Core rules Version Alpha 1.

1
By Jake Teague
It is the year 2150, and humanity has been ravaged by the rebellion of A.I.. 3 factions are fighting for dominance of the Super cities, a Dark era has begun. This is the rule book for this sci/fi fantasy game using 28mm heroic scale models, Dark era. '': Inches RoF: Rate of fire CCW: Close combat weapon #: Number Die: dice LOS: line of sight CP: Command points This game uses a measuring tape (all measurements are in inches), 6 sided dice (a D6), and 28mm models on 25mm round bases on a 3 by 3 (foot) board. Use 'true' line of sight to determine if a model can see an enemy to shoot them. This means that you need to look from the perspective of the model, as if it was a real battle. You may always pre measure distances. When arcs are mentioned the front arc is the front of the model from his shoulders the back the back of his shoulders. If D3 is mentioned (since there is no such thing) roll a D6 but treat 1 and 2 as 1, 3 and 4 as 2, and 5 and 6 as 3. If a D66 is rolled then roll 2D6. Pick one die that is the first number and the other the second. When you roll, don't add them together, treat it as a number (example: 66, 51, 13). On a side note, interpret all rules in your own way. If there is an argument, then roll a die, on a 13 player A is right, and on a 4-6 player B is right. This will speed up the game and make it a more enjoyable time for both players.

Stats:
Each model in this game has stats. This is what the whole game bases off. It looks something like this: Morale-12 (13) Expertise-(4,3) Will-2 Endurance-(4'',7'') Agility-2 (3) Weapons-Machine gun (10'',5,3) Morale is how brave each model is, the higher the better. The first value is the models morale if it is out of coherency of another friendly model, the second if its in. Use first value for coherency distance. If a model if within half of its first morale value (rounding up) of a friendly model then it may use the second morale. This does result in your coherency raising to the new morale, increasing coherency distance. Expertise is how skilled each model is in each aspect. The first value is shooting, the next is close combat. Will is how tough the model is, the higher the better. Endurance is how fast the model is. The first value is how fast it moves normally, the second is its sprint. You may not sprint in 2 consecutive turns.

Agility is how good the model is at dodging. The higher the harder it is to hit it. The first value is the agility when it moves normally, the second value is the agility if the model sprints. If someone fires at your back arc minus 1 from your agility for the purpose of hitting. If you are asked to make a stat test, roll a die, then consult this table. You need to roll equal or higher to the result specified, (top, stat, bottom, equal or more than): 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 3 2 If you are required to take a morale test, roll 3D6 and add them together. You have to roll equal or less then your morale to pass. If failed then the rule will specify the consequence.

Weapons:
The weapons stats show how powerful the weapon is. The first value is its optimal range (everything in the game has infinite range), the second is power, the next is its Rate of Fire (RoF). If you fire your weapon at optimal range, then shoot at normal. But if you are not in optimal range decrease your shooting expertise to 1 (for the purpose of shooting). You may only fire 1 weapon a turn (grenades included). Malfunction!: Sometimes, a weapon may jam, overheat, or even explode! When rolling to hit (shooting), if you roll a 1 (on any of the die) then the weapon malfunctions. The model may not shoot this turn (grenades included). In the next turn (move phase) roll a die. On a 3 plus you fix the malfunction, and may act normally. If the model moved then this roll is 4 plus. On any other roll the model failed and it may not shoot any weapons this turn. AOE's (see below) malfunction on a double when deviating (not the direction, the distance). Intervening models: If there are any intervening models when one model fires at another, then decrease the shooting expertise of this model by 1 for the duration of this shoot phase. Dual-wield: A weapon with this special rule may re-roll any/all of its to hit dice once per phase, but minus 1 expertise from the model (if its a gun-shooting expertise, and combat weapon-combat expertise). AOE: If a weapon has AOE next to it then the means it is a area of effect weapon (explosive). Pick a target as normal (very first number is its range) but pick a point instead of a model, and deviate (see later), but every model within x'' (12''AOE x'', as it shows in the profile, x being the radius of the blast) is also hit by the weapon. Resolve shooting as normal after this. RoF works differently with AOE's. The targets get hit by the number specified by the weapon instead of rolling. Deviation: the downside to AOE's is getting it to stay on target. Pick a target, but roll a D66. This is which direction it deviates to: 11-13: Move 2D6'' West 14-16: Move 2D6'' East 21-23: Move 2D6'' North 24-26-: Move 2D6'' South 31-33: Move 2D6'' North West 34-36: Move 2D6'' North East 41-43: Move 2D6'' South East 44-46: Move 2D6'' South West 51-66: Direct hit, no deviation Minus your expertise (first value) off the deviation distance. After deviation resolve hits (you don't have to roll to hit, you have already). If the AOE goes out of LOS of the model firing or optimal range, then just continue resolving as normal, it doesn’t matter, this represents the explosive curving or some other event. Flamer: If a weapon has a stat like this: (10'',6,1''), then that means it is a flamer weapon. Draw a x'' line (x: range of the flamer, first value) from the model and mark the line with dice or string or suitable marker. Any models

