You are on page 1of 18

DALLAS POST5 0 ¢

C M Y K
Vol. 122 No. 9
THE BACK MOUNTAIN'S NEWSPAPER SINCE 1889
The
www.mydallaspost.com An edi ti on of The Ti mes Leader
April 29 - May 5, 2012
WILKES-BARRE, PA.
Harveys Lake Police Chief
Charles Musial said the current
stationonStateRoute415has too
many safety issues to justify stay-
ing rather than moving to the for-
mer recreation center on Little
League Road.
The borough received a
$78,220 grant fromgaming funds
in March to proceed with the pro-
ject, which includes renovating
the former recreationbuildingin-
toapolicestationandmovingthe
borough offices to the current po-
lice building.
Council voted 4-2 in favor of
moving forward with the project
at a meeting April 17. Council
members Larry Radel, Boyd Bar-
ber, Fran Kopko and Amy Wil-
liams voted for continuing with
the project while Michell’e Boice
and Thomas Kehler voted
against the motion.
Council member Ed Kelly ab-
stained fromthe vote as he want-
ed to see results from a referen-
dum vote in November about
whether the project should be
completed.
Boice has raised concerns
about the project, including how
it will affect taxpayers and why it
was not announced to the public
before applying for the grant.
Current building woes
The current police station is
housed in a former seasonal bait
store, which Musial said was ac-
quired by the borough about 10
years ago “at a good price” from
Joe Paglianite, owner of Grotto
Pizza.
According to Dallas Post ar-
chives, borough officials planned
torent thespaceandsurrounding
land for $400 a month in early
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Harveys Lake Police Chief Charles Musial thinks the present
police station in the borough is not secure, not up to code and
needs too many repairs to save.
HL police move is hotbed issue
By SARAH HITE
shite@mydallaspost.com
Council voted 4-2 in favor of moving forward with the project at
a meeting April 17. Council members Larry Radel, Boyd Barber,
Fran Kopko and Amy Williams voted for continuing with the pro-
ject while Michell’e Boice and Thomas Kehler voted against the
motion.
See POLICE, Page 12
About 80 kindergarteners
from Wycallis Elementary put
what they learned about Earth
Day into action on April 20 by
weeding the flower beds in
front of their school.
Kindergarten teacher Victo-
ria Flynn said it was the first
time the classes had ever done
anything like that in observ-
ance of the holiday.
“Mrs. Crahall and I kept won-
dering about the weeds in front
of the school, and we just de-
cided what a great idea for the
kids to do something for Earth
Day,” she said.
Students participated in oth-
er projects in class, such as sav-
ing their extra paper to make
Earth Day worksheets, but
Flynn said the weeding activity
allowed students to get their
hands dirty while learning how
to care for the environment.
“We did one side with the
morning class and one side
with the afternoon classes,”
Flynn said. “This is a great
hands-on opportunity for
them.”
The tykes brought in grocery
bags to collect weeds as well as
gloves to protect their hands.
Kindergarten teacher Susan
Crahall gave the kids a quick
debriefing before they started
ripping roots from the ground.
“You see these flowers?
They’re dandelions,” she told
the kids. “Even though they
look pretty, they’re weeds, too.
And look how many of them
there are!”
“Holy smokes!” shouted 6-
year-old Paul McMillan, of Dal-
las, when he noticed all the yel-
low flowers in front of the
school.
Jordan Porasky, 5, of Dallas,
helps pick weeds at home with
her parents. She enjoys weed-
ing because “you get to help
the Earth,” and it’s important
because “the Earth makes wa-
ter and air.”
Six-year-old Ciana Cruz, of
Shavertown, never weeded be-
fore, but liked digging in the
dirt and being outside.
“It’s fun to clean and pick up
things,” she said. “(Weeding)
helps flowers grow.”
Samuel Comitz, 6, of Dallas,
wandered around the front of
Wycallis Elementary, trying to
find the perfect spot to weed.
“You have to keep the planet
clean because the Earth has to
be healthy,” he said of the im-
portance of Earth Day.
Five-year-old Landon Daney,
of Dallas, said though he re-
cently moved, he liked helping
his dad weed the family gar-
den.
“It’s fun because you get to
pull things out of the ground,
and I like that if it’s too hard,
you get to dig,” he said.
Daney said Earth Day is an
important reminder to keep the
Earth clean and green.
“You have to take care of the
planet,” he said. “We don’t
want it to be dirty.”
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Kindergartener Haylee Engelman picks a flower to give to her ’Mommy’ while she weeds the flower beds at Wycallis Elementary
School.
Wycallis Elementary kindergarten teacher Susan Crahall shows
her students what to look for as they weed the school flower
beds as part of an Earth Day project.
Wycallis Elementary kindergartener Alex Corley joins his class-
mates in weeding the flower beds in front of the school during an
Earth Day project.
Taking pride
in their school
By SARAH HITE
shite@mydallaspost.com
Rock Solid Academy, a bud-
ding K-8 Christian school in
the Back Mountain, will hold
its first open house this week,
and officials announced a more
than $2,000 decrease in tuition
rates for the 2012-13 school
year.
Head of School Mark DiPip-
pa said Phase I of the school
building project, which in-
cludes construction of a lobby,
front offices and a model class-
room, was recently completed.
The school is located in the
Twin Stacks complex off State
Route 415 as board members
signed a 5-year lease with Twin
Stacks in December. Construc-
tion within the former Inter-
Mountain Medical Group loca-
tion began in February.
Phase II of the project will in-
clude more classrooms in the
existing space and Phase III,
which will not be completed
this year, will include a full
cafeteria, a multi-purpose
room for athletics and high
school classes.
An open house will be held
April 30 through May 5 to
show off the school to the com-
munity and to attract potential
students and their families.
DiPippa said the sign on the
building will soon be lit at
night, identifying the school
within the community and
making it more visible to pas-
sersby.
“This shows us as being dif-
ferent than other schools,” he
said. “A lot of Christian schools
get their start in a church base-
ment.”
The model classroom fea-
tures a large space that will
eventually become the kinder-
Rock Solid is
moving ahead
By SARAH HITE
shite@mydallaspost.com
What: Rock Solid Academy open
house
When: Monday, April 30 through
Saturday, May 5
Time: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Saturday
More info: Contact Head of School
Mark DiPippa at mdipippa@rock-
solidacademy.org or visit the
school’s website at www.rocksoli-
dacademy.org.
O P E N H O U S E
See ROCK, Page 12
Misericordia University Presi-
dent Michael MacDowell may be
a Los Angeles, Calif., native, but
he said the Back Mountain feels
more like home.
