You are on page 1of 28

Document Type Definition From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Document Type Definition (DTD) is one of several SGML

and XML schema languages, and is also the term used to describe a document or portion thereof that is authored in the DTD language. A DTD is primarily used for the expression of a schema via a set of declarations that conform to a particular markup syntax and that describe a class, or type, of document, in terms of constraints on the structure of that document. A DTD may also declare constructs that are not always required to establish document structure, but that may affect the interpretation of some documents. XML documents are described using a subset of DTD which imposes a number of restrictions on the document's structure, as required per the XML standard (XML is in itself an application of SGML optimized for automated parsing). DTDs are written in a formal syntax that explains precisely which elements and entities may appear where in the document and what the elements contents and attributes are. DTD is native to the SGML and XML specifications, and since its introduction other specification languages such as XML Schema and RELAX NG have been released with additional functionality. As an expression of a schema, a DTD specifies, in effect, the syntax of an "application" of SGML or XML, such as the derivative language HTML or XHTML. This syntax is usually a less general form of the syntax of SGML or XML. In a DTD, the structure of a class of documents is described via (i) (ii) Element declarations attribute-list declarations.

Element declarations name the allowable set of elements within the document, and specify whether and how declared elements and runs of character data may be contained within each element. Attribute-list declarations name the allowable set of attributes for each declared element, including the type of each attribute value, if not an explicit set of valid value(s).

Contents [hide]

1 Associating DTDs with documents o 1.1 Examples 1 2 Markup Declarations o 2.1 Element Type Declarations o 2.2 Attribute List Declarations o 2.3 Entity Declarations o 2.4 Notation Declarations 3 XML DTDs and schema validation 4 XML DTD Example 5 See also 6 References 7 External links Associating DTDs with documents A DTD is associated with an XML document via a Document Type Declaration, the syntactic fragment doctypedecl, that appears near the start of the XML document.[1] The declaration establishes that the document is an instance of the type defined by the referenced DTD. The declarations in a DTD are divided into (i)an internal subset The declarations in the internal subset are embedded in the Document Type Declaration in the document itself. (ii)an external subset The declarations in the external subset are located in a separate text file. The external subset may be referenced via a public identifier and/or a system identifier. Programs for reading documents may not be required to read the external subset.

Examples 1 Here is an example of a Document Type Declaration containing both public and system identifiers: <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <!DOCTYPE foo [ <!ENTITY greeting "helloworld"> ]> <!DOCTYPE bar [ <!ENTITY greeting "helloworld"> ]> All HTML 4.01 documents are expected to conform to one of three SGML DTDs. The public identifiers of these DTDs are constant and are as follows:

-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN -//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN -//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Frameset//EN

The system identifiers of these DTDs, if present in the Document Type Declaration, will be URI references. System identifiers can vary, but are expected to point to a specific set of declarations in a resolvable location. SGML allows for public identifiers to be mapped to system identifiers in catalogs that are optionally made available to the URI resolvers used by document parsing software. Markup Declarations In a DTD markup declarations are used to declare which element types, attribute lists, entities and notations are allowed in the structure of the corresponding class of XML documents.[2] Element Type Declarations An Element Type Declaration defines an element and its possible content. A valid XML document only contains elements that are defined in the DTD. An elements content is specified by some key words and characters:

EMPTY for no content ANY for any content , for orders | for alternatives ("either...or") ( ) for groups

* for any number (zero or more) + for at least once (one or more) ? mark for optional (zero or one) If there is no *, + or ?, the element must occur exactly one time

Examples: <!ELEMENT html (head, body)> <!ELEMENT p (#PCDATA | p | ul | dl | table | h1|h2|h3)*> Attribute List Declarations An Attribute List specifies the name, data type and default value of each attribute associated with a given element type,[3] for example: <!ATTLIST img id ID #IMPLIED src CDATA #REQUIRED > There are the following attribute types:

CDATA (Character set of data) ID IDREF and IDREFS NMTOKEN and NMTOKENS ENTITY and ENTITIES NOTATION and NOTATIONS Listings and NOTATION-listings

A default value can be used to define whether an attribute must occur (#REQUIRED) or not (#IMPLIED), whether it has a fixed value (#FIXED), and which value should be used as a default value ("") in case the given attribute is left out in an XML tag.