within the third value in inches is hit by the flamer once. The model firing the weapon it not hurt when he fires it, but if he moves in range (or stays in range) or is hit by a flamer weapon, he is affected. This line then stays in play for the rest of the game, and any models starting or ending their move in the radius of the flamer line is hit again. Flamer weapons automatically hit, only roll to wound. You may draw this line through terrain. Flamer weapons ignore cover (no cover saves may be taken against these hits). If a flamer line touches a terrain piece, it is set alight. Everything in the building takes hits from the flamer and everything within the radius (flamer) of the building takes hits as well. This lasts the rest of the game. Grenades: Grenades are used in the shoot sub phase. Grenades are used like AOE's. Once deciding where you are going to throw it, roll on the deviation table. After deviation, resolve effect. There are 2 types of grenades. Damage and special. If it is a damage grenade treat it as an AOE weapon. If it is special then the grenade will specify the effect. Grenades do not have an infinite range, they may only be thrown within their optimum range (but may deviate out of optimum range). Ordnance: Any model hit by an ordinance weapon takes double stress points from the shooting attack. Ammo: Every weapon has some kind of ammo, whether it is bullets, energy supplies or some other strange source. After a models shoots, roll a die. On a 3+ nothing happens. On a 1 or 2 the model runs out of ammo, this model may not fire this weapon for the rest of the game. Note that a model may still pick up other weapons through the game (see Picking up/dropping weapons rule) Night attack: If night attack is active then half the optimal range of all weapons and decrease all morale of all models by 1.

CCW:
Every model in the game has a standard (4,2) CCW. It only has 2 values because it is used in combat. The first value is its power, the second is its speed. If a gun has x next to it that means it can also be used in assault. Treat it as a normal weapon in assault. Modifiers can apply to change the original (4,2) stat. Fumble!: Sometimes, when in hand to hand combat, a model may get ahead of itself and flurry attacks at the opponent and stumbles, or it is so dumb struck at someone charging it. This is just a small number of scenarios that represent Fumble!. When in combat, if a 6 is rolled to hit (on any of the die) then the model fumbles, and may not attack that phase.

Picking up/dropping weapons:
If a model dies, remove it and replace it with a counter of some kind (or just tip it over). Any model that goes within base contact with this may choose to pick up a weapon that that model had while it was alive (so long as the model still had ammo on the weapon). A model may have up to 3 weapons at a time (grenades not included). For every weapon after the first that the model has decrease its endurance (both values) by 1''. A model may drop a weapon during its movement phase (to a minimum of 1). This way a model can return its endurance values to normal if it has excess weapons (more then one).

