contents

INTRODUCTION

BOOKLET 2

SECTION 1

Project description&Programme...... Project Setting&Client......

ARCHITECTURAL MANAGEMENT
About The ADA...... Project Team /Roles & Responsibilities / Relationships...... Construction&Use Risks...... Project Planning /Stages of Work...... Pre /Post Contractual Considerations...... CDM Regulations /Health&Safety Issues......

SECTION 2

ARCHITECTURAL PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
This section describes how the design project would be delivered from inception through to completion, reflecting on the roles undertaken by consultants, contractors and suppliers.

BUILDING ECONOMICS

SECTION 3

[APS] ARCT 1053

Procurement Strategies...... Project Briefing /Cost Planning...... Project Drivers&Objectives......

LEGAL ISSUES

SECTION 4

Planning Legislation...... Property Law...... Adjoining Owners&Bouandaries...... The Planning Process...... Planning Appeals&Enforcement...... Conservation Areas&Listed Buildings...... Architect’s Legal Duties&Responsibilities......

APPENDIX

01
PROJECT INTRODUCTION

THE CLIENT , SETTING
THE CLIENT THEIR VISION HOW IT WILL BE ACHIEVED
The Partnership are responsible for the development and delivery of the ‘Community Plan’, which sets out and outlines a series of strategic targets and priorities for making Tower Hamlets a better borough for its resident, workers and visitors. The Core Strategy’, is the primary document created to support the ambitious long-term aspirations set out in the ‘Community Plan’ for the development and regeneration in the area. The document strategizes and forcasts the borough’s spatial strategy for the next decade (2025). Specifying on how, when and where future developments should occur and be delivered across the borough. The Cultural Center will be amongst the first of these redevelopment schemes taking place over the next decade to reboost and re enrgise the borough.

THE SCENE

PARTNERSHIP

[Fig01]

The Tower Hamlets Partnership is a strategic partnership that operates in the borough of Tower Hamlets. It was established in November 2001 by the police, the Council and local health, fire services (the main public sector organisations), local resident representatives, businesses and voluntary & faith groups. They worked together to ensure that the Partnership functioned as a local body that provided and improved services for the borough local residents, visitors and workers.

A CULTURAL CENTER FOR THE COMMUNITY MADE BY THE COMMUNITY
[Fig02]

The Tower Hamlets Partnership wish to create a new iconic Mixed-Use Cultural center in the heart of the East Eand following the legacy left behind after the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games. The mix use Cultural Center will be the one of the great destinations and places to go in the richly diverse borough of Tower Hamlets . It must attract visitors locally, regionally, nationally and globally. The center will reflect and embody the ethos of the Olympic and Paralympic games. The new center will comprise of a Cinema, Arts Pavilion, Crafts Workshop, Extreme Sports space and a place to eat and unwind. If proven a success the Center will be used as an exemplary template model for councils nationwide to follow in their respective boroughs.

In September 2011 The Towr Hamlets Partnership advertised a regional competition under the banner ‘A cultural Center for the community by the community’ It was a competition open to all architects and designers whom could design and realise the vision of The Partnerships Cultural Center. The Partnership were adiment not to follow the conventional route of going to a major Architectural practice. They wanted to give this monumental opportunity to create the new icon of the borough to innovative presently unkown practices.Advent Design Associates (ADA) were just that. ADA one the competition having been shortlisted from 200 entries, and were immediately appointed by The Partnership(The Client) as Design Team leader.

[Fig03]