That’s why the 65-year-old will
maintain residence in Harveys
Lake with his wife, Tina, once he
retires on June 30, 2013.
“While we enjoy the west, we
decidedwe want toretire here be-
cause the people have a sense of
community about them; they
care about one another and that’s
different than in most big cities,”
said MacDowell. “And we’ve made so many good friends
here.”
The 12th president of Luzerne
County’s oldest college an-
nounced his retirement on April
19 after 14 years in the position –
the first of many accomplish-
ments he mentioned in a recent
MU pres retiring
but staying here
By SARAH HITE
shite@mydallaspost.com
See PRES, Page 3
Misericordia University Presi-
dent Michael MacDowell an-
nounced he will step down when
his current contract expires on
June 30, 2013.
C M Y K
PAGE 2 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
The Dallas Post
Community Newspaper Group
15 NORTH MAIN STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
570-675-5211
news@mydallaspost.com • FAX 570-675-3650
Display Advertising Deadline: Tuesdays at 12 noon
Contact Diane McGee at 970-7153
The Dallas Post has a variety of advertising rates and programs.
The Dallas Post satisfies most co-op ad programs and offers creative services at no charge. Combination rates with
The Abington Journal, Clarks Summit and the Sunday Dispatch, Pittston are available.
Coverage Area: The Dallas Post covers the
Back Mountain community which includes the
Dallas and Lake-Lehman School Districts. We
try to get to as many events as possible, but
staff and space limitations make it impossible
to cover everything. If you have news about
your family, town or organization please send
it to us and we’ll try to get it in. Photographs
are welcome. Send them two ways, by mail to
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by
e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com. E-mail is
the best and most timely method for submis-
sion. E-mailed photos should be in JPEG
format with a resolution of at least 200 dpi. The
deadline for all copy is Tuesday at noon. prior
to publication. Corrections, clarifications? The
Dallas Post will correct errors of fact or clarify
any misunderstandings, call 675-5211. Have
a story idea? Please call, we’d like to hear
about it. Letters: The Dallas Post prints letters
of local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The
Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711. All letters must be signed and include a
daytime phone number for verification.
You can now purchase any photo
that appears in The Dallas Post
from The Times Leader photo store.
Simply log onto www.timesleader.
com/photostore and click on the link
for The Dallas Post.
Orders for subscriptions received by
Friday at noon will begin the follow-
ing week. Please inform us of dam-
age or delay, call 829-5000. The
Dallas Post is published weekly by
Impressions Media, $20 per year
in Luzerne & Wyoming Counties
(PA), $24 in NJ, NY and all other
PA counties, $27 all other states.
Periodicals postage paid at Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18701-9996 POSTMAS-
TER: Send address change to The
Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711
ADVERTISING
NEWS
WANT A PHOTO?
CIRCULATION
◆ CROSSWORD CORNER
Puzzle answers, Page 2
TUESDAY, MAY1
Dallas Township
601 Tunkhannock Hwy. (Route 309), Dallas Township
The board of supervisors will hold a public work session at 7:30
p.m. in the municipal building.
Ross Township
72 Broadway Road, Sweet Valley
The boardof supervisors will holda regular meeting at 7 p.m. in
the municipal building.
T H I S W E E K ’ S M E E T I N G S
Astory about an art exhibit by artists fromthe Verve Vertu Art
Studio that appeared in the April 22 issue of The Dallas Post had
an incorrect date.
The reception to introduce the works of the artists will be held
from5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 3 in the Speech-Language and
Hearing Center on the second floor of John J. Passan Hall located
on the lower campus of Misericordia University.
The Dallas Post regrets the error.
F O R T H E R E C O R D …
The Luzerne County Alco-
hol Highway Safety Program
will hold a week-long training
program for local police offi-
cers from May 7-11 at Luzerne
County Community College.
It will be the first such
county-wide training offered
to multiple police depart-
ments in more than 20 years
and is expected to draw offi-
cers from several depart-
ments, including Wilkes-
Barre, Pittston, Plains Town-
ship, Kingston Township,
Harvey’s Lake, West Pittston
and Newport Township. Sev-
eral departments from out-
side the county will also at-
tend.
The program is being con-
ducted in cooperation with
the Luzerne County District
Attorney’s Office, the Penn-
sylvania DUI Association and
Luzerne County Community
College.
The program will offer po-
lice officers instructions on
how to properly set up DUI
checkpoints and training on
all aspects of DUI law. It will
also offer instruction of SFST,
or Standard Field Sobriety
Testing. The courses will take
place at LCCC’s Public Safety
Training Facility.
In addition to police offi-
cers from throughout the
county, the program will be
observed by Luzerne County
officials, including District
Attorney Stefanie Salavantis.
Representatives from the
Pennsylvania DUI Association
will also attend.
Local police officers will undergo week-long training
Free compost/mulch is now
available at the Jackson Town-
shipRecyclingCenter onHunts-
ville Road to all Jackson Town-
ship residents.
Compost/mulch can be
picked up from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday through Saturday. The
center is closed on Sundays.
Residents are asked to bring
containers as Jackson Township
employees cannot load com-
post/mulch due to insurance
purposes.
For more information, con-
tact the Jackson Township mu-
nicipal office at 675-8731or visit
the department at 2211 Hunts-
ville Road, Jackson Township.
Free compost/mulch at JT Recycling Center
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE 3
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
interview.
“The average length of a uni-
versity president is about six and
a half years, so I thought it was a
good time to go,” said MacDow-
ell.
MacDowell came to Misericor-
dia in 1998 after spending nine
years as vice president of institu-
tional advancement and econom-
ics professor at Hartwick College
in Oneonta, N.Y.
Hesaiddespitesomeissues, he
found what was once known as
College Misericordia to have
“great promise” and “very good
programs.”
“I saw the idea of getting visi-
bility for the institution, increas-
ingenrollment andtryingtoraise
more money as my three goals
and I’ve stuck to those through-
out my time here,” he said.
MacDowell was impressed
with the college’s sense of mis-
sion. When he served as presi-
dent of the National Council on
Economic Education based in
New York City, he noticed many
small schools didn’t have a mis-
sion or sense of direction.
“I think the legacy of this place
(Misericordia University) is the
Sisters of Mercy and their charis-
ma,” said MacDowell. “If you
have a sense of what’s important
and what isn’t, then it’s pretty
easy to manage the place. If any-
thing is open to you and you can
go any way, then you don’t have
anyOccam’s razor (thelawof par-
simony, economy or succinct-
ness) by which to make deci-
sions.”
During his tenure, MacDowell
oversaw the transition from Col-
legeMisericordiatoMisericordia
University in 2007, a process he
describes as “time-consuming”
and “active” but one that was
needed to improve the efficiency
of administration.