Turn system:
The turn system works in this order: Move Fight Damage Each player will do his/her move and fight phase, then the other will do the same, then both player do damage all together (example: one player moves all his models, then he shoots/fights in combat, then the other player will do the same, and then do the damage phase all together). Move phase: In this phase you move your models. A model can move a maximum of the values in the models endurance stats. If a model sprints it can't shoot. If a model has suffered a major wound (see later) and still sprint (or

going berserk/falling back, see later) then it will suffer an immediate minor wound, this could result in the death of this model. If you wish to charge a model into another model to enter close combat then add D3'' to it's sprint move and move a maximum of that distance toward an enemy. This model may not shoot weapons if it charges. If the model is out of charge range it may charge a different model (but using the same result on the D3) or may move normally (without the extra D3''). If one of your models are charged then you may not move away, and can not gain a charge bonus. Falling: When a model jumps off a piece of terrain, measure how far it has fallen. Every 3'' it fell, roll a die. On a 4+ it takes a minor wounds. In addition, a model that falls 6'' takes a major wound on a 4+ (for each 6'' fallen).

Fight phase:
This is split in to 2 sub sections. The shoot phase is where you fire your weapons. The combat phase is where you fight in close combat. Shooting goes first then combat.

Shooting:
If expertise is mentioned then use first value. Models may shoot a infinite distance of the weapon you wish to use. If you are above ground level you may gain extra range. For every 2'' you are above ground level from your target (measure from base) you may add 1'' to your optimal range. Check if the model shooting can see the model you wish to shoot, and if it is in the shootings models front arc. Then you need to see how many shots you get. Check the RoF of the weapon being fired. The number specified is how many die you roll for hitting. To hit you have to roll more then the roll specified on this table. For every number you get over the specified value below you get a hit. (top: expertise, side: enemy's agility): A E 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 5 5 4 3 2 5 5 5 4 3 6 5 5 5 4 6 6 5 5 5 6 6 6 5 5

For every hit you got, roll a die. To wound you have to roll equal or more then the roll specified on this table (first value)(top: power, side: enemy's will): W P 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 2,2 - 6 5 - - 6 - - - - 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 5 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 5 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 5 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4

Any other result is excluded. If you roll equal or more then the first value then you deal a minor wound. If you roll equal or more to the second value you (must) deal a major wound. You can not get a minor and major wound with the same die. For every minor wound you got add 1 stress point, for every major wound add 2 stress points to the model (put a die next to the model to remember how many stress points it has taken), I will explain stress points later. Hiding: A model may chose to conceal itself during the movement phase. If a model chooses to hide then it may not move, shoot, or assault. A model that is hidden also can not be shot at. Only grenades, AOEs, and flamers can effect a model that is hidden. If a grenade (or flamer/AOE weapon) hits a model that is hidden then it is immediately not hidden any more, but may go back into hiding next owning player's turn. If a

model that is hiding is assaulted then it is immediately not hidden any more and enters combat, and may not reactive fire. A model can only hide itself if the piece of terrain its going to hide in is suitable, (say, a large chunk of metal, a bush, a pipe, a crevice in a rock or wall, etc, something that you could conceal yourself in), so be realistic about it. A model that is hiding can still hold an objective (see later). Over-kill: If a weapons power is 3 times (or more) the will of the target it over-kills. For every wound you deal roll a die. On a 3 plus deal another minor wound to that model. Watch out!: When a model is shot at, after finishing determining wounds dealt, a model within 1'' may opt to try and jump in the way of harm, or the target grabs his comrade to save himself. Roll a die for each wound suffered. On a 4+ the model takes this wound instead (do not re-roll wounding and ignore over-kill, just allocate the wounds onto this model). After this has finished, move the brave (or victimised) model so that it is next to the model its saving, and in-between the shooter and the target. Point blank: If a model is within 3'' of the model it is firing at, then the target suffers a minus 1 modifier to its agility for this shot.