Spatial scale and LDF spatial planning tools inter-relationship diagram

CLIENT FUNDERS

THE LONDON CULTURAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME is a cost effective operating model, well placed to support Local Authorities to respond to the rapidly changing political and fiscal environment and inevitable transformation of cultural services that resulted from the unprecedented pressure on public finance. The small core team had limited overheads and by fundraising for relatively small sums of project funding, effectively engaging local authorities and supporting networks of delivery partners, the capacity for delivering sustainable improvement and change was created from within the sector The LCIP has been funded by Capital Ambition and a consortium of partners in three phases. Phase one was funded in January 2008, following a report to the Capital Ambition Programme Board on 26 November 2007 and subsequent support expressed for the programme by over half of London’s Chief Executives. The total value of this phase was over £400,000, with £200,000 from Capital Ambition and the balance of the funding provided by a range of partners, including MLA, Arts Council, and Sport England and from Local Authorities. The programme combined a variety of work strands, designed to raise performance in individual Local Authorities, tackle the weakest areas of performance and raise standards in the cultural sector. LCIP has led London to outperform other regions and is now considered an example of good practice nationally, with many of its programmes and models being replicated by other regions and the LGA Group. Under CPA, London’s cultural services were the poorest performing service block in London and the worst of any other English Region. The LCIP effectively supported Local Authorities to improve their culture block scores and were the most improved region under CPA. Independent evaluation of Culture in the CAA showed that London’s Cultural Services performed considerably better than other regions and LCIP was cited as making a significant contribution. London’s cultural services contributed to more green flags than all other regions and LCIP was cited as a contributing factor to London’s success.

The LONDON CULTURAL IMPROVEMENT GROUP (LCIG) came into existence in 2007, through the joint vision and belief of: • • • • • • • The City of London’s 32 Boroughs Arts Coucil England MLA (Museums Libraries Archive) Council English Heritage Sports England London councils Capital Ambition

REGIONAL C U LT U R A L AGENCIES

CORE TEAM

The organisations collaborated together to form the LONDON CULTURAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME (LCIP), a strategic body that would strive to improve cultural services in London.

LCIP has attracted considerable partnership funding in cash and in kind, outperforming its phase one funding target by over 100%. Almost £100,000 in inward investment from Renaissance funding has been provided directly to London’s Local Authorities to deliver priority improvements in local authority museums. The Cultural Agencies commitment to supporting London Boroughs through LCIP is demonstrated by MLA’s prioritisation of the programme following its reorganisation with additional investment from the agencies in the programme. Strong leadership to align a range of partners behind a strategic approach to driving improvement in local authority cultural services leading to additional capacity and investment in the programme. Relatively small grant incentives to local authorities ensured high levels of engagement with the programme and with partner authorities; higher levels of commitment; and that projects were completed on time and did not drift. The project team had credibility with local authorities because members of the core team had extensive experience and knowledge of working within local authorities and were able to build up trust.

Local Authorities were engaged with working up the bid through the establishment of the London Cultural Improvement Group and consultation with sector‐led professional organisations such as London CLOA and ALCL at all stages. 01

LCIPPhase1Closure Report

FUNDING TO COMPLETION

LCIP

+

MAJOR GLOBAL SPONSOR

&

COMMERCIAL SPONSORS

FUNDING
FUNDING RAISED FOR THE SPATIAL THE STRATEGY PROJECT TO DESIGN AND DEVELOP AN ICONIC CULTURAL CENTER IN THE BOROUGH OF TOWERHAMLETS IN TIME FOR THE 2012 OLYMPIC & PARALYMPIC GAME LEGACY .

>

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SPATIAL STRATEGY

TOWER HAMLETS PARTNERSHIP

INTIATIVE

SEARCH FOR A SITE THAT IS NEED OF REDEVELOPMENT IN AND RE-USE IN THE BOROUGH

OSBORN STREET ABANDONED WAREHOUSE SITE

FIRST 2012 SPATIAL STRATEGY PILOT PROJECT

OSBORN CENTRE OF CULTURE & ARTS

WHO WE ARE
We are a young design-led practice based in North-West London led by directors Prince Emmanuel Yemoh, Katie Jane Parkes and Samson Ric Taylor. We work closely with our clients, users, specialists and communities to ensure that a strong emphasis on innovative & functional design is threaded throughout the special places we collaboratively create. The Advent Design Associates (ADA) was founded in 2010, during the height of the recession by the three young gifted entrepreneurial designers named above. Together they decided to leave BDP, the award-winning interdisciplinary practice (of architects, designers, engineers and urbanists) they all worked for, and go at it alone, together, with the belief that they had what it took to design and create an Architecture responsive to a rapidly changing world. An Architecture we have never seen before. Though in our infancy as a practice, we posess considerable experience haven worked for a leading international practice, and as such take on all varieties of work ranging from international and regional competitions to large complex commercial projects, working and collaborating with a talented team of consultants and specialists as and when their expertise is needed. We pride ourselves on our ability to listen, learn and respond to the specific needs and requirements of our clients, users, communities and environment through cultural and socially aware bespoke design.

