirmation Class
Monday - 7:00 p.m. Trustees Meeting;
7:30 p.m. Administrative Council
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. Outreach
Committee
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Chancel Choir
Thursday - 7:30 a.m. Students meet
around the flag pole for prayer; 12:00
Noon National Day of Prayer @ City
Building; 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Supper’s
On Us
Friday - 1:30 p.m. Church Women
United May Fellowship Tea @ St. Peter
Lutheran Church; 3:00 p.m. Last Mustard
Seeds of this school year

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
L
e
h
m
a
n
n

s
We thank the sponsors of this page and ask you to please support them.
8— The Herald
www.delphosherald.com Friday, April 27, 2012
Religion news deja vu
The late, great Associated Press religion reporter George
Cornell noticed a striking pattern as he dug into a 1981 sur-
vey of journalists in elite newsrooms such as The New York
Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Time, News-
week, ABC, CBS and NBC.
In the space marked “religion,” 50 percent of these elite
journalists wrote one word -- “none.”
“They wrote ‘none’ and many even underlined that word,”
said Cornell, in an interview conducted for my graduate
project at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.
Parts of the interview were included in my 1983 cover story
on religion-news coverage for The Quill, the journal of the
Society of Professional Journalists.
In the religion slot, he noted, they “didn’t just say ‘none.’
They said ‘NONE.’ “
Other numbers jumped out of that controversial report by
researchers S. Robert Lichter and Stanley Rothman, such as
the fact that 8 percent of the journalists said they attended
worship services weekly, while 86 percent said they seldom
or never did so. In contrast, the Gallup Organization has
consistently reported that about 40 percent of Americans
claim to attend services each week.
Ever since then, I have heard clergy quote those numbers
as evidence of a deep chasm of hostility between journalists
and religious believers, especially religious traditionalists. I
have returned to this topic many times during the 24 years
-- the anniversary was this past week -- that I have written
this column for the Scripps Howard News Service.
In response, I keep quoting commentator Bill Moy-
ers, who once said many journalists are “tone deaf” when
it comes to hearing the music of faith. I’m also convinced
we’re dealing with a “blind spot” that has two sides, be-
cause leaders on both sides of the First Amendment simply
do not respect each other and the roles their institutions play
in public life.
Readers of this column, and of the GetReligion.org blog,
constantly ask me if I have seen signs of progress through
the years. Yes, there were some flickers of hope in the late
1990s and early in the following decade, as a few more
news organizations hired journalists with the experience
and training to improve religion-news coverage.
You see, almost everyone agrees coverage improves
when editors hire trained religion specialists and then give
them the time and space they need to do their jobs -- just
like journalists on other complicated beats. Also, religious
believers can do fine work on this beat and so can skeptics.
The key is that they need to know what they’re doing and be
committed to accuracy and fairness.
The question people like me keep asking is this one: Why
don’t more editors hire pros to cover such a pivotal beat in
national and international news?
Alas, this is where recent polls have, for me, caused some
nasty flashbacks.
Consider, for example, that recent survey by the Pew
Forum on Religion and Public Life indicating that a mere
19 percent of Americans feel that journalists are “friendly”
toward religion in this culture. Only 11 percent of Repub-
licans see the press as faith-friendly, while 24 percent of
Democrats hold that view.
Meanwhile, researchers with the University of Southern
California’s Knight Program in Media and Religion and the
University of Akron’s Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Poli-
tics have released a new survey indicating that two-thirds of
the American public says that mainstream religion coverage
is too “sensationalized” and focuses too much on scandals
and politics. Just under 30 percent of the journalists agreed.
In this survey, nearly 60 percent of the journalists said
they think “religious people are far too sensitive about reli-
gion stories.” At the same time, a sizable minority of news
consumers -- 37 percent -- remain convinced that journalists
are “hostile to religion and religious people.”
Wait a minute. That 37 percent figure is uncomfortably
similar to the consistent Gallup finding (the previously men-
tioned 40 percent) on the number of Americans who claim
to attend weekly worship services. Is there a connection?
This correlation is relevant, but these groups “do not
overlap completely,” said veteran religion-news researcher
John C. Green of Akron.
Nevertheless, he said, “there is a connection between
regular worship attendance and the perception that the news
media are hostile to religious people.” At the same time,
“less religious journalists are more likely to agree that reli-
gious people are too sensitive.”
The standoff continues. It’s kind of like deja vu all over
again.

(Terry Mattingly is the director of the Washington Journalism Center at
the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and leads the GetReli-
gion.org project to study religion and the news.)
** ** **
(EDITORS: For editorial questions, please contact Kendra Phipps
at kphipps@amuniversal.com.)
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A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service -
Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast;
8:30 a.m. TDTR Retreat
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School;
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
Monday - 7:00 p.m. SW Conference
Delegate Meeting
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. Altar Guild
Wednesday - 11:00 a.m. Good
Morning/Good Shepherd; 7:00 p.m.
InReach/OutReach Meeting
Thursday - 12:00 p.m. National Day
of Prayer at City Building
Friday - 1:30 p.m. Church Women
United
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 10:00 a.m. Worship Service;
11:00 a.m. Pot Luck Dinner

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of
Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery
provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at
The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Discipleship
in The Upper Level
For more info see our website: www.
delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Saturday - 8:45 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Youth-Trash-A-Thon
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE No
Kidmo/Communion Service; 1:30
p.m. Jubilee Class Leading Worship
Service
Tuesday - 9:00 a.m. - MUMS
Wednesday - 6:45 p.m. Calvary
Youth, AWANA; 7:00 p.m. Men’s Bible
Study