Combat:
If expertise is mentioned use second value. If your model charged, add 1 to its speed for this combat. Any models in base contact with each other are in close combat. First you have to determine how many attacks you get. Check your weapon speed. The number specified is the number of die you roll to hit. To hit you have to roll equal or more then the roll specified on this table. For every number you get over the first you get a hit. (top: expertise side: enemy's expertise): E E 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 4 4 3 2 2 5 4 4 3 2 6 5 4 4 3 6 6 5 4 4 6 6 6 5 4

For every hit you got, roll a die. To wound you have to roll equal or more then the roll specified on this table (top: power, side: enemy's will): W P 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 2,2 - 6 6 - - 6 - - - - 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 6 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 6 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4

Any other result is excluded. If you roll equal or more then the first value then you deal a minor wound. If you roll equal or more to the second value you (must) deal a major wound. You can not get a minor and major wound with the same die. For every minor wound you got add 1 stress point, for every major wound add 2 stress points to the model (put a die next to the model to remember how many stress points it has taken, and note down how many major and minor wounds were taken), I will explain stress points later. Then your opponent fights back (in his fight phase). Move the model(s) that were in combat back 1'' from the enemy (both sides) once both models have fought. If it is the second players turn (the one who went second) and he has charged a model, just do both attacks in the same turn, do not wait till the next players turn to continue the combat. You may not charge in 2 consecutive turns but may enter assault without charging (meaning you don't get the charge bonus). When models are in combat they can not be shot at, too much of a risk of hitting your own men.

Cover:
Depending on the cover value this gives you a saving throw against wounds (when its dealt, before the damage phase). You have to roll equal or more to the cover value to negate the stress point. You may only benefit if you are behind the terrain piece (from the model shooting at you) or if its area terrain. With area terrain you get cover from no matter where the enemy shoots you (say a ruin is area terrain because you can hide behind piles of rubble, or a wood, you can hide behind trees and in foliage). Bushes, fences, etc:6 Rocks, hills, forests,rubble,craters etc:5 Ruins (area terrain), etc:4 Fortified ruin (area terrain):3 If you move through cover you suffer minus 1 speed for the purpose of combat (for the number of die to hit). If you move into, out of, or through cover then minus D3'' from movement. Depending on the power of your ranged weapon, you can decrease cover value and make it easier to kill models inside. When wounding, for every major wound you get increase the cover value by 1 (this means you could potentially negate the cover all together).

Damage phase:
This is the most important phase in the game since this is where you do damage and break units. If a model was shot at or in an combat roll a morale test for it (do leaders first, see later), but minus the amount of stress points on the model from your morale stat. If the model is in coherency of another friendly model(s) then they take a morale test too (even if they weren’t involved, to a maximum of 1 test). If a model has wounds already on you minus the amount of wounds it has (major counts as 2) off your morale, for the purpose of this phase. If the morale test is passed take half (rounding up) every wound taken in this turn, and put a counter next to the model to represent it. So if a model took 3 minor wounds and 4 major wounds during the shoot phase it would take 2 minor and 2 major wounds. 3 minor wounds, 2 major wounds, or 1 major wound and 2 minor wounds will kill a model, removing it from play. If the morale test is failed, follow the instructions above but take all wounds dealt against it in the shoot sub phase. Then roll on reaction table (if the model failed and is still alive):

2-6: Fall back, move sprinting distance away (in the move phase) from the enemy toward your table edge (this move is not affected by cover). If you leave the table edge then model is removed. Before movement, (after the first in which the model ran away) roll a morale test (in the move phase). If passed then you may act normally, but may not move (can rotate). If failed then continue running and do a test next turn. 7-8: Pinned, half endurance (both values, rounding up), and move toward the closest piece of terrain and stay in it shooting at closest visible enemy. Before movement, (after the first in which it was pinned) roll a morale test (in the move phase). If passed then the model may act normally, but may not move (can rotate). If failed then continue being pinned and do a test next turn. 9-11: Berserk, in your turn charge toward closest visible enemy (even if not in charge range, you still get plus D3'' and must do so every turn, this move is not affected by cover), and replace speed value with D3 instead. You may not shoot. Continue this until a morale test if passed (in the move phase, before movement, but after first in which it went berserk). When the model does pass it may act normally. 12: Suicide, this model is removed from play.
If a model fails another morale test because of stress then roll on this table again and apply that result instead (even if its the same one). If a model is suffering from 1 of the results above then it may not hold an objective (see later), and may not hide (unless pinned). Models also don't count toward (and may not benefit from) coherency if suffering from 1 of the results above.

Leaders:
These hold the army together and lead the assault. If your leader dies then all friendly models within line of sight must take a morale test (in the damage phase, if a morale test is already needed then do so but double stress taken for the purpose of a morale test) and if failed roll on reaction table. Leaders also give you command points. These give you re-rolls when you need it most. At the beginning of the game then roll a 2d6. This is how many CP you have for the game. You may use 1 CP to re-roll 1 die

(only once per die): to hit (combat/shooting), and for morale. If your leader dies you lose all your CP. At the beginning of each turn, if your leader is alive, add D3 CP to your total AP (not on first turn). If you are in coherency of an objective (see later) at the beginning of your turn (not the first) then add 1 CP. Your leader may also use commands. It takes 3 command points to issue a command, and you may only issue one command a turn: Regroup!: In the move phase, every one of your models that is within LOS of your leader automatically revive from fall back/pinned/berserk effects and may act normally from then on. Focus fire!: In the shoot sub-phase, your leader may nominate a single enemy model within LOS of him/her. Any model shooting against this model gets plus 1 to its RoF. Hold this position!: Every model in coherency of your leader takes half stress points (for the purpose of morale) for this turn.

Battle suits:
These form the bulk and carry the most powerful wargear in the army. Expertise-(2,3,4) Armour-4 Endurance-(4'',6'') Agility-1 On the expertise, the first value is how many weapons it can fire, the second its shooting expertise, then last its combat expertise. Armour is the equivalent of will (for the purpose of wounding), but is used like cover (second value). When the battle-suit fails an armour roll, it loses 1 armour (if the armour reaches 0 then the battle-suit becomes wrecked, see below). When rolling for armour do it all at once (for each weapon, not for all the shooting all together, thats just unfair). Endurance is the same with infantry, but if you sprint half the # of weapons it can fire (rounding down) in addition to other effects. Agility is the same as infantry. Battle suits may take no benefits from cover since they are so big. If a battle suit charges then add D6'' to sprint, but it may not shoot. Killing battle suits is slightly different to killing infantry. In the damage phase roll a D6 and add the amount of stress the battle suit currently has on it then consult this table: 1-6: No effect 7-10: Stun 11-14: Immobilised 15-17: Weapon destroyed 18+: Wrecked Nothing: nothing happens. Stun: half all expertise for 1 turn. Immobilised: The first time this happens half both endurance values (rounding up). The second time the battle suit may not move again. Weapon destroyed: first result halves expertise (both values) and from the second onward the enemy player chooses 1 weapon to be destroyed on the battle suit. Wrecked: Remove the battle suit from play. If a weapon destroyed result comes up enough times for all the weapons being destroyed and it comes up again then treat it as a immobilised. If the battle suit is already immobilised (twice) then treat as wrecked. If the battle suit has been immobilised twice and gets another immobilised result then treat as weapon destroyed and if all the weapons are destroyed treat as wrecked. Battle suits may not hold objectives.

Vehicles:
Vehicles are very similar to battle suits. They act the exact same but they do not have endurance. Instead, they always move 4'' or can turbo boost 8'' (if you turbo you may not shoot). They also have a slightly different stat line: Expertise-(2,4) Armour-4,3,3 Agility-1 (3) They only difference is that endurance is gone and expertise is different (first value is how may weapons can be fired, next its shooting expertise), and agility has 2 values (the first is normal, the second if it turbo boosts) and armour has 3 values. Armour still works like normal armour but the first value is if you are firing at the vehicles front armour, the second its sides, the last its back, determined by LOS (whatever facing you can see the most of). If you decrease the armour then decrease it only on that side, and if decreased to 0 then wrecked, as with battle-suits. Vehicles can not assault and when assaulted they are treated as normal (but the enemy auto hits, or if it turbo boosted then 3 plus to hit). Vehicles can not move through cover with a cover value (first one) of 3 or more. Cover otherwise does not effect vehicles. The front arc rules still apply to vehicles (their weapons, not the model, and only 45 degrees either side of the weapon.) but they do not get reduced agility if being fired in the back.. Vehicles may not react-fire. If you are in coherency of a vehicle then you count as being in coherency (the huge behemoth inspires all around it). Ramming: Vehicles may ram a model. Turbo boost the tank until it reaches base contact with a model(s). The model(s) must then immediately take a morale test but add half (rounding up) the distance moved from the vehicle to the roll. If the roll is failed then move the model(s) out of the way of the tank and fall back (see damage phase). The model(s) also suffer 1 minor wound for every 2'' moved and 1 major wound for every 3'' (no cover save may be taken against this). If the morale test is passed then the model(s) steps aside from the tank so it doesn't hit them then continue the turn as normal.

Aircraft:
Aircraft are basically vehicles in mid-air. What separates them from vehicles is altitude. There are 3 altitudes that aircraft can fly in, changing the way the move and shoot (and the way they are shot at): Hover: Hover is the most manoeuvrable altitude. Aircraft hovering can move anywhere between 0'' and 12''. The front arcs rule does not affect aircraft, they can fire in any direction. This represents the high manoeuvrability of the aircraft. Hovering aircraft can sacrifice fire-power to dodge incoming fire. In the enemy shoot-sub phase, before armour rolls are made, the aircraft gets a 4 plus cover save. If the aircraft does attempt to dodge, then it can only fire 1 weapon in the following turn. Ariel: Ariel is the all-round altitude. Aircraft in ariel can move anywhere between 9'' and 18'' (no more, no less). Also, aircraft in ariel have restrictions to turning. Before they move, they turn 45 degrees either way. After they move, they may do the same thing. This is to represent the limitations to manoeuvrability with higher speed. Soaring: Soaring is the fastest altitude. Soaring aircraft can move anywhere between 15'' and 24'' (no more, no less). Soaring aircraft also have restrictions to turning. They may not turn before they move, but after they may turn 45 degrees. This does mean that the soaring aircraft have difficulty staying on a 3 by 3 board. If a soaring aircraft goes off the table during the game it may re-enter the game in your next turn. Anything that isn't a soaring aircraft must try to stay on the board, but if this is impossible, then resolve as above. The entry of the aircraft will specify which altitudes it can access. At the beginning of the move phase, an aircraft must select which altitude it will enter. An aircraft can safely enter an altitude that is 'next' to it (ariel to hover or soaring) or stay in the same altitude. A hovering aircraft can try to go straight to soaring or vice versa (if it can access those altitude). If this is attempted, roll a D6. On a 3 plus the extreme change in

altitude is successful. On a 1-2 the engines give in and the aircraft becomes a wreck! (see below for details). Aircraft are damaged differently to vehicles. Below is how aircraft are damaged aircraft: Nothing: nothing happens. Stun: half all expertise for 1 turn. Immobilised: The first time this happens the aircraft may not change altitude again, and its movement is restricted to the following: Hover:4''-8'', Ariel:12''-16'', Soaring:18''-21''. The second time this happens the aircraft becomes a wreck. Weapon destroyed: First result halves expertise (both values) and from the second onward the enemy player chooses 1 weapon to be destroyed on the aircraft. Wrecked: Crash! Remove the aircraft from play and follow the rules for crashing. The rest of the rules for damaging vehicles stay the same with aircraft. Aircraft can not be engaged in combat. Aircraft do not benefit from extra range with additional height. Aircraft can not benefit from cover. Every time an aircraft suffers one of the results above (not including nothing) roll a D6. On a 6 the aircraft is shot out of the air and crashes! It is harder to hit targets that are far higher/lower then you. To represent this, for every 'altitude' (not the first, treat ground as an altitude even though aircraft can't access this) above/below your target is from you, decrease you expertise by 1. AOE's and flamers can not target ariel or soaring aircraft, but may target hovering aircraft, but any deviation or 'burn lines' do not harm ground targets since you are firing into the air. When aircraft die they go out in style. If an aircraft suffers a wrecked result, it immediately crashes! First you must work out the direction of the crash. Roll on this table to determine the crash direction (hovering aircraft instead roll on the deviation table): 1 90-45 degrees left 2 5 6 45-0 degrees left 45-0 degrees right 90-45 degrees right 3,4 Forward

