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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012
PHOTO/DON MCGLYNN

Frog and Toad hit the stage. Page 19.

3 NEWS
Page 4 – Happenings to produce County Lines

NEWS

Page 5 – Officers recognized for rescue

13 ARTS
Page 15 – Vintage Theater’s exhibit celebrates regional music scene Page 18 – Lacuna Coil comes to Toyota Pavilion Page 20 – Nay Aug Park hosts World Laughter Day celebration

30 SPORTS
Page 29 – District 2 sets spring playoffs Page 32 – Holy Cross takes division title

OUR TEAM
GO Lackawanna Editor Don McGlyyn - 558-0113 dmcglynn@golackawanna.com Staff Writer/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Advertising Representative Karen Fiscus – 970-7291 kfiscus@timesleader.com Obituaries 558-0113 News Tips 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503 1950s and ’60s in Old Forge. Anyone interested with information or photos of mine openings, buildings, miners, breakers or stories of life and workings in the mines can contact Orechovsky evenings at 702.4217 or info@oldforgecoalmine.com. If enough information is collected, there will be a public forum in May on “The Last Days of Coal Mining in Old Forge.” The Fourth Annual Memorial Pet Walk for Tracey’s Hope Hospice Care Program and Rescue for Domestic Animals, Inc. will take place on Sat., May 5 at McDade Park, Scranton. Registration begins at noon. Attendees and their pets are invited to walk in honor or memory of a devoted pet. There will also be a balloon release to memorialize all deceased pets. All walkers must collect a minimum of $15 in donations to participate in the walk. All walkers who collect $25 or more in donations will receive a Memorial Pet Walk shirt. In addition to the walk, there will be a Chinese auction basket raffle . There will also be psychic readings, food and beverages by Thomas’ Barbeque, a flea market, a dessert table, vendors and pets for adoption. For vendor information or a sponsor form, call 457.1625 Fifth Annual St. Mary’s Classic golf tournament, presented by Queen of Apostles Parish, will be held at 1 p.m. on Sun., May 6 at Pine Hills Golf Course, Taylor. This year’s tourney will be played in memory of Tom Bennie Sr. The cost, which is $80. For more information, contact the parish office at 457.3412, or email jimmcmahon1@verizon.net . Car show, The Scranton School for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children will host its annual car show on Sun., May 6 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will feature vendors offering crafts, food, prizes and games throughout the day. For more information, call 497.9238. The Fourth Annual Mayor’s Ping Pong Tournament will be held on Sat., May 12 in the gym at Weston Field starting at 9:30 a.m. This free event is open to the public with playing divisions starting at 12 years old and extending to an open division for the more serious competitor. Trophies will be given for the top two finalists in each age division. Those interested are asked to register by Thurs., May 10. For more information, call 348.4186 or email sopshinsky@scrantonpa.gov with your name, age, address and age. Catholic Choral Society spring concert will be held on Fri., May 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Immaculate Conception Church, 801 Taylor Ave., Scranton and on Sun., May 20 at 7 p.m. at St. Ignatius Church, 339 North Maple St., Kingston For more information, call 587.2753 or visit www.catholicchoralsociety.org. The Big Blue Devil Golf Classic will take place May 20 at the Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club. Cost for the Captain and Crew event is $125 per golfer or $500 per foursome and includes cart and green fees, tournament dinner, cash prizes to flight winners and runners-up, scats, prizes and tournament golf shirt. To register, e-mail BigBlueDevilClassic@gmail.com or call 6509356. Scholarship sponsorships are available for $250, hole sponsorships at $100 and $50 patron sponsorships are also available. Donations to the Richard P. Notari Sr. Scholarship Fund can be mailed to 13 Lincoln St., Old Forge, PA 18518. Checks can be made payable to the Richard P. Notari Sr. Scholarship Fund. Jay Steveskey will perform at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 550 Madison Ave. Scranton, on Sunday, May 20 at 3 p.m. Cost: Free with a donation to the church’s Safety New Food Pantry. Info: 346.6400. NYC bus trip to annual St. George Ukrainian Street Festival, with North Anthracite Council of League of Ukrainian Catholics, Sat., May 19. Bus leaves from St. Vladimir Church, 430 N. 7th Ave., Scranton, 8 a.m., or St. Vladimir Church, 70 Zerby Ave., Edwardsville, 8:30 a.m. Bus leaves NYC at 9 p.m. Cost: $35. Info: (570) 5632275. Simple Gifts, an international folk music group, will perform at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 550 Madison Ave. Scranton, on Sunday, Oct. 7 at 3 p.m. Cost: Free with a donation to the church’s Safety New Food Pantry. Info: 346.6400.

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR
TO have your event published in the Community Calendar, contact GO Lackawanna Editor Don McGlynn at dmcglynn@golackawanna.com or 570-558-0113. Tour de Scranton, bike ride benefiting the Erin Jessica Moreken Drug and Alcohol Treatment Fund, Sun., April 29, registration at 9 a.m., ride starts at 10 a.m. at Scranton High School. Cost: $35 , $50 for parents and children under 12.

SPORTS

Business card exchange, presented by Main Street Chamber, Mon., April 30, 5-8 p.m., Barrett’s Pub, 474 Main St., Archbald. Cost: Free. Food and cash bar available. Net proceeds to benefit Women’s Resource Center. Info: 1-888-2331522. Overeaters Anonymous meetings, First Presbyterian Church, 201 Stone Ave., Clarks Summit, weekly, Mon. and Wed., 7 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs., 9:30 a.m. and Sun., 4 p.m. Info: (570) 587-4313. Coal Mining info sought, Carl Orechovsky, research editor of Anthracite Archives, Old Forge, is seeking information about the coal mining industry during the

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-120
829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Newsroom Circulation

Published weekly by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Sunday 75¢ per week Mailed Subscriptions Sunday $1.00 per week in PA $3.05 per week outside PA

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

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NEWS
GO LACKAWANNA PHOTO/JASON RIEDMILLER

Stadium Authority votes 4-1 for sale
By TOM ROBINSON Go Lackawanna Sports Correspondent

YANKEES SALE APPROVED
Report: Stadium a large money producer
By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Attorney Steven Labovitz, county chief baseball negotiator; Craig Schmitt, stadium architect; Greg Butz, construction manager; Michael Vind, county financial advisor and Thomas Durkin, county chief financial officer, from left, were in attendance at the Scranton Cultural Center on Wednesday.

SCRANTON – Lackawanna County released ownership of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees baseball franchise Thursday, April 26 as a means to bring professional baseball back to PNC Field in Moosic. The Lackawanna County Multi-Purpose Stadium Authority approved the sale of the Triple-A baseball team to SWB Yan-

kees LLC in a deal that was often described as the best the county could make out of a difficult situation. Faced with a deteriorating stadium, and a less-than-favorable Memorandum of Understanding to sell the franchise, county officials and their lawyers worked over the past several months to negotiate key changes to the final agreement of the sale. That new agreement on the $14.6-million sale was ap-

proved by a 4-1 stadium authority vote Thursday. The sale allows for a $43-million reconstruction of PNC Field, which began Friday. The reconstruction will return the team to its Moosic home in 2013. Northeastern Pennsylvania is without International League baseball for the first time in 24 years, while the team plays this season on the
See STADIUM, Page 12

SCRANTON – Lackawanna County officials released a new economic impact study that projects Triple-A baseball and a reconstructed stadium will infuse $9.4 million annually into the regional economy and have an estimated annual economic impact of $47 million. Triple-A baseball was estimated at a $6.6-million infusion and a $32.8-million im-

pact annually prior to the stadium reconstruction. The Lackawanna County Multi-Purpose Stadium Authority approved the sale of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees franchise to SWB Yankees LLC on Thursday, April 26. Funds from the $14.6-million sale are needed for the funding of the $43-million reconstruction project. DRL Consulting & DevelopSee PRODUCER, Page 16

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MAN ON THE STREET
Go Lackawanna asked five members of the Holy Cross High School baseball team what they thought of the recent sale of the SWB Yankees and the planned reconstruction of PNC Field.

SPORTS

“I think it’s good for the area. When the new stadium is built and everything comes back, it will probably bring more people in for games.”
Zach Watters, 18, of Olyphant

“I think it’s going to be good for the community. I think more people are going to want to come down to the stadium, because of the reconstruction.”
Jordan Nicholoff, 18, of Old Forge

“I think it’s a good idea . I think it will attract more fans.”
Vince Rebar, 18, of Throop

“I think it’s good for the area. I think it will get a lot more people in attendance.”
Jimmy Malone, 17, of Dunmore

“I think it’s going to be real good for the area. Growing up, we had season tickets to the Red Barons and that’s where I learned to play baseball. Hopefully more kids will get to go out and see the Yankees when they’re back.”
Ryan McGoff, 18, of Scranton

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GOLackawanna LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

Sunday, April 29, 2012

NEWS

mum of 1,500 copies to be delivered to the county on or about SCRANTON – Lackawanna November1. In other business, commisCounty’s annual County Lines publication will be produced sioners unanimously accepted this year by Happenings Com- the $39,616.91 quote from Verimunications Group, Inc., the zon Select Services, Inc., for the Clarks Summit-based company Emergency Services departwhich also publishes Happen- ment for a one-year mainteings Magazine, the local month- nance contract for equipment. lylifestyleandleisureperiodical. They also approved the Lackawanna County Com- $55,946.44 quote from Hondru missioners unanimously ap- Fleet for the purchase of two proved an agreement with Hap- FordFusionSedansforthecounpenings during their April 25 ty Children and Youth Services meeting to produce the re- department. Additionally, source, which incommissioners cludes “history, unanimously ratigeography, govPublished fied the Pennsylernment, demoannually since vania Commisgraphics, statis1990, County siononCrimeand tics, quality of life, Delinquency elected and apLines was Grant application pointed officials, previously prosubmitted by the directories, maps, county Treattrivia, and more,” duced by the ment Court for according to the county’s Rethe2012/2013Recounty website. strictive IntermePublished angional Planning diate Punishment nually since 1990, Commission Grant for County Lines was $317,000 and an previously proand distributed application for duced by the to schools, the 2012/2013 Incounty’s Regional termediate PuniPlanning Comgovernment, shment Grant for mission and disand non-profit $128,000. tributed to agencies. Treatment schools, governCourt Coordinament, and nontor Barbara Durprofit agencies. Happenings Communications kin said the $317,000 in state Group President Paula Macka- funding, with no county match rey told the commissioners that required, will fund treatment they will raise the quality of the services and the salaries of two publication and save the county case managers and one probamoney by selling advertising to tion officer while the $128,000 fully cover the costs of the “new- will fund the salaries of a partly designed, full-color” product. time case manager and a proba“I’m sure we can deliver a tion officer. Commissioners also unanigreat product for the county,” mously entered into a five-year Mackarey said. “We’re real excited about Grant-In-AidAgreementtocomthis,” Commissioner Corey mence on July 1 and expire on O’Brien responded. “It’s a way June 30, 2017 with the Pennsylthat we can save some money vania Board of Probation and Paand also get an incredible prod- role for the Adult Probation/Pauct instead of having our in- role office. Director of Adult Prohouse folks and outside people bation Joseph Mecca said the county is scheduled to receive paid to put this together .” Mackarey added that Hap- about$650,000inthe2011/2012 peningshasalsoproducedpubli- fiscal year from the grant, twocations for the Greater Scranton thirds of which has already been Chamber of Commerce. The received, though this amount agreement guarantees a mini- fluctuates from year to year.

RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Happenings approved to produce County Lines

COUNTY RECOGNIZES MEDAL RECIPIENT

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ackawanna County Commissioner Patrick O’Malley presented a proclamation to Col. Thomas S. Bracey in recognition of his service to the United States while enlisted in the Air Force. At a recent Taylor Borough Council meeting, Col. Bracey, a Taylor resident, and veteran of World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, was honored with five medals for his service.

SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL

Council finds answers on borrowing
RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON–Followingapublic caucus with city and financial officialsonApril26,ScrantonCity Council is expected to authorize unfunded debt legislation that would approve up to $26.6 million in borrowing and refinancing that they had previous questioned. Bond Counsel Brian Koscelansky, Business Administrator Ryan McGowan, and financial adviser Michael Vind met with council before their regular meeting to assuage fears that Mayor Chris Doherty would be given “carte blanche” authority to borrow millionsofdollarswithoutcouncilapproval. In order to pay back 2011 debt, the city was approved to borrow $9.85 million by Senior Judge Jerome Cheslock of the Lackawanna County Court of Common Pleas on Jan. 27, but when the legislation was received by council earlier this month, Council Solicitor Boyd Hughes found the amount to be $26.6 million. In an April 17 letter to council,

Hughes listed 28 “issues” he had with the ordinance, including unclear language and unspecified costs, and recommended that the borrowing be reduced from $26.6 million to $14.52 million plus the underwriting costs and expenses of the project. Council would not place the legislation on its agenda for a vote until an explanation was given. Koscelansky told council on Thursday that the legislation would only approve the borrowing of $9.85 million and the refinancing of $8.6 million in existing debt for a total of $18.45 million; it is only “up to” $26.6 million that would be approved depending on interest rates, the pricing on the bonds, and other factors. “I am assuring council that the onlythingthisordinance(is)…only for the purposes of unfunded debt for funding the 2003 (Series) A, B, C, and D (bonds) and paying the costs. That’s the only thing. I wouldn’t give you an opinion at the end of the day that this was issued…under the ordinance for anything other than those purpos-

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es,” Koscelansky said. Hughes said after the meeting that he was satisfied with the explanation and would recommend councilintroducingtheordinance during their May 3 meeting, though several citizens expressed concerns about borrowing more money considering the city’s current financial state. “This is something that is part of the 2012 budget, the unfunded debt and refinancing…We can’t walk away from this. We decided upon this back in December, that is what we were going to do,” Councilman Bob McGoff said. Parking tax approved During council’s regular meeting, council heard from Jerry Ferrario, a Scranton property owner seeking clarification on the parking tax ordinance introduced during their April 12 meeting. Ferrario asked if a landlord who provides a parking space to his tenant would be subject to the tax if the space were included in the rent,
See COUNCIL, Page 9

Sunday, April 29, 2012

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STUDENTS PLACE AT CONFERENCE

Officers recognized for rescue
Scranton City Police Chief Daniel Duffy announced that four police officers were recognized recently by the agency for their involvement with assisting residents to safety during a fire on the 800 block of Beech St. on April 9. According to a press release, Cpl. Thomas McDonald and Patrolmen Chris Kaushas, Joseph Kearney and Daniel Schaufler of the Scranton Police Department found a heavy smoke condition and a working fire with residents on the rooftop of a burning home on Beech St. The officers drove a police car into the front yard as close to the roof as possible and stood on the roof of the vehicle, where they assisted the residents to safety by catching them as they jumped. The officers noticed that the fire had spread and went to another residence removing the occupant from it. At the same time an elderly

NEWS

Kaushas

Kearney

McDonald

Schaufler

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ackawanna College Phi Beta Lambda students, from left, Aashita Singh, Scranton; Ervin Harris-Allen, Scranton; Wendy Davies, Scranton; Darrian Steward, Stewartsville, NJ; Karen Hicks, Clarks Summit and Jessica Grunza, Scranton, competed in the 41st Annual PBL State Leadership Conference held March 30 to April 1, in Gettysburg. Harris-Allen won first place in Computer Game and Simulation Programming; Dunton won third place in Computer Concepts; Steward won third place in Impromptu Speaking; Davies won third place for Small Business Management Plan.

male suffered from cardiac arrest at one of the homes and the officers assisted the medical personnel. One of the police officers was treated at an area hospital for smoke inhalation and was later released. Duffy presented the four with official letters of recognition and Scranton Police lapel pins that are given out for persons who go above and beyond the call of duty.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

2012
ELECTION

NEWS

Kathleen Kane, a prosecutor for nearly 13 years, defeats U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy.
edge-wise,” she said during Political newcomer Kath- a recent campaign swing in leen Kane is the Democratic the Scranton area. Her campaign has been finominee for Pennsylvania nanced chiefly by her husattorney general. The former Lackawanna band and a handful of other County prosecutor defeated executives at Kane Is Able, a former U.S. Rep. Patrick Scranton-based, non-union Murphy, 53 percent to 47 trucking and warehouse percent with nearly 97 per- company that his family founded and owns. cent of the vote Of the more than in Tuesday’s primary countKane worked $2.5 million the campaign raised, ed. for the Chris Kane alone All results are Lackawanna contributed or unofficial. loaned $2.25 milKane will opCounty lion, according to pose Republidistrict state campaign-fican David J. nance reports. Freed, who ran attorney’s Murphy reportunopposed. office for ed contributions Kane, who is of $2.2 million and making her first nearly 13 was outraising bid for elective years, Kane by more than office, would be 3-1 in the days the first woman prosecuting leading up to the elected as the more than primary. state’s chief leMurphy is an exgal and law-en3,000 cases congressman and forcement offiinvolving former Army lawcer if she wins yer who cut his lethe November crimes ranging gal teeth in miligeneral elecfrom public tary settings that tion. corruption to included the Iraq Kane worked war. for the Lackamurder. He was the first wanna County Iraq war veteran district attorney’s office for nearly 13 elected to the U.S. House of years, prosecuting more Representatives, where he than 3,000 cases involving represented Pennsylvania’s crimes ranging from public 8th district from 2007 until 2011. corruption to murder. He also attended King’s She specialized in cases involving abuse of children College in Wilkes-Barre. and senior citizens, and Murphy is the brother of forheaded the office’s insur- mer Wilkes-Barre city adance-fraud unit. She left in ministrator J.J. Murphy. In Luzerne County, Kane 2007 to work on Hillary Clinton’s campaign for pres- won easily over Murphy, taking 72 percent of voters ident. Running for attorney gen- with 16,865 votes to Mureral “is a natural progres- phy’s 6,445. Freed received sion — career-wise and ex- 11,743 in the Republican perience-wise and knowl- Primary.
The Associated Press

Ex-county prosecutor wins Democratic nod

Matt Cartwright defeats U.S. Rep. Tim Holden

PHOTO/ PETE G. WILCOX

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Congressman Tim Holden is the Democratic incumbent in the 17th Congressional District lost to Democratic challenger Matt Cartwright of Moosic, Lackawanna County.