He said prior to reaching uni-
versity status, the college had
been divided into four parts – sci-
ence, humanities, business edu-
cation and health sciences –
which were headed by appointed
faculty members.
Becoming a university allowed
the school to divide into colleges
- the College of Heath Science,
the College of Arts and Sciences
and the College of Professional
Studies – which allowed each
part to function according to its
needs with hired deans at the
helm.
“It just made sense we’d evolve
to that point, and hence the uni-
versity status was not just the no-
menclature,” said MacDowell.
He said university status al-
lowedmoreattentiontoindividu-
al needs of students in each field,
promoted research and allowed
departments more control over
programs.
Physical changes to the Dallas
Township campus have been on-
going since MacDowell’s arrival.
The Mary Kintz Bevevino Li-
brary was in the process of being
built during his inaugural year
and nearly every building on
campus has been improved or
constructed during his presiden-
cy.
Currently, the university is in
the process of buildinga newdor-
mitory and preparing athletic
fields for the arrival of its first Di-
vision III football season this fall.
MacDowell said the decision
was an economic one, which will
allow programs with excess ca-
pacity to accept more students.
He said the addition of football
will also add to the décor and
community spirit of the campus.
Despite his west coast origins,
MacDowell was integral to the
creationof several communityor-
ganizations such as the Back
Mountain Historical Association
and the Back Mountain Commu-
nity Partnership.
“All of these things we were in-
volved in, in both leading and fol-
lowing,” he said. “If somebody
asks us to do something, we’ll do
it … It’s amazing how much you
can do if you don’t want to take
credit for it.”
MacDowell has lived in Cali-
fornia, Texas, Indiana, Louisiana,
Illinois and NewYork and says he
hasn’t come across a community
as proud and as caring as North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
“We’re going to stay at our
place out on the lake, and we love
it out there, so we’re going to be
here,” he said. “We’re going to
spend some time where it’s warm
inthe winter – we have a house in
Florida – but we voted with our
feet and we’re staying.”
MacDowell is most proud of
the students who have gone
through the university.
“All the buildings and all the
growth of the student body and
the endowment and the fundrais-
ing and all the community activ-
ities are really for not if the stu-
dents don’t come here and do
well,” he said.
MacDowell hopes to spend
more time teaching economics
through the Calvin K. Kazanjian
Economics Foundation, of which
he is a board member, during his
retirement.
PRES
Continued from Page 1
The Back Mountain Commu-
nity Partnership continued its
discussion April 19 about plans
for a regional emergency man-
agement agency building to be
constructed in Lehman Town-
ship.
Lehman Township was award-
ed a $975,000 grant fromgaming
funds onbehalf of thepartnership
last month for the project.
The partnership initially re-
quested $1.2 million in the grant
application. Chairman James Re-
ino Jr. said a committee consist-
ing of partnership members was
formed and discussions were
held with EMA officials to deter-
mine whether the project could
be scaled down.
Reino said the major change in
the project plans includes remov-
ing the proposed pole barn and
instead building an addition on
theexistingbuilding. Thesiteis a
former medical building located
off State Route 118. Reino said
this change will save money
while better utilizing existing
space at the site.
He also said discussions with
EMAofficials led the group to in-
clude an additional $30,000
worth of emergency equipment
than what was initially requested
in the grant application.
Reinosaidfurniture was anoth-
er piece of the project that was
scaled back to correspond with
the monies available.
The project was developed af-
ter two tropical storms wreaked
havoc on the Back Mountain late
last year.
In other news …
• Lynn Banta of the Back
Mountain Chamber of Com-
merce told members the busi-
ness expo held at Misericordia
University on April 18 was a well-
attended and successful event.
She also said the Back Moun-
tain Community Partnership’s
membership in the chamber has
officially been processed and re-
search conducted by an intern
proved the partnership is the on-
ly governmental organization of
its kind in the state.
• Vice Chairman John Wilkes
Jr. said municipalities should
provide a training session for
road department workers for a
jointly-purchased radar speed
trailer.
He saidthe mechanismis more
complicated than originally
thought, and a training session
with those who would be relocat-
ing the equipment would be ben-
eficial.
• Ray Iwanoski, of Lehman
Township, said the group should
make a point to personally thank
Michael MacDowell, president of
Misericordia University, for his
contributions to the partnership
and the community.
The morning before the part-
nership meeting, MacDowell an-
nounced his plans to retire on
June 30, 2013.
• The next Back Mountain
CommunityPartnershipmeeting
will be at 3 p.m. Thursday, May
17 at Misericordia University.
B A C K M O U N TA I N C O M M U N I T Y PA R T N E R S H I P
Plans continue for regional EMA building to be built
By SARAH HITE
shite@mydallaspost.com
Reino said the major change in the project plans includes remov-
ing the proposed pole barn and instead building an addition on
the existing building. The site is a former medical building locat-
ed off State Route 118. Reino said this change will save money
while better utilizing existing space at the site.
V
olunteers gathered on April 21 in honor of Earth Day to do
spring clean up at the Back Mountain Trail. Those who par-
ticipated met behind the Knights of Columbus parking lot in
Luzerne with rakes, leaf blowers, gloves and bags for trash pickup
and cleaned the trail.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Jackie Newhart, of Kingston, right, Georgette Oann, of Old Forge, and Molly Whalen, of Kingston, collect litter near the Back Moun-
tain Trail.
Nancy Lane, of Dallas, right, Tammy Grear, of Kingston, and
Deana Nat, of Wilkes-Barre, search for litter near the Back
Mountain Trail in Luzerne.
RIGHT PHOTO; Organizer Mark Albrecht, left, gives instructions
to volunteers Noah Hiedcavage, 6, right, of Luzerne; Evan Nice,
10, and Dave Nice, both of Swoyersville, and Melissa Hiedcavage,
of Luzerne, before they depart from the Knights of Columbus
parking lot to help with spring cleanup of the Back Mountain
Trail.
CLEANING UP
THE TRAIL
Trula Hollywood, director for
the Area Agency on Agency for
Luzerne and Wyoming counties,
said requests for proposals are
currently being sought for a new
Dallas Senior Center.
Requests for proposals for a
new building to house the center
were advertised in a local news-
paper on April 21. The deadline
for proposals is May 6.
Hollywood hopes the project
can be approved at least six
weeks after thedeadline. Shealso
said interested facilities in the
Dallas area have told her they
won’t need much time to prepare
for an opening.
“We are making it a priority,”
said Hollywood.
She also said many residents
have beenusingthe Edwardsville
center in the meantime.