You will notice that there is a possible influence in the crash direction of the aircraft. This is to represents the struggle of the pilot to control the aircraft to crash into the enemy (the last laugh!). In this situation the controlling player of the aircraft chooses the angle of the crash (but only within the limits specified). After resolving direction, you must work out distance of the crash. Hover crashes 2D6'', ariel crashes 4D6'', and soaring crashes 6D6''. If the crash distance would take the aircraft off the table then don't resolve crash damage. After resolving where the aircraft crashes replace it with a 5'' diameter template. Anything under the template suffers a power 10 hit, and anything that survives is pinned (trapped under the wreckage). Since soaring aircraft are so high, they do not crash straight away, they have to drop first. The turn after the aircraft was wrecked (damage phase , before any die are rolled) resolve the crash damage (this will allow models to attempt to get out of the way of the crash site), but deviate the crash marker 2D6''. Then resolve crash damage as normal. Aircraft have slightly different stat lines to vehicles too. The first expertise value has 3 numbers, first is how many weapons it can fire when hovering, second ariel, and third soaring. This is the same with agility, as it changes with altitude.

Mission:
There are 5 types of mission. Roll a D6 to see which one you have. If you roll a 6 you may choose which mission you play or re-roll the die.

Secure the objectives: Roll a D3+1; thats how many objectives you have. Split the objectives between the players (1 person may have more than the other, or may have the only one, if this is the case roll off to see who gets more/ the only one) and roll of to see who places first. The first person may place the objective anywhere on the board that is not within 8'' of a table edge and not on a piece of terrain that is inaccessible to models. After it is placed, the opponent places an objective anywhere on the board following the restrictions above but may not place it within 8'' of another objective. Continue this cycle until all objectives are placed. To hold an objective you must be within half of your coherency distance (rounding up), you may not hold more than 1 objective at 1 time. If you are holding an objective and your opponent is also holding the same objective, then neither can capture it until one is gets off it. At the end of the game the person who is holding the most objectives wins. Wipe out: At the end of the game the person who has killed the most wins (if you are wiped out you lose anyway). At the end of every turn for every model you have killed at 1 to your CP. Retrieve the package: Place the package in the centre of the board. If you move within base contact of the objective then you pick it up. This does not impede this model at all. If the model that is carrying the package dies place the package where he died. You may drop the package at any time. At the end of the game whoever has control of the package wins. Failing that, the person who is closest to the package wins. If you hold the package you get plus 3 CP. If no one holds it then treat it as an objective for the purpose of CP. Defend the HQ: Randomly choose 1 ruin on the table. This is the HQ. At the end of the game whoever has the most models in the HQ wins the game. If you are in the HQ treat it as an objective for the purpose of CP. King of the hill: Designate the tallest piece of terrain on the board. This is the 'hill'. At the end of the game whosoever models is on the 'hill' and is closest to the ceiling wins the game. If you are on the hill treat it as an objective for the purpose of CP.