By Andrew Sedar and Steve Mocarsky Times Leader

Holden can’t hang onto seat
friend in him. He also promised not to be a quiet freshman in Congress. “I might just be one of 435 (House members), but I promise you I’ll be a loud one,” Cartwright said. GOP opponent in fall His path to Washington still goes through Laureen Cummings, of Old Forge, who captured the Republican nomination Tuesday. But the district is heavily stocked with registered Democrats who have a 5-3 margin over Republicans, giving Cartwright a clear advantage Christopher Borick, a political science professor from Muhlenberg College near Allentown, said he wouldn’t call Cartwright’s victory “a major upset,” but it wasn’t a win he saw coming. Borick, a Throop resident, credited several factors for Cartwright’s win, among them the voter’s continued “palpable discontent right now with almost anything establishment.” “It says that voters in North-

For the second consecutive congressional election, voters of Northeastern Pennsylvania have sent an entrenched U.S. House member packing. Matt Cartwright, a 50-yearold attorney from Moosic, defeated 20-year incumbent U.S. Rep. Tim Holden, D-St. Clair, on Tuesday, April 24 according to unofficial Democratic primary results for the 17th Congressional District. Cartwright received 33 to Holden’s 24,874, a 57 percent to 43 percent victory. Speaking to a throng of supporters packed into the Medallion Ball Room inside the Hilton Scranton Hotel on Tuesday night, Cartwright thanked voters and his family for getting him one step closer to Washington. Repeating a campaign slogan he used quite often he promised the district that “I’ll work for you.” He said Wall Street, oil companies and others who have corrupted the system will not find a

eastern Pennsylvania, like a lot of the voters right now, aren’t going to give passes simply because (the incumbent’s) been there.” Two years ago, voters elected Lou Barletta over 13-term incumbent Paul E. Kanjorski and Tom Marino over two-term incumbent Chris Carney. But both of those victories were in the general elections. Having a long-term incumbent lose to a political newcomer from within his own party is not a common occurrence by any stretch. But his game plan was nearly flawless and had some help from an unlikely source, Republicans in the state Legislature who redrew the districts to make it more Democratic, which ate into Holden’s Blue Dog, moderate image he had built up over two decades. Borick said Cartwright did a good job getting his message out to voters and the redrawn 17th Congressional District, which included only 20 percent of Holden’s old district, also hurt Holden.

SPORTS

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NEWS

Toyota Pavilion hosts Dirty Girl Mud Run
By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

COURTESY PHOTO

The Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain will host the Dirty Girl Mud Run.

t’s time to get dirty for charity. The Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain will host the Dirty Girl Mud Run, a 5K mud run/obstacle course, on Saturday, May 5. A portion of the proceeds raised from the event will be donated to the National Breast Cancer Foundation for breast cancer research, awareness and education. “We saw an opportunity to raise money for breast cancer research on a large platform,” said race director Jimmy Gohsman. “Last year, we raised $50,000, IF YOU GO and this year we’re on track to reach our goal of What: Dirty Girl $250,000.” Mud Run Where: Toyota Gohsman founded the Pavilion, 100 MonDirty Girl Mud Run setage Mountain Rd., ries along with Robin Scranton Gohsman and Chris When: Saturday, McIntosh. The three recMay 5, starting at ognized the rising pop8 a.m. ularity of mud runs, but Cost: $75 Info: www.godrity- were interested in doing girl.com one a little differently than people were used to. “All the others were co-ed,” said Gohsman. “Their goal is to test the limits of physical strength and fitness, (see) how hardcore and intimidating they can be.” Aside from being a female-only event, Gohsman said what separates Dirty Girl apart from most mud runs is it’s a noncompetitive run that isn’t timed. Each obstacle is designed for women of all fitness levels, with different options at each obstacle varying in degrees of difficulty. Participants can also choose not to do a certain obstacle they feel uncomfortable with. “We stress fun,” said Gohsman. “The vibe is spectacular. Everyone is encouraging of each other. You’ll see different members of different teams helping each other out. It’s not competitive. Nobody’s competing with one another.” The run features 11 to 15 obstacles, depending on the location. There are some obstacles
See MUD, Page 13

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

NEWS

Prison Board discusses juvenile detention costs
RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

BARLETTA RECEIVES LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

SCRANTON – In an ongoing effort to keep the costs of Lackawanna County government down, the Prison Board discussed the charges associated with housing juvenile offenders in outside facilities and the option of constructing a new juvenile detention facility to meet its needs during the Board of Managers meeting held on Wednesday, April 25. According to its monthly report, the Lackawanna County Juvenile Detention Center is currently detaining eight juveniles with one female being held in Tioga County. The maximum security facility is licensed to hold 10 detainees, but is only equipped to hold males and requires other facilities’ assistance when it exceeds capacity. During the month of March, one female was housed in Tioga County for four days at a rate of $223 per day for a total of $892. One female was also housed in Lancaster County for two days at a rate of $280.32 per day for a total of $560.64. By comparison, in March 2011, three females were housed for 29 days in Lancaster County for a total of $7,975. In March, one male was detained in Tioga County for five days at a rate of $223 per day for a total of $1,115, though one male was detained for Wyoming County for five days at a

rate of $225 per day for a total of $1,125. Lackawanna County is not alone in these consistent cost and capacity issues. Director of Juvenile Detention Cliff Hoffman noted that Luzerne County is sending both males and females to Lehigh County. The board brought up the option of building a new facility or retrofitting an existing county building, but Hoffman said that when the county looked into it four years ago, even building a small, 24-bed facility was estimated to cost at least $12 million to meet current standards and no grants were available for such projects. “When we tried to bring all the counties together to build a facility, because none of the counties can guarantee beds, we can’t guarantee any revenue. Because we can’t guarantee any revenue, then the cost is on us to construct it,” Commissioner Corey O’Brien explained. “We don’t have the funds available to construct that type of facility and have it large enough to accommodate anybody, including ourselves, so we needed the other counties’ participation in that in order to do that because the state won’t allow anyone to enter into an agreement. We couldn’t find a way that the other counties could actively participate in the funding of financing.”

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he National Italian-American Political Action Committee (NIA-PAC) recently presented U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-11, with its Lifetime Achievement Award. Joseph Tarantino, Jr., vice-chairman, right, and Joseph P. Stampone, Esq., president, left, presented Barletta, center, with the award.

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Save at the water park
t’s that time of year again that families start to map out their summer vacations. With the price of gasoline on the rise and the current economic troubles, many people are opting out of weekly family vacations and spending money on day trips to amusement parks. It’s always a good idea to plan ahead for any trip, especially when there are tickets involved.

DEAL DETECTIVE

LEADERSHIP LACKAWANNA CLASS VISITS STATE CAPITOL NEWS

JENNA URBAN
count when you purchase a season pass in advance, and that is how you will get the most for your money. Most passes usually equal the cost of about three visits, so if it’s somewhere that you will be visiting more than three times you may want to look at purchasing one . Some season passes also offer additional discounts on parking and food, so that is something else to look for when deciding on the best possible deal. Another way to save is by signing up for emails, discounts and coupons on Facebook or directly on the park’s website. These savings could be as small as a coupon for a free hot dog or as much as free parking, which can get very costly. Dorney Park offers a discount when you purchase tickets online rather than at the gate. Adult tickets cost $48.99 at the gate, but only $39.99 when you buy them online. Kids’ tickets are also discounted online by $5, dropping from $29.99 to

I have mentioned in the past that it’s essential to plan a budget months in advance, and this holds true for vacations. We actually put money aside each month in a vacation club in order to save for our overnight and day trips, but even if you haven’t been saving all year, there are some tips to help you get the most from your money at amusement parks. Most parks offer a dis-

$24.99. Through May 28, you can purchase a season pass for three payments of $34.99. Hershey Park offers discounts when you purchase tickets at Giant Food Stores. Starting Tuesday, May 1 Giant Food Stores will be selling tickets for $15 off. Vouchers for free parking are available through June 30, when you purchase two regular admission tickets. Camel Beach also offers a discount when you purchase tickets online for $30.99 dropping from $36.99 at the gate. A season pass is $99 or $89 when you purchase four or more. Sno Cove tickets are $19.99 for adults and $16.99 for kids. An individual season pass is $99. As you can see, there are some great deals for water parks that provide fun for the entire family without having to travel very far. Stay posted for any specials by signing up for newsletters and following the water parks via facebook and/or twitter. If you know of any deals for water parks, share them with us at facebook.com/ golackawanna.

Chris O’Connor, Becky Snyder and Kay Daniel, from left, met State Rep. Ken Smith, D-112, right, during a recent visit to Pennsylvania’s State Capitol. The three are members of Leadership Lackawanna’s core class of 2012 who gathered on Wednesday, April 18, for a regional event with Leadership Pocono, State Rep. Smith, and State Rep. Mario Scavello, D-176, to tour the State Capitol. Class participants had lunch with State Rep. Smith, and took photos in the Capitol Rotunda.

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SAKS FIFTH AVE - BANANA REPUBLIC – ACUVUE OASYS – NIGHT & DAY

COUNCIL
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BLIC – HEMINGWAY – CARRERA – LACOSTE – JAI KUDO – NINE WEST – TURATI – BANANA REPUBLIC – ACUVUE OASYS – NIGHT & DAY – AIROPTIX AQUA
YO DOG – COLEMAN – NASCAR – LINDA EVANS – J.LO – ACUVUE OASYS

www.crystalvisioncenter.com

DEFINITION AC – MANDALAY – LIBERTY SPORT – NINE WEST – J.LO – CHESTERFIELD – SAKS FIFTH AVE - CARRERA – LACOSTE - JAI KUDO

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and while Hughes responded that the purpose of the legislation was to mainly tax parking lots and garages only, his question would better be answered by the Law Department or Licensing, Inspections, and Permits. The ordinance imposes a 15 percent tax upon each parking transaction by operators of parking lots and garages located within the city and establishes annual license fees of $1 per space. Lots and garages owned by the Scranton Parking Authority are exempt. Councilman Pat Rogan suggested tabling the legislation until Ferrario’s question could be answered, but his motion to table died without a second. The ordinance was passed 4-1. .

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Fuel-It Victory Tour comes to Quaker Steak & Lube
Quaker Steak & Lube will host a “Bike Nite” benefiting Children’s Miracle Network at Geisinger on Wednesday, May 2 from 5 to 9 p.m. The event will feature a 2013 Fuel-It Victory Tour. Participants can take a test ride on a 2013 Victory from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Entertainment, games, prizes and giveaways will be included. Twenty percent of participants’ checks will benefit Children’s Miracle Network at Geisinger. Participants must present a fundraising coupon upon visit. The funds raised by this event will help to provide pediatric equipment, programs and services at Janet Weis Children’s Hospital and throughout Geisinger Health System. For coupons or additional information, call 271.6188 or email KJSNYDER3@geisinger.edu.

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12

GO LACKAWANNA

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Tomorrow’s Leaders Today
he Leadership Lackawanna teen program, Tomorrow’s Leaders Today, met on Thursday, April 19 at The Inn at Nichols Village, Clarks Summit, for their graduation recognition luncheon. Leadership Lackawanna’s seven-month Tomorrow’s Leaders Today program develops the leadership, interpersonal and managerial skills of high school juniors and provides real-world experiences in the areas of philanthropy, non-profit organizations and community service.

NEWS

T

In addition to the skills learned and topics explored, the opportunities and challenges of northeastern Pennsylvania were discussed as participants networked with community leaders and other high school students. Sessions were held one full weekday each month. Leadership Lackawanna’s Tomorrow’s Leaders Today Program accepts applications from juniors who attend high school in Lackawanna County or in the Lackawanna Trail and Western Wayne school districts.

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTOS/JASON RIEDMILLER

Lackawanna County Commissioners Patrick M. O’Maley, Corey D. O’Brien and Jim Wansacz, from left, were in attendance at Wednesday’s public hearing.

STADIUM
Continued from page 3

MICHAEL STRAUB/COURTESY PHOTO

Graduates from this year’s Leadership Lackawanna teen program, Tomorrow’s Leaders Today, include, front row, from left, Gina Maria Morgese, Holy Cross; Goldie Nicola Gunawan, Scranton Prep; Chelsea Schultz, West Scranton; Maria Francesca Ingaglio, Western Wayne; Brianna Alunni, North Pocono; second row, Nora Hurchick, West Scranton; Morgan Elaine Curran, Lackawanna Trail; Alexandra Krehel, Valley View; Lindsey Rae Evans, Mid Valley; Jessica Purawic, West Scranton; Ashley Opalka, Carbondale Area; Rosanna Misura, Carbondale Area; Kaelyn C. Jacques, Western Wayne; third row; Mary Ann Seamon, Holy Cross; Dana Elizabeth Jenkins, Holy Cross; Sarah Rotell, Valley View; Victoria Elizabeth Ellsworth, Lackawanna Trail; Gavin David Lindemuth, Dunmore; Emily Morgan, North Pocono; Laura Fetch, Riverside; Peter Craige Carter, Carbondale Area; Casey Marcks, Scranton; Emma Katharine Musto, Abington Heights; fourth row, Nicholas John Humphreys, Lakeland; John G. Evans II, Summit Christian Academy; Yacouba Sidibe, Riverside; James M. Segilia, Riverside; Griffin Charles Gerchman, Dunmore; William Cappelloni Demyan, Lakeland; Anthony Joseph Piccolini, Old Forge; Shomik Ghosh, Abington Heights; Michael Gilbride, West Scranton and Alexander John Eiden, Scranton. Absent from photo: Myranda Polcha, Mid Valley.

road to allow for the reconstruction. “You are going to be able to keep the team here in a stateof-the-art ballpark for 30 years – and possibly 50 years – in a deal that is better than what was originally negotiated,” said attorney Steven Labovitz, who led negotiations for the county. “We weren’t sure this was going to get done on time,” Lackawanna County commissioner Jim Wansacz said. Labovitz said there were times the negotiations were in serious danger of breaking down. SWB Yankees LLC, a joint venture of the New York Yankees and Mandalay Baseball Properties, made some key concessions, taking on part of the costs of maintenance and capital improvements to the stadium. “The biggest one was the issue the new commissioners raised,” Labovitz said. “They were very worried about where future capital improvements would come from. That was a very intense negotiation.” Labovitz told a crowd of about 100 at a public hearing Wednesday, April 25 at the Scranton Cultural Center that the Yankees have shown a com-

Attorney Steven Labovitz led negotiations for the county.

mitment to be here for the long-term. “They put their team on the road at the cost of millions of dollars,” Labovitz said. “They really want to be here. They would not have put in this much time and this much effort if they did not want to be here.” Not everyone was convinced. In the public comment section of the hearing, the reactions of 16 speakers were split nearly equally between positive and negative responses. Attorney John McGee, who led the push that resulted in Triple-A baseball arriving in northeastern Pennsylvania in 1989, spoke at that session and was the only member of the public to speak at the Thursday morning stadium authority meeting prior to the official vote. McGee, a former member of and solicitor for the authority, urged the stadium authority not to enter into the agreement without more binding contract language to specifi-

cally prevent the New York Yankees from taking the team out of the area. “I’m opposed to the sale because of the risk that the team can relocate,” McGee said. “I strongly urge you not to act until the New York Yankees enter into a non-relocation agreement that they entered into with their own city.” Christopher Munley was the only authority member to vote against the sale. “Right now, we have to put all our eggs into an LLC that could go under at any time,” Munley said. “Without the (New York) Yankees willing to sign, I am unwilling to vote on it.” Munley, however, conceded that “this agreement is light years ahead of where we were years ago.” The New York Yankees received an option to purchase the franchise in 2007 when former county commissioner Robert Cordaro negotiated the deal that produced an affiliation with the team in place of the Philadelphia Phillies and the former Scranton/WilkesBarre Red Barons. A Memorandum of Understanding with SWB Yankees LLC in November of 2010 created the groundwork for the deal that the new county commissioners insisted on improving before accepting. Authority members James Timlin, Bill Jenkins, Anthony
See STADIUM , Page 16

SPORTS

ARTS

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

13

NEWS
PHOTOS SUBMITTED

The Dirty Girl Mud Run will be held on Saturday, May 5.