WHERE WE ARE
67 North Circular Road,London Borough of Brent, NW107DS
We started The ADA practice without without any external help/or money so it was essential that we cut our costs where ever and how ever possible. One way in which we made this savings was by using Prince’s (co-director) basement in North-West London as our first office. It was rent-free meaning we cut costs and made huge savings on what we could have spent for renting a space. It is only a temporary solution until we are in a position to invest in a larger space as the company grows.

Prince.E.Yemoh
BArch BA(Hons) Architecture

(GDip) Landscape Design BA(Hons) Architecture

Katie.J.Parkes

Samson.R.Wallace
BEng (Hons)

OUR PEOPLE
The ADA run by three young gifted co-directors (founders) whom have considerably extensive experience between each other. Before starting up ADA they had all worked within respective sectors within Building Design Partnership(BDP), a leading and awardwinning interdisciplinary practice of architects, designers, engineers and urbanists.

3
CO-DIRECTOR CO-DIRECTOR CO-DIRECTOR

Specialisation / Experience /

Architect I worked for BDP in London for two years, in the retail and regeneration studio,where I played a key role in design for a series of large scale developments in the UK, Poland, India and China.

Specialisation / Experience /

Landscape&Urban Designer I’ve been in BDP London’s landscape and urbanism studio for 4 years,where I was an extremely active member within the team comprising of urban planners, urban designers, masterplanners and landscape architects.I’ve learnt alot from these disciplines.

Specialisation / Experience /

Structural Engineer I’ve been Involved in projects from the concept and detail of the design through to implementation, testing and handover. Part of a team that ensures a building is fit- for-purpose and adheres to the project budget and schedule.

OUR VALUES
1. BE HONEST AND ACT WITH INTEGRITY 2. BE COMPETENT 3. PROMOTE YOUR SERVICES HONESTLY AND RESPONSIBLY 4. MANAGE YOUR BUSINESS COMPETENTLY 5. CONSIDER THE WIDER IMPACT OF YOUR WORK 6. CARRY OUT YOUR WORK FAITHFULLY AND CONSCIENTIOUSLY 7. BE TRUSTWORTHY AND LOOK AFTER YOUR CLIENTS’ MONEY PROPERLY 8. HAVE APPROPRIATE INSURANCE ARRANGEMENTS 9. MAINTAIN THE REPUTATION OF ARCHITECTS 10. DEAL WITH DISPUTES OR COMPLAINTS APPROPRIATELY 11. CO-OPERATE WITH REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND INVESTIGATIONS 12. HAVE RESPECT FOR OTHERS.

12
(Taken from the The Architects Code of Conduct)

02

ARCHITECTURAL MANAGEMENT

PROFESSIONALISM, ARCHITECTS

APPOINTMENT

ADA recommend the use of standard forms of appointment such as RIBA’s Standard Conditions for Appointment of Architects (S-CON-07). However large experienced clients such as The Tower Hamlets Partnership have their own bespoke agreements that often cause complications during the project. It is quite ZHHHcommon for agreements to be signed years after the project started. Progressing in design and construction works (Stage K) without a signed appointment is bad practice going against both the ARB Codes of Practice (standard 4.5) and RIBA Code of Professional Conduct (Guidance Note 4.1). The absence of a formal appointment could mean that the client couldchange the terms of the appointment, putting the architect in a very risky position with very few options.. To prevent putting strain on the relationship with the client architects often continue to work without a signed agreement, meaning that the risk of potential disputes is high without exact terms and conditions. Therefore ADA have agreed with the client that they will not work until a formal appointment has been agreed and signed.