Hollywood said residents hav-
ing trouble with transportation
can call her office directly at 822-
1158 ext. 2316 or e-mail her at
thollywood@aging.luzerne-
wyoming.org.
-Sarah Hite
Sr. center location sought
Supervisors tookactiontostop
illegal dumping on a quiet coun-
try road and approved three
quotes through the state COS-
TARS Program at their April 11
meeting.
Sunny Acres Road fits the de-
scription of a quiet country road,
sparsely populated, that can fre-
quently fall victim to illegal
dumping. When word reached
the supervisors, supervisors took
action to prevent it.
Chairman Lonnie Piatt said
material from outside the town-
ship was being taken to a proper-
ty on Sunny Acres Road and
dumped. The township’s ordi-
nance, number 1-85, restricts and
regulates dumping within the
township.
Supervisors authorized town-
ship Attorney Mark McNealis as
enforcement representative to
send a registered letter to the
property owner on the violation.
Also, the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection was noti-
fied and recently met with the
property owner. Piatt said the
owner is working with DEP to
clean it up the property.
“Normally, they give 30 to 45
days for the homeowner to clean
up the debris,” Piatt said.
Planning ahead, supervisors
decided to take advantage of
quotes for material through the
state run COSTARS Program.
The COSTARS programis a joint
effort by the Pennsylvania De-
partment of Transportation and
the Department of General Ser-
vices to give municipalities the
ability to find competitive prices
on necessary items.
Usually, bids are approved and
materials held until the munici-
pality needs them, Piatt said.
Supervisors approved a quote
from Central Clay Products for
$9.99 per 50-pound bag of mag-
nesium chloride. Every year the
municipality orders 16 tons of
magnesium chloride for the next
winter season. Piatt said the road
crewprefers the bags for the ease
of filling the hoppers on the
trucks for spreading.
“It is the type of material you
only need in certain areas,” he
said.
Other bids were from Bradco
Supply Company, Towanda, for
$11.40 per bag; andJohnBonham
Road Equipment and Supply, Ho-
nesdale, for $11.45 a bag.
Supervisors also approved
quotes from Central Clay Prod-
ucts to purchase six pipes at
$9.50afoot andsixpipebands for
$12.23 a piece.
Other quotes were received
from Bradco Supply and John
Bonham Road Equipment and
Supply but were a fewcents high-
er than thequote from Central
Clay Products, Piatt said.
American Asphalt’s quote for
blacktopwas alsoapproved. That
quote, through the COSTARS
program, was $63.75 for 9.5 milli-
liter, per ton and $57.50 for 19
milliliters per ton.
L A K E T O W N S H I P
Supervisors move
to stop dumping
By Eileen Godin
Dallas Post Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 4 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Kevin M. Barno, MPT • K. Bridget Barno, PT
Sharon Marranca, MPT • Hal Glatz, MPT
Maria Hall, PTA • William Montross, MPT
• Hands-on one on one manual therapy by a skilled Physical Therapist
• Supervised exercise program appropriate for your condition
Comprehensive Outpatient Physical Therapy Featuring:
• All post-surgical orthopedic conditions including rehab for total joint replacement, rotator cuff
repairs and arthroscopic surgery • Arthritis • Work Injury • Neck/Back Pain • Disc Injuries
• Auto Accidents • Foot/Ankle Injury • TMJ Dysfunction Program • Fall Prevention Program
Treatment for:
We’ve Expanded! We Now Have A Location In Pittston
Most
Insurances
Do Not
Require
A Referral.
All Major
Insurances
Accepted.
William Montross, MPT
Pinnacle Rehabilitation Associates welcomes
William Montross, MPT to our new Pittston location.
With over seventeen years experience, William can assist you with...
2 Convenient
Locations To
Serve You! www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
201 South Main Street
Pittston • 602-1933
520 Third Avenue
Kingston • 714-6460
NEW
LOCATION
7
4
6
9
2
6
7
4
9
3
4
1
AREAAGENCY on AGING:
LUZERNE &WYOMING COUNTIES
111 N. Pennsylvania Blvd. , Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
570-822-1158 ext. 3539 • 800-252-1512 ext. 3539
AgingLW.org
CHESTER - James Wesley, 80,
of Trucksville, died Thursday,
April 19, 2012, at Kindred Hospi-
tal, Wilkes-Barre.
He was born April 11, 1932 in
Aliquippa, was a graduate of
Penn State University where he
earned a Bachelor of Science in
Chemical Engineering and was a
member of Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity.
He was the North East Region-
al Director of the PA Dept. of En-
vironmental Protection. During
his tenure as Regional Director,
he had a pivotal role in three im-
portant projects: the cleanup fol-
lowing the Agnes Flood, the But-
ler Mine Tunnel collapse and the
remediation of the giardia water
infestation.
In recent years, he operated an
environmental service company
specializing in remediation ser-
vices.
He served on the Boards of
Family Services, The Joint Com-
munity Relations Group and was
chairman of the Wyoming Valley
Human Service Commission. He
was a member of Interested
Adults, African American Com-
mittee, Board of Directors for the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Con-
servancy Executive Committee,
Northeastern Network Inc.
He was founder and president
of the Institute for African Amer-
ican National Heritage. He was a
lyricist and played guitar for
many years with the B.B. Kay’s
Expedition band.
Surviving are his wife, the for-
mer E. Ann Clark; three children,
J. Daryll, of Trucksville; Stepha-
nie S., of Dallas; and Mark W., of
Nanticoke; three grandchildren;
a brother, Bennie Bell, of Phila-
delphia.
Memorial donations to the
American Lung Association.
DAVIS - Betty Mae, 69, of Dal-
las, died Friday, April 20, 2012, at
the Meadows Nursing Center,
Dallas.
She was born August 28, 1942
in Sweet Valley and graduated in
1960 from Lake Township High
School.
Shewas a Girl Scout leader and
named Mother of the Year in
1974.
Surviving are daughters, Cyn-
thia Boyd, Sweet Valley; Susan
Williams, Dallas; and Candy
Cummings, Dallas; three grand-
children.
KATLIC - Adam Richard, 24,
died Saturday, April 21, 2012, at
his home in Glyndon, Md.
He was born December 26,
1987 in Kingston, and lived in the
Back Mountain until last year
whenhe movedwithhis familyto
Baltimore. He attended Wyom-
ing Seminary and Holy Redeem-
er High School and then worked
in various restaurants as a chef.
Surviving are his parents,
Diane and Mark; sister, Kathe-
rine; grandparents, Helen Kop-
cha, John and Nancy Katlic;
aunts, uncles, and cousins.
Memorial donations to the St.