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s minis-
try - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Service/Vorst Baptism; 9:30 a.m. Church
School for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship
Service; 11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on
WDOH: 4:00 Confirmation Class
Monday - 7:00 p.m. Trustees Meeting;
7:30 p.m. Administrative Council
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. Outreach
Committee
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Chancel Choir
Thursday - 7:30 a.m. Students meet
around the flag pole for prayer; 12:00
Noon National Day of Prayer @ City
Building; 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Supper’s
On Us
Friday - 1:30 p.m. Church Women
United May Fellowship Tea @ St. Peter
Lutheran Church; 3:00 p.m. Last Mustard
Seeds of this school year

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
L
e
h
m
a
n
n

s
We thank the sponsors of this page and ask you to please support them.
8— The Herald
www.delphosherald.com Friday, April 27, 2012
Religion news deja vu
The late, great Associated Press religion reporter George
Cornell noticed a striking pattern as he dug into a 1981 sur-
vey of journalists in elite newsrooms such as The New York
Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Time, News-
week, ABC, CBS and NBC.
In the space marked “religion,” 50 percent of these elite
journalists wrote one word -- “none.”
“They wrote ‘none’ and many even underlined that word,”
said Cornell, in an interview conducted for my graduate
project at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.
Parts of the interview were included in my 1983 cover story
on religion-news coverage for The Quill, the journal of the
Society of Professional Journalists.
In the religion slot, he noted, they “didn’t just say ‘none.’
They said ‘NONE.’ “
Other numbers jumped out of that controversial report by
researchers S. Robert Lichter and Stanley Rothman, such as
the fact that 8 percent of the journalists said they attended
worship services weekly, while 86 percent said they seldom
or never did so. In contrast, the Gallup Organization has
consistently reported that about 40 percent of Americans
claim to attend services each week.
Ever since then, I have heard clergy quote those numbers
as evidence of a deep chasm of hostility between journalists
and religious believers, especially religious traditionalists. I
have returned to this topic many times during the 24 years
-- the anniversary was this past week -- that I have written
this column for the Scripps Howard News Service.
In response, I keep quoting commentator Bill Moy-
ers, who once said many journalists are “tone deaf” when
it comes to hearing the music of faith. I’m also convinced
we’re dealing with a “blind spot” that has two sides, be-
cause leaders on both sides of the First Amendment simply
do not respect each other and the roles their institutions play
in public life.
Readers of this column, and of the GetReligion.org blog,
constantly ask me if I have seen signs of progress through
the years. Yes, there were some flickers of hope in the late
1990s and early in the following decade, as a few more
news organizations hired journalists with the experience
and training to improve religion-news coverage.
You see, almost everyone agrees coverage improves
when editors hire trained religion specialists and then give
them the time and space they need to do their jobs -- just
like journalists on other complicated beats. Also, religious
believers can do fine work on this beat and so can skeptics.
The key is that they need to know what they’re doing and be
committed to accuracy and fairness.
The question people like me keep asking is this one: Why
don’t more editors hire pros to cover such a pivotal beat in
national and international news?
Alas, this is where recent polls have, for me, caused some
nasty flashbacks.
Consider, for example, that recent survey by the Pew
Forum on Religion and Public Life indicating that a mere
19 percent of Americans feel that journalists are “friendly”
toward religion in this culture. Only 11 percent of Repub-
licans see the press as faith-friendly, while 24 percent of
Democrats hold that view.
Meanwhile, researchers with the University of Southern
California’s Knight Program in Media and Religion and the
University of Akron’s Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Poli-
tics have released a new survey indicating that two-thirds of
the American public says that mainstream religion coverage
is too “sensationalized” and focuses too much on scandals
and politics. Just under 30 percent of the journalists agreed.
In this survey, nearly 60 percent of the journalists said
they think “religious people are far too sensitive about reli-
gion stories.” At the same time, a sizable minority of news
consumers -- 37 percent -- remain convinced that journalists
are “hostile to religion and religious people.”
Wait a minute. That 37 percent figure is uncomfortably
similar to the consistent Gallup finding (the previously men-
tioned 40 percent) on the number of Americans who claim
to attend weekly worship services. Is there a connection?
This correlation is relevant, but these groups “do not
overlap completely,” said veteran religion-news researcher
John C. Green of Akron.
Nevertheless, he said, “there is a connection between
regular worship attendance and the perception that the news
media are hostile to religious people.” At the same time,
“less religious journalists are more likely to agree that reli-
gious people are too sensitive.”
The standoff continues. It’s kind of like deja vu all over
again.

(Terry Mattingly is the director of the Washington Journalism Center at
the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and leads the GetReli-
gion.org project to study religion and the news.)
** ** **
(EDITORS: For editorial questions, please contact Kendra Phipps
at kphipps@amuniversal.com.)
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR UFS
Friday, April 27, 2012 The Herald - 9 www.delphosherald.com
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Rent $90/day
Contact
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419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
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GREAT RATES
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950 Pets
BRENDA’S
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419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
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OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
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Since 1973
419-692-7261
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• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
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• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
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SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
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22 Years Experience • Insured
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Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
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“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
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• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
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BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
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Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
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IMPROVEMENT LLC
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FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your special
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
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ervice
in print & online
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Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
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Sell it in
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INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
3 bedroom, 3 car garage.
New roof, new furnace & central air, updated kitchen, bath,
and more! $70,500.
Approx. monthly payment -
$
376.48
details, pics and more chbsinc.com 419-586-8220
Open House
9am-5pm
Sat. & Sun.
$0 Down • $0 Closing
Home warranty.
Remodeled!
604 W. 7th St., Delphos
005

Lost & Found
FOUND- CALICO female
in the block of 900 N. Ca-
nal St. Has claws, very
friendly. Call
567-712-0952
FOUND- SMALL black
and white dog found out in
the country Friday 4/20.
Call 419-692-1075
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
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advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
CHILDCARE PROVIDER
Openings available for
children age 6 months and
older in my smoke-free,
pet-free, Delphos home.
Lunch and afternoon
snack provided. Available
from 7:45 A.M. to 5:00
P.M. Monday thru Friday.
Many years experience.
References available. Feel
free to call Stacy at
419-236-1358
FORT JENNINGSarea
Babysitter has openings.
Smoke-free, Pet-free
home. Call 567-204-0934
if interested.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
MAX’S ANIMAL Swap &
Flea Market. May 5 and 6,
8am-? at 6440 Harding
Highway, E 309, Lima,
OH. 419- 225- 8545,
419-230-9134,
419-230-7405
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
340

Garage Sales
18069 ROAD 24-R, Fort
Jennings. Dvd’s, TV’s,
furniture, toys, video
games, household items,
clothing, lots more.
April 26&27- 8am-8pm.
April 28- 8am-1pm
340

Garage Sales
529 E. Jackson St. 6-Party
Sale. Friday-Saturday 9-6.
Professional quality NEW
tools; men, women and
children clothes 80% @
25¢-50¢. Leather, blue-
jean, rain, winter coats
and jackets; skirts, house
dresses, bluejeans, dress
pants. Knickknacks, appli-
ances, MaryKay=cheap,
dishes
8225 DEFIANCE Tr.
RV supplies and LOTS of
misc. Thurs. April 26 thru
Sat. April 28 - 8am-5pm.
DOUBLE GARAGE Sale
810 N. Main &
827 N. Washington.
Friday & Saturday 8-6.
1979 Sea Ray Sundancer
260 boat, Vera Bradley,
furniture, dishes, lots of
movies (DVD’s & VHS),
r ecor ds, appl i ances,
lamps, hand guns, humidi-
fier, camp stoves, Oster
kitchen center, men’s,
women’s & kid’s clothes,
portable air compressor,
and much misc.
MULTIPLE FAMILIES
458 S. Pierce St.
Thurs & Fri 9am-7pm,
Sat 9am-2pm.
Desk, TV stand, computer
desk, electronics, printer,
fax machine, etc., many
small kitchen appliances,
dishes, pictures, luggage,
Elvis Presley memorabilia,
clothing, toys, bedding,
wood handle golf clubs, so
much more!
550

Pets & Supplies
FOR SALE - Full blooded
Golden Retriever pups.
Mom & Dad on premises.
Have papers and first
shots. $300-$400.
419-286-2868
590

House For Rent
HOME FOR RENT
2BR plus office,
basement, garage,
$650/month +deposit.
References is a must!
Call Krista Schrader with
Schrader Realty
419-233-3737
800

House For Sale
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath
Ranch home. Detached
heated garage, large yard,
patio. Ph. 419-234-5065
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
820

Motorcycles
& Mopeds
2006 HONDA Helix.
Excellent shape. Low
mileage. $2900.00 firm.
Call 419-695-6178
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
290

Wanted to Buy
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
095

Child Care
280

Flea Market
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Spooky noise
6 Tropical trees
11 Reduces the noise
level
13 Salad vegetable
14 Divulge
15 Straightens
16 Jeer
17 -- -and-breakfast
18 Deli units
21 Cold-shoulders
23 Ocean fish
26 -- cit. (footnote
abbr.)
27 Count i ng- r hyme
start
28 Wind indicator
29 Opposed
31 Column order
32 Vicar’s residence
33 Home finder
35 The A in B.A.
36 Ride a wave
37 Map dir.
38 Pig’s digs
39 Armload of papers
40 Do Easter eggs
41 Highlander’s pair
42 Mama’s boy
44 Used a shop ma-
chine
47 Sovereign decrees
51 -- -down cake
52 More risky
53 Migratory flocks
54 Job possibilities
DOWN
1 T’ai -- ch’uan
2 Sugarcane product
3 Mind reading
4 Whaler of fiction
5 Lantern fuel
6 Tent supports
7 In the course of
8 Fail to keep up with
9 Geol. formation
10 Plea at sea
12 Fruit pits
13 Brindled cat
18 Pack animals
19 “Casablanca” actor
20 Barely enough
22 False
23 Hauled away
24 Like some bagels
25 Court order
28 Old TV knob
30 NASA destination
31 Yellow trumpet
34 Wiped out data
36 Cast a shadow
39 Ekberg or Garbo
41 “-- little piggy ...”
43 Opposite of naugh-
ty
44 Drag along
45 Gorilla or chimp
46 Mao -- -tung
48 Undercover org.
49 Turner or Koppel
50 AARP members
DEAR DOCTOR K: I have an
aunt whose house is filled to the
ceiling with junk in some places. I
worry about her safety navigating
around all that stuff. I think she is
a hoarder. What causes this, and
how can I help her?
DEAR READER: If your
aunt’s house has become so
filled with “stuff” that she can’t
get around easily, I’m inclined to
agree with you. She may indeed
suffer from compulsive hoarding.
Hoarders accumulate objects of
questionable value in large and
disorganized amounts.
Until recently, compulsive
hoarding was considered a less-
frequent symptom of obsessive-
compulsive disorder (OCD). But
the majority of hoarders don’t
have other OCD symptoms, such
as compulsions and repetitive
behaviors.
Compulsive hoarders may
have a hard time throwing things
away. This is true even when the
things in question aren’t valuable
or useful. One of my patients with
this problem once said, “If I throw it
away, it’s gone forever.” If it has no
value, what’s wrong with it being
gone forever?
In many cases, compulsive
hoarders may accumulate so
much stuff that they can no
longer use their home the way it’s
supposed to be used. They may
be embarrassed at the state of the
home and withdraw socially. This
can lead to social isolation.
A hoarder’s home can become
so disordered and unsafe that
it’s difficult or impossible to
navigate. Hoarders are much
more vulnerable to falls and
serious injuries, particularly if they
are older than 60. As we age, our
reflexes and balance get worse,
and our muscles get weaker. Add
in a house full of things to trip
over, and you’ve got a prescription
for serious injury. Also, dust and
mold can cause asthma and other
allergic reactions.
Unfortunately, family
interventions don’t always
help. They can cause rifts in
relationships. If you want to help
your aunt, be available to her, but
it may be best to leave the heavy
lifting to the professionals.
What to do? First, ask your
doctor to help you identify a
mental health professional who
can help. Most moderate-sized
communities have professionals
with special experience dealing
with compulsive behaviors. Once
you get that name, you can have
a talk with your aunt. OCD and
depression are sometimes tied to
compulsive hoarding, and there
are effective treatments for both.
Hoarding also can be an early
sign of dementia. If you think
your aunt’s memory, her ability
to speak or her ability to organize
her activities is starting to fail, a
neurologist can be helpful.
Another approach to finding
a therapist with experience in
the treatment of hoarding is to
check the hoarding section of the
International OCD Foundation
website, ocfoundation.org/
hoarding.
A behavioral therapy
program may help your aunt.
These programs help hoarders
recognize and deal with their
distorted thinking or beliefs. They
also help strengthen hoarders’
organizational and decision-
making skills and manage anxiety.
Therapists may also make
home visits to help with sorting,
organizing and discarding. In
short, there are many options to
help your aunt.
(Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard Medical
School. Go to his website to send
questions and get additional
information: www.AskDoctorK.
com.)
Distributed by Universal UClick
for UFS
Therapy can help hoarders
manage their compulsion
Dr. Anthony
L. Komaroff, M.D.
On
Health
Dear Sara: I’m looking for
a homemade polish for my
kitchen cabinets. My cabinets
are dated, so I’m sure most
anything is better than the
way they look now. Any
suggestions? -- Lisa H., North
Carolina
Dear Lisa: Here’s a
tried-and-true recipe from a
fellow reader, Donna from
California:
“My kitchen cabinets are
old, old, old, and they look
their age, so I didn’t mind
experimenting on them. I tried
a recipe for furniture polish
that is one part white vinegar
to four parts olive oil. I made
up a very small batch of 1/4
cup of oil and 2 tablespoons
of vinegar. I dabbed a clean,
soft cloth into the mixture, then
rubbed it into my cabinets.
After applying only a small
amount, the polished door
looked glossy and lustrous.”
You can clean with Murphy
Oil Soap before applying the
above polish.
Dear Sara: Do you have
a body wash recipe? --
Rebecca, email
Dear Rebecca: Baby
shampoo works well for hair
and skin for all ages. You can
use it as a makeup remover,
too. Here are three homemade
body wash recipes:

Body wash
2 cups Tom’s of Maine
moisturizing bar soap or
Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap
(grated)
1/2 gallon distilled water
2 tablespoons vegetable
glycerin
15 drops skin-safe
fragrance or essential oil
Mix grated soap, water and
glycerin together in a large
pan. Warm on the stove using
low heat. Stir until the soap
dissolves. Add essential oil
and mix well. Transfer to a jar
with a tight lid.
One reader, Tracy Q. from
New York, shares: “I make
homemade body wash from
cheap shampoo. Use one
cup of Suave shampoo (in
your favorite scent), 1/2 cup
water and 3 tablespoons
of Epsom salt. Combine all
the ingredients together and
whisk the mixture until it’s
frothy. Pour it into a recycled
liquid soap container and you
have instant body wash at a
fraction of the cost!”
Another reader, Constance
from New Jersey, shares her
recipe: “Grate two bars of
soap (I used 4.25-ounce Olay
Shea Butter bars) with a fine
cheese grater. Pour grated
soap and 2 cups of water
into a saucepan. Heat over
medium-low heat until soap is
dissolved, about five minutes.
Cool slightly. The soap should
have the consistency of
whole milk at this point. Pour
into bottles. You can top off
your bottles with more water
if you want. Cool overnight.
The bodywash should have
the consistency of melted
ice cream when cooled. Use
a nickel-sized dollop on your
bath sponge and lather up!
I’m going to get a year of use
out of two bars of soap. I also
replaced my facial cleanser
with this. It even works well
for shaving!”
(Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a website
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
City, MO, 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.)
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
Make your own polish to spruce of kitchen cabinets
SARA NOEL
Frugal
Living
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Walter L. Lamb, Douglas R.
Lamb, Vicki L. Lamb, Luan F.
Lamb to 1022 Shannon LLC,
portion of lot 304, Van Wert
subdivision.
Jill D. Conrad Family Living
Trust to Alisa M. Boroff, portion of
section 15, Pleasant Township.
James C. Gerdeman, Jane A.
Gerdeman to Darrin J. Gerdeman,
Denise C. Gerdeman, portion of
section 26, Washington Township
(Mox Addition, lot 5).
Amy Johns, Rick Johns Jr.
to Codi A. Walser, Lindsey A.
Walser, inlot 269, Middle Point.
Laurie S. Seibert to First KLAS
Properties LLC, portion of inlot
325, Delphos.
Margaret F. Fischer, Margaret
Fischer to Margaret F. Fischer
Revocable trust, portion of
sections 35, 36, Washington
Township.
Estate of Dallas B.
Rhodenbaugh, Betty Jean
Rhodenbaugh to Mark S.
Rhodenbaugh, inlot 528, Van
Wert.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Friday Evening April 27, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
10 - The Herald Friday, April 27, 2012
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Bad neighbor
needs to get a life
Dear Annie: My hus-
band, “Ken,” has been self-
employed for 25 years. He
owns two large trailers and
has always parked them in
our driveway. However, in
the past two months, we’ve
had visits from the police
department nearly every
night. A neighbor we have
never met keeps reporting
us. He complains that when
my husband gets home from
work, he sometimes parks his
truck with one tire resting in
the dirt.
A city ordinance requires
us to have the section where
we park either
rocked or paved. We
can’t afford it right
now. Times have
been really tough.
Ken tries very hard
to park our trailers
and truck in our
driveway without
touching any grass,
but it’s difficult to
do. The police have
been sympathetic,
saying the neigh-
bor is targeting us.
They know him as the local
troublemaker. He has a view
of our driveway from his
backyard and watches it all
the time.
We are honest, hardwork-
ing people and wouldn’t harm
a soul, but this situation has
become personal. Yesterday,
we asked the police officer
to file a neighbor nuisance
report. We don’t know what
else to do. I can’t sleep and
I’m scared for my family. I
have no idea what else this
man is capable of. I’m ready
to have a restraining order
placed against him, but as
far as I know, he doesn’t
approach our house. He only
watches it, which creeps
me out even more. Can
we do anything? -- Illinois
Neighbor
Dear Illinois: Your
unkind, nosy neighbor has
way too much time on his
hands. He can watch your
house from a distance all
day long if he wishes and
as long as you keep violat-
ing a city ordinance, he will
keep reporting you. First, see
whether there is a neighbor-
hood association that could
help the two of you resolve
this. Sometimes, such neigh-
bors simply crave attention
and need to feel important.
Then start saving your pen-
nies to enlarge the driveway
area.
Dear Annie: My friend
“Lonnie” smokes both
tobacco and marijuana in
the presence of her young
child. Anytime I mention the
subject and tell her I don’t
support her smoking, she
completely ignores me. I
feel terrible being associated
with a person who can’t see
the effect tobacco and drug
use will have on her child. I
often wonder what will hap-
pen when her daughter real-
izes that her entire schedule
is based around Mommy’s
smoke break.
I am ready to move on
from this tainted friend-
ship, but hate the thought of
never spending quality time
with Lonnie’s little girl. She
is always put on the back
“burner.” Any suggestions?
-- Burned-Out Friend
Dear Friend: Lonnie is
addicted. Quitting is too dif-
ficult for her, and she doesn’t
want to be lectured about
it. She is unlikely to admit
that she values her smoking
above her child’s health. Is
there a father in the picture?
Would he do anything about
this? Would you
be willing to report
Lonnie for posses-
sion? Regardless,
please stick around
in order to keep an
eye on the child.
Offer to baby-sit.
Take her to your
home or to the park
as often as you can.
We hope Lonnie
will soon realize the
damage she is doing
and shape up.
Dear Annie: “Saskatoon”
asked whether it was rude for
someone to leave the TV on
while others were visiting.
There could be another rea-
son besides rudeness.
I am the caregiver for
someone who keeps the TV
on all day. Unfortunately,
people don’t realize she has
dementia and is mostly deaf.
Since she cannot under-
stand conversations going
on around her and becomes
more confused if asked to
participate in them, the TV
provides a safe and comfort-
able haven.
Please help your readers
understand that there may
be other reasons why some-
one keeps the TV on, and
the caregivers are the ones
who would appreciate a visit
with conversation. -- New
Hampshire
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column.
www.delphosherald.com
SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2012
An important long-range plan of
yours could be ready
for implementation
some time in the year
ahead. Once you have
your blueprint laid
out, follow it to the
letter and you should
be able to expect good results.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Things that are of a financial or
material nature tend to ultimately
work out quite well for you. It’s OK
to envision positive results and work
toward those ends.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
If there is someone you’d like to get
to know better, don’t wait for that
person to call you. Make the overtures
yourself and let that individual know
you’re interested in him or her.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Be watchful for an unexpected shift
that could produce some opportunities
in your chosen field of endeavor. A
power source could open up that’ll be
perfect for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There
is an appeal about you that others will
find extremely attractive. Many people
will appreciate you as a friend while
others may view you romantically.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
People with whom you’re involved
will tend to do nice things for you
purely on impulse. Be appreciative of
their overtures and try to reciprocate
later.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- You’re in a particularly good
cycle for improving all your one-
on-one relationships. There are two
worthwhile friends on whom you can
begin your efforts.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
If you apply yourself, new ways can
be found to improve certain personal
friendships. It would be best to focus
on those connections that need the
most work.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- New ways can be found to
start generating some much-needed
additional income. At the very least,
make the small changes needed to
produce a little more fundage.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Someone with whom you have
recently begun to establish a friendship
could be particularly helpful to you.
He or she will put you in touch with a
valuable contact.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- This is a particularly good day to
make and/or sign any long-term legal
agreements. The odds will be tilted in
your favor in terms of making a deal
that will withstand the test of time.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
As long as you think through all of
your moves first, don’t be timid about
taking a well-calculated risk that
you feel would help fulfill a special,
ambitious objective.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
The high esteem in which your friends
hold you has you doing no wrong in
their eyes. It isn’t likely that they
would deny any request you make of
them.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Annie’s Mailbox
Friday, April 27, 2012 The Herald — 11
www.delphosherald.com
Political convention protesters could be armed
By TAMARA LUSH and MITCH WEISS
Associated Press
TAMPA, Fla. — The thousands of protest-
ers expected at the Democratic and Republican
national conventions can come armed with a lot
more than signs and slogans: State law in Florida
and North Carolina allows concealed weapons,
including guns.
In Tampa, where the RNC will hold its festivi-
ties this fall, officials are starting to worry about
people toting guns in such a politically-charged
environment. The City Council voted Thursday
to ask Republican Gov. Rick Scott to help them
temporarily ban concealed weapons. Charlotte
officials have yet to publically voice concern, but
with both cities trying to balance public safety
with First and Second Amendment rights, it’s
likely the host city for the Democratic convention
will also have to address the issue.
The Tampa City Council wants Scott to issue
an executive order, preventing people with con-
cealed weapons permits from carrying guns.
“We believe it is necessary and prudent to
take this reasonable step to prevent a potential
tragedy,” council member Lisa Montelione said
in a draft letter to Scott.
Tampa city leaders have already proposed
a host of banned items (lumber, hatchets, gas
masks, chains and “super soaker” water can-
nons) — but they are prevented from outlawing
concealed guns. Florida and North Carolina have
laws prohibiting local officials from pre-empting
state gun statutes.
Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn said the state
law has made the city “look silly,” particularly
because officials can ban water guns but not real
ones.
“We’re kind of constrained by the state law,”
he said.
Charlotte officials also believe they are ham-
strung.
“We can’t change what the state legislature
has in place,” said Mark Newbold, an attorney
with the police department.
Tens of thousands of delegates, journalists and
political junkies will stream into the mid-sized
cities for the multi-day conventions. Republicans
hold their event at the Tampa Bay Times Arena
during Aug. 27-30. The Democrats’ party is a
week later at the Time Warner Cable Arena.
Inside the arenas, the Secret Service has banned
civilians from carrying guns.
Both cities have hosted large gatherings before
— Tampa has held four Super Bowls and Charlotte
has entertained the Atlantic Coast Conference
basketball tournament and the National Rifle
Association convention — but neither has really
experienced an event such as this.
In the last 50 years, political conventions have
become a magnet for protesters, and they have
sometimes turned ugly.
In 1968, demonstrators tried to disrupt the
Democratic National Convention in Chicago.
Scenes of police clashing with protesters on the
streets played on TV screens in living rooms
across America. Four years later, anti-war dem-
onstrators disrupted the Republican National
Convention in Miami Beach.
More recently, thousands of protesters
descended on St. Paul, Minn., in 2008, when the
city hosted the Republican National Convention.
Some demonstrators smashed cars, punctured
tires and threw bottles in a confrontation with
pepper-spray wielding police. Hundreds of peo-
ple were arrested over a few days.
“Everything we are doing is based on some-
thing that happened at another convention or
another national security event,” Tampa City
Attorney Jim Shimberg said.
The federal government has given $50 million
each to Charlotte and Tampa to help them pay
for new security-related equipment, training and
officer salaries.
Tampa is proposing a “Clean Zone” protest
area with portable toilets, water, a stage and a
microphone for protesters. Outside that area,
people will be allowed to march down an official
parade route as long as they have a permit.
The exact location of the protest zones and
security perimeter will be decided by the city
commission in the coming weeks.
Joyce Hamilton Henry, the director of the mid-
Florida office of the American Civil Liberties
Union, said her organization is concerned about
protests that will be limited to 60 minutes, and a
ban on masks.
“We feel it’s totally unrealistic, especially
if groups are coming in with large numbers,”
Hamilton Henry said.
The Tampa Police Department is expected to
rotate most of its 1,000-officer force into conven-
tion security during the event, which could draw
up to 45,000 people. An additional 3,000 officers
from other agencies around the state will help.
The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police
Department plans to add 2,400 to 3,400 officers
from outside departments to its force of more
than 1,750.
For the convention there, a coalition of groups
has formed because they said they are angry the
city has refused to share information about where
they can gather.
The Coalition to Protest at the DNC has
threatened to gather without permits, and prom-
ised a massive demonstration Sept. 2 in what they
call the Wall Street of the South.
Charlotte, a city of 760,000 people, is home
to Bank of America Corp., one of the nation’s
largest banks.
“This is something we have to do. They can’t
stop our right to protest,” said Ben Carroll, a
coalition spokesman.
Members of the coalition said they’re still
angry about how police in February disbanded
an Occupy Charlotte tent city on the lawn outside
the old City Hall. Protesters had been camped
there since October.
The move came one week after Charlotte
adopted an extraordinary event ordinance restrict-
ing political demonstrations ahead of this year’s
convention. The new rules give police more
power to stop and search people when the con-
vention comes to town. And people won’t be
allowed to carry backpacks and other items in
designated areas.
Answers to Thursday’s questions:
The buzzard’s flight inspired the Wright Brothers to
develop a wing warping system for maneuvering and bank-
ing aircraft. The buzzard twists one wingtip upward and the
other downward to make banked turns.
Set has the greatest number of definitions in the Oxford
English Dictionary — 464.
Today’s questions:
What golfing great helped design the first golf clubs to
be given numbers instead of Scottish names like mashie,
baffie and niblick?
What product was advertised in the very first infomer-
cial aired on American television?
Answers in Saturday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Georgic: pertaining to agriculture and country life
Yearcock: a one-year-old hen
The Outstanding National Debt as of 6:30 a.m. today
was $15,634,437,625,209.
The estimated population of the United States is
312,655,316, so each citizen’s share of this debt is
$50,005.
The National Debt has continued to increase an aver-
age of $3.96 billion per day since Sept. 28, 2007.
(Continued from page 1)
debate, Nixon was well ahead
in the polls but in the debate,
he came across as lacking
the charisma of a Kennedy.
Even though Kennedy made
mistakes in the content of
his remarks, all people saw
was how handsome he was.
He looked very charismatic
and people connected with
that to the point where that’s
all they paid attention to,”
McMurry said.
The first of three debates
in that campaign took place
in Chicago. While the sena-
tor from Massachusetts spent
the afternoon on his hotel’s
roof working on his tan, the
incumbent vice president
was coming off a knee sur-
gery that left him pale and
underweight. He also refused
makeup. He didn’t look good
on camera and the image
made a lasting impression on
American politics.
McMurry says the role of
television in politics works
en tandem with other super-
ficial elements of our cul-
ture.
“We connect with image
more than substance — espe-
cially in a culture that has
a short attention span and
is so focused on entertain-
ment. This means we’re in a
cultural climate where most
people spend less time doing
research and trying to get
the important information;
we just swallow the sound
bites,” he said. “This creates
a culture where the candi-
date who overwhelms his or
her opponent with advertis-
ing will come out on top
because a significant portion
of our population only pays
attention to sound bites and
image.”
By DIRK LAMMERS
Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. —
When civil rights activist Ray
Robinson arrived at Wounded
Knee in April 1973 to stand
alongside Native Americans
in their fight against social
injustice, he excitedly called
his wife back home and told
her, “This could be the spark
that lights the prairie fire.”
“No, it’s not. Come home.
Please come home,” his wife,
Cheryl Buswell-Robinson,
recalled begging of him.
The African-american
activist and follower of Martin
Luther King Jr. never made it
home to Bogue Chitto, Ala.
He was declared dead, but
his body never was found and
little is known about what
happened. Not knowing has
haunted Buswell-Robinson
and the couple’s three chil-
dren for nearly 40 years.
The United States govern-
ment handles investigations