Team members have been selected on the basis of their merit and effeciency in their respective fields. The Client is satisfied with the fee and competence of all members of the Project Team.

wider project TEAM

ROLES & FUNCTIONS
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER
STANHOPE PLC

CLIENT
TOWER HAMLETS PARTNERSHIP

ARCHITECT
ADVENT DESIGN ASSOCIATES

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
ARUP

OTHER CONSULTANTS
CAPITA SYMONDS (transport) DRIVERS JONAS DELOITTE (planning)

QUANTITY SURVEYOR
DAVIS LANGDON

CONTRACTOR
WATES

The Tower Hamlets Partnership is a strategic partnership that operates in the borough of Tower Hamlets to provide improved services for the borough local residents, visitors and workers. The partnership are in charge of selecting the potential site on which the new iconic Culture & Arts Centre is to be designed and built upon. If they do not posses the capability to do so they will often instruct a consultant to carry out the necessary work. The Partnership will select a representative during the building design works, whom will ensure that the project runs smoothly with regards to cost and scheduling. The Towerhamlets Partnership representative must be up to date with all matters in relation to the design project & provide regular feedback to The Partnership.

As Development Manager they are responsible for co-ordinating and managing all aspects in relation to the building procurement process.

As the Lead Consultant/ Design Team Leader Advent Design Associates are responsible for the co-ordination of all works by the Design Team (Structural Engineers, Interior Designers, Landscap Architects, Consultants etc) ensuring that the client’s requirements are met with regards to Time Schedule and Budgets.

ARUP engineers play a fundamental part in the Building process. The ability to design Structure for Buildings makes them a key part to the Design Team.

Their expertise in their respective fields allows them to provide a substantial contribution to all aspects of the design & construction works.

Also known as a Cost Consultant they are responsible for estimating the Building costs based on the Design & Specification proposals of the project. They operate either within the Design Team or advice the Client directly.

Often referred to as the Builder, they are responsible for the coordination and mangement of all Construction works.

SUBCONTRACTOR
TBC???

SUPPLIER
TBC???

CLERK OF WORKS
TBC??

FACILITIES MANAGER
TBC?

Often a Specialist Trader (Roofing,Cladding etc) they are able to carry out design works on specific and specialised parts of the construction works on behalf of the Contractor.

Responsible for the supply of Materials and Equipment but not its erection/construction on site. They can offer advice services to the Design Team.

Also known as the Site Inspector, they work directly for the Client and are responsible for monitoring Standards of Construction on Site. They work in close proximity to the Design Team Leader (Advent Design Associates).

Is responsible for the subsequent running of the completed Building and Equipment. They have a decisive role during Hand over, Occupation and in Compiling the brief of the Building.

ARCHITECTS, RELATIONSHIPS

Successful working relationships depend on the roles of parties being clearly established from the outset. (Architects Job Book, p14) Disputes often arise due to misunderstandings of clear and exact roles within the project team. It is quite common for the architect to be in a position of high risk for not consulting the client about decisions being made or work being created. The architect and all other parties within the project team must adhere to the correct channels of conduct and instruction. To avoid these potential issuesarising it is good practice to have the following in place at the projects beginning: • Roles and Responsibilities Matrix • Decision Making Process • Change Control Procedures

[Fig04]

RIBA TRADITIONAL, PLAN

OF WORK & THE PEOPLE INVOLVED

WORK STAGES. A-B (15% of fees due) Appraisal C-D,E (further 30% of fees due) Design Final Proposals F-H (further 30% of fees due) Production J-L (remaining 25% of fees due) Construction to Practical Completion Job Management Office Managemet

PEOPLE INVOLVED. E E/A E / A / QS / PO E / A / QS / SC E / A / QS / SC / PO / BCO E / A / QS / SC / T1+T2+T3+T4 E / A / QS / SC / C / CQS
A+T COW PS / SA / SF / FT / SSC

E A QS PO SC BCO T1-T4 C CQS A+T COW PS SA SF FT SSC

Employer (Archhitect’s Client) Architect Quantity Surveyor Planning Officer ( Local Authority) Specialist Consultants Building Control Officer ( Local Authority) Builders invited to Tender Contractor (Successful Tenderer) Contractor’s own Quantity Surveyor Artists & Tradesmen Clerk of Works Planning Supervisor Contractor’s Site Agent Site Foreman Foreman Tradesman Specialist Sub Contractor.