John’s Episcopal Church, 3738
Butler Road, Glyndon, MD
21136.
KESTER - Anna M., 84, of
Echo Valley Estates, Shaver-
town, died Monday, April 23,
2012, in the Meadows Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center, Dal-
las.
She was born in the Miners
Mills Sectionof Wilkes-Barre and
was a graduate of Coughlin High
School, Wilkes-Barre.
She was formerly employed by
Carter Footwear, Parsons, and
Natona Mills, Dallas. She was an
owner and property manager of
EchoValleyEstates, Shavertown.
She served on the board of di-
rectors of Homebound Health
Services Inc.
Surviving are her husband of
49 years, Michael J. Kester, Sha-
vertown; daughters, Nancy
Johns, Pringle; Bonnie Stachnik,
Dallas; son, Michael II, Shaver-
town; 11 grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren; sister, Mar-
garet Yedinak, Dushore; nieces
and nephews.
MILUNICH - Michael J., 82, of
Harveys Lake, died Saturday
April 21, 2012, in Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Hospital, Plains
Township.
He was born in Luzerne, was a
graduate of Luzerne High
School, Class of 1947, and an Ar-
my veteran of the Korean Con-
flict.
He worked for Walben, Inc.,
Sterling Engineering and retired
from Pennsylvania Gas and Wa-
ter Company.
He was a member of the Har-
veys Lake Rod and Gun Club, the
Bunker Hill Rod and Gun Club
and Our Lady of Victory Church,
Harveys Lake.
Surviving are nieces and neph-
ews.
MOTOVIDLAK - Margaret E.,
94, of Dallas, and formerly of
Tilghman’s Island, Maryland,
died Thursday, April 19, 2012.
She was born January 25, 1918,
in Ashley.
Surviving are her daughter, Ar-
lene Bankovich, Dallas, with
whom she resided; son, John E.,
Wittman, Maryland; four grand-
children; four great-grandchil-
dren.
STOGOSKI - William J. “Sto-
gie” Stogoski, 76, of Harveys
Lake, died Monday, April 16,
2012, at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital after a short illness.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre,
attended school in Luzerne and
graduated from Fort Smith Ar-
kansas Military High School.
He was a fireman with the In-
dependent Kingston Fire Depart-
ment for 33 years. He also
worked at North Branch Lumber
in Kingston, ran an ambulance
service for many years and was
employed at Bi-Lo’s in Dallas.
He was a veteraninthe U.S. Ar-
my and was later enlisted with
the 109th Field Artillery.
He was a member of the Dor-
ranceton United Methodist
Church.
Surviving are his step-mother,
Stephanie Stogoski, Glen Lyon;
sister, Viola Harris, Idetown;
companion, Beverly Orlando,
Harveys Lake; and her daughter,
Angela Orlando, Peckville; a
niece, nephews, great-nephews
and a great-niece.
Memorial donations to the
American Diabetes Association,
P.O. Box 4383, Bethlehem, PA
18018.
SULT – Ryan J., 32, Harveys
Lake, died Thursday, April 19,
2012, at home.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre,
was a graduate of Lake-Lehman
High School, Blacksnake Junior
College, Liberty University and
attended Trinity Baptist College.
Surviving are his parents, Le-
Roy J. and Denise Nuttall Sult;
his wife, the former Blake Nagle;
son, R. Ethan; daughter, Mia Ry-
Lee; sister, Leighanna.
Memorial donations to his
children, c/o National Penn
Bank, 196 N. Main St., Shaver-
town, PA18708.
TINSLEY - Alice C., 92, of Dal-
las, died Friday, April 20, 2012, at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
She was born in Dallas, was a
graduate of Dallas Township
School and Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital School of Nursing.
She was a registered nurse
with the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
She was a member of the
Wilkes-Barre School of Nursing
Alumni, The Ladies Auxiliary of
IremTemple and the Dallas Unit-
ed Methodist Church.
Surviving are a son, Calvin,
Dallas; and a daughter Ruth Sta-
nulis, Boston, Mass; sister, Mary
Elizabeth Knecht, Philadelphia;
four grandchildren; three great-
grandsons.
O B I T U A R I E S
TheVerizonPioneers TalkingBook Repair Volunteers werere-
cently awarded the President’s Volunteer Service award in rec-
ognition and appreciation of their service to their communities.
Here, William Nicholas, left, of Wilkes-Barre, receives the award
for 25 years of volunteer service from William Lawson, of Sha-
vertown, Talk Book Repair coordinator.
PIONEERS RECEIVE AWARD
Senior Citizens Centers sponsored by the
Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne and
Wyoming Counties offer hot noon meals
Monday through Friday to people 60 years of
age or older. Donations fromparticipants are
gratefullyacceptedandneededinorder toex-
pand this program.
The following is the menu for the week of
April 29:
MONDAY: Spaghetti and meatballs, gar-
den salad with salad dressing, Italian green
beans, Italian bread, chocolate pound cake,
margarine, milk and coffee.
TUESDAY: Bag lunch
WEDNESDAY: Meatloaf, gravy, gardensal-
ad, parsley boiled potatoes, whole wheat din-
ner roll, peaches, margarine, milk and coffee.
THURSDAY: Roast beef, gravy, mashedpo-
tatoes, glazedcarrots, multi-graindinner roll,
angel food cake with fruit topping, marga-
rine, milk and coffee.
FRIDAY: Taco salad bar
S E N I O R C E N T E R S M E N U
Three Dallas Rotarians, who
have served as club presidents,
recently received Paul Harris
Fellow Awards for “Service
Above Self.” From left, are Dis-
trict Governor-Elect and Past
President Art Peoples, Past Pres-
ident Sandy Peoples, Paul Har-
ris Committee Chairman Eric
Martin and Past President Paul
Saxon.
Rotarians
receive
awards
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE 5
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Download
Our New
Mobile
App
PIZZA PERFECT
696-2100
PIZZA • WINGS
AND MORE!
16 Carverton Road
Trucksville
Mon. - Thurs. 4pm to 10pm
Fri 11am to 11pm • Sat. 12:30pm to 11pm
Sun. 2pm to 10pm
SAME ORIGINAL RECIPE,
HAND MADE, HAND BAKED
We Accept CareCredit
For over 30 years, families have trusted in us for their dental care. Isn’t it
time for your family to receive the quality care that you deserve.
Riverside Commons, 575 Pierce St. • Suite 201 • Kingston • 331-8100 • www.dr.gmn.com
A Dentist that treats you like family.
TRUSTED.
Dr. Gary Nataupsky
N
O
W
O
P
E
N
!