on reservations. Minneapolis-
based FBI spokesman Kyle
Loven said the Robinson case
is a pending investigation,
so federal prosecutors and
investigators can’t discuss it.
Buswell-Robinson, 67,
flew into Sioux Falls from
Detroit on Thursday ahead of
a conference commemorat-
ing the 40th anniversary of
the 1973 American Indian
Movement takeover of the
Pine Ridge reservation vil-
lage of Wounded Knee.
She’s not looking for
arrests or prosecutions. She
just wants to know where her
husband’s body is so she can
give him a proper burial.
“People have information
as to where his body is bur-
ied,” she said.
Two Native Americans
were confirmed to have died
during the 1973 siege, and
rumors of other deaths per-
sist. FBI documents that now
are public suggest the pos-
sibility of people buried at
Wounded Knee during the
occupation. There’s no men-
tion of Robinson in the FBI
correspondence, but two doc-
uments reveal the presence of
two black people toward the
end of the standoff:
— On May 5, 1973, a
transcript of an interview
with a man who claimed to
be at Wounded Knee the
week prior stated “he heard
that one black man and one
black woman had recently
arrived.”
— A May 21, 1973, FBI
memo reported an Indian
woman who left the village
on April 20, 1973, counted
200 Indians, 11 whites and
two blacks.
Buswell-Robinson said
those two were most likely
Robinson and a black woman
from Alabama who went with
him. The woman returned
after the standoff; Robinson
didn’t.
Buswell-Robinson filed a
missing person’s report with
the FBI and in October 1974
traveled to Rapid City and the
AIM headquarters in St. Paul,
Minn., but said she learned
nothing about what happened
to her husband. In the years
after Robinson’s disappear-
ance, she corresponded with
writer and political activist
Barbara Deming.
In a letter dated Dec. 29,
1974, Buswell-Robinson
wrote that she had been told
Robinson backpacked into
Wounded Knee at night and
was later shot for not follow-
ing an order to immediately
report to AIM co-founder
Dennis Banks.
AIM member Richard
Two Elk of Denver told The
Associated Press in 2004 that
he had seen someone shoot
Robinson in the knees, but
the reason was because he
had refused to pick up a gun
and was constantly annoying
people in the bunker. Two
Elk declined an email request
from the AP this week to talk
further about the incident.
Banks, in a telephone
interview Thursday, said
he can’t recall ever meeting
Robinson. He said the only
recollection of Robinson he
has is when his family visited
AIM in St. Paul to ask for
information.
“Over the years, the
Robinson name has popped
up and I’m not sure even who
would have that information
or where it was,” Banks told
the AP. “That’s a complete
blank to me.”
By MANUEL VALDES
Associated Press
SEATTLE — The American Civil Liberties Union filed a
lawsuit Thursday against the U.S. Border Patrol seeking to bar
agents from making traffic stops, saying people are being pulled
over and questioned for the way they look and without reason-
able suspicion.
The lawsuit stems from tensions between immigrants and
the expanded presence of Border Patrol agents on Washington
state’s Olympic Peninsula, which shares no land border with
Canada.
“People are being stopped based solely on their appearance
and ethnicity. This is unlawful and contrary to American values,”
said Matt Adams, legal director of the Northwest Immigrant
Rights Project, which also joined the lawsuit. “No one in a car
should be stopped and interrogated by government agents unless
the law enforcement officer has a legal basis to do so.”
The ACLU and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project filed
the lawsuit on behalf of three peninsula residents who have been
stopped by Border Patrol agents.
Border Patrol spokesman Richard Sinks said U.S. Customs
and Border Protection “strictly prohibits” profiling on the basis
of race or religion.
“In determining whether individuals are admissible into
the United States, CBP utilizes specific facts and follows the
Department of Justice’s ‘Guidance Regarding the Use of Race
by Federal Law Enforcement Agencies,”’ Sinks said.
The agency has said it is following its mandate to enforce the
country’s immigration laws and protect the border and shoreline
from terrorists, drug smugglers and other illegal activity.
But one of the plaintiffs says Border Patrol agents stopped
him numerous times, even though he’s a U.S. citizen.
Jose Sanchez, a prison guard at Olympic Corrections Center
in Forks, Wash., said agents have followed him home and ques-
tioned him when he’s with his family. In one instance, they told
Sanchez they were pulling him over because his windows were
too dark, but they didn’t ask for his car insurance or registration,
the lawsuit says.
Another plaintiff is Ernest Grimes, a prison guard at Clallam
Bay Corrections Center and a part-time police officer from
Neah Bay, Wash. Grimes said a Border Patrol agent pulled him
over last year. According to the lawsuit, the agent approached
Grimes, who is black, with his hand on his weapon while yelling
at him to roll down his window.
The agent provided no reason for the traffic stop while he
interrogated Grimes about his immigration status, the lawsuit
alleges. Grimes was wearing his guard uniform at the time.
The third plaintiff, 18-year-old Ismael Ramos Contreras of
Forks, was with a group of friends when four agents pulled them
over. The lawsuit says one of the agents tried to take the keys out
of the ignition and interrogated the teenagers but never provided
a reason for the stop. Ramos also was asked for his immigration
status outside a courthouse in Forks.
(Continued from page 1)
among themselves about that fateful battle, the footage they gathered
and how it affected them. During one of those conversations, he said,
he realized how he and a friend had seen different things that day and
how it affected them differently. He thought the various memories of
the 12 different people in his platoon would be worth putting on film.
All 12 agreed.
Although there have been documentaries made about war for as
long as there have been cameras to film them, documentarians say it
is unusual for the warrior himself to be the one making the film and
using his own battle footage.
“Live action, American, filmmaker as subject on war trauma is
not, to my mind, terribly common,” said Michael Renov, associate
dean of academic affairs at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts and
author of “The Subject of Documentary.”
Perhaps the effort that comes closest to it, he noted, was Ari
Folman’s 2008 Oscar-nominated film “Waltz With Bashir,” in which
the filmmaker interviewed Israeli soldiers he fought with in the 1982
Lebanon war and used animation to visualize his story.
One of the hardest things for Anderson to do will be to fill in the
years between the battle and what his fellow Marines are doing now
and still be able to effectively show how war changed them, said
Mitchell Block, who produced the Oscar-nominated war documen-
tary “Poster Girl.”
For that film, onetime cheerleader and Iraq combat veteran
Robynn Murray allowed cameras to follow her for more than a year,
vividly capturing her struggles to overcome PTSD.
Having the close relationship he does with the people he’s filming
could overcome missing out on those years between the battle and
the present day, Block said, but only if his subjects have compelling
stories to tell.
Anderson and childhood friend Antonio de la Torre of Los
Angeles hope to have the documentary finished by the fall, about the
time of his wedding and in time for next year’s film festival circuit.
They are making it on a budget of $30,000, most of it raised
through the website kickstarter.com.
“That may seem like peanuts to most people,” Anderson says with
a laugh. “But me and my buddy Antonio have been working together
for more than a decade with digital editing and we’ve written up a
pretty clean budget and we think we can do it.”
The two made their first film in high school, a mockumentary
that took the filmmakers to Nevada’s infamous Area 51 in a jokey
attempt to prove long-held conspiracy theories that space aliens live
there. They have since gone on to film commercials for small local
television stations. This will be their first documentary.
With reams of war footage and 12 engrossing stories to tell,
Anderson believes they are up to the task.
By MICHAEL BIESECKER
Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. — John
Edwards’ ex-aide acknowledged Thursday
that much of nearly $1 million in cam-
paign supporters’ cash went to build his
North Carolina dream house, not to buy
the silence of the presidential candidate’s
pregnant mistress.
Andrew Young testified for a fourth
straight day at Edwards’ campaign finance
fraud trial, peppered with questions from
Edwards attorney Abbe Lowell about the
money from two donors that flowed into
personal accounts controlled by Young and
his wife.
Young has said he took secret payments
from wealthy donors at Edwards’ direction
to help conceal the presidential contender’s
affair with Rielle Hunter and keep his 2008
presidential campaign viable.
Young said the checks secretly provided
by a then-96-year-old heiress were mixed
with the couple’s other house funds, much
of which went into renovations and con-
struction of their $1.5 million hilltop house
on 10 acres near Chapel Hill, N.C. Young
often deferred questions on the payments to
his wife, Cheri, saying “my wife is the one
who handles the finances in our family.”
Young’s testimony is considered key to
the prosecution’s case that while campaign-
ing for the White House, Edwards directed
a scheme to use the money from the heiress
and a Texas lawyer to conceal his affair
with Hunter.
Young initially claimed he was the
father of Hunter’s daughter and took her
into his home with his wife.
Lowell asked Young about numerous
changes to the construction of the North
Carolina house after the payments started
coming in, including a pool, home theater
and extra bedroom.
At the time, Young and his wife were
living with Hunter in a $20,000 a month
rental mansion along the California coast,
paid for by a wealthy lawyer who served as
Edwards’ campaign finance chairman.
“We were living out in Santa Barbara and
we lost our sense of perspective,” Young said
on the witness stand. “The house became
more and more extravagant.”
Edwards denies knowing about the
$725,000 in checks from heiress Rachel
“Bunny” Mellon sent to Young through
her interior designer. In addition to the
maximum $2,300 to the Edwards cam-
paign allowed by law, Mellon also provid-
ed another $6.4 million to a political action
committee and anti-poverty foundation tied
to Edwards.
Another $200,000 was given to the
Youngs by the Texas lawyer, Fred Baron.
Records shown at trial documented pay-
ments for private jets, five-star hotels and
other expenses incurred by Hunter and the
Youngs while they were in hiding. Baron
died in 2008 of cancer at age 61.
Young testified Thursday he had sent
Baron an invoice for many of the expenses
the aide had already paid for with money
from Mellon; he said Baron then wired
another $325,000 to the builder construct-
ing the Young’s house.
The questions about the cash from
Mellon funneled to Young’s house came
towards the end of a full day of cross-
examination, in which Lowell sought to
undermine the ex-aide’s credibility and
paint him as a pathological liar.
Lowell pointed out inconsistencies with
Young’s account of the scandal at trial
this week and in multiple other accounts,
including grand jury testimony and his
2010 tell-all book about Edwards.
Referring to the timing of a conversa-
tion with a law partner of Edwards, Lowell
asked, “And you made that up too, didn’t
you?”
“No, sir,” Young responded.
Lowell asked Young whether he first
learned Hunter, was pregnant in May 2007,
as his book says: inJune 2007, as he testi-
fied; or in early July, a date backed by phone
records and Hunter’s medical records.
The timeline issues could challenge the
accounts of conversations Young said he
had with Edwards in a car discussing who
to ask for money to help take care of Hunter
and discussing Hunter’s pregnancy.
Video
Primary
Widow of civil rights activist wants him home
ACLU sues US Border Patrol
Ex-Edwards aide: Donors’ cash went into NC house
2
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