MUD
Continued from page 7
DON MCGLYNN/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ARTS

Bill Sheakoski, co-owner of Pizza by Pappas, checks on a pizza during the third Annual Pizza for Autism Awareness Fundraiser held Tuesday and Wednesday, April 24 and 25.

Pizza by Pappas hosts Autism awareness fundraiser
By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

L

ast week, doing something charitable was as easy as ordering a pizza, thanks to Pizza by Pappas. The downtown Scranton restaurant held its third annual Pizza for Autism Awareness Fundraiser on Tuesday and Wednesday, April 24 and 25. During the fundraiser 50 percent of the sales price of every pizza sold was donated to

the Northeast Regional Autism Center at Friendship House. “I would call it the easiest fundraiser in the world. All you have to do is come in and get lunch,” said Bill Sheakoski. Sheakoski, who owns Pizza by Pappas with his brother, Tom, said prior to this fundraiser the two tried more elaborate fundraisers, asking customers to do things like print out coupons, but realized their idea needed some tweak-

ing after seeing the results. “It seemed like the more hoops there were to jump through the less response we were getting. I started researching how other places were doing it, and that’s what made me come up with this idea. And I think it’s worked out great.” Pizza by Pappas advertises the fundraiser in the weeks leading up to the event, to let
See PIZZA, Page 14

“I would call it the easiest fundraiser in the world. All you have to do is come in and get lunch.”
— Bill Sheakoski

that are staples at all the runs, like the “H2 Oh My God,” a water pit, and the “PMS” (Pretty Muddy Stuff), the mud pit. Waves of teams will be sent out to run the course every 15 minutes starting at 8 a.m. on May 5. After the race, runners will have a chance to clean up, change, and enjoy a beverage and some entertainment with their teammates and friends. “It’s a festival atmosphere. People can hang out with their friends and family, a lot of people bring their family, it’s a family-friendly event,” said Gohsman. The first Dirty Girl was held last year in Wisconsin, originally with 3,000 available spots. After selling those 3,000 spots quicker than expected, an additional 3,000 spots were created that the group had no problem filling. Since then, the group has held a number of runs across the country, with each one bringing in a large turnout, and they’re expecting the same when they come to

Participants can sign up as a team or individually.

Scranton. “This is the first time we’re coming to Scranton,” said Gohsman. “We’re pretty excited about the turnout, we’re just shy of 8,000 (now) .” Dirty Girl will hold registration the day of the event if spots are still open, but Gohsman said he expects for all the available spots to be filled by May 5 and recommends that those interested in participating register in advance. Women can register as a team, or individually. Cost is $75. There are 250 spots reserved for cancer survivors free of charge. For more information, or to register, visit www.godirtygirl.com.

SPORTS

14

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

PIZZA
Continued from page 13

RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL GOES TO WASHINGTON

their customers know when it’s happening. Sheakoski said they have had luck getting the word out by passing out flyers, running print ads and going through social media outlets, but still stretch the fundraiser out to two days in an effort to give anyone who wishes a chance to participate. “A lot of times I would see fundraisers, and I’d see it on the news at 11 o’clock, and I’d think, ‘Oh that sounded so neat. I would have gone to that, but I didn’t know about it.’ So I said, ‘Why don’t we do it and have it for two days,’ and…historically the second day is always the busier day,” said Sheakoski. Judging by the money Pizza by Pappas has been able to raise, Sheakoski’s plan makes sense. The fundraiser brought in $13,700 combined over the first two years, and an estimated total of $5,200 this year. He said the restaurant has had similar luck in November when they run the same fundraiser for pancreatic cancer research. Both fundraisers began in 2010 when Sheakoski and his brother were looking for a way to give back to the community. After doing some research, they decided to raise money for these two charities. “It’s something that we looked into and felt they were both good causes,” said Sheakoski. The third annual Pizza for Autism Awareness Fundraiser may be over but Pizza by Pappas isn’t done collecting. They will have a collection jar on the counter through the month of April. For more information on Pizza by Pappas’ upcoming fundraisers, Sheakoski recommended visiting the restaurant’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ events/219450174825817/, calling 346.2290, or emailing charity@pizzabypappas.com. Pizza by Pappas is located at 303 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.

er Program is designed to prepare students for entry level natural resource ranger Lackawanna College and interpreter positions in announces Park Ranger federal, state, county and Training Program municipal park systems. Participants will experience both The Lackawanna College Continuing Education depart- classroom and hands-on field training and education. ment has announced the forWith the MPOETC Act 120 mation of a one-year certificate Police Academy training Park Ranger Training program. The first class will start included, students will qualify for law enforcement ranger in the fall 2012 semester. The Natural Resource Rang- positions as well.
ASK OUR DOCTORS You always get the help you need when you ask.

SCHOOL NOTES

NEWS

The eighth-grade students at Riverside High School had the opportunity to visit the White House without leaving Taylor. Students in Mr. Nathan Barrett’s health class had been selected as one of 144 participants through Discovery Education Live, a series of web based events, to be video streamed into a live, interactive video conference on the subject of teen dating violence in the United States on Wednesday, April 18. The class of 30 students had the opportunity to listen and discuss warning signs, strategies and ways to obtain resources on teen dating violence and how to avoid it. The video conference was one hour in length.

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Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

15

NEWS

By DON McGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

VOLUNTEERS HONORED
T
he Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania (CAC/ NEPA) took a moment to thank some volunteers who made a difference this past year during its second annual Cocktails by Moonlight, held Thursday, April 26 at the Colonnade in Scranton.

Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy and Christina Byron.

WNEP’s Sharla McBride presented awards.

Guido LaPorta of Waverly with Pat and Tim Lavelle of Clarks Green.

Patty Lafferty, Colleen Kearney and Joe Price of Scranton.

ARTS

During Cocktails by Moonlight, the CAC/NEPA presented their annual Child Advocate of the Year Awards. Among this year’s recipients was Riverside High School senior, Stephanie Tilberry. Tilberry, 18, of Taylor, received the inaugural Student Ambassador Award. She said she became aware of the CAC/NEPA, a private, nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide treatment and intervention of child physical and sexual abuse, last year when she was trying out for Miss Viking. Tilberry explained that one of the requirements for Miss Viking is to choose a local philanthropy group that the cheerleading squad will work with during the year . “I researched a couple places when I was trying out, and the advocacy center was just such a great cause, and I knew I wanted to work with them,” said Tilberry. “After I got Miss Viking last March, we started doing fundraisers with them.” Since then, Tilberry and the Riverside cheerleaders have put together a pancake breakfast, ice cream social, basket raffles and a t-shirt sale for CAC/NEPA. “Just things to let the community know they’re there, and help them out financially as much as we can,” said Tilberry.

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTOS/JASON RIEDMILLER

Mary Ann LoPorta, right, presents Stephanie Tilberry, left, with the Student Ambassador Award.

After working with her this past year the CAC/NEPA felt Tilberry was the perfect candidate for the award. “We felt that Stephanie, as the leader, deserved some recognition and gratitude,” said Mary Ann LaPorta, director of the Children’s Advocacy Center and president of the Pennsylvania Chapter of Children’s Advocacy Center. “I’m very grateful, but I don’t think I deserve an award,” said Tilberry. “I’m so honored, but I don’t think I’m doing anything I shouldn’t be doing anyway.”

Other members of the community, who were also honored on Thursday, were the Children Advocate of the Year Award honorees. The recipients were Scranton Police Chief Daniel Duffy, attorney Judith Price, Kelly Rodney, Stroudsburg Area Police Detective Susan Charles and attorney Jack Sardoni. In years prior to last, the awards were given out during the Annual Moonlight Run, which is scheduled for Sunday, April 29 at Nay Aug Park. Cocktails by Moonlight now serves as an unofficial kickoff to the 5K and

10K walk/run, which is a fundraiser for the Children’s Advocacy Center, and also features a Family Festival with a number of activities for children, prizes, live entertainment, food, beverages and much more. Registration for the Moonlight Walk/Run will be taken prior to or the day of the race. The Cost is $20, $10 for students. Children can participate for free with the purchase of one adult ticket. For more information, or to inquire about volunteering for the event, call 969.7313.

SPORTS

16

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012
said, “one person’s spending becomes someone else’s income and some of the second person’s income is spent, becoming a third person’s income and so on.” The study showed that the Triple-A franchise spends $3,094,000 on the purchase of local goods and services annually and is expected to spend $4,458,000 in the future. Employment, associated with the team, is expected to rise from $2,148,302 annually to $2,750,077. Taxes, fees and stadium rentals will rise from $904,000 to $1,789,000 each year, according to the study. In addition to the future annual economic impact, the construction phase is expected to $23.5 million to the local economy – $17.5 million in employment and $6 million in the cost of materials.

PRODUCER
Continued from page 3

Historic building welcomes
J
oey’s Place has opened its doors at 222 Wyoming Ave., Scranton, inside the Ritz Building. The restaurant’s owners, Mike and Elizabeth Carson, who named Joey’s Place after their 9-year-old son, said they thought the location would be perfect for their business when they heard it was available.

ment of Harrisburg created a four-page report entitled “Triple-A Baseball: An Important Economic Engine for Northeastern Pennsylvania.” Lackawanna County chief financial officer Thomas Durkin presented highlights of the study at a public hearing Wednesday, April 25 at the Scranton Cultural Center about the sale and stadium reconstruction. “We anticipate it will have a significant enhancement on the economic impact on northeastern Pennsylvania,” Durkin said. Durkin explained that a “multiplier of five” was used to determine economic impact. Under that concept, he

NEWS

NEW BUSINESS

STADIUM
ARTS
Continued from page 12

Zaleski and Joe DeAntona voted in favor of the sale. “This hurts me,” Jenkins said. “I never wanted the team sold. “We were not left with many options after the agreement in 2007.” Should the Yankees try to move the team, the county would have the right to repurchase the franchise. Munley said the board will not give away those rights. “I have faith in the Yankees, they are a great organization,” Munley said, “but I don’t have any faith in Mandalay.” Under Mandalay’s direction, attendance has fallen in recent years to an all-time low in 2011. The management company has been criticized for high prices, the lack of promotions and being unwilling to try to connect with local fans. Kristen Rose, who had served as Scranton/WilkesBarre Yankees team president, stepped down last week and took a new position with Mandalay. County commissioner Corey O’Brien said he has been assured that when the team returns next season it will be with price points

that are cost-effective and family-friendly. He said Mandalay has acknowledged that previous plans were not effective. “It didn’t work,” O’Brien said. “We’ve been assured and re-assured that that whole philosophy is over and they are coming in with a new plan. “I think they can only succeed here through actions, not words, and I think they have taken some real good first steps.” The Yankees are leasing the stadium at $750,000 per year and have committed $15 million toward future stadium upgrades. Timlin said when the new-look stadium is unveiled, the team is likely to also have a new name. He said during the authority meeting that he has been assured by New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman that only the parent club will operate under the name Yankees in 2013. During Wednesday’s public hearing, attorney Gene Hickey of Moosic asked for assurances and clarifications that the stadium would return to its original intent as a multi-purpose facility and not just be for the Yankees use. County lawyers explained that such provisions are included in the sales agreement.

“I love it here actually,” said Mike. “It’s got a good history, that made a difference for us. I was in here when it was the theater.” Joey’s Place offers eat-in, takeout, delivery and catering. Their menu features a variety of items, including soups, salads, hot and cold sandwiches, hoagies and breakfast foods. The Carsons, who prior to opening Joey’s Place owned the Gouldsboro Diner, said everything is made fresh. Currently, the restaurant is on-

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTOS/ DON MCGLYNN

Joey’s Place will be open for dinner on Friday, May 4 for Scranton’s First Friday.

ly open for breakfast and lunch, but the two plan to be opening for dinner starting the second week of May. Starting Monday, May 9, Joey’s Place will be open Monday through Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday, 5 to 8 p.m. For more information, call 344.9951.

SCRANTON NATIVE PRESENTS RESEARCH

SPORTS

Occupational therapy student Beth Gladson of Scranton, a Misericordia University student researcher, enrolled in the weekend Entry-Level Master’s Degree Program, is presenting her graduate research project at the annual American Occupational Therapy Association Conference in Indianapolis, Ind. Collaborating on the research project are, from left, Lalit Shah, Ed.D., professor; Gladson and Ellen McLaughlin, Ed.D., associate professor.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

17

ARTS CALENDAR
VISUAL ARTS
AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 9691040, www.artistsforart.org. ‘Intramurals,’ 10 artists refereed by Christopher Moss, continues through May. ArtWorks Gallery and Studio, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 207-1815, www.artworksnepa.com. ‘Round Two: sculptures and paintings from recycled materials by Shirley Thomas. B’s Floral Design, Inc. 131 Penn Ave., Scranton. Info: bsfloraldesigninginc@yahoo.com ‘Natural Progression,’ photography by Lynn Andreoli. Bella Faccias Personalized Chocolate and Gifts, 516 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 3438777, www.bellafaccias.com. ‘Confections Affections,’ work by Constance Denchy. The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-6761, www.thebogscranton.com. ‘Spirited Animals’ work by Troy Weston. Chocolate Creations, Cangiano’s Italian Specialties, Ferrone Winery, and Realty Network Group, 400 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 207-2667, www.mycangianos.com. ‘It Girl Designs by Brea & Marissa Toth’ featuring hand painted wine glasses and handmade jewelry. City Café, 116 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 343-3550, www.citycafescranton.com ‘Urban Impressions’ featuring mixed media, watercolor portrait commissions by Marisha Lozada. Duffy Accessories, 218 Linden St., Scranton. Info: (570) 9410411. ‘SpiriTiles’ by Houston Llew Eden – a vegan café, 344 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 9691606, www.edenavegancafe.com. ‘Photographing the Photographer,’ works by Christian Pilosi and Maura Cummings. Electric City Tattoo Gallery, 618 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 343-5549, www.electriccitytattoo.com. ‘Asian Fusion,’ works by Mike Frenchko. The Fanciful Fox, 342 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 5583001, www.fancifulfox.com. ‘R2R Gathering,’ handmade hula hoops. GreenBeing, 334 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-9988, www.shopgreenbeing.com. ‘Spinyl Vinyl’ a collection of work

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Laura Craig Gallery, 307 Linden St., Scranton, (570) 963-7995. ‘American Heartland’ pastels and watercolors by northeast regional artists. Marquis Art & Frame, Scranton, 515 Center St., Scranton, (570) 344-3313, www.marquisartframe.com. ‘Living in Colour” by Denise Thomas. Mission Yoga, 544 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 3469642, www.mission-yoga.com. ‘Splintered,’ works of Tory Utt. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (570) 878-3970, www.newvisionsstudio.com. Scratchboard illustrations by Bri Hermanson, blown glass sculptures by Michael Swanson and photographs by Timmy Walsh. Pierre’s Fine Clothing and Accessories, 424 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 346-0779. ‘Material Girl,’ works by Sarah

Edwards. POSH at The Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 955-5890, www.poshatsc.com. Works by William Freeman.

THEATER
The University of Scranton, Royal Theatre of the McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts, Info: (570) 941-4318. ‘A Year with Frog and Toad,’ April 29, May 4-5, Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Cost: Varies. Jason Miller Playwrights Project, Renaissance, 500 Plaza, Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: nepaplaywrights@live.com “Me Me Me,” a short play by Alicia Grega, Fri., May 4 at 6, 6:30, 7 and 7:30 p.m. Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Rd., Jim Thorpe, Info: (866) 6057325, pennspeak.com. Beatlemania Now, May 4, 8 p.m., Cost: $25.

NEWS

eystone College alum Nick Shotwell will be teaching a black and white photography class at New Visions Studio and Gallery Wednesday evenings May 16 through June from 6 to 9 p.m. Students will learn how to develop black and white film and make prints in a darkroom. Cost of the class is $199.99. All chemicals and paper is included. No prior photography experience is needed New Visions Studio and Gallery is located at 201 Vine St., Scranton. For more information, call 878.3970 or email newvisionsstudio@gmail.com.
made out of reconstructed vinyl records created by Marywood University students. Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 343-3000, www.hilton.com. Works by Josef Selvin. Jersey Style Subs, 401 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 9550282, www.jerseystylesubs.comcastbiz.net. ‘Art on the Wall,’ works by Edward Kucha and Joseph Paciotti. The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-3388, www.thekeysscranton.com. ‘Flesh and Bone,’ works of Sean Costello. Kildare’s Irish Pub, 119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 3444030, www.kildaresirishpub.com. Works of Jessica Smallwood.