Back in the Back Mountain at the
Twin Stacks Center
• Specializing in Mens’ and Boys’ Haircuts
from Modern to Classic Styles
• Plenty of Parking Easy In and Out
• No Appointment Needed
• Fun For All Sports Fans
• Professional & Experienced Stylists
SPECIAL
DALLAS SPORTS PAGE DALLAS SPORTS PAGE DALLAS SPORTS PAGE
Senior
Citizens
Men’s or
Boy’s Cut
Combo
Father, Son,
Brothers
2 for
$
14
99
Includes Shampoo,
Cut, & Style
Includes Shampoo,
Cut, & Style
Includes Shampoo,
Cut, & Style
EXPIRES 6/1/12 EXPIRES 6/1/12 EXPIRES 6/1/12
$
9
99 $
6
99
Open Daily Monday - Saturday
Dallas • 1148 Twin Stacks Drive (next to Shapes)
675-2466
SPORTS PAGE SPORTS PAGE
Great Haircuts for Men & Boys
Rebecca, Tierney and Megan
OPEN MONDAYS 9-6
• Chicken Pastina Soup
• Penne Pasta with Marinara Sauce
• Metro Alfredo with Farfalle Pasta
• Chicken Marsala • Kielbasa
• Beef Cacciatore • Stuffed
Flounder • Garlic Mashed Potatoes
• Candied Sweet Potatoes • Green
Beans Almandine • Salad Station
• Caesar Salad • Italian Garden
Salad • Pasta Salad • Potato Salad
• Carving Station • Triple Smoked
Baked Ham • Slow Roasted Breast
of Turkey • Home made Pan Gravy
• Cranberry Sauce • Rolls and
Butter • Dessert Station
• Assortment of Freshly Baked
Desserts and Pastries • Fresh Fruit
PLUS TAX & GRATUITY
1174 Memorial Hwy • Dallas • 675-3663 themetrobarandgrill.com
No coupons or discounts
M E T R O
LLLLLLLLLLLLUS US US US US US US US US US UUS UUUUS US TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT TTTAX AX AX AAX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AX AAX AAAX AX &&&&&&&&& &&& GGGGGGGGGGGGGGG GGGRA RA RRA RA A RA RA A RA RA A RA RA A RRA RA RA RATU U TU TU TTU TU TUIT T IT T IT T IT IT ITYYYYYYYYYYY PPPPPPPL PL LLLL PL PL PL
N di t
$21.95PP | CHILDREN UNDER 10 - $8.95 | CHILDREN UNDER 4 - FREE
11am - 4pm
(Reservations Suggested)
Ma, 13 º noon - 4 p.m. º Adults $30
*
| Children $13
*
Whether your mom fancies lobster bisque, rosemary
crusted lamb or stuffed sole Florentine, she’ll love this
exquisite lunch with her family at the Irem Clubhouse.
Reservations required: 675-1134, ext. 100
C M 13 4 Ad lt $30
*
| Chhild $13
*
CCCCCCCCCCCC
OP£N TO TH£ PUBLIC
Enjoy country club cuisine Wednesday - Saturday for lunch and dinner
and Sunday for brunch. The new spring menu bursts with flavor!
CAT£RINC ADDS A SP£CIAL TOUCH
Hot and cold platters, starting at only $16, are the perfect accent to
your next party or event. Details: 675-1134 ext. 100
Reservatìons recommenJeJ. º 64 RìJguay Drìve, Da||as, Pa.
WWW.IR£MCLUBHOUS£.COM º £N]OY YOUR IAVORIT£ B£V£RAC£ WITH B.Y.O.B.
CLUBHOUSE
*
Includes tax & service charge
Program will deal
with bullying
A programto help children
deal with bullying will be
held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May
6 at the Educational Building
of the Trucksville United
Methodist Church, 40 Knob
Hill Road.
Mothers and school-age
children are invited to attend
the program. A luncheon will
also be held.
Reservations should be
made by April 30 by calling
696-3897. A free will offering
will be taken at the door.
Barbeque set
at TUMC
Trucksville United Metho-
dist Church annual spring
barbeque will be held from5
to 7 p.m. on Friday, May 4
and Saturday, May 5 at the
education building, 40 Knob
Hill Road. Takeouts will be
available from4:30 p.m.
Tickets, at $8 for adults
and $4 for children, include
half a chicken and all the
fixings, homemade desserts
and beverages.
To reserve tickets, call the
church office at 696-3897.
Dorcas Society
plans sale
The ladies Dorcas Society
of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church,
474 Yalick Road, Dallas, will
sponsor a rummage and bake
sale from8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Friday, May 4 and from8 a.m.
to1 p.m. on Saturday, May 5
at the church. Saturday Bag
Day hours will be from11
a.m. to1 p.m.
Cross Creek church
welcomes speaker
Bodie Hodge, a speaker,
writer and researcher for
Answers In Genesis, will
speak at Cross Creek Com-
munity Church, 370 Carv-
erton Road, Trucksville at 9
and10:45 a.m. and 6 and 7:30
p.m. on Sunday, May 6 and at
6:30 and 8 p.m. on Monday,
May 7.
For more information, call
the church office at 696-0399.
Rummage sale
planned at LIUM
The Lehman-Idetown
United Methodist Church,
1011 Mountain ViewDrive,
Lehman, will hold its annual
Spring Rummage Sale from9
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, May
11 with a snack bar and from
9 a.m. to noon on Saturday,
May 12. Saturday is Bag Day.
A bake sale will also be
held and homemade vegeta-
ble soup will be available for
$5 per quart. Items in usable
condition will be accepted for
donation through Wednes-
day, May 9.
Odd Fellows
plan breakfast
I.O.O.F. Odd Fellows Onei-
da Lodge #371will hold its
semi-annual breakfast from
7:30 to10:30 a.m. on Sat-
urday, May 12 at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church.
Donation is $6 and monies
raised will support arthritis
research and a local student
attending a United Nations
trip.
For further information,
call Clarence J. Michael at
675-0488.
GOH announces
summer camp
The Gate of Heaven Sum-
mer Music Camp for students
aged 9-15 will be held from
9:30 a.m. to noon July 23-27.
Learn to sing like a bird while
enjoying games, snacks and
making newfriends.
A special Youth Liturgy
featuring the participants will
be at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, July
29. This year’s theme: “Ca-
tholic symbols, gestures, and
traditions.” To register, call
675-2121 by July 15.
C HURC H
B RI E F S
C
ub Scout Pack 155 of
Trucksville hosted its an-
nual Spring Fundraising
Dinner onApril 21at the Dickson
Educational Facility at the
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. The dinner consisted of
plain, blueBEARy, tie-dyed and
Tiger Cub pancakes.