Entity Declarations

Entities are variables used to define abbreviations; a typical use is user-readable names for special characters.[4] Thus, entities help to avoid repetition and make editing easier. In general, there are basically two different types:

Internal (Parsed) Entities define entity references in order to replace certain strings by a replacement text. The content of the entity is given in the declaration. External (Parsed) Entities refer to external storage objects.

Notation Declarations Notations read the file format of unparsed external documents in order to include non-XML data in a XML document. For example a GIF image: <!NOTATION GIF system "image/gif"> XML DTDs and schema validation The XML DTD syntax is one of several XML schema languages. A common misconception is that non-validating XML parsers are not required to read DTDs, when in fact, the DTD must still be scanned for correct syntax as well as for declarations of entities and default attributes. A non-validating parser may, however, elect not to read external entities, including the external subset of the DTD. If the XML document depends on declarations found only in external entities, it should assert standalone="no" in its XML declaration. Identification of the validating DTD may be performed by the use of XML Catalogs. <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE people_list SYSTEM "example.dtd"> <people_list> <person> <name>Gofur Halmurat</name> <birthdate>04/02/1977</birthdate> <gender>Male</gender> </person> </people_list> XML DTD Example

An example of a very simple XML DTD to describe a list of persons is given below: <!ELEMENT people_list (person*)> <!ELEMENT person (name, birthdate?, gender?, socialsecuritynumber?)> <!ELEMENT name (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT birthdate (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT gender (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT socialsecuritynumber (#PCDATA)> Taking this line by line, it says: 1. people_list is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains any number of person elements. The * denotes there can be 0 or more person elements within the people_list element. 2. person is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains one element named name, followed by one named birthdate (optional), then gender (also optional) and socialsecuritynumber (also optional). The ? indicates that an element is optional. The reference to the name element name has no ?, so a person element must contain a name element. 3. name is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains "parsed character data" (#PCDATA). 4. birthdate is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains parsed character data. 5. gender is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains parsed character data. 6. socialsecuritynumber is a valid element name, and an instance of such an element contains parsed character data. An example of an XML file which makes use of and conforms to this DTD follows. It assumes the DTD is identifiable by the relative URI reference "example.dtd", and the "people_list" after "!DOCTYPE" tells us that the root tags, or the first element defined in the DTD, is called "people_list": <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE people_list SYSTEM "example.dtd"> <people_list> <person>

<name>Fred Bloggs</name> <birthdate>27/11/2008</birthdate> <gender>Male</gender> </person> </people_list> It is possible to render this in an XML-enabled browser (such as IE5 or Mozilla) by pasting and saving the DTD component above to a text file namedexample.dtd and the XML file to a differently-named text file, and opening the XML file with the browser. The files should both be saved in the same directory. However, many browsers do not check that an XML document conforms to the rules in the DTD; they are only required to check that the DTD is syntactically correct. For security reasons, they may also choose not to read the external DTD. Other alternatives to DTDs have become available in the last few years:

XML Schema, also referred to as XML Schema Definition (XSD), has achieved Recommendation status within the W3C, and is popular for "data oriented" (that is, transactional non-publishing) XML use because of its stronger typing and easier round-tripping to Java declarations. Most of the publishing world has found that the added complexity of XSD would not bring them any particular benefits[citation needed], so DTDs are still far more popular there. An XML Schema Definition is itself an XML document while a DTD is not. RELAX NG, which is also a part of DSDL, is an ISO international standard. It is more expressive than XSD, while providing a simpler syntax, but commercial software support has been slow in coming. Document Structure Description (DSD) was another proposed alternative that, as of 2008, has not seen much progress or adoption in several years.

<!DOCTYPE NEWSPAPER [ <!ELEMENT NEWSPAPER (ARTICLE+)> <!ELEMENT ARTICLE (HEADLINE,BYLINE,LEAD,BODY,NOTES)> <!ELEMENT HEADLINE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT BYLINE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT LEAD (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT BODY (#PCDATA)>