DEVELOPER APPOINTMENT

THE CLIENT
Potential Site • • • • • • Appoint Financial advisors Establish an internal decision making system is in place to avoid design delays. Nominate Client representattive to keep wider client organisation informed. Confirm appointment of Architect. Appoint Specialist advisors Potential Site: ensure purchase is completed on time Ideas & Vision Set up Funding framework to ensure payments are made

ARCHITECT’S APPOINTMENT
• • • • • Confirm brief Advice on Consultants Draft Programme Appoint Surveyor Arrange an in-house site inspection

site inspection / analysis
• • • • • • • Detect Existing Site properties Identify names & Addresses Establish Boundaries & Access Site orientation & characteristics Photograph Site & make Sketch notes Take basic dimensions of the site to enable preliminary analysis & design works Instruct Surveyor to prepare more accurate and detailed survey drawings of the Site.

survey
• • • • • • • Establish existing structures (Plans, elevations, sections and selected details) Ownership of Fence, and Party Agreements. Plot accurate levels, boundaries and adjoining buildings. Services,Soil test & Trial holes Establish Improvement lines Schedule of defects. Comprehensive internal and external photographs of the site and its immediate context.

briefing process
• Findings from the Site Analysis are compared to the results from the Survey which are then compared to the requirements of the brief. • • Consultants’ advice as to whether the design development is Feasible. Decision is made to continue the development of the design development.

consultant recommendation
• • • • Architect selects consultants for specialist services for recommendation Fees assessed & programme discussed Obtain references to establish the quality of their reputation. Appointment by client

PROJECT PLANNING, STAGE

OF WORKS

SERVICES CONSULTANT APPOINTMENT

ENGINEER APPOINTMENT

QUANTITY SURVEYOR APPOINTMENT

• • • • Design development. Cost & Contract options Discuss design policy, structure, materials, servicing

Consultants’ meetings with Client

DESIGN PROPOSALS
• • • • Prepare report. Collect samples and illustrations Liase with consultants to discuss design. Create basic drawings, models and sketches

design report
• • • • • • The report should state the Client’s original brief. The site conditions & Analysis related to the brief. Attitude & approach to design problems. Consulatants’ recommendations. assessment of cost and fees. Submit report to client for further discussion.

approvals from client CONTRACTOR APPOINTMENT hand over to contractor architect is novated & now works for the contractor contractor instructs Architect to develop the building design drawing further into a coherent detailed construction/production drawings
• • • Set up of an appropriate Drawing Programme. Liase with Consultants to set up an effecient schedule reference system. Develop Construction Drawings.

PROJECT PLANNING, STAGE

CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS
• • • • • Produce a set of Key drawings-GA Plans/Sections & Elevations Produce a coherent set of Construction Details. Ensure that all Key Drawings & Details are a fully dimensioned and referenced to details and schedules. Check all drawings received from other parties/ consultants against own drawings. Aknowledge as corect or Advice on dicrepancies Produce draft schedules of recurring parts of the building design: Doors/ Windows/Ironmongery/Sanitary fittings/Joinery &Fittings/ Electrical fittings/ Finishes & Decorations & Furnushing • • • Site Staff & Labourers H&S Supervisors • • • Subcontractors & Suppliers Liase and discuss costs with Quantity Surveyor. Add schedules to Construction drawings once Contractor has approved. Finalise all darwings

Skilled Trademen/Finishing Foremen

approvals from contractor

OF WORKS (CONTINUED)

CONSTRUCTION

COMPLETION

CONSIDERATIONS, PRE

/POST CONTRACT

DELAY OF FORMAL CLIENT – ARCHITECT AGREEMENT_ It is important to be aware that disputes are likely to happen between parties involved in the design and construction process if exact and clear terms of appointment aren’t provided. TIME_ It is important that the project isn’t started without having completed the design and over optimism of the design team’s ability to produce the required tender information will resulte in insufficient and unsatisfactory information for Stage 2 Tenders. CLIENT DECISIONS_ Experienced clients often become complacent and rely soley upon their experience without fully heeding the design team’s advice, usually to the detriment of the project. The client introducing late changes into the project can have drastic effects also. PROCUREMENT_ This needs adequate planning so that the design team are familiar with their responsibilities. CONTRACT_ If the procurement route should evolve and change during the project it may become incompatible with the contract, making contract administration of the contract very challenging.