TOP PHOTO: Cub Scout Jacob
Banta, 9, of Trucksville, center,
unveils the Blue ’Bear’y, Mickey
Mouse and Tiger Cub (made
with Resse’s pieces) pancakes
as fellow Scouts Joseph Sowga,
6, left, of Shavertown, and his
brother Austin, 9, look on.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
RIGHT PHOTO: Nine-year-old
Nick Zaboski, of Shavertown,
samples a piece of bacon at the
Cub Scout Pack 155
Annual Spring Fundraising
Dinner.
Cubs
host
dinner
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18711 • 570-675-5211
news@mydallaspost.com
Joe Butkiewicz
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
829-7249
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Dotty Martin
EDITOR
970-7440
dmartin@mydallaspost.com
Diane McGee
ADVERTISING
970-7153
dmcgee@timesleader.com
The Dallas Post
C o m m u n i t y N e w s p a p e r G r o u p
Pat Giordano, of Harveys Lake, feels fortunatethat shewas abletocapturethis spectacular sunset recentlyontheGulf Coast of Florida. The
three-masted schooner just happened to sail by Pat.
"YOUR SPACE" is reserved specifically
for Dallas Post readers whohave something
they’d like to share with fellow readers.
Submitted items may include photo-
graphs or short stories and should be sent
via e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com, by
fax to 675-3650 or by mail to The Dallas
Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711.
Information must include the submitting
person’s name, address andtelephone num-
ber in the event we have questions. Readers
wishing to have their photos returned
should include a self-addressed/stamped
envelope. Items will be published in the or-
der in which they are received.
The editor of The Dallas Post reserves the
right toreject any items submittedfor publi-
cation.
YOUR SPACE
The History Channel
• On April 27, 4977 B.C., the universe is created, according to
17th-century German mathematician and astronomer Johannes
Kepler. Scientists in the 20th century developed the Big Bang theory,
which showed that Kepler’s calculations were off by about 13.7 billion
years.
• On April 23, 1564, according to tradition, the great English dram-
atist and poet William Shakespeare is born in Stratford-on-Avon. It is
impossible to be certain the exact day on which he was born, but
church records show that he was baptized on April 26, and three
days was a customary amount of time to wait before baptizing a
newborn.
• On April 26, 1865, John Wilkes Booth is killed when Union sol-
diers track him down to a Virginia farm12 days after he assassinated
President Abraham Lincoln. The original plan involved a simultane-
ous assassination of Lincoln, Vice President Andrew Johnson and
Secretary of State William Seward.
• On April 24, 1936, a group of firemen responding to an alarm in
Camden, N.J., is televised. It was the first time an unplanned event
was broadcast on television, anticipating the development of live TV
news coverage.
• On April 25, 1947, President Harry Truman officially opens the
first White House bowling alley. Eisenhower closed the two-lane alley
in 1955 and turned it into a mimeograph room. Nixon had a one-lane
alley installed underground directly beneath the North Portico en-
trance of the White House.
• On April 28, 1958, “The Witch Doctor,” by singer/songwriter
David Seville, hits the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s pop charts. The song
used the unusual technique of recording the singer’s voice at a speed
different than the music.
• On April 29, 1974, President Richard Nixon announces to the
public that he will release transcripts of 46 taped White House con-
versations in response to a Watergate trial subpoena. On Aug. 8,
1974, Nixon avoided a Senate impeachment trial by becoming the
first American president to resign from office.
M O M E N T S I N T I M E
20 YEARS AGO – 1992
The piano students of Su-
sanne Motyka recently partici-
pated in the Junior Mozart Fes-
tival held at the First Presbyter-
ian Church, Wilkes-Barre. Excel-
lent ratings were received by
Matthew Motyka, Timothy Fla-
nagan, Da-
vid Lohin,
vocal award,
Rebecca Da-
vis, Shawna
Hinchey
and superi-
or rating by
Joy Hole-
man.
Recently the Dallas 500 was
held at the Community Church
of Dallas. The winners of that
race advanced on to the regional
AWANA Grand Prix Open held
near Vestal, N.Y. Winning car
racers included Melissa Sutton,
Jeff Pimm, Stephen Losh, Kim
Jones, Andrews Race, Eric
Pimm, Jamie Jordan, Becky
Bush, Heidi Horn and Gary
Crompton,.
30 YEARS AGO – 1982
Students from Lake-Lehman
and Dallas Area High School re-
cently attended a drafting semi-
nar at the Pennsylvania State
University Wilkes-Barre Cam-
pus, Lehman. Hosted by the en-
gineering faculty, the session
gave the students an opportuni-
ty to sample college engineering
classes andfindout about admis-
sionrequirements for college en-
gineering programs. Lehman
students who attended the semi-
nar included Dave Hopfer, Rus-
sell Williams, Joe Tomaselli and
Paul Dembowski. Dallas stu-
dents who attended the seminar
included Ray Cupinski, Chad
Washesky, Bob Lauer andChuck
Swepston.
The Board of Directors of the
Back Mountain Library recently
appointed Joseph Killeen of
Overbrook Road, Dallas, chair-
man of this year’s Library Auc-
tion. Killeen, Assistant Vice
President of United Penn Bank
inDallas, has beenactive incom-
munity affairs for a number of
years and is currently a member
of the Dallas Rotary and the Dal-
las Area Fall Fir Cmmittee.
40 YEARS AGO – 1972
Trophy winners at the annual
Kite Derby held at Frances Slo-
cum Park by Cub Scout Pack
233, St. Paul’s Church, Shaver-
town, were: Alex Zajkowski,
Paul Sweet, Paul Youngblood,
Gary Masitis, Mike Kubasti, Ter-
ry Cummings and Frank Yam-
rick.
The Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia Chapter of the American As-
sociation of Teachers of French
sponsored the 1972 National
FrenchContest at King’s College
recently. Katherine Lawrence, a
student at Dallas Senior High
School, tied for second place in
the level three examination.
Miss Lawrence’s paper has been
forwarded to the regional com-
petition.
50 YEARS AGO – 1962
Adult mixed choir of Dallas
ExtensionSchool will present “A
Tribute to April” Monday eve-
ning in the Dallas Senior High
School Auditorium. It will be an
evening of surprises with songs
by the chorus for April and East-
er. Chorus soloists are: Ellouise
Holmgren, Richard Benny, Do-
rothy Cosgrove, Sandra Sprout,
Sally Seymour, Carol Coates,
Edward Ratcliffe, Deloris Sav-
age, JenniePeters, BettieHanna,
Marie Troxell and Georgia
Weidner.