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18

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

IF YOU GO
What: Rhythm of the Region II music and art exhibit Where: The Vintage Theater, 119 Penn Ave, Scranton When: Opening reception Friday, May 4, 6-9 p.m., exhibit runs Wed. evenings 6 p.m. – 12 a.m., Thurs. and Fri. 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. until May 31 Cost: Free, donations encouraged

NEWS New Vintage Theater exhibit celebrates regional music scene
By RICH HOWELLS rhowell@golackawanna.com

W
ARTS SPORTS

hen Conor O’Brien is asked what his favorite local concert was, he can’t simply pick just one. The first on his list was one of his first shows ever at 14-yearsold – Captain, We’re Sinking and The Menzingers at the now-defunct Cafe Metro in WilkesBarre. He had never been in a mosh pit before that show, and while the raw energy of the performance was not the catalyst for him opening The Vintage Theater, 119 Penn Ave., Scranton, which will exhibit Rhythm of the Region II on First Friday, May 4, it certainly sparked his interest. He goes on to talk about a show at Test Pattern, also long gone, where he worked a merchandise table, A Social State’s CD release show at his own venue, and an intimate, unplugged performance by River City Extension in that same spot. He hopes that his theater has had its own “substantial impact” on the local music scene. It clearly has made an impact on him. “What I’m noticing more so, and what is a good thing honestly, is that there seems to be a larger focus on original music again in this region in the past year or so. I’ve seen a lot of focus on that, and I don’t think we were the ones to necessarily cre-

See VINTAGE, Page 21

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

19

IF YOU GO
What: “A Year with Frog and Toad” Where: The Scranton Cultural Center and the University of Scranton’s Royal Theatre of McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts. When: Tuesday and Wednesday, May 1 and 2, and Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5. Info: 941.4318 or 346-7369.
GO LACKAWANNA PHOTO/DON MCGLYNN

NEWS ARTS SPORTS

Peter Alexander and Claxton Rabb, who star in "A Year with Frog and Toad," made a special visit to the Taylor Community Library.

‘Frog and Toad’ come to life at Taylor Community Library
By Don McGlynn dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

he University of Scranton and the Scranton Cultural Center helped bring two literary characters to life for a group of children at the Taylor Community Library on Tuesday, April 24. Peter Alexander, of Linden, N.J., and Claxton Rabb, of East Orange,

T

N.J., who star as Frog and Toad in “A Year with Frog and Toad” at the Scranton Cultural Center and the University of Scranton’s McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts this week, paid a visit to the library to entertain the children. The two read selections of “Frog and Toad,” sang several songs from the play, taught the children a song

and went through a brief acting exercise. “It was very good,” said Mariah Kumor. “I liked it when they were dancing and singing, and then showed us how to do it.” By Tuesday, the performance at the library was nothing for Alexander and Rabb, the two University of Scranton students had been per-

forming excerpts from the show for weeks at libraries and several area elementary schools leading up to the play’s opening on Friday, April 27. “It’s touring in the way that we’re going from the university’s stage (April 27 to 29) to the Scranton Cultural Center (May 1 to 2), and then
See LEAP, Page 21

20

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Lacuna Coil to play Pavilion
fter recording six fulllength albums, two EPs, and a DVD, selling over 800,000 units in the United States alone, Cristina Scabbia, one of two lead vocalists in the Italian goth metal outfit Lacuna Coil, will tell you that success comes from the heart. Always surrounded by music, coming from a large family where her brothers and sisters constantly listened to everything from rock to hip hop to traditional Italian music, Scabbia’s dream of performing in a band was realized when she was hired to sing back-up vocals for the group and was asked to join as a permanent member soon after.
“I never took lessons, so basically I started because I was passionate about singing, and then I got better. I improved just by singing constantly, being on tour and recording, but I never did anything special to improve. I always try to sing with my heart more than with my technique. I’m trying to express my feelings through my voice, not really tell the world that I’m the best technical singer in the world,” said Scabbia. While some may judge her or her band based on her gender or her stunning appearance before she can even open her mouth, her obvious passion for her work, she hopes, will make people look deeper into her talent. “I think that happens in every circumstance in life, I mean, from advertisements, movies, anything you could possibly mention,” said Scabbia . “The body of a woman is beautiful, women are beautiful, so everyone will always be putting more attention on that, but as long as they recognize that I’m a good singer as well, that’s all that matters. I can’t help if the first thing that appears is my appearance. I just accept it, and so do the guys in the band because you cannot do anything about that.” Lacuna Coil, which translates to “Empty Spiral,” had little trouble breaking into the United States market, particularly during the 2004 Ozzfest, because of their unique sound, which includes complementary male and female vocals. “We think it’s something special because most other bands have one singer or they have two singers that are typical-

NEWS

A

By Rich Howells rhowells@golackawanna.com

IF YOU GO

What: Rob Zombie, Megadeth, and Lacuna Coil Where: Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain, 1000 Montage Mountain Rd,Scranton When: May 12, 8 p.m. Cost: $44-66.50

ly using a very feminine voice for the girl and a very growling, masculine voice for the guy. We both sing, so we both can sing aggressively, we can both sing more mellow, and that’s what makes the band special and different,” said Scabbia. Their latest album, “Dark Adrenaline,” debuted at number 15 on the Billboard Top 200 albums chart, their highest yet, and sold almost 20,000 units in its first week. While their future as recording artists seems bright, the record was inspired by darker times in their personal lives. “We’re always inspired by our lives, and of course life is evolving, life is changing, new experiences are coming up, and most of them were not that positive, you know, because that’s part of life. And everything is reflected in the lyrics, so the songwriting was a little bit different because of the mood around the songwriting period, but not really the recording,” Scabbia admitted. “We knew that we wanted to have heavier guitars. We knew that we wanted to have a darker sound because of the lyrics and because of the moment we were living, so in that, yeah, it’s a completely different album.” The band plans to have a lot of fun, however, when they share the stage once again with Rob Zombie and Megadeth, a tour that is coming to the Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain on Saturday, May 12. “It’s going to be great for the fans that are coming because they’re going to be seeing a show with three bands that are playing completely different music, and this variety will make the show more dynamic and more interesting,” she emphasized. The band is also continuing their “Dark Legacy” tour around the country, celebrating 15 years with career-spanning sets that last over two hours. Playing songs both old and new lately has been “weird,” Scabbia said, but it also reminds her of what she has learned along the way, which happens to be one of the reasons she got the gig in the first place. “What I learned is that you have to keep it real, because no matter what you do, if you’re honest and you’re really playing and singing what you feel inside, people are going to follow you because they will see that you are the real deal.

AP PHOTO

Italian rock Band Lacuna Coil arrive for the Kerrang Awards 2009, at the Brewery in London, Monday, August 3, 2009.

ARTS

You’re not a band put together by a label; you’re not a band put together for the business, so they will connect with you very, very easily,” she acknowledged. “The same thing is valid for the live show. If they see that you’re having a good time onstage, they are going to have a good time. And thank God we’ve been able to keep it fresh, evolving every

time without really changing our roots. They are still there and strong, and fans can feel it.” Scabbia and Lacuna Coil likely have another 15 years, at least, ahead, as she feels that there is so much more that they “need and want to do.” “When you feel that you’ve arrived, that means you’re done.”

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Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna
“That’s art. That’s a form of artwork, and it doesn’t have to be anything too complicated, but collectively, we just want to show through the power of numbers that for every shirt, that’s an average of four or five people and their passion and their music. The shirt is just a piece of merchandise, but it’s what stands behind it,” O’Brien emphasized. He relates to the bands not just as a fan, but as a venue owner, as he feels that both are facing similar issues to stay alive in today’s economy. “If one fails, we all fail. I don’t mean that just between venues and bands, I mean that between bands and bands, venues and venues,” he clarified. “Either A, people treat it too much like a business, or B, they treat it not enough. Once again, it’s a difficult balance.” But he stresses that it’s just as important for music lovers to support both as well. “Go to shows!” O’Brien exclaimed. “Go to shows that you don’t know. Don’t just go to your friends’ bands…It’s no more usually than five to seven dollars. You waste that on Starbucks…If you find a band you like, support them. Be a fan.” Because if they don’t, The Vintage Theater and the bands it supports may end up as just another part of Scranton’s musical history sooner rather than later. “We want to make sure that (closed venues) don’t fade from the spotlight and people remember why they were there and the role that they filled,” he said. “Maybe it’s wishful thinking that someday someone will do that for us.”

21

VINTAGE
Continued from page 18

ate that spark, but I do feel we’ve had a big part in keeping it going and showing that you can be sustainable,” O’Brien explained. The now 20-year-old performing arts director co-founded The Vintage Theater just three years ago, and since then has been the host of over 1,000 different artists in 100s of different bands, with at least two of those bands scoring writeups in Rolling Stone magazine; some acts have since become nationally or even internationally renowned. “Honestly, we’re just capitalizing on how great a location Scranton really is and can be, in such close proximity to New York and Philly, and it’s not that far from D.C. and it’s not that far from Chicago,” said O’Brien . “And also, we do have a very cultivated music scene, I feel. We’ve just simply piggybacked on a really incredible scene, and if we’ve been able to be a part of that, I’m proud to say, ‘Yay!’ but that’s more for others to say.” The genres have ranged from rap to hip-hop to indie rock to hardcore to jazz to reggae to blues to punk to ska. O’Brien calls the local music scene “eclectic,” a word he also uses to describe the space itself, which blends an art gallery with a performance space and a café. This diversity led to an exhibit last year called Rhythm of the Region, whose goal was to show how the visual arts are

NEWS

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Ted Michalowski will be on hand at the opening reception of "Rhythm of the Region II" at The Vintage Theater in Scranton to host a live drawing session.

fueled by the performing arts through photography and graphic work; a sequel, Rhythm of the Region II, will open Friday at 6 p.m. This year’s exhibit will feature photography by Tom Bonomo, and it will have a heavier focus placed on original visual art, which will include illustrations by Ted Michalowski and Gerry Stankiewicz. Smeltzer and Smith will, appropriately, provide musical accompaniment while Michalowski hosts a live drawing session during the opening, further solidifying the notion that art and music are synergetic. “Also, a big heavy focus this year is venue-specific photography and memorabilia, so we have a small collection of stuff from the now resting-in-peace Test Pattern and Cafe Metropolis and others. I’m actually trying to collect memorabilia from places such as Cafe Del Sol and The Dome and The Staircase,” said O’Brien.

“That’s only within the past decade or two. If you wanted to really do a heavy, heavy historical documentation of Scranton’s music history, you’d have to go back to the 1880s, to the vaudeville era…We’re giving respect to the people who created these venues and supported these venues. Without them, there would be no niche for us to fill,” he continued. “I feel that if you don’t preserve that, like anything in history, if you don’t learn from it, we’re never going to repeat the amazing things that they did and maybe we can learn a little and try to succeed where they might not have. Not that they failed, by any means, but just be able to preserve ourselves a little longer.” O’Brien facilitated Rhythm of the Region with Visual Arts Director Theresa O’Connor, who is also the exhibit’s curator. One aspect he is particularly excited to unveil is the wall of t-shirts from local bands.

ARTS

LEAP
Continued from page 19

back to the university (May 4 to 6), so it’s the biggest tour I’ve ever done,” joked Alexander. “We’ll call it a mini-tour,” added Rabb. “A Year with Frog and Toad” is based on Arnold Lobel’s children’s stories, which tells the story of a frog and toad that discover the benefits of true friendship. The musical was first performed on Broadway in 2003, and is being brought to the Scranton area through a partnership between the University of Scranton and the Scranton Cultural Center. “We were thinking of ways to foster a partnership, said Scranton Cultural Center’s Educational Outreach Manger Amy Dickerson. “We have this incredible university right up

the road, and rather than bringing in an outside theater company, which we do do, we thought why not utilize the talent in our own backyard.” So far, the partnership is proving beneficial for both parties involved, in addition to providing the Scranton Cultural Center with more talent to put on their schedule, it’s also offering students a chance to work on a professional stage. “It’s a unique experience for the university because they get to work with a real union crew on the main stage. We’ve never had a performance that wasn’t a national touring company on the main stage so to be able to have a local university perform on that is a first,” said Dickerson. In addition to the cast, which also includes several other University of Scranton students, some of Alexander and Rabb’s classmates are obtaining hands-on training behind the scenes, being allowed to work

SPORTS

Peter Alexander and Claxton Rabb got Shameeza Bacchus, Mariah Kumor and Amelia Smicherko, from left, on their feet to learn a song from the play "A Year with Frog and Toad."

PHOTOS/DON MCGLYNN

side by side with the crew. “It’s great for everyone involved, not just for us, but for the guy doing lights and the guy doing sound they get to work with a professional, and that’s experience you just don’t get,” said Alexander. Currently, the University of

Scranton and the Scranton Cultural Center have no definite plans to put on another production together, but Dickerson is hopeful the two groups will work together again soon. “This is the first of hopefully many partnerships,” said Dickerson.

Peter Alexander and Claxton Rabb play the titles characters in the Scranton Cultural Center’s performance of "A Year with Frog and Toad."

The University of Scranton Players will be presenting “A Year with Frog and Toad” throughout the week, for more information visit www.thescrantonplayers.com.

PAGE 22

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24

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

25

NEWS

New Visions welcomes scratchboard illustrator for exhibit and live demo
ew Visions Studio & Gallery will exhibit the work of Brooklyn-based scratchboard illustrator Bri Hermanson starting Friday, May 4. Hermanson will be on hand for the opening of the exhibit, and on Saturday May 5 at 1 p.m. for a live scratchboard demo. This event is free and open to the public. Those in attendance will have a chance to see Hermanson work live, while learning the scratchboard process. A scratchboard is composed of a stark white base of clay or chalk covered with a coating of black India ink.
Scratchboard has a history in illustration; its precision translates well to magazines and books yet it is more versatile a medium than the older techniques of woodcut and engraving. This exhibit, which will be on display at New Visions Studio & Gallery May 4 through May 18, will also feature the work of Michael Swanson and Timmy Walsh. Swanson is a glass artist and has had recent shows featuring his artwork of blown, cast, slumped and fused glass in various galleries in Scranton, Clarks Summit, Tunkhannock and Wilkes-Barre. Graduating from Keystone College in 2006, he returned to Keystone College in 2010 to work as the Studio Tech for their expanding Glass program. Walsh started Camera For A Cure in 2008 when he was 6 years old. When Walsh was 5 years old his aunt was diagnosed with stage 3A lung cancer. She never smoked. After researching and learning more about lung cancer he felt that more people needed to be aware and understand that it is not just a smoker’s cancer. Walsh decided to start selling his original photos, and recently his painting, with all funds being donated to the Lung Cancer Alliance. An artists’ reception will be held on First Friday, May 4 from 5 to 10 p.m. At the opening reception, there will be refreshments and opportunities to meet with the artists. There will also be live music by world touring Italian singer Emile Rivera. New Visions Studio & Gallery is located at 201 Vine St., Scranton. For more information, call 878.3970, email newvisionsstudio@gmail.com or visit www.newvisionsstudio.com

N

ARTS SPORTS

A scratchboard is composed of a stark white base of clay or chalk covered with a coating of black India ink.

26

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

NEWS

Scranton prepares for World Laughter Day
IF YOU GO
What: World Laughter Day When: Sunday, May 6 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Where: The pavilion pool at Nay Aug Park Cost: Free. Info: laughToLive.net or 650.7518.
COURTESY PHOTO

Jeannine M Luby, owner of Laugh to Live!, leads a mini laughter yoga sessions during last year’s World Laughter Day.

SPORTS

ARTS

Jeannine M Luby, owner of Laugh to Live!, will sponsor a celebration of the annual World Laughter Day, on Sunday, May 6 at Nay Aug Park in Scranton. World Laughter Day was started by Dr. Madan Kataria, a medical doctor and the founder of laughter yoga. Kataria said "When we laugh, we change. When we change, the world changes." "I believe, of course, that we should make time each day to laugh so that we can replenish our mind, body and spirit and

live the best version of ourselves but there are a number of reasons why people get too busy or just don’t fit laughter in. On World Laughter Day, we’re committing to making time for ourselves and each other to enjoy the healing power of laughter, together," said Luby a certified laughter yoga leader, comedian and author. The event is open to everyone and there is no admission fee. During the event, Luby will lead mini laughter yoga sessions every half hour between 12:30 and 3:30 p.m.