Deployment:
After objectives, you deploy your models. There are 3 types of deployment. Roll a D3 to see which one you have: Conflict: Split the table into 2 halves and roll off to see who deploys first and who gets which table edge (roll separately). Start off by placing your leader any where in your table half. Your opponent then does the same, but must place his leader (in his table half) 8'' away from yours. Then you place a model in your table half 8'' away from enemy models. Your opponent then does the same, and so on until all of your army has been deployed. If either side runs out of models before the other has, the side with more models deploys them all at the same time. Surprise attack (teleport, air dropped, or jumping from hiding spots): Split the table into 4 sections. Only 1 player deploys but he has to roll a die to see which quarter he deploys in for each model. After he has deployed the other side appears. Place all your models where you would like them to be (but must be 3'' away from enemies) then deviate the full 2D6'' (no decreasing distance). If a model would end up in impassible terrain, on a model, or of the table, move them a minimum distance so they are not. When falling back fall back to the closest table edge. The player that is 'Surprising' goes first. Convoy ambush: Draw an imaginary line down the table. One side deploys his models within 4'' of this line, and 8'' from an enemy. The other side deploys his models 8'' away from the enemy and the centre line. Take turns placing models, starting with the person in the centre. When falling back fall back to the closest table edge. The player that is ambushing goes first. When all models have been deployed each player rolls a D6. Whoever wins gets to choose whether to use

night attack rules or not on the first turn or the 3 rd turn onward. Then roll off again to see who goes first then start the game!

Game length:
After 3 turns roll a die. On a 4+ the game ends. On a 1, 2, or 3 the game continues. After an additional turn roll a die. On a 3+ the game ends. On a 1, or 2 it continues. After an additional turn end the game. Reference tables: Step by step setting up battle: • Decide armies • Decide terrain • Roll for mission: 1: Secure the objectives 2: Wipe out! 3: Retrieve the package 4: Defend the HQ 5: King of the hill 6: Choose or re-roll • Roll for deployment: 1-2: Conflict 3-4: Surprise attack 5-6: Convoy ambush • Place objectives • Deploy • Roll for command points • Begin the game! Turn sequence: • Move: Try to fix malfunctions Possibly use commands Move all of your models, either normal, or sprint/charge • Fight: • Shoot: Possibly use commands Measure for range (possible point blank modifier) Check ROF and roll needed Resolve how many hits you get (possible malfunction) Roll to wound (keep note of minor and major wounds) Check to see if you need to do over-kill Check to see if you run out of ammo • Combat Check speed and roll needed Resolve how many hits you get (possibly fumble) Roll to wound (keep note of minor and major wounds) Minus losers stress off winners stress then add this on to loser • Damage Minus stress of morale and roll morale test Depending on roll put wounds on model (remove model if needed, but place marker for looting weapons purposes) If the model survives roll on reaction table and resolve effect To hit (shooting): A E 1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

5 5 4 3 2 5 5 5 4 3 6 5 5 5 4 6 6 5 5 5 6 6 6 5 5

To hit (combat): E E 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 4 4 3 2 2 5 4 4 3 2 6 5 4 4 3 6 6 5 4 4 6 6 6 5 4

To wound (shooting/combat): W P 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 - 6 5 - - 6 - - - - -

7

8

9

10

6 5 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 2,2 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 2,2 5 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 2,3 5 6 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4 2,4 5 5,6 4,6 3,5 2,4

1-6: No effect 7-10: Stun 11-14: Immobilised 15-17: Weapon destroyed 18+: Wrecked 11-13: Move 2D6'' West 14-16: Move 2D6'' East 21-23: Move 2D6'' North 24-26-: Move 2D6'' South 31-33: Move 2D6'' North West 34-36: Move 2D6'' North East 41-43: Move 2D6'' South East 44-46: Move 2D6'' South West 51-66: Direct hit, no deviation Bushes, fences, etc:6 Rocks, hills, etc:5 Ruins (area terrain), etc:4 Fortified ruin (area terrain):3 2-6: Fall back 7-8: Pinned 9-11: Berserk 12: Suicide Special thanks:

Jono (play-testing, ideas, motivation) , My dad (motivation, ideas), Sword (play-testing, ideas, motivation), JamesC (motivation, ideas), Leopenis (ideas), My brother (motivation)

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