[Fig07]

CONSTRUCTION DESIGN & MANAGEMENT
INTER-RELATIONSHIPS DESIGNING FOR HEALTH & SAFETY

[Fig05]

[Fig06]

CLIENT DUTIES

DESIGNER DUTIES

CDM,

KEY DUTIES

[Fig07]

03
BUILDING ECONOMICS

COMPARISON OF PROCUREMENT METHOD

PROCUREMENT ROUTES
The initial procurement method was Design & Build as it offered the possibility of a guaranteed cost, completion date and provided lower risk to the Client, allowing responsibilities and risk to fall on the Contractor. . However, in March (3 months after the project had started) the client selected a traditional procurement route using a two stage tendering method as they were unconvinced the Design & Build approach would achieve their aspirations in getting a higher cost certainty and better control of the quality and design due to the development being in a conservation area in Brick lane, causing significant delays to the project. This change order in procurement route had severe implications on Advent Design Associates(ADA) responsibilities and scope of work, because usually in the traditional procurement approach, the project would have been fully designed before construction.

For further deatils on procurement comparisons please refer to the Procurement section in Appendix 03)
[Fig08]

SPECULATIVE RISK
For further deatils on procurement comparisons please refer to the Procurement section in Appendix 03)

[Fig09]

Which contract Choosing the appropriate building contract. 4th edition

ORIGINAL PROCUREMENT& EVOLVED PROCUREMENT COMPARISONS

[Fig10]

PROJECT SUMMARY, CAPITAL COSTS

This Report recommends that the Culture & Arts Center be developed on Existing land owned by The Old Truman Brewery. The Capital Cost of the building construction is estimated at £4,000,000 assuming a Design & Build approach.

CLIENT ARCHITECT COST PROCUREMENT START/COMPLETION

D Tower Hamlets Partnership Advent Design Associates £4,000,000 Design & Build Jan 2012/Sept 2012

FUNDING Public Funders contribution Official Partner contribution Official Supporters contribution TOTAL

DESIGN & BUILD £2,000,000 £1,000,000 £1,000,000 £4,000,000

04
LEGAL ISSUES

LAND OWNERSHIP
‘THE SITE’ Land Owner / 15-25 Osborn St,London,E16 The Old Truman Brewery
The Old Truman Brewery, East London’s revolutionary arts and media quarter, is home to a hive of creative businesses as well as exclusively independent shops, galleries, markets, bars and restaurants.01

OSB ORN STR EET
W E HIT CH E AP LR D OA

Conservation Area / Statutory Listed / Building ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION Land Owner / Conservation Area / Statutory Listed / Building

Yes No 27 Osborn St,London,E1 EDF Energy plc Yes No

WHITECHAPEL ART 80 Whitechapel High St,London, E1 7QX GALLERY Land Owner / Conservation Area / Listed Building / The Whitechapel Gallery Yes No

PLANNING APPLICATION HISTORY OF ‘THE SITE’

2001
APPLICATION NUMBER / PA / 0 0 / 0 0 6 3 9 ADDRESS / PROPOSAL /
15 To 25, Osborn Street, London, E1

2001
PA / 0 0 / 0 0 6 4 0
15 To 25, Osborn Street, London, E1

2003
PA / 0 2 / 0 1 5 4 2
15 To 25, Osborn Street, London, E1

2009
PA / 0 9 / 0 1 4 0 2
15 To 25, Osborn Street, London, E1

2011
PA / 1 0 / 0 2 7 4 8
15 To 25, Osborn Street, London, E1

Demolition of main buildings and development of a six storey building facing Osborn Street providing retail, showroom, light industrial and office with flats above. 02

Demolition of 15-23 Osborn Street and partial demolition of no. 25 Osborn Street to enable redevelopment. 03

Use of ground floor and part first floor as entertainment venue including function / performance hall, restaurant and four bars with ancillary offices. 04 29/10/2003

Demolition of all buildings on site and a change of use to a car park. 05

Demolition of all buildings on site (except the building at 17 Osborn Street) and erection of a brick wall and planting on the east boundary plus a metal palisade fence. 06 02/03/2011

DESCISION DATE / DESCISION /

25/09/2001

25/09/2001

07/12/2009

WITHDRAWN - RETURNED TO APPLICANT

WITHDRAWN - RETURNED TO APPLICANT

WITHDRAWN - RETURNED TO APPLICANT

WITHDRAWN BY APPLICANT

WITHDRAWN BY APPLICANT

APPENDIX

[APS] ARCT 1053

COST PLANNING & PROCUREMENT METHODS

NOTE:

01

ALL PAGES IN THIS SECTION HAVE BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THE ‘ARCHITECTS FEES 2005’ & ‘WHICH CONTRACT CHOOSING THE APPROPRIATE BUILDING CONTRACT. 4TH EDITION’ BOOKS

FEE RANGE COMPARISONS
There is, of course, variation in the fees reported in this survey. The averages reported in the tables and the ‘lines of best fit’ presented in the charts disguise variations between individual jobs. The charts, right, show the distribution of fees, analysing new build and refurbishment separately for jobs undertaken using the traditional contract types. On each fees chart below, the solid line shows the average fees - the ‘line of best fit’. The grey lines show lower and upper quartiles. It is clear that there is a greater variation in fees from the average for refurbishment jobs than for new build jobs. Fees reported using the design & build contract show less variation than traditional contract jobs.

ArchitectsFees2005

ArchitectsFees2005

DESIGN & BUILD PROCUREMENT CONTRACTUAL RELATIONSHIPS /
With design and build, it is likely that in the absence of in-house professional staff, the client will wish to engage outside consultants to advise on the preparation of requirements and to evaluate and select tenders etc. Often one or more of these consultants will switch from being appointed by the client to being appointed by the contractor at the time the contractor is engaged. The main contractual link is between the client and the contractor and if the client’s agent or representative has only a limited role. The contractor might also have a contractual link with his own design consultants, and with sub-contractors and suppliers. As the contractor is wholly

Which contract Choosing the appropriate building contract. 4th edition

DESIGN & BUILD PROCUREMENT PLAN OF WORK STAGES

The client may need to appoint consultants to advise on his design requirements and costs, if he does not have this expertise available in-house. The contractor is responsible to a greater or lesser extent for design, as well as for carrying out the work and may appoint its own consultants. The arrangement may be for total design and construction, or for design development and production information based on a scheme design supplied by the client’s consultants

Which contract Choosing the appropriate building contract. 4th edi-

LONDON CULTURAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME FUNDING

CASH FUNDING SUMMARY
In each financial year that LCIP ran it attracted funding from Capital Ambition and match funding from partner organisations. In total, the funding provided has been nearly evenly split between Capital Ambition and the cross-organisational match-funding: Capital Ambition has provided 57.82% of the monetary funding to deliver LCIP compared with 42.18% from partner organisations. The total value of monetary funding since LCIP inception is £1,598,200. The graph demonstrates the funding levels, by financial year, broken down into contributing organisations

SUMMARY OF MATCH-FUNDING TO STRANDS

The graph demonstrates the years in which individual strands have been most active and gives an indication of strands that have included higher levels of cross-organisational working. Some of the more recent strands, such as Heritage Change and Access to Funding, have significantly lower levels of partner contribution as they were only active from quarter 2 onwards of 2010/11. Project management is particularly high as three members of the LCIP team are line-managed by MLA Council staff and all external partners regularly attend partner meetings and LCIP board meetings.

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