Children ages 5 to11are invited to get funny at the microphone for the “Kids’ Joke telling Showcase” at 1:30 p.m. A parent or guardian must be present to register the child. Artist Judith Youshock of "Heart to Art" will be on hand with art supplies to lead participants in the painting of a community mural for the non-profit Humor Therapy Fund of the Scranton Area Foundation. A variety of baskets will be raffled off with donations benefiting the Humor Therapy Fund.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

PAGE 27

28

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Celebrate Free Comic Book Day
Looking back on the last several years, it’s hard to remember when the summer blockbuster movie season didn’t contain at least two or three multimillion-dollar superhero movies, but believe it or not, I grew up in a world where those big-budget adaptations were simply a pipe dream. Sure, we had a few “Batman” movies that quickly went downhill among other sporadic attempts, but I remember picking up my monthly issue of the nowonline-only Wizard magazine at the comic book shop and reading the “Casting Call” feature, wondering if I’d ever see an “X-Men” movie in my lifetime. It proposed casting choices for comic movies we never dreamed would happen, even correctly predicting that one day Patrick Stewart would be sitting in Professor X’s wheelchair. Instead of guessing how Hollywood could make a computer-generated Hulk appear real, fans are now taking bets on which tightsclad character will be optioned for the big screen treatment next. I may be dating myself, but that still amazes me. A majority of the most anticipated movies this summer, in fact, are based on a comic books, kicking off this week with “The Avengers” and followed by “Men in Black III,” “The Amazing Spider-Man,” and “The Dark Knight Rises.” Even films like “Prometheus,” “G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” and the “Total Recall” remake are tailor-made for science fiction fans, so while our wildest fanboy fantasies continue to go mainstream, I think it’s worth noting that its source material still exists and is also in need of financial support.

NEWS

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY

RICH HOWELLS
But on Free Comic Book Day, which falls on May 5 this year, comic shops aren’t asking for your money. In fact, as the name indicates, they’re giving away promotional comics to attract new readers and bring some back who may have strayed from the fold. Some stores even have creators on hand to sign their work; locally, my shop of preference, Comics on the Green, will have veteran Marvel and DC Comics artist Tom Derenick along with special promotions and face painting for the kids. The free comics this year star everyone from the Avengers to Peanuts to Superman to Mega Man to Transformers to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and sample stories featuring smaller names like X-O Manowar and the Hypernaturals are also being offered. If you don’t recognize the monikers that’s OK – the point is to expose you to something you never knew you were missing out on. Free Comic Book Day

started in 2002, coordinated by the country’s largest distributor, Diamond Comic Distributors, and supported by independent shops all over. This isn’t something you’re going to see at Barnes & Noble, and there’s a good reason for that – they don’t care whether you’re buying comics, movies, CDs, books, or e-readers, as long as they’re making a profit. The small shops, however, are doing this because they want you to love what they love, and there’s plenty of love to go around. The reasons these characters resonate with people in the movies are often the same reasons they have been beloved by generations of comic fans, except the comics give readers so much more. The stories are more varied, detailed, and complex, and they’re more fun because they have the ability to capture so much more creativity. The print pages are limited only by the creators’ imaginations, while live films will always be limited by real-world situations, such as time and budget constraints. Instead of being the guy who has to

whisper in the geek’s ear, asking who this guy or that guy is as they appear onscreen, it’s way more awesome to be the one in the know. But whereas my father grew up reading Captain America and Namor the Sub-Mariner, and I discovered comics through their animated counterparts in the ‘90s, kids today are too busy talking on their cell phones and shouting commands to their squadron of friends they never met over Xbox LIVE to do something “boring” like read. Sure, you have your bestsellers now and again, but sometimes you get “Harry Potter” and “The Hunger Games” and sometimes you get “Twilight,” so the quality undoubtedly varies. Even with e-readers and iPads, the only reading many children are doing is on the internet, which doesn’t always offer the best material. You might start on a mainstream comic like “Spider-Man,” but that simply opens you up to an entire universe of characters, and from there, a never-ending list of titles from all differ-

ent genres. Whether you appreciate great artistry or great writing, it’s all found in a comic, yet the medium forever hangs in the balance. The characters are becoming profitable entities, sure, but the books themselves are mostly supported by diehard fans. Just in my lifetime, I’ve seen the number of comic stores within a few miles of me drop from five to one, and I can count on one hand how many are still in this entire region currently. It may only be a matter of time before everything goes digital, and after that, no one knows how long sequential art will last when it’s viewed on your computer screen rather than in your hand. It’s no coincidence that Free Comic Book Day usually coincides with a major movie release, though film adaptations shouldn’t be your alternative to the original material – it should be your gateway into that work. People I grew up with who would be bored out of their skulls every time I brought up comics are now asking me to go with them to the next movie opening, so while I’m happy to oblige, I also have to remind them that they can borrow those graphic novels on my shelf any time. This may sound like an advertisement, but so be it – show your support by going to FreeComicBookDay.com and finding a participating store near you, or just go to your local comic shop any day of the week and ask the store owner for some recommendations. You’d be surprised how much exists out there for every taste, and you may be even more surprised to find how much you’ll learn from reading instead of watching. Not that I still don’t dream about a Silver Surfer or a Dr. Strange movie, mind you, but at least I’ll always have something to spark my imagination.

SPORTS

ARTS

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

29

District 2 sets spring playoff plans
By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

SPORTS BRIEF
SWB Yankees improving The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees reached the .500 mark on the season, first with a four-game winning streak, then by stopping the International League’s hottest team. The Yankees even their record for the first time all season when the four-game streak put them at 8-8. They made it back to 9-9 Wednesday, April 25, with an 8-6 victory that stopped a nine-game Pawtucket Red Sox winning streak. Pawtucket led, 5-0, early but the Yankees rallied to win on a four-run ninth inning that included a two-run single by Francisco Cervelli. McGloin made Blue-White start West Scranton graduate Matt McGloin took the first snaps at quarterback for Penn State in its BlueWhite Game on Saturday, April 21 before an estimated crowd of 60,000 at Beaver Stadium. The defense won, 77-65, in a new format under new head coach Bill O’Brien. The scoring system awarded the offense six points for a touchdown, one for a point-after touchdown, three for a field goal, two points for each play of 15 or more yards and two for consecutive first downs. The

District 2 of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association has set schedules and made plans for spring sports championships, beginning with the boys’ tennis team tournament that gets underway Friday, May 4.

will be determined after the completion of the first day with Birchwood Racquet Club and Kingston Racquet Club available as indoor sites. Williamsport, a District 4 member, is included in the field in Class AAA, making it a regional tournament.

BOYS’ TENNIS

TRACK AND FIELD

remaining seed the next night. The finals will be at a neutral site and will include a third-place match in the opener. All of the doubleheaders start at 5 p.m. and have the second match a half hour after the completion of the first match.

defense earned seven points for a touchdown, six for a turnover, four for a sack, two for a tackle for loss and one for forcing a punt after three plays. McGloin went 6-for-13 for 105 yards and one of the team’s two touchdown passes. Gavin falls two wins short of Olympics Lackawanna Trail graduate Keith Gavin came two wins short of reaching the London Olympic Games and finished third at the U.S. Olympic Trials in the 84-kilogram men’s freestyle wrestling weight class Sunday, April 22, in Iowa City, Iowa. Gavin, who was an unbeaten national champion at the University of Pittsburgh, received a bye into the quarterfinals where he defeated Quentin Wright of the Nittany Lion Wrestling Club, 7-0, 4-0. Gavin, who represented the Lehigh Valley Athletic Club, lost to Trent Paulson of Sunkist Kids and the Cyclone Wrestling Club, 1-0, 2-0, in the semifinals. Following the loss, Gavin came back with two straight consolation wins, including 1-0, 1-0 over Raymond Jordan of the Sunkist Kids for third place. Paulson won the first bout of his best-of-three final with Jake Herbert before Herbert won two straight to claim the Olympic berth.

NEWS

The team championships will have quarterfinal play at the home of higher-seeded teams on May 4. The semifinals and finals in both Class AAA and AA will be held May 8 at Kirby Park. Seeds for the singles tournament will be determined in a 7 p.m. meeting at Dunmore High School on May 8. The singles play will then begin May 10 at 9 a.m. at Kirby Park and the nearby Wilkes University courts. Three rounds will be held to get the fields down to the four semifinals in each class. Semifinals and finals will be May 11. The doubles tournament follows a similar routine with the first three rounds at Kirby Park and Wilkes on May 16. The semifinals and finals are May 17. Semifinals and finals sites

The Class AAA meet is set for Scranton Memorial Stadium on Monday, May 14 with the Class AA meet scheduled for Tuesday, May 15. Both meets have 3 p.m. starts.

GIRLS’ SOCCER

This is the final year for spring district and state championships. The 10-team, one-class tournament will open with two games on May 18 or 19. The quarterfinals are May 21, followed by the semifinals May 23 and finals May 25.

BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL

The Class AA tournament will be held May 21, 22 and 24. An eight-team field will start with two doubleheaders, at the home of the top two seeds, May 21. The semifinals are in a doubleheader at the highest

Both sports will follow the same format with open tournaments. Class AAA and AA need four rounds and are scheduled for May 21, 23, 25 and 30. Class AAAA and A need three rounds and will be May 22, 24 and 30. Higher seeds will host all games until the final round. Finals will be at neutral sites and will have admission charges for fans. In baseball, there are six eligible teams in Class AAAA, 15 in Class AAA, 15 in Class AA and seven in Class A. In softball, there are seven in Class AAAA, 14 in Class AAA, 14 in Class AA and eight in Class A. Williamsport, a District 4 member, is included in the fields in Class AAAA, making them regional tournaments.

BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL

ARTS

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Kirsch pitches no-hitter for Falcons
TOP STORY Chris Kirsch gave Lackawanna College its second baseball no-hitter in eight days Tuesday, April 24, when the Falcons shut out Burlington County College, 15-0, in the first game of a doubleheader. Kirsch struck out 11 and walked three in the seven-inning game. Adam Davis threw a no-hitter on April 17. Kirsch’s no-hitter was part of a sweep that allowed Lackawanna to run its winning streak to 15 games and its record to 37-9. NATIONALLY RANKED Keystone College and Lackawanna continued to climb in the national baseball rankings. Keystone is third among National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III teams, according to the D3baseball.com/ NCBWA Top 25. The Giants won 18 straight to improve to 28-4 and reach the highest ranking in school history. Lackawanna is fourth among National Junior College Athletic

LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS RECAP

NEWS

GO ONLINE
For daily roundups of local college sports, including results from Saturday’s action, see golackawanna.com/sports.

ARTS

Association Division II teams. Marywood’s Taylor McKeown scored six goals Wednesday, April 25 in an 18-9 victory over Hartwick College to move into sole possession of eighth place on the all-time NCAA Division III career women’s lacrosse goalscoring list. McKeown has scored in all 58 career games for Marywood, which has won eight straight to improve to 13-3 and match its school record for wins. The Scranton softball team was 14th in the nation in runs per game (7.35) through games of April 22. The Royals also had the 13th-best winning percentage at .846 (22-4). PLAYOFF ROUNDUP Both University of Scranton tennis teams advanced to Satur-

day, April 28, Landmark Conference championship matches with semifinal wins. The Royals won all four singles matches that were decided to beat Catholic University, 5-2, in the men’s semifinals Wednesday, April 25 at Birchwood Racquet Club in Clarks Summit. Joe Morra rallied for a threeset win at number-two singles to clinch the victory. Freshmen Megan Azzalina and Nicole Mahaffey each won twice Tuesday when Scranton beat host Drew, 5-3, in the women’s semifinals. The men were scheduled to face Drew and the women were at Susquehanna on Saturday. Marywood advanced to Saturday’s Colonial States Athletic Conference men’s tennis final with a 6-0 victory over Neumann University Friday in Easton. Evan Bolus, Todd Doran and Daniel Pfafman, who had each been part of doubles victories for a 3-0 lead, quickly wrapped up straight-set singles wins to clinch the match. SEASON AWARD Scranton’s Chris Schank, a ju-

nior from Scranton Prep, finished fourth in the Empire 8 Championship to earn a firstteam, conference all-star berth. Schank shot 79 and 80 at Hershey Country Club in the final two rounds of the conference tournament, which started with two rounds in the fall. WEEKLY AWARDS Scranton senior Christina Capalbo was named Landmark Conference softball Pitcher of the Week after throwing a fourhitter April 21 in a 1-0 win over Catholic. Marywood’s Kimberly Commisso and Todd Doran earned Colonial States Athletic Conference Player of the Week awards in women’s lacrosse and men’s tennis. Commisso, a sophomore, had 14 goals in three games while passing the century mark for her career. Doran was honored for the third time this season after helping Marywood finish unbeaten in the conference for the third straight year by winning twice each in singles and doubles. Marywood’s Chris Vogel was

selected to the CSAC Honor Roll in men’s lacrosse. Scranton’s Schank used a pair of top-five tournament finishes to earn the school’s Athlete of the Week award. Keystone College named Abby Cohen and Esteban Meletiche its Athletes of the Week. Cohen went 9-for-16 (.567) to help the softball team go 3-3. Meletiche was 9-for-21 (.429) with three home runs and 12 RBI in four wins. TOP EVENTS
Scranton Prep graduate Andrew Loyack matched a career low with a 2-over-par, 74 at Scranton Municipal Wednesday, April 25 to lead Scranton to a 302-322 golf victory over Marywood.

Scranton scored eight runs in the first inning and seven in the 11th Wednesday while using a 27-hit effort to defeat Wilkes University, 19-13, in baseball. Commisso scored four goals Monday, April 23 when Marywood completed a perfect CSAC women’s lacrosse regular season with a 13-9 victory over Neumann University. -Compiled by Tom Robinson

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Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

31

NEWS ARTS
PHOTO SUBMITTED

The 1986-87 state championship Riverside girls basketball team gathered for a 25-year reunion Friday night at Arcaro & Genell’s in Old Forge.

The Riverside Lady Vikes were unbeaten in 29 games in 1987 . They remain unmatched a quarter century later. Players, coaches, family and friends gathered Friday night, April 27, at Arcaro & Genell’s to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Riverside’s 1986-87 Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AA girls’ basketball championship. There were times that winter that the Lady Vikes made perfection look so easy that it is hard to imagine that no Lackawanna League team since has been able to match their state title, let alone the unbeaten record they compiled while winning it. Friday night’s reunion gave players a chance to watch video and listen to the end of the championship game radio broadcast while

State champions reunite
TOM ROBINSON
KEEPING SCORE
sharing other stories and memories from a season when they were unbeatable from start to finish. Large crowds latched on to the squad early that season in anticipation of a strong team built around a frontcourt of senior captains Lisa Sporer, Mary Lisowski and Jennifer Oustrich. The Riverside program was on a roll under coach Tom Nageli and had been to a state championship game in 1982. When a talented sophomore backcourt of Missy Evanish and Shannon Powell and key subs Dana Ozark and Michelle Tippett quickly established that they were more than capable of supporting their older
See REUNITE, Page 34

SPORTS
GO LACKAWANNA PHOTO/JASON RIELDMILLER

The 1986-87 Riverside girls basketball team are, from left, Jennifer Oustrich, Lisa Sporer Minnenbach, Shannon Powell Cosminski, Missy Evanish Smith and Mary Lisowski Copp, standing, head coach Tom Nageli, Suzi Deininger Taylor, Christine Roche, Kari Wiorkowski Machelli, team manager Kristin Nash, Michelle Tippett Antoniacci, Tina Stravinskas Walz, Dan Ozark Suppan, and assistant coach Frank Chisdock.

32

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NOTEBOOK

NEWS ARTS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Holy Cross takes division title in tennis

Weather shortened the schedule throughout the week, but enough competition was conducted for one Lackawanna County team to win a title outright while six others clinched at least ties for division championships. Holy Cross locked up the Lackawanna League Division 3 boys’ tennis title. Abington Heights is assured of finishing no worse than a tie for first in Lackawanna Track Conference Division 1 girls and Lackawanna Division 1 boys’ tennis. Valley View, Scranton and Mid Valley clinched at least ties for first in the three boys’ divisions of the Lackawanna Track Conference. Scranton Prep clinched at least a tie in Lackawanna League Division 2 boys’ tennis. GIRLS’ TRACK Abington Heights had a big week, winning at Honesdale in league competition then taking the championship of the Lasagna Invitational Friday night, April 27, at Wyalusing Valley High School. The Lady Comets scored 108.5 points, well ahead of second-place Holy Redeemer’s 70 among 20 teams that scored points at Wyalusing. Holy Cross was seventh with 44 points and Valley View was eighth with 38 points. Alex Chapman won the shot put for Abington Heights, which piled up points in the relays with two wins and a second-place finish. Elisia Cadman, Kelsey O’Donnell, Isabelle Clauss and Lauren Hoyt won the 400 relay while Taylor Ross, Jenn Burke, Erin Jaeger and Brianna Jaeger won the 3200 relay. Cadman, Clauss and Erin Jaeger were also part of the second-place, 1600 relay team along with Missy Burke. Devan Kerecman of Holy Cross cleared 11 feet to win the pole vault. Holy Cross is tied for first with Western Wayne in Division 2 of the Lackawanna League. The two teams square off Monday at Western Wayne in the fi-

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTO/JASON RIEDMILLER

Old Forge’s Nina Pascolini drives in a run.

nal meet of the regular season. Elk Lake has clinched at least a tie in Division 3. BOYS’ TRACK Valley View duplicated the effort by Abington Heights. The Cougars clinched their division title tie with a win at Delaware Valley then won the title of the Lasagna Invitational. “There is some great competition there,” Valley View coach Brian Kearney said in a telephone interview. “I thought it really helped us for districts.” Valley View won its first Lasagna title in just its second trip to Wyalusing. Brandon Jackson won the 300 hurdles and was part of the winning 1600 relay team along with Brandon Bednash, Brandon Ossont and Daniel Deleo. Tyler Phillips matched the previous meet record while finishing second in the 100 meters in 11.17 seconds. Valley View outscored Holy

Cross, 95.5-66, for the team title. Abington Heights was 11th among 24 scoring teams with 27 points. Riverside was 17th with 10 and Lackawanna Trail was 21st with eight. Sean Burke of Abington Heights set a record while winning the 3200 in 9:23.20. He led a group of four runners who each took more than seven seconds off the previous record. Rico Galassi of Holy Cross was second and also won the 1600 in a meet record 4:32.2. State cross country runner-up Luke Jones of Elk Lake was fourth. Galassi was one of three champions from Holy Cross. Andrew Nelson won the 400 and Albert Miner took the 110 high hurdles. Riverside’s Kyle Davis set a record in the discus with a throw of 152-5. Valley View still has to beat North Pocono, which is tied for second place, in a Monday meet to win the Lackawanna Division

SPORTS

Old Forge’s Lauren Carey beats the throw to Riverside’s Bethany Mickavicz at first base.

1 championship outright. Scranton goes for the Division 2 clincher against West Scranton and Mid Valley faces Carbondale in Division 3. BOYS’ TENNIS Holy Cross beat Riverside, Dunmore and Western Wayne to

repeat as division champ with much more room to spare. The Crusaders needed a playoff to take the title last season. This season, they are 6-1 with two matches left. Dunmore is 4-4.
See TITLE , Page 34

Sunday, April 29, 2012

GOLackawanna

33

CALDER CUP PLAYOFFS

NEWS ARTS
PHOTOS BY FRED ADAMS

Penguins Ryan Craig celebrates the second goal against Hershey in the first period of play on Friday, April 27.

BEARS TIE SERIES
H
TOM VENESKY Times Leader

ERSHEY –The Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins missed two chances to advance to the second round of the Calder Cup playoffs. The second straight loss to the Hershey Bears, 4-1 on Friday, April 27 turned Saturday’s Game Five into the deciding game. The Penguins were blanked on nine power play opportunities while Hershey connected on three of its four chances to take Game 4 of their opening round Calder Cup playoff

series 4-1. The win allowed Hershey to even up the bestof-five series at two games apiece and force a deciding Game 5 on Saturday, April 29, at the Mohegan Sun Arena. After watching their 2-0 series lead evaporate, the Penguins still weren’t hitting the panic button. “Now it’s a one game series,” defenseman Alexandre Picard said. “We don’t feel like there’s any momentum swings. We don’t believe in momentum. The way we’re thinking right now is it’s a one game series.”

For the second straight game, the Bears built a twogoal lead. On Friday, they did it with a tally late in the first period and another midway through the second. On Wednesday, the Penguins spotted the Bears a two-goal lead in the first period. Still, head coach John Hynes said the Penguins’ starts in both games weren’t all that bad. “On both nights we missed a primetime chance, and they
See CALDER CUP, Page 34

SPORTS
THE PATRIOT-NEWS

Hershey’s Dany Sabourin reacts after Wilkes-Barre/Scranton’s Eric Tangradi evens Friday’s game at two.

34

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 29, 2012

CALDER CUP
Continued from page 33

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTO/JASON RIEDMILLER

A collage was made celebrating the Riverside girls basketball team.

REUNITE
Continued from page 31

teammates, talk of the team’s potential accomplishments started early. Girls’ basketball in the Lackawanna League in general, and the Northern Division in particular, was near its peak when the 1986-87 season began. Valley View had been to the state Class AAA title game the season before. Wallenpaupack and Honesdale also had strong teams in a division from which Carbondale had emerged as a state champion and Mid Valley as a state finalist in the previous decade. The Lady Vikes still managed to roll through the regular-season schedule unbeaten, building momentum for their post-season run. When speaking to a gathering of about 60 at the banquet, assistant coach Frank Chisdock praised the players for the hard work and dedication that went into producing the team. There were reminders of other key contributions, including the community support which meant that the Lady Vikes had a larger cheering section than their opponents through each step of the playoff run. Coaches, from other sports in the Riverside athletic program and from Northern Division rivals, pitched in to travel around the state gathering scouting reports on upcoming opponents. The championship dream nearly came to an end early in the state tournament when the Lady Vikes had an off night, faced a double-figures deficit and still found themselves behind deep into a game against South Williamsport.

The comeback that night is one of the things I remember most from covering Riverside’s state championship run. It may have helped prepare the team for handling the eight-point deficit it faced against a talented Bishop Guilfoyle team from Altoona at the Hersheypark Arena in the Friday afternoon championship game March 27, 1987. A power outage in Taylor briefly cut off the fans back at home from the radio broadcast as the comeback started adding to the drama for those who could not make the trip. Ozark came off the bench to hit a long shot from the wing in the days before 3-pointers and Sporer completed the comeback with a steal and length-ofthe-court drive. Head coach Tom Nageli recalled ultimately being thankful that the noise from the crowd prevented his players from hearing his call for a timeout. Instead, they took a tie game into their own hands in the closing seconds. Nageli pointed out that all five players touched the ball on the gamewinning play. It ended with the three senior leaders. Sporer got the ball ahead to Oustrich on the right wing. Oustrich found Lisowski cutting under the basket from the left side with four seconds left for the last of her gamehigh 18 points and a 46-44 victory. The celebration had to wait through a timeout and one last defensive stop. When it was over, the team returned from Hershey the next morning for a trolley ride through Moosic and Taylor as the state champions were saluted. Twenty-five years later, it was a treat for many who were there to remember those days again.

came down and scored,” he said. “On both nights we had good starts.” Hershey’s first goal came after Picard just missed the net on a two-on-one chance. The Bears rushed back the other way and connected when a Zach Miskovic pass deflected off Cameron Schilling’s leg and past Brad Thiessen to make it 1-0. Both Hershey goals came on the power play, while the Penguins faltered with the man advantage, blanking on six opportunities through the first two periods. But just like Game 3, the Penguins chipped away at the Hershey lead. This time it was Jason Williams, who poked in an Alex Grant pass from across the crease to cut the Bears’ lead to 2-1 with two minutes left

in the second period. The Penguins received another boost in the waning seconds when Schilling was called for cross-checking at 19:29, allowing plenty of power play time to carry over into the third period. The Penguins failed to capitalize on the power play – their seventh -- and Grant said they missed an opportunity to seize control and mount a comeback. “To get that goal in the second should’ve sparked us a little more than it did,” he said. “We had to come out in the third and really, really step it up. Unfortunately we didn’t do that.” The Bears power play stepped up for a third time when a miscue by Eric Tangradi led to a 3-1 Hershey lead. Tangradi was whistled for unsportsmanlike conduct at the midway point of the third period after he shot the puck at Hershey’s Jacob Micflikier after the whistle.

“We can use some better judgment there,” Hynes said. On the ensuing power play, Ryan Potulny launched a slapshot from the top of the slot that Boyd Kane deflected past Thiessen for the two-goal lead. The Penguins got another power play opportunity with seven minutes left but couldn’t get the puck past Dany Sabourin, who stopped 22 of the 23 shots he faced. Picard said Thiessen wasn’t at fault for Friday’s loss. “First of all, we have to do a better job to not get in those penalty kill situations,” he said. “We have to be more disciplined. You can’t blame the goalie for those point blank shots with traffic in front of the net. We have to do a better job.”
MORE ONLINE: For coverage of Saturday’s deciding game, see www.golackawanna.com/sports.

ARTS

NEWS

GO LACKAWANNA PHOTOS/JASON RIEDMILLER

Riverside pitcher Lacee Collins helped lead the Lady Vikes to a 7-6 win over Old Forge.

TITLE
Continued from page 32 Title

Abington Heights and Scranton Prep are also in position to take titles outright after extending long unbeaten streaks. Scranton Prep plays at Holy Cross Monday night, April 30. BASEBALL Old Forge and Mid Valley each won consecutive road games to stay close behind Val-

ley View in Division 2. The Blue Devils and Spartans are 6-2 while the Cougars are 5-1. North Pocono regained sole possession of first place from Scranton in Division 1. Justin Haddix threw a twohitter with 11 strikeouts and Joe Runco scored both runs Wednesday night when the Trojans downed the Knights, 2-1. Runco scored on a Billy Nelson sacrifice fly and came all the way around from second base on a wild pitch on a third

SPORTS

strike. SOFTBALL North Pocono and Valley View remained unbeaten at the top of Divisions 1 and 2. Old Forge and rival Riverside got their Tuesday night game in under the lights in Taylor despite a rain shower early in the game. The Lady Vikes pulled out a 7-6 win with the help of three RBI by Ashley Buffton. Old Forge bounced back with a late rally for a 3-2 win over Dunmore on Thursday.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

PAGE 35

Fuel Up
with

You Could Win A FREE GAS CARD.
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$
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or a

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Read The Times Leader daily to see if you’re a winner.
Drop off your entry form at one of these locations!
Cross Valley Federal Credit Union - 9 locations Cooks Pharmacy Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags Cartridge World Schiel’s Family Markets - 2 locations Malacari’s Produce & Deli Ochman’s Coins & Jewelry

Now through May. 19, 2012 The Times Leader is giving away a $25 gas card every single day! Register for your chance to win by filling out the official entry form below and dropping it off at a participating location. Additional entry forms may be available at store locations. Enter as often as you like at any location. No purchase necessary. Read The Times Leader every day from May 6th through May 26th to see if you’re a winner. Each week, the previous week’s winners will be announced (i.e. the winner of the Saturday, May 19th $25 gas card will publish on Saturday, May 26th.) All contest forms will be picked up each Thursday during the contest period and seven winners will be selected through a random drawing of all entries collected for that week—one winner for each day. The Times Leader will also award a $500 gas card at the end of the contest to the grand prize winner. The grand prize winner will be drawn on May 25, 2012, from entries collected May 18, 2012 through noon on May 24, 2012. Grand prize winner will publish on Sunday May 27th. Must be 18 or older to enter. Employees of The Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company or any of its divisions or of any of the participating sponsors are not eligible for prizes. Winners can pick up their prize at The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, during normal business hours. Any prizes not claimed by June 30, 2012 will be forfeited.

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Wilkes-Barre • 270-3976 30 Hanover Street Wilkes-Barre • 970-4460

(PARSONS SECTION)

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570-823-7676

www.choiceone.org

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822-2025

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752012

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No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name and photo used for publicity. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre office. The winners will be determined through random drawing from all entries received during duration of promotion. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors’ employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

timesleader.com

PAGE 36

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

FAMILY CIRCUS

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

MARKETPLACE
300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

PAGE 37

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

golackawanna.com
500 Employment 600 Financial
406 536 IT/Software Development 536 IT/Software Development

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals
412 Autos for Sale
All wheel drive, cruise, CD player, low miles. $11,575

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com
ATVs/Dune Buggies

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

HONDA ‘04 CRV

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost 310 Attorney Services

WANTED ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS
HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

Web Developer
GWC is looking for a Web Developer to work in-house at our corporate office. Primary responsibilities would be the building and integration of interactive web sites, applications and services for both public and internal sites. Qualifications include proficiency in designing data-driven applications, and architecting efficient client-server solutions. The candidate must also have an in-depth understanding of the software development lifecycle and be able to communicate project status, issues, and resolutions. A Bachelor’s degree is required, along with at least 1 year of Microsoft VS.NET (C# or VB.NET) development experience with data-driven web applications. Experience with DotNetNuke and graphical design preferred but not required. GWC Warranty offers a competitive salary & comprehensive benefits package including medical and 401k.

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

Paid!!!

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,995 takes it away. 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
412 Autos for Sale

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

412 Autos for Sale
SANTE FE AWD, auto, alloys $13,900

HYUNDAI ‘07

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

To place your ad call...829-7130
HONDA ‘06 RIDGELINE RTS

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner. $15,900

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
AZZURA Leather moonroof & much more

409

Autos under $5000
Automatic, 4WD, power seats. $16,995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
120 Found
FOUND: adult gray, fluffy female cat in Duryea area. Yellow eyes, very friendly. 570-457-3983

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

TOMAHAWK`11

Interested candidates may submit their resumes via email to
ATV, 110 CC. Brand New Tomahawk Kids Quad. Only $695 takes it away! 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

4 auto, good condition. 120k. $2,450.

CHEVY ‘04 MALIBU4CLASSIC door, cylinder,

566 Sales/Business Development

To placeyour adcall. .829-7130
566 Sales/Business Development

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI ‘08

$15,570 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

careers@gwcwarranty.com or by fax at 570-456-0967

auto, 4x4 Super Cab, all power, cruise control, sliding rear window $3,850 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

FORD ‘01Triton V8, F150 XLT Pickup

YOUR CAREER. REINVENTED.
Picture a new kind of future – one where you can make an impact, not just a living. Train for a career in insurance and financial product sales with The Prudential Insurance Company of America’s Financial Professional Program. You’ll learn hands-on from seasoned professionals, in the classroom and the field. And you’ll get the support you need to prepare for required licensing exams. All while receiving a generous compensation and benefits package. After your training period, you’ll have a world of opportunities – including the chance to lead your own practice. Want to make an exciting career change? If you have a strong interest in financial sales, email your resume or call me today.
Lisa Hummel Agency Recruiter 32 Scranton Office Park Scranton, PA 18507 Phone 570-340-7052 Fax 570-340-7063 www.applicationstation.com Code: PRUDWB_2R Lisa.Hummel@Prudential.com

566 Sales/Business Development

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

150 Special Notices

Craft Oil Corporation, a Lubricant & Oil Equipment Distributor based in Avoca, PA is looking for Experienced, Motivated, and Dependable People to Join Our Avoca Team.

CDL Class B Drivers Wanted

PAYING $500
Full size 4 wheel drive trucks for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

Requirements: Valid CDL Class B license with Tanker & Hazmat endorsement. Minimum of 1 year driving experience, Tanker experience preferred. Territory includes counties throughout PA, NY, NJ, and DE. Competitive pay with experience factored. Full benefit package including health benefits, FSA, 401K, and paid time off. Preferred method of applying for this position is to visit our website to complete an online application. To obtain an application please visit our facility or you can visit our website at www.craftoilcorp.com. To apply in person: Craft Oil Corporation 837 Cherry Street Avoca, PA, 18641 Fax- 570-451-0700 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. EEO/M/F/D/V

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd row seat, runs good, needs body work $1900. 570-902-5623

MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

DODGE `00 DURANGO SPORT VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Newark, New Jersey and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers and are committed to diversity in its workforce. Prudential is an employer that participates in E-Verify. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities.

0204417-00001-00 Ed. 7/2011

PAGE 38

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

Open House Directory
Hop Bottom Clarks Summit South Abington Green Ridge Dalton Green Ridge Dickson City Old Forge Dickson City Clarks Summit Scranton Madison Twp. Scranton Scranton Old Forge Peckville Scranton Scranton Clarks Summit Harveys Lake Scranton Dalton Tunkhannock Scranton Scranton Scranton Union Dale Clarks Summit Clarks Summit Dunmore Mayfield Tunkhannock Clarks Summit Spring Brook Twp. Clarks Summit Clarks Green Dunmore Peckville Moscow Moosic 1432 Lakeside Road

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.
SATURDAY APRIL 28TH, 2012 ,
12-2PM

ERA One Source Realty

14058 Orchard Dr. Lot 38 Chatham Hill Cir. 1920 N. Washington Ave 202 Miles St. 1036 Columbia 1400 Main St. 910 S. Main St 1221 Throop St. 2615 Ransom Rd 102 Yesu Dr. 281 Spring Run Ln. 2404 N. Washington Ave. 1118 Stanton St. 148 Harrison St. 1125 Mott St. 634 Taylor Ave. 824 Brook St. 318 Simerell Rd. 855 Queen of Peace Rd. 437 Genet St. 142 Wallsville Rd. 26 Susquehanna Ave. 933 Woodlawn St. 356 N Hyde Park 1751 Sanderson Ave. 2730 Lewis Lake 99 Parkland Dr. 108 Griffon Pond Rd. 1451 Monroe 206 Gorham Ave. 3686 SR6 1303 Sycamore Ln. 1024 Rt. 307 613 Meadow Ln 235 N. Abington Rd. 320 Cherry St. 1125 Mott St. 2911 Aberdeen Rd. 2305 Browning Close

SUNDAY APRIL 29TH, 2012 ,
1-3PM 1-3PM 1-3PM 12-2PM 12:30-2:30PM 11AM-1PM 2-4PM 1-3PM 12-2PM 12-2PM 11:30AM-1PM 11AM-12:30PM 12-1:30PM 12-2PM 1-2PM 1-2:30PM 2:30-4PM 2:30-4PM 1-3PM 12-1:30PM 12-2PM 1-3PM 2-4PM 12-1:30PM 12-1:30PM 12:30-2:30PM 1-3PM 1-2:30PM 1:30-3:30PM 2:30-4PM 12-2PM 12-2PM 1-3PM 1-2:30PM 1-2:30PM 1-2PM 1-2PM 1-2:30PM 1-2:30PM

ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty ERA One Source Realty Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network Realty Network ERA Brady Associates Century 21 Sherlock Homes Century 21 Sherlock Homes Century 21 Sherlock Homes Century 21 Sherlock Homes Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country Coldwell Banker Town & Country O’Boyle Real Estate O’Boyle Real Estate O’Boyle Real Estate O’Boyle Real Estate O’Boyle Real Estate Prudential Preferred Properties Prudential Preferred Properties Prudential Preferred Properties Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
One owner, 4WD, Alloys.

PAGE 39 412 Autos for Sale

JEEP LIBERTY ‘06

519 Wyoming Ave Scranton 570-961-5945 www.tomsgarageandsales.com

& Auto Sales

CROSSROAD MOTORS
700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl. 14k, Factory Warranty. $21,699 ‘11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 26k, Factory Warranty, 6 Cylinder $20,799 ‘11 Nissan Rogue AWD, 17k, Factory Warranty. $19,699 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 6 cyl. 32k $12,899 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed, Factory warranty. $12,199 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX 4x4 65k, a title. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR 62k, Rear air A/C $7999 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,299 ‘11 Toyota Rav 4 4x4 AT only 8,000 miles, new condition $23,399 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

570-825-7988

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale
112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

11,100 miles Gray $29,499

CHEVY ‘10 CAMARO SS DODGE ‘09 CALIBER

SXT 29,200 miles Red $12,995

LOADED w/ Plow 25,600miles White $31,495

GMC ‘08 SIERRA SLT

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
Leather moonroof, smartkey, 1 owner

$14,880 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SUBARU FORESTER’S

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

8

412 Autos for Sale
Low miles, leather & alloys. $8,800

SATURN ‘03 VUE

starting at $11,450 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

to choose From

We’ll run your ad in the classified section until your vehicle is sold.

Selling your ride?

NISSAN ‘09 ALTIMA SL

Eddie Bauer 36,000 miles, Black $20,995 Limited AWD 28,000 miles, Red $22,995

FORD ‘08 EXPLORER

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

IMPREZA’S

SUBARU

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

FORD ‘08 EDGE

$19,995 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

4

FWD 74,000 miles Gray $13,495

HYUNDAI ‘07 SANTA FE TOYOTA ‘06 SIENNA LE DODGE ‘05 NEON SXT

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

34,000 miles Light Blue $15,900

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

starting at $12,400 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

to choose From

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

ONLY ONE LEADER. N N ONLY ONE LEADER.
timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

55,000 miles Orange $6,995

545

85,000 miles Silver $10,900

CHEVY ‘03 SUBURBAN LT

Marketing/ Product

545

Marketing/ Product

70,000 miles, Black $8,899

MERCEDES ’00 BENZ ML320 HONDA ‘00 PASSPORT

Marketing Manager
The economy may be slowing, but GWC Warranty is growing! GWC, a nationwide leader in vehicle service contracts, is seeking a Marketing Manager for our brand new Wilkes-Barre executive office. The ideal candidate will possess an analytical mind, an eagerness to manage a variety of projects and the ability to drive those projects to completion. Typical projects would include: Strategic differentiation, market segmentation, gathering voice of the customer data, market-specific growth strategies and brand messaging. This job is MBA-level work but may also be perfect for the high-performing individual who has experience overseeing process development and execution of strategic, corporate initiatives. Candidates must possess a bachelor’s degree and have strong working knowledge of the Microsoft Office Suite (Excel, Project & PowerPoint in particular). Additional knowledge of other database & operating platforms is a plus. GWC Warranty offers a competitive salary & comprehensive benefits package including medical and 401k.

Black 88,000 miles

DOMESTIC & FOREIGN SALES & SERVICE

• All Wheel Drive • 31 MPG Highway • IIHSTop Safety Pick

Specializing in A/C Ser vice

412 Autos for Sale

To place your ad cal . 829-7130

new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE 4 door sedan. Like

SALE PRICE

$

25,900 + 0.9

CDB-11

% FINANCING
AVAILABLE

Highest Predicted Resale Value Midsize Utility Vehicle Ve

Interested candidates may submit their resumes via email to

570-346-4641 1-800-982-4054 www.minookasubaru.com
HOURS: MONDAYTHRUTHURSDAY 9:00 A.M.TO 8:30 P .M. FRIDAY 9:00 A.M.TO 5:00 P .M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M.TO 2:00 P .M. • CLOSED SUNDAY
Based on ALG’s 2012 Residual Value Award for Midsize Utility Vehicles. ALG, the industry benchmark for residual values and depreciation data, www.alg.com. EPA estimated fuel economy for Outback 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary.Top Safety Pick given by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (iihs.org).Tax and tags not included. Financing contingent on lender approval. Call for details.

careers@gwcwarranty.com or by fax at 570-456-0967

PAGE 40 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

439

Motorcycles

439

Motorcycles

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200
45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727
• All original

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
Motorcycles

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

To place your LINE UP ad call...829-7130 A GREAT DEAL...
451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

IN CLASSIFIED!

CHRYSLER `02 TOWN & COUNTRY

1500 Cargo Van. AWD. V8 automatic. A/C. New brakes & tires. Price reduced $10,250. Call 570-474-6028

GMC `05 SAVANA

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

442 RVs & Campers

439

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean. $9,000 (570) 646-2645

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

439

Motorcycles

CITY AUTO MART
State St. & Highland Avenue Clarks Summit, PA 570-586-3015
Chevrolet ‘99 Blazer
124,000 miles $4,697

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

115,000 miles $4,995

Buick ‘01 LeSabre

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

BMW 2010 K1300S

439

Motorcycles

$15,000 FIRM. Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.

Honda ‘03 CR-V
116,000 miles $9,995

421

Mitsubishi ‘03 Eclipse
135,000 miles $6,994

Boats & Marinas

GRUMMAN ‘95 DEEPV
16’ 48hp Evinrude 50 lb thrust electric motor. All tackle and life vests included. Live well, fish finder. $4,000 570-579-3975

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $1,300 or best offer 570-362-3626 Ask for Lee

MERCEDES 1975

124,000 miles $5,398

Ford ‘03 Windstar

BMW ‘05 X3
90,000 miles $14,995

427

Chevrolet ‘05 Tahoe
99,000 miles $14,995

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

Custom Vehicle Operations. Very Unique, Fast Bike. 1800cc. 10,000 miles. Performance Rinehart pipes, comfortable Mustang seat with back rest and detachable rack , Kuryakyn pegs and grips, color matched frame, SE heavy breather air filter comes with HD dust cover and gold CVO owners key. Excellent condition. Silver Rush/ Midnight Black. Asking $13,500 Call Ron @ 570- 868-3330

HARLEY ‘07 SCREAMING EAGLE DYNA Assembled by

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

1 owner, only 7k miles. $22,900 560 Pierce Street Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced for quick sale $6,295. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

HYANDAI ‘11 SANTA FE

NISSAN ‘97 PICKUP XE
4WD, alloys, 5 speed. $6,880

Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

KIA ‘08 SPORTAGE EX
4WD, Low Miles. $14,450

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA ‘08 4 RUNNER

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

One owner, only 42k miles. $8,880

CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

118,000 miles $8,995

Ford ‘05 Escape

Chrysler ‘05 300 AWD
93,000 miles $11,995

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

FLHRC. Burgundy / Cream. 6 speed. Cruise control. Back rests, grips, battery tender, cover. Willie G accessories. 19,000 miles. $13,250. Williamsport, PA 262-993-4228

HARLEY DAVIDSON `07 Road King Classic

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Electronic 6 speed automatic. Brown leather “King Ranch” interior. Heat/cool front seats. Power moonroof, rear view camera, 18” aluminum wheels, tow package, navigation system. 23,000 miles. Asking $30,000 Call Jeff @ 570-829-7172

4X4 LARIAT 145” WB STYLESIDE 5.4L V8 engine

FORD `10 F150 BLACK KING RANCH

REDUCED!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

AWD, Black interior/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

OUTLANDER SPORT SE

MITSUBISHI `11

1 Owner, moonroof & alloys. $21,800 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

506 Administrative/ Clerical

Leather, alloys & moonroof $16,995

FORD ‘08 ESCAPE XLT

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts

Toyota ‘05 Highlander
87,000 miles $13,997

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

HSoft riding FLH. ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

Experienced general office. Car dealership experience preferred. Send resume to: c/o Times Leader Box 4000 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
All original $12,000

509

Jeep ‘06 Commander
63,000 miles $14,995

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

$49,000

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL MERCEDES ‘29
$24,000

Jeep ‘09 Commander
70,000 miles $16,973

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

FORD ‘09 ESCAPE LTD
Only 14k miles, leather moonroof, 1 owner $21,880

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

All Cars Reconditioned, Guaranteed & Certified for an Extended Warranty In Business for Over 20 Years

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes.
Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $7595. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

570-574-1275

FREE PICKUP

A large architectural woodworking company located in Kingston, PA is looking for experienced cabinet makers and finishers. Great pay and benefits. Only solid, mature, and positive people should apply. Call: 570-283-5934 Or email: agata @4daughters.net

Architectural Woodworkers Needed

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

PAGE 41

PAGE 42 518 Customer Support/Client Care 533 Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair 542 Logistics/ Transportation 542 Logistics/ Transportation 566 Sales/Retail/ Business Development 630 Money To Loan
“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 744 Furniture & Accessories 784 Tools
LAWN MOWER 19” rechargeable rotary mower with charger, model no 247. 370480. Like new gently used 2 years on small townhouse plot. New $400; asking $150. 570-825-2961

Our busy animal hospital is looking for a motivated, dependable person to work in our client services and telephone receptionist departments. Customer service and experience answering multi-line telephones is preferred. Ability to work well with the public and attention to detail a must! Hours will include weekdays, some Saturdays and evenings. Please reply to: c/o The Times Leader Box 3095 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

CLIENT SERVICES/ TELEPHONE RECEPTIONIST

Our company is seeking an individual that has extensive experience in all BODY SHOP OPERATIONS. Applicants must have first hand knowledge of DRP repair requirements and estimating systems. They must show leadership skills with an emphasis on production, quality, and customer satisfaction. PA State Appraisers Licenses Required. A full benefit package & competitive salary is offered. COCCIA FORD LINCOLN COCCIA COLLISION CENTER 577 East Main St Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18701 Rudy Podest 570-823-8888 rpodest@ cocciacars.com ALL APPLICANTS ARE CONFIDENTIAL.

BODY SHOP MANAGER

Gas field/landscape drivers plus hands on labor required. Operate dump trucks & load equipment on lowboy. Deliver to job site. Must operate skid steer excavator, hydro-seed truck, etc. Will plow in winter. Must have clean driving record and pass drug test. Top Wages Paid. Call Harvis Interview Service @ 542-5330. Leave message. Will send an application. Or forward resume: varsity.harvis@ gmail.com Employer is Varsity, Inc. No walk-ins. EOE

CDL-A DRIVER

BOLUS FREIGHT SYSTEMS is looking for two straight truck drivers. Must have Class A CDL license, year round work available. For more information call: 1-800-444-1497 EXT 721 OR HIT ‘0’ CARL
AND ASK FOR OR JOE D.

Drivers/ Straight Truck

EXCLUSIVE CASINO RESORT RETAILER

MRG

SALES ASSOCIATES
WE
OFFER A GREAT BENEFITS PACKAGE!!!!

IS LOOKING FOR

SECTIONAL, beautiful 5 piece beige leather. In perfect condition. Includes hide-a-bed and two recliners. New $3,700, now $1,500. Call 570-474-5643 TABLE 45” drop leaf oak table $25. Cane oak chairs $5. each. 22” round oak lamp table $5. Oak plant table $8. 9 table lamps $5 each. 570-639-1653

QUALIFIED CANDIDATES CAN APPLY IN PERSON AT OUR MARSHALL ROUSSO STORE IN MOHEGAN SUN CASINO, ON-LINE AT www.marshall retailgroup.com
OR FAX YOUR RESUME TO 609-317-1126

800 PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs

756

Medical Equipment

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

522

Education/ Training

adjunct days. One for MASSAGE THERAPY INSTRUCTOR and one for HEALTH INFORMATION instructor. Qualified applicants must have minimum 3 years work experience in related field. Teaching experience a plus but not required. Fax resume to: 570-287-7936 Or send to Director of Education Fortis Institute 166 Slocum Street Forty Fort PA 18704

TEACHING POSITION Two openings,

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

for an experienced driver/warehouse. Air brake CDL preferred, but not required. Must have experience driving a 26 foot straight truck. Excellent starting rate and full benefits package. Apply in person to: INTERSTATE BUILDING MATERIALS, INC. Attn: Director of HR 322 Laurel St. Pittston 18640

DRIVER/ WAREHOUSE Immediate opening

DRIVERS Local drivers wanted. To run from Mountain Top to Carlisle, PA. 2 positions available. Most weekends at home. $16 an hour. Great benefits. Plus much more…Call Celadon today! 800-729-9770. www.Drive Celadon.com

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
To work the jewelry floor. Previous experience is a plus. Must have great personality and able to work days, nights and some weekends. Part time or full time. Full benefits available. Send resumes to: The Times Leader Box 3090 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

A PHENOMENAL PLACE TO WORK!

WALKER for handicap $6. 570-779-9791

700 MERCHANDISE
710 Appliances

758 Miscellaneous
COFFEE MAKER Bunn automatic, two burner, stainless $75. 847-3368 MAILBOX, Step 2, heavy duty plastic, hunter green. Mounts over 4” x 4” post, includes reflective numbers. Good condition, $30. (sells new for $60). 570-814-9574

SALESPERSON

white, 2 years old $150. obo. Broan, white $50. obo. 570-574-3899

DISHWASHER 24”

PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

RANGE HOOD 30”

712

Baby Items

Drivers CDL-A: Local Hazleton dedicated route! Home every night! Great Pay, Benefits! Estenson Logistics Apply: www.goelc.com 1-866-336-9642

UMBRELLA Stroller $7. 570-779-9791

726

Clothing

To place your ad call...829-7130
MALIBU LIGHT Expressions, tier lights with auto timer, 12 fixtures. New $74. sell $50. Aluminum fine screen 48”w, 15’ roll $10. 570-779-9791 OFFICE DESK with pull out drawers in great shape $25; new bathroom sink, white $10; bathroom sink, tan $10; School classroom desk $20. 570-262-7923.

Full or part time. No licenses needed. Call 570-310-1394

INSPECTOR

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

GasSearch Drilling Services Corporation is looking for the following position:

- Medical, Dental, Vision Insurance - 401K - Quarterly Safety Bonus - Paid Holidays - Paid Vacation

Experienced Mechanic

Apply within or online: GasSearch Drilling Services Corporation 8283 Hwy 29 Montrose, PA 18801 570-278-7118 www. gassearchdrilling. com

Penn State Mechanical Contractors has openings for energetic, motivated, experienced plumbers and pipefitters. Experienced foremen are also encouraged to apply. We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benefit package based on experience. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Send resume with work history to: Penn State Mechanical Contractors, Inc. PO Box 1027 Wilkes Barre, PA 18703 Fax: 570-823-0736 Kimberly@pennstate mechanical.com

PLUMBERS AND PIPEFITTERS

Due to our continued growth, Bolus Freight Systems is expanding its fleet of company drivers. Company drivers will enjoy dedicated runs or regional runs. You can be home every night or every weekend, the choice is yours. You can earn in excess of $1400 per week, and you will be driving a new or late model truck. Part time and weekend work also available. This is a career opportunity for dependable drivers to work for an industry leader and one of the highest paying companies in the business. We offer a performance bonus, paid vacations and holidays, medical and life insurance as well as 401K. For more information call: 1-800-444-1497 ext 721 or hit ‘0’ and ask for Carl or Joe D. Drivers: Local work with Palletized Freight. Home Every Day! Minimum Weekly Pay Guarantee. CDL-A, 2 years experience. 23 years of age. GoPenske.com #1200649 or 866-823-0357

DRIVERS

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385

COAT

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

744

Furniture & Accessories

600 FINANCIAL
610 Business Opportunities

COFFEE TABLE, solid oak, great condition, measures 53" Lx24" x 17" h $75. 570-690-6087

758 Miscellaneous
REVEREWARE, clean, shiny & very good condition, 8 pieces $3-$6 each. Corelle Spring Blossom Crazy daisy 60 pieces @.30 each. Flatware 26 piece Everbrite stainless deluxe in case $8. Vintage style 12 piece pumpkin tea set $10. Ceramic Christmas tree with lights $5. 639-1653

548 Medical/Health

Medical Equipment Technician
EXPERIENCE DELIVERING & INSTRUCTING ON MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES. FULL TIME POSITION, REQUIRES SOME ON CALL. MUST BE DETAIL ORIENTED, GOOD VERBAL & WRITTEN SKILLS A MUST. RESUMES TO

FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR YOURSELF” INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO

Solid Oak. Table with 2 leaves, 6 chairs, buffet, protective table pads included. $800 570-299-5046 ETAGERE. Curved wrought iron unit with glass shelves. $60. 570-288-5251

DINING ROOM SET

815

Dogs

PRIOR

rjacobs@caregivers america.com.

*Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income *Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs *Veterans Financing Program * Accounts available through 0ut Wilkes-Barre & Scranton

To place your ad call...829-7130
* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 ROCKING CHAIR Boston $100. 570-847-336

770

Photo Equipment

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES Pure-Bred. Black
Brown. $500. Call 570-840-4243

&

FURNISH FOR LESS

CAMERA. Nikon 35mm zoom touch 470 AF. $75 570-847-3368

776 Sporting Goods
BASKETBALL HOOP Portable. Adjustable height. Rim slightly bent, otherwise good condition. $40. 570-881-6160 DRIVER. Callaway Ftiz 13 degree Senior shaft. Very good condition. $75 570-287-5745

duty case in the Dallas area for 3-11 and 11-7 shifts. Call Jessica at 451-3050 for immediate interview.

RNS AND LPNS needed for private

Janpro.com
Located at Wyoming Valley Mall must sell. $125,000 negotiable. Ask for Rob 570-693-3323

570-824-5774

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
$400 570-250-9690

TURN KEY OPERATION

LHASA-POO & SHIH-TZUcurrent. PUPPIES Shots

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 815 Dogs 906 Homes for Sale 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 950 Half Doubles

PAGE 43

AKC, 8 weeks, 2 females & 2 males. Chocolate & party colors Shots & wormed. Vet checked. Home Raised. $500. 570-864-2643

POMERANIAN

Fire damaged home. Sold as is. 60’ x 235’ lot. Public sewer, water & gas. $34,500 negotiable Call 570-675-0446, evenings.

SHAVERTOWN 105 Summit Street

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

225-227 Boston Ave Double block. Wyoming Area schools. Out of flood zone. 1 side rented to long term tenant at $525 /month. Other side remodeled - move in or rent at $650/month. 3 bedrooms each side, gas furnaces, sunrooms, large yard. $149,000. Call 570-357-0042

WEST PITTSTON

wall to wall carpet, heat, public water, sewer & recycling fees included. Tile bathroom with shower. Attic & yard. Stove & fridge furnished. Washer / dryer hookup. Good location, off street parking, No pets. 1 year lease & security, $650. Call 570-655-0530

FORTY FORT 2nd floor, 4 rooms,

WILKES-BARRE

378 Miller St. Recently remodeled, 1st floor. 1 bedroom, living room, large modern kitchen with stove. New bath, clean basement, laundry hookups. Enclosed porch, parking. No pets/smoking. $475/mo. includes heat and water. 570-288-9843

LUZERNE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Parsons Section 3 bedroom. Off street parking. Pets welcome. $550/mo. Credit / Criminal check required. Call 570-266-5336

WILKES-BARRE

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY
1042 Cleaning & Maintainence

Easily converts to single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $120,000. 570-693-2408

DOUBLE BLOCK

WYOMING

Beautiful, oversized executive style apartment in large historic home. Two bedrooms, one bath, granite kitchen, hardwood floors, dining room, living room, basement storage, beautiful front porch, washer/ dryer. $1,200 monthly plus utilities. No pets. No smoking. Call 570-472-1110 KINGSTON

KINGSTON

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*

Shoppingfora newapartment? Classifiedlets youcomparecostswithouthassle orworry! Getmoving withclassified!
953 Houses for Rent

Collect Cash. Not Dust.
Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

We would love to clean your home. We clean around your schedule. We clean weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly. We also do one time cleaning. Call Eddie 570-677-0344 or online at www. empresacleaning. com

HOUSE CLEANING

1057Construction & Building

LEHIGH VALLEY

912 Lots & Acreage
196 Foote Avenue Corner lot, bordering Foote Ave and McAlpine St. Commercial zoning. $10,000 or best offer. Please Call 610-675-9132

317 N. Maple Ave. Large Two story, 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Central Heat & Air, washer/dryer in unit, parking. $840 + utilities & 1 month security 570-262-6947

EATON TERRACE

1st floor. 1 bedroom. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! Off street parking. Fresh paint. NO PETS $525 + security 570-477-6018 leave message

NANTICOKE

GARAGE DOOR

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.
ONLY ONE LEADER. ONL NL LY N LEADER. LE LE
timesleader.com

944

Commercial Properties

315 PLAZA
1st floor, 2 bedrooms. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $750 + security & references. Call 570-969-9268

DURYEA

PITTSTON

1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

JACKSON TWP. 3 bedroom home on Hillside Road. $650/mo + utilities. Lake Lehman School District. No pets. Call American Asphalt Paving Co., at 570-696-1181, ext. 243 between 7:00AM and 3PM Monday -Friday

BACK MOUNTAIN

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE 570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489

1135

Hauling & Trucking

WEST PITTSTON

Charming remodeled 2 story is in excellent move in condition. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, carpeted floors, patio/balcony, basement, central heating, deck/ porch, Pool, view & 2 car garage. It has new roof, windows & siding. Located in quiet development close to everything, walking distance from grocery store. School District is one of the best in the area. Taxes are cheap yet across from a wildlife preserve, so you will feel like your on vacation when sitting on your porch. For sale by owner. Act fast this charming home isn’t going to be available long! $219,000 Call 696-2009 for details or view http://1580spring creekcircle. blogspot.com

5 Acres $19,900 10 Acres $29,900 23 Acres - Mini Farm - $189,900 Gorgeous views, woods, streams! 2 1/2 hours NY City! Call (888) 793-7762

FARM LIQUIDATION!

UPSTATE NY

Freshly painted, 2 bedrooms, refrigerator & stove, washer/dryer & water provided, off-street parking, no pets, $525/month + heat, electric & security deposit. Call (570)417-2919

KINGSTON

Containing Six separate offices, 1 large meeting room. Segregated bathrooms. Kitchenette. Total recent renovation. Great location. Lot parking in rear. $3,500 monthly. Call 570-299-5471

OFFICE SPACE

KINGSTON

PETS ALLOWED!

932 Shoemaker Ave. 1 bedroom, 1st floor, carpet, private drive. Gas heat, fridge, stove, w/d hookup. $425 plus utilities. No pets. 570-693-4226

WEST WYOMING

950

Half Doubles

3 bedroom, 1 bath, eat-in kitchen, washer/dryer hookup, off street parking. $700 + utilities.

HARVEYS LAKE
leave message

FOR SALE OR RENT Single home in gated retirement village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Granite countertops, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, appliances included. Quiet 55 plus community. No Pets. One year lease. $1675/mo + utilities & security. Monthly maintenance fee included. 570-592-3023

DALLAS

ALWAYS READY HAULING Moving, Deliveries, Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information.
*2008 Pulse Research

Over 47,000

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section.
*2008 Pulse Research

91%

What Do You HaveTo Sell Today?

570-606-7917

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Modern 1 bedroom on the park between Market & Pierce Bridges. $555/mo + electric washer/dryer in apt. Air, Dishwasher, Free Internet, Parking, Storage. Call Jeff at 570-822-8577

1 bedroom. Heat & hot water included. $550 month + security required 973-879-4730

WILKES-BARRE

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $900 + electric only

NANTICOKE Desirable

3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1st floor laundry, new carpeting and paint. $590 + utilities 570-814-3838

KINGSTON

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

What Do Y Have ou T Sell o T oday?
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
ONL NLY N LE D NL LE ONLY ONE LEADER. LEADER.
timesleader.com

Renovated 1st floor, 2 bedroom apartment. New carpeting and paint. Fridge & stove. Water Included. $600 + security & utilities. Call 570-240-6620 or 570-388-6503

HARDING

1 nice neighborhood. Off street parking. Heat included. $525 Call 570-441-4101

LUZERNE bedroom. Quiet,

1 bedroom, some appliances included, all utilities included except electric, hardwood floors, Pet friendly. $600. 570-969-9268

WILKES-BARRE 155 W. River St.

1/2 Double, 2 bedroom. Newly remodeled. Gas Heat. Washer & dryer hookup, yard, parking. Section 8 Not Approved. No pets. $550 + utilities. 570-714-1530

KINGSTON Penn St.

971 Vacation & Resort Properties
Furnished Summer Home. Weekly and/ or Monthly. Starting June to end of August. Washer & dryer. Free boat slips. Call for more details. 570-639-5041

HARVEYS LAKE

1165

Lawn Care

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
ONL NLY N LE D L LE ONLY ONE LEADER. LEADER.
timesleader.com

Affordable, reliable, meticulous. Rates as low as $20. Emerald Green 570-825-4963

GRASS CUTTING

PAGE 44

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise 796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

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Auto Parts

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In a matter of weeks, you can shave hundreds of dollars off your grocery bill just by clipping

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

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Apartments/ Unfurnished

To subscribe, call 829-5000.

Apartments Come in and see our spacious 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments with heat and water included!

Applewood Acres

Ask About Our 3 Bedroom Special!

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Abington Heights School District Pets Welcomed 1% Wage Tax House Buying Clause* Job Transfer Clause*
For more information Call 570-586-2491 or visit us online at www.applewoodacres.com
*restrictions apply

Already a subscriber? Pick up EXTRA COPIES of The Sunday Times Leader at the newsstand and multiply your savings!

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

PAGE 45

PAGE 46

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let o m .c

PAGE 47

PRICES SLA SHED
2001 CHEVY ASTRO CARG O V AN
ONE O W N ER
7 PASSEN G ER ONE O W N ER ONE O W N ER

A LL P RE-O W N ED VEHI CLES

R EN OVA TI ON SA LE

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2010 VO LKSW AG EN BEETLE CO NVERTI BLE FI EDI O N O N LY 798 NAL TI
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MI LES!

SAL PRI E CE O NL Y $ *

23 999
,
ONE O W N ER

1 O F O N LY 1500 M ADE!

CKUP 2007 CHEVY CO BALT 2006 CHRYSLER TO W N 2005 CHEVY M ALI BU 2003 CHEVY S10 PI 4Dr XCAB XTREM E EDI O N TI & CO UNTRY LS

ONL Y 43K MI LES

ONL Y 48K MI LES

ONL Y 38K MI LES

ONL Y 43K MI LES

#Z2656,V6 4 Speed A utom atic w /O verdrive,D eep Tinted G l igh Back BucketSeats,FrontA uxilary Seat ass,H l $ *

#12581A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,D eep Tinted G l ass,A M /FM /C D ,C ruise,Til t,Low M il es
$

9 999
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ONE O W N ER

#12058A ,3.5LV6,A uto.,A /C ,C ruise,A M /FM /C D , Rem ote Start,PW ,PD L,A loy W heel l s,Rear Spoil er

#Z2583, 4. 3LV6, 5 Speed, PS, PB, A /C , PW , P .Locks, Tit C rui l, se

#Z2391, 4 C yl A T, PS, PB, A /C , , A M /FM /St ereo, D river I o C ent nf er

$

11 399*
,

$

11 999*
,

$

12 487*
,

2007 CHEVY I PALA LT M SEDAN
REM O TE START

2009 CHEVY M ALI BU SEDAN

2007 SATURN AURA XE
ONL Y 39K MI LES

2007 PO NTI TO RRENT AC

2001 CHEVY SI LVERADO EXTENDED CAB LT 4X4
ONE O W N ER
LEATHER

#12555A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning, A l inum W heel D ,PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors, um s,C Leather,Til ruise,Low M il t,C es

$

12 784*
,

#12034A ,4 C yl utom atic,Traction C ontrol ir ,A ,A C onditioning,C ruise,PW ,PD L,O nStar,Pow er Seats

#Z2436,3.5LV6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat w /Lum bar A djustm ent,Steering W heelC ontrol O w ner s,1

$

12 999*
,

$

2005 CHEVY TRAI LBLAZER 2007 SUZUKI XL7 4DR LS 4X4 AW D
ONL Y 37K MI LES

12 999*
,

#12554A ,V6 A utom atic,Stabil i-Trak,A ir,PW ,PD L, C D ,55K M il ne O w ner es,O

$

13 999*
,

#12260A ,5. 3LV8 A uto. / Tow H aulM ode,A ir,PW ,PD L, ,w D eep Tinted G l ass,C ruise,O f fRoad Suspension Pkg,Trail ering Equipm ent,C astA l inum W heel nl 46K M il um s,O y es

$

14 888*
,

2011 CHEVY AVEO LT

A 2011 CHEVY HHR LT 2011 KI SO UL SPO RT
ONL Y 9K MI LES

ONE O W N ER

ONL Y 46K MI LES

#Z2682, 6 C yl A T, PS, PB, A /C , PW , , PL, Til, C ruise, A l .W heel t um s

$

14 995*
,

#12004A ,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Til t, C ruise,A loy W heel l s

#Z2573,4 C yl T,PS,PB,A /C ,Leather, ,A Sunroof ,16K,A l .W heel um s,Spoil er

$

2007 CHEVY EXPRESS

“Regenc Conversi y on” Van

2010 SUBARU FO RESTER 2.5X LI I AW D M TED
SUN RO O F ONE O W N ER

14 999*
,

$

2008 H UM M ER H3

15 389*
,

#Z2561,2.2LA utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,C ruise,Luggage Rack Rail s,XM Satelite,O nStar,Running Boards,1 O w ner l

$

2010 CHEVRO LET SUBURBAN LT 4W D
ONE O W N ER

15 900*
,

#12300A ,1. uto. ir,C ruise, 6LA ,A A M /FM /C D ,PW ,PD L,A loys,18K M il l es $ *

2010 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ
ONL Y 18K MI LES

16 972
,

ONE O W N ER

LO W MI LES

#Z2661,4.3LV6 A utom atic,A /C ,Ful oor C overing, lFl PW ,PD L,C l Seats,O nStar,C ruise,O nl 49K M il oth y es

#12550A ,2. uto. ir,Leather,A loy 5LA ,A l W heel ,PD L,C ruise,P.M irrors s,PW

#Z2680A ,3. 7LVortec I5 A utom atic,A ir,Pow er O ptions,C hrom e A l inum W heel eated Leather um s,H Seats,6 D isc C D M onsoon Stereo,O nStar,XM Satelite l

#12343A ,V8 A uto.,Front/Rear A /C & H eat,Leather,Bose Stereo,H D Trail Pkg,Rem ote Start,3rd Row ,Pow er ering O ptions,O nstar,A l inum W heel uetooth & M uch M ore! um s,Bl

$

17 900*
,

$

21 888*
,

$

23 999*
,

#12519A ,V8 A utom atic,A /C ,A ssistSteps,Leather, Rem ote Start,Pow er O ptions,Sunroof O nStar,20” , W heel eated/C ool FrontSeats,N avigation s,H ed

$

31 999*
,

$

38 900*
,

* r ices p lu s t x & t g s . P r io r u s e d a ily r en t l o n s electvehicles . Selectp ict r es f o r illu s t a t n p u r p o s es o n ly. P a a a u r io XM a n d On St r f ees a p p lica b le. Lo w AP R t w ell q u a lif ied b u yer s .N o tr es p o n s ib le f o r t o g r a p hica l er r o r s . a o yp

VA LLEY 821-2772•1-800-444-7172 601 Ki d er Street,W ikes-Ba rre,PA d l CHEVROLET

KEN W A LLA CE’ S

Sca n From M ob ile D evice For M ore Sp ecia ls

M o n .-Thu rs .8:30-8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30-7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30-5:00p m

EXIT 1 70B O FF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGH T O N BU SIN ESS RO U TE 309 TO SIXTH L IGH T J ST BEL O W W YO M IN G V AL L EY M AL L . . U

PAGE 48

TH IS IS B IG ! TH IS IS IG
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TH E NUM BER 1 NISSAN DEAL ER I TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGI N* N O *

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19 9

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2011 N IS S A N M URA N O CROS S -CA BRIOL E T A W D
STK#N 20877 M O D EL# 27011 M SR P $47, 520

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A W H A T A L EA SE! 3.5S V S E DA N
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