<!ELEMENT NOTES (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE AUTHOR CDATA #REQUIRED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE EDITOR CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE DATE CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE EDITION CDATA #IMPLIED> ]> Introduction to DTD A Document Type Definition (DTD) defines the legal building blocks of an XML document. It defines the document structure with a list of legal elements and attributes. A DTD can be declared inline inside an XML document, or as an external reference. Internal DTD Declaration If the DTD is declared inside the XML file, it should be wrapped in a DOCTYPE definition with the following syntax: <!DOCTYPE root-element [element-declarations]> Example XML document with an internal DTD: <?xml version="1.0"?> <!DOCTYPE note [ <!ELEMENT note (to,from,heading,body)> <!ELEMENT to (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT from (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT heading (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT body (#PCDATA)> ]> <note> <to>Tove</to> <from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading>

<body>Don't forget me this weekend</body> </note> Open the XML file above in your browser (select "view source" or "view page source" to view the DTD) The DTD above is interpreted like this:

!DOCTYPE note defines that the root element of this document is note !ELEMENT note defines that the note element contains four elements: "to,from,heading,body" !ELEMENT to defines the to element to be of type "#PCDATA" !ELEMENT from defines the from element to be of type "#PCDATA" !ELEMENT heading defines the heading element to be of type "#PCDATA" !ELEMENT body defines the body element to be of type "#PCDATA"

External DTD Declaration If the DTD is declared in an external file, it should be wrapped in a DOCTYPE definition with the following syntax: <!DOCTYPE root-element SYSTEM "filename"> This is the same XML document as above, but with an external DTD (Open it, and select view source): <?xml version="1.0"?> <!DOCTYPE note SYSTEM "note.dtd"> <note> <to>Tove</to> <from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading> <body>Don't forget me this weekend!</body> </note>

And this is the file "note.dtd" which contains the DTD: <!ELEMENT note (to,from,heading,body)>

<!ELEMENT to (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT from (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT heading (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT body (#PCDATA)>

Why Use a DTD? With a DTD, each of your XML files can carry a description of its own format. With a DTD, independent groups of people can agree to use a standard DTD for interchanging data. Your application can use a standard DTD to verify that the data you receive from the outside world is valid. You can also use a DTD to verify your own data. DTD - XML Building Blocks The main building blocks of both XML and HTML documents are elements. The Building Blocks of XML Documents Seen from a DTD point of view, all XML documents (and HTML documents) are made up by the following building blocks:

Elements Attributes Entities PCDATA CDATA

Elements Elements are the main building blocks of both XML and HTML documents.

Examples of HTML elements are "body" and "table". Examples of XML elements could be "note" and "message". Elements can contain text, other elements, or be empty. Examples of empty HTML elements are "hr", "br" and "img". Examples: <body>some text</body> <message>some text</message> Attributes Attributes provide extra information about elements.

Attributes are always placed inside the opening tag of an element. Attributes always come in name/value pairs. The following "img" element has additional information about a source file: <img src="computer.gif" /> The name of the element is "img". The name of the attribute is "src". The value of the attribute is "computer.gif". Since the element itself is empty it is closed by a " /". Entities Some characters have a special meaning in XML, like the less than sign (<) that defines the start of an XML tag. Most of you know the HTML entity: "&nbsp;". This "no-breaking-space" entity is used in HTML to insert an extra space in a document. Entities are expanded when a document is parsed by an XML parser.

The following entities are predefined in XML:

Entity References &lt; &gt; &amp; &quot; &apos; PCDATA

Character < > & " '

PCDATA means parsed character data.

Think of character data as the text found between the start tag and the end tag of an XML element. PCDATA is text that WILL be parsed by a parser. The text will be examined by the parser for entities and markup. Tags inside the text will be treated as markup and entities will be expanded. However, parsed character data should not contain any &, <, or > characters; these need to be represented by the &amp; &lt; and &gt; entities, respectively. CDATA CDATA means character data.

CDATA is text that will NOT be parsed by a parser. Tags inside the text will NOT be treated as markup and entities will not be expanded. DTD - Elements In a DTD, elements are declared with an ELEMENT declaration. Declaring Elements In a DTD, XML elements are declared with an element declaration with the following syntax: <!ELEMENT element-name category> or <!ELEMENT element-name (element-content)> Empty Elements

Empty elements are declared with the category keyword EMPTY: <!ELEMENT element-name EMPTY> Example: <!ELEMENT br EMPTY> XML example: <br /> Elements with Parsed Character Data Elements with only parsed character data are declared with #PCDATA inside parentheses: <!ELEMENT element-name (#PCDATA)> Example: <!ELEMENT from (#PCDATA)> Elements with any Contents Elements declared with the category keyword ANY, can contain any combination of parsable data: <!ELEMENT element-name ANY> Example: <!ELEMENT note ANY>