Dallas Boy Scout Troop 281
met at the home of Den Mother
Mrs. George Krashkevich to as-
semble bird boxes. Boys taking
part in the project are: John
McClary, Jay Buckingham, B.
Scott Rumbaugh, Drew Bitten-
bender, James Tupper, Thomas
Bottoms, Douglas Hess and
Mark Carm.
60 YEARS AGO – 1952
Dallas Borough elementary
students are rehearsing for the
annual operetta, to be presented
in the auditorium next week.
Principal characters in “Sunny”
are Harold Oaks, Sondra Clark,
Robert Cross, Mary Dora Scott,
Neil Smith Sandra Sprout, Joyce
Oliver and Zena Strub.
Two Wilkes College students
from Dallas are appearing in the
Cue ‘n’ Curtain production of
“Ah, wilderness!” tonight andto-
morrow night at the college
gymnasium on South Franklin
Street. They are William Hoff-
man, sonof Mr. andMrs. Charles
Hoffman, Lake Street, and Dale
Warmouth, son of Mrs. Eva War-
mouth, Huntsville.
70 YEARS AGO – 1952
A few sidelights on what the
younger farmers of Dallas Town-
ship are learning in agriculture
class these days are in store for a
number of old-timers ad proud
pappas who will attend the fa-
ther and Son Banquet of the Fu-
ture farmers of America at Dal-
las Township High School next
Wednesday night. General chair-
man of the banquet is Gerald M.
Snyder, chapter advisor andagri-
culture instructor at the town-
ship school. His committee in-
cludes Paul Carlin, Harold El-
ston, Ralph Snyder, Walter Ko-
zemchak, Danny Kozemchak,
Lawrence Smith and Aubrey
Weaver.
Tires for seven passenger cars
and five trucks of this area were
approved last week by Tir3 ra-
tioning board 40-5 at Shickshin-
ny. The following were permit-
ted passenger car retreads: Mi-
chael Butry, George Ladamus,
Julie Abelson, Roy Tyson, Allen
Lloyd, C.W. Stroud and Samuel
Bronson.
Information for “Only Yester-
day” is taken from past issues of
The Dallas Post which is 122
years old. The information is
printed here exactly as it ap-
peared in the newspaper years
ago.
ONLY
YESTERDAY
By Samantha Weaver
• It was beloved American humorist Will Rogers who made the
following sage observation: “You can’t say civilization don’t advance,
for in every war they kill you a new way.”
• Elkhart, Ind., has the dubious distinction of being the RV capital
of the world.
• According to a survey by the magazine Vegetarian Times, if
you’re a vegetarian, you have 3 percent of the U.S. population for
company. Only half of 1 percent of Americans are vegans, consuming
no animal products at all, while 10 percent say they follow a “vegetar-
ian-inclined” diet.
• The Hawaiian alphabet has only 12 letters.
• According to the law in the town of Chester, England, if you catch
a Welshman within the city walls after the sun has gone down, you
may shoot him with a longbow.
S T R A N G E B U T T R U E
“ W H AT I S YO U R FAV O R I T E T E L E V I S I O N S H O W ? ”
“Even though I know
it’s fake, the WWE. I
like the steel cages
and the inferno
matches when they
light the ring on fire.”
Tucker Lacey
Dallas
“Sponge Bob because
he has special best
friends like Patrick,
the starfish, and Gary,
the snail.
Dalton Robbins
Dallas
“Dora because she has
long hair and jewelry
and Boots, the monkey
and Swiper, the fox.
Aanya Parikh
Shavertown
“Batman, Superman
and Spiderman. They
all punch the bad guys
and I like the web-
bing.”
Brady Johnson
Trucksville
“The super heroes –
Superman and Spider
Man. Superman can fly
and Spider Man is
tough and has webs.”
Bruce Comiskey
Dallas
“Sponge Bob. It’s fun-
ny. He’s so funny when
he talks to his friend
Patrick.”
Devon Nelson
Dallas
C M Y K
PAGE 6 Sunday, April 29, 2012
E D I T O R I A L
www.mydallaspost.com
Dear Editor:
The Jackson Township Volun-
teer Fire Department is reaching
out to residents for support of its
annual fund drive.
Fire department members
thank all who have donated and
ask those who have not to consid-
er a donation.
These funds are used to pur-
chase new fire equipment, main-
tain and operate current equip-
ment and the fire hall.
This is the only source of reve-
nue to support the 24/7 coverage
for emergencies in the township.
Dave Bradbury
Fund Drive Chairman
L E T T E R T O E D I T O R
JT Fire Dept. fund
drive now operating
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE 7
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Senior Homecare By Angels
Up to 24 Hour care
Meal Preparation
Errands/Shopping
Hygiene Assistance
Light Housekeeping
Medication Reminders
Companionship
Licensed, Bonded and Insured
FREE In Home Consultation
Call 570-270-6700 or visit visitingangels.com
4
4
4
7
4
4
4
4
7
4
4
4
4
7
4
THIS WEEK’S FEATURE
BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER SPECIALS
GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE
639-3474 Just 4 Miles From Dallas
Pole 279 • Lakeside Drive • Harveys Lake
Lakeside
Skillet
Open Daily 7am - 9pm
Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches, bread and
quiches made fromthe freshest local ingredients.
100 E. OVERBROOK ROAD • SHAVERTOWN
6749787 • BROWNBARNCAFE.COM
OPEN FOR LUNCH
TUESDAYSATURDAY 11 A.M.3 P.M.
OPEN FOR DINNER
THURSDAYSATURDAY 5 P.M.9 P.M.
Ah! Some Chocolates
AT
Gift Certificates in all denominations are nowavailable
OPEN
MOTHER’S
DAY
MAY 13TH
MAKE YOUR
RESERVATIONS EARLY!
BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY
Starting at $2.99
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!
Mother’s Day
is May 13
Breakfast Served
All Day
Homemade Lunch
& Dinner Specials
Homemade Desserts
Open 6am-9pm Daily
6 Miles from Dallas Center on Rt 118
2407 Rt. 118, Pikes Creek
Celebrating
25
Years
675-1110
y
M E T R O
1174 Memorial Hwy • Dallas • 675-3663
themetrobarandgrill.com
• Chicken Pastina Soup • Penne Pasta with Marinara Sauce • Metro Alfredo with Farfalle Pasta
• Chicken Marsala • Kielbasa • Beef Cacciatore • Stuffed Flounder • Garlic Mashed Potatoes
• Candied Sweet Potatoes • Green Beans Almandine • Salad Station • Caesar Salad
• Italian Garden Salad • Pasta Salad • Potato Salad • Carