AP Identify – Chapter 13: The Renaissance Hassan

Asha

1) Cereta: (1469-1499) a female humanist who illustrated both the successes and failures of educated Renaissance women. She was taught languages, philosophy, theology, and mathematics by her father, a member of the governing elite of Brescia in Lombardy. Widowed at eighteen, she spent the remainder of her life to her studies. She believed that women caused their own inferiority-not the divine order of things- but they still carried the potential of their own minds. 2) Machiavelli: (1467-1527) A political strategist of the Renaissance who authored a short political treatise called the prince, in which he discusses political power and how a ruler can gain, maintain, and increase it. The ultimate significance of Machiavelli rests on two main ideas: that one permanent social order reflecting God’s will cannot be established and that politics has its own laws and ought to be a science. 3) Gutenberg: (1454) Johannes Guttenberg was one of the three men responsible for the moveable type. The idea of printing on paper originated with the Chinese and was introduced to Europeans by the Arabs in the 12th century. The Guttenberg bible was published in 1456, beginning radical social changes like increased literacy rates and propaganda. 4) Thomas More: (1478- 1535) An Englishman who was a trained lawyer but lived as a student in a monastery. He later became ambassador to Flanders for Henry VIII where he wrote Utopia. Utopia describes an ideal community on an island where everyone lives a perfect existence. More refused to sign the Act of Succession because he wouldn't recognize Henry VIII as head of the Church and was killed in 1535. 5) Erasmus: (1466-1536) Raised in a monastery and learned in Latin, Erasmus devoted his life’s work to the application of the best humanistic learning to the study and explanation of the bible. He wrote the education of a Christian prince (1504) a book that combined idealistic and practical suggestions for the formation of a ruler’s character. 6) Rabelais: (1490-1553) French humanist Rabelais is the renowned renaissance author of Gargantua and Pantagruel. The two works can be read as either a comic romance about the adventures of the giant Gargantua and his son Pantagruel, a spoof on contemporary French society, or as an illustration of Rabelais’s prodigious learning. He rejected the Middle Age's focus on the afterlife and believed that people should enjoy life to the fullest. 7) “New Monarchs”: rulers who unified and brought stability to their country as well as centralizing their governments. These rulers included King Ferdinand & Queen Isabella of Spain, Charles VII of France, and Henry VII of England.

One of the Crown’s chief sources of income until the revolution of 1789. it was effective in reducing aristocratic troublemaking. She held the same strong catholic beleifs that he did when it came to politics. 15) Ferdinand of Aragon: (r. He strengthened royal finances through taxes on land and salt. One of the Crown’s chief sources of income until the revolution of 1789. Together they reinstated the 'hermandades' and started the Inquisition. 10) Charles VII: King of France who ruled from1422-1461. reconciled with the Burundians and Armagnac. and its methods were sometimes terrifying. 13) Court of Star Chamber: A judicial offshoot of the royal council that dealt with England’s real or potential aristocratic threats. They applied principles of Roman law.The marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile represented the union of two royal houses and was made to consolidate and ensure the power of Spain. 16) Miguel de Cervantes/Don Quixote: (1547-1616) a Spanish writer who introduced one of literature’s greatest masterpieces when he Wrote Don Quixote.Together they reinstated the 'hermandades' and started the Inquisition. The marriage of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile represented the union of two royal houses and was made to consolidate and ensure the power of Spain. laws. They got their name from the stars painted on the ceiling of the room. They were given the title "The Catholic Kings of Spain" by the papacy and were given permission to establish a national church. He led France into a long recovery following the hundred-year war. They were given the title "The Catholic Kings of Spain" by the papacy and were given permission to establish a national church. The council consisted of twelve to fifteen lesser landowning men educated in law. He came to power after the 100 years’ war. 14) Isabella of Castile: (r. 11) Henry VII: King of England who ruled from 1485-1509 was a Machiavellian member of the house of Tudor. 1474-1516) Ferdinand took hold of the rule of Spain but allowed a loose confederacy of kingdoms to still maintain their own parliments. and courts. 1474-1516) Isabella. 12) Royal council: The center of English royal authority that governed on a national level. . although a joint ruler. allowed her husband to take the lead in political affairs. 9) Gabelle: French salt tax. The novel told the tale of a man who lives in a world of dreams and seeks military glory as a knight in the wrong time period. Despite being against the precedent of English common law. He carried a deep distrust for the nobles and did all to limit their power. and reorganized the royal council.8) Taille: French land tax.

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