Elements with Children (sequences)

Elements with one or more children are declared with the name of the children elements inside parentheses: <!ELEMENT element-name (child1)> or <!ELEMENT element-name (child1,child2,...)> Example: <!ELEMENT note (to,from,heading,body)> When children are declared in a sequence separated by commas, the children must appear in the same sequence in the document. In a full declaration, the children must also be declared, and the children can also have children. The full declaration of the "note" element is: <!ELEMENT note (to,from,heading,body)> <!ELEMENT to (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT from (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT heading (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT body (#PCDATA)> Declaring Only One Occurrence of an Element <!ELEMENT element-name (child-name)> Example: <!ELEMENT note (message)> The example above declares that the child element "message" must occur once, and only once inside the "note" element. Declaring Minimum One Occurrence of an Element <!ELEMENT element-name (child-name+)> Example: <!ELEMENT note (message+)>

The + sign in the example above declares that the child element "message" must occur one or more times inside the "note" element. Declaring Zero or More Occurrences of an Element <!ELEMENT element-name (child-name*)> Example: <!ELEMENT note (message*)> The * sign in the example above declares that the child element "message" can occur zero or more times inside the "note" element. Declaring Zero or One Occurrences of an Element <!ELEMENT element-name (child-name?)> Example: <!ELEMENT note (message?)> The ? sign in the example above declares that the child element "message" can occur zero or one time inside the "note" element. Declaring either/or Content Example: <!ELEMENT note (to,from,header,(message|body))> The example above declares that the "note" element must contain a "to" element, a "from" element, a "header" element, and either a "message" or a "body" element. Declaring Mixed Content Example: <!ELEMENT note (#PCDATA|to|from|header|message)*> The example above declares that the "note" element can contain zero or more occurrences of parsed character data, "to", "from", "header", or "message" elements.

DTD Attributes In a DTD, attributes are declared with an ATTLIST declaration. Declaring Attributes An attribute declaration has the following syntax: <!ATTLIST element-name attribute-name attribute-type default-value> DTD example: <!ATTLIST payment type CDATA "check"> XML example: <payment type="check" /> The attribute-type can be one of the following: Type CDATA (en1|en2|..) ID IDREF IDREFS NMTOKEN NMTOKENS ENTITY ENTITIES NOTATION xml: Description The value is character data The value must be one from an enumerated list The value is a unique id The value is the id of another element The value is a list of other ids The value is a valid XML name The value is a list of valid XML names The value is an entity The value is a list of entities The value is a name of a notation The value is a predefined xml value

The default-value can be one of the following: Value value #REQUIRED Explanation The default value of the attribute The attribute is required

#IMPLIED #FIXED value

The attribute is not required The attribute value is fixed

A Default Attribute Value DTD: <!ELEMENT square EMPTY> <!ATTLIST square width CDATA "0"> Valid XML: <square width="100" /> In the example above, the "square" element is defined to be an empty element with a "width" attribute of type CDATA. If no width is specified, it has a default value of 0.

#REQUIRED Syntax <!ATTLIST element-name attribute-name attribute-type #REQUIRED> Example DTD: <!ATTLIST person number CDATA #REQUIRED> Valid XML: <person number="5677" /> Invalid XML: <person />

Use the #REQUIRED keyword if you don't have an option for a default value, but still want to force the attribute to be present. #IMPLIED Syntax

<!ATTLIST element-name attribute-name attribute-type #IMPLIED> Example DTD: <!ATTLIST contact fax CDATA #IMPLIED> Valid XML: <contact fax="555-667788" /> Valid XML: <contact /> Use the #IMPLIED keyword if you don't want to force the author to include an attribute, and you don't have an option for a default value.

#FIXED Syntax <!ATTLIST element-name attribute-name attribute-type #FIXED "value"> Example DTD: <!ATTLIST sender company CDATA #FIXED "Microsoft"> Valid XML: <sender company="Microsoft" /> Invalid XML: <sender company="W3Schools" /> Use the #FIXED keyword when you want an attribute to have a fixed value without allowing the author to change it. If an author includes another value, the XML parser will return an error.

Enumerated Attribute Values Syntax <!ATTLIST element-name attribute-name (en1|en2|..) default-value> Example DTD: <!ATTLIST payment type (check|cash) "cash"> XML example: <payment type="check" /> or <payment type="cash" /> Use enumerated attribute values when you want the attribute value to be one of a fixed set of legal values. XML Elements vs. Attributes In XML, there are no rules about when to use attributes, and when to use child elements. Use of Elements vs. Attributes Data can be stored in child elements or in attributes. Take a look at these examples: <person sex="female"> <firstname>Anna</firstname> <lastname>Smith</lastname> </person> <person> <sex>female</sex> <firstname>Anna</firstname> <lastname>Smith</lastname> </person> In the first example sex is an attribute. In the last, sex is a child element. Both examples provide the same information.

There are no rules about when to use attributes, and when to use child elements. My experience is that attributes are handy in HTML, but in XML you should try to avoid them. Use child elements if the information feels like data. My Favorite Way I like to store data in child elements. The following three XML documents contain exactly the same information: A date attribute is used in the first example: <note date="12/11/2002"> <to>Tove</to> <from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading> <body>Don't forget me this weekend!</body> </note> A date element is used in the second example: <note> <date>12/11/2002</date> <to>Tove</to> <from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading> <body>Don't forget me this weekend!</body> </note>

An expanded date element is used in the third: (THIS IS MY FAVORITE): <note> <date> <day>12</day> <month>11</month> <year>2002</year> </date> <to>Tove</to>

<from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading> <body>Don't forget me this weekend!</body> </note>

Avoid using attributes? Should you avoid using attributes? Some of the problems with attributes are:

attributes cannot contain multiple values (child elements can) attributes are not easily expandable (for future changes) attributes cannot describe structures (child elements can) attributes are more difficult to manipulate by program code attribute values are not easy to test against a DTD

If you use attributes as containers for data, you end up with documents that are difficult to read and maintain. Try to use elements to describe data. Use attributes only to provide information that is not relevant to the data. Don't end up like this (this is not how XML should be used): <note day="12" month="11" year="2002" to="Tove" from="Jani" heading="Reminder" body="Don't forget me this weekend!"> </note> An Exception to my Attribute Rule Rules always have exceptions. My rule about attributes has one exception: Sometimes I assign ID references to elements. These ID references can be used to access XML elements in much the same way as the NAME or ID attributes in HTML. This example demonstrates this: <messages>

<note id="p501"> <to>Tove</to> <from>Jani</from> <heading>Reminder</heading> <body>Don't forget me this weekend!</body> </note> <note id="p502"> <to>Jani</to> <from>Tove</from> <heading>Re: Reminder</heading> <body>I will not!</body> </note> </messages> The ID in these examples is just a counter, or a unique identifier, to identify the different notes in the XML file, and not a part of the note data. What I am trying to say here is that metadata (data about data) should be stored as attributes, and that data itself should be stored as elements. DTD - Entities Entities are variables used to define shortcuts to standard text or special characters.

Entity references are references to entities Entities can be declared internal or external

An Internal Entity Declaration Syntax <!ENTITY entity-name "entity-value"> Example DTD Example: <!ENTITY writer "Donald Duck.">

<!ENTITY copyright "Copyright W3Schools."> XML example: <author>&writer;&copyright;</author> Note: An entity has three parts: an ampersand (&), an entity name, and a semicolon (;).

An External Entity Declaration Syntax <!ENTITY entity-name SYSTEM "URI/URL"> Example DTD Example: <!ENTITY writer SYSTEM "http://www.w3schools.com/entities.dtd"> <!ENTITY copyright SYSTEM "http://www.w3schools.com/entities.dtd"> XML example: <author>&writer;&copyright;</author> DTD Validation With Internet Explorer 5+ you can validate your XML against a DTD. Validating With the XML Parser If you try to open an XML document, the XML Parser might generate an error. By accessing the parseError object, you can retrieve the error code, the error text, or even the line that caused the error. Note: The load( ) method is used for files, while the loadXML( ) method is used for strings.

Example var xmlDoc = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM"); xmlDoc.async="false"; xmlDoc.validateOnParse="true"; xmlDoc.load("note_dtd_error.xml"); document.write("<br />Error Code: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.errorCode); document.write("<br />Error Reason: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.reason); document.write("<br />Error Line: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.line); Look at the XML file Turn Validation Off Validation can be turned off by setting the XML parser's validateOnParse="false". Example var xmlDoc = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM"); xmlDoc.async="false"; xmlDoc.validateOnParse="false"; xmlDoc.load("note_dtd_error.xml"); document.write("<br />Error Code: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.errorCode); document.write("<br />Error Reason: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.reason); document.write("<br />Error Line: "); document.write(xmlDoc.parseError.line);

DTD - Examples from the internet TV Schedule DTD By David Moisan. Copied from http://www.davidmoisan.org/

<!DOCTYPE TVSCHEDULE [ <!ELEMENT TVSCHEDULE (CHANNEL+)> <!ELEMENT CHANNEL (BANNER,DAY+)> <!ELEMENT BANNER (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT DAY (DATE,(HOLIDAY|PROGRAMSLOT+)+)> <!ELEMENT HOLIDAY (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT DATE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT PROGRAMSLOT (TIME,TITLE,DESCRIPTION?)> <!ELEMENT TIME (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT TITLE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT DESCRIPTION (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST TVSCHEDULE NAME CDATA #REQUIRED> <!ATTLIST CHANNEL CHAN CDATA #REQUIRED> <!ATTLIST PROGRAMSLOT VTR CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST TITLE RATING CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST TITLE LANGUAGE CDATA #IMPLIED> ]> Newspaper Article DTD Copied from http://www.vervet.com/ <!DOCTYPE NEWSPAPER [ <!ELEMENT NEWSPAPER (ARTICLE+)> <!ELEMENT ARTICLE (HEADLINE,BYLINE,LEAD,BODY,NOTES)> <!ELEMENT HEADLINE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT BYLINE (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT LEAD (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT BODY (#PCDATA)> <!ELEMENT NOTES (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE AUTHOR CDATA #REQUIRED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE EDITOR CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE DATE CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ATTLIST ARTICLE EDITION CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ENTITY NEWSPAPER "Vervet Logic Times">

<!ENTITY PUBLISHER "Vervet Logic Press"> <!ENTITY COPYRIGHT "Copyright 1998 Vervet Logic Press"> ]>

Product Catalog DTD Copied from http://www.vervet.com/ <!DOCTYPE CATALOG [ <!ENTITY AUTHOR "John Doe"> <!ENTITY COMPANY "JD Power Tools, Inc."> <!ENTITY EMAIL "jd@jd-tools.com"> <!ELEMENT CATALOG (PRODUCT+)> <!ELEMENT PRODUCT (SPECIFICATIONS+,OPTIONS?,PRICE+,NOTES?)> <!ATTLIST PRODUCT NAME CDATA #IMPLIED CATEGORY (HandTool|Table|Shop-Professional) "HandTool" PARTNUM CDATA #IMPLIED PLANT (Pittsburgh|Milwaukee|Chicago) "Chicago" INVENTORY (InStock|Backordered|Discontinued) "InStock"> <!ELEMENT SPECIFICATIONS (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST SPECIFICATIONS WEIGHT CDATA #IMPLIED POWER CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ELEMENT OPTIONS (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST OPTIONS FINISH (Metal|Polished|Matte) "Matte" ADAPTER (Included|Optional|NotApplicable) "Included"

CASE (HardShell|Soft|NotApplicable) "HardShell"> <!ELEMENT PRICE (#PCDATA)> <!ATTLIST PRICE MSRP CDATA #IMPLIED WHOLESALE CDATA #IMPLIED STREET CDATA #IMPLIED SHIPPING CDATA #IMPLIED> <!ELEMENT NOTES (#PCDATA)> ]>

You Have Learned DTD, Now What? DTD Summary This tutorial has taught you how to describe the structure of an XML document. You have learned how to use a DTD to define the legal elements of an XML document, and how a DTD can be declared inside your XML document, or as an external reference. You have learned how to declare the legal elements, attributes, entities, and CDATA sections for XML documents. You have also seen how to validate an XML document against a DTD. Now You Know DTD, What's Next? The next step is to learn about XML Schema. XML Schema is used to define the legal elements of an XML document, just like a DTD. We think that very soon XML Schemas will be used in most Web applications as a replacement for DTDs. XML Schema is an XML-based alternative to DTD.

Unlike DTD, XML Schemas has support for data types and namespaces. If you want to learn more about XML Schema, please visit our XML Schema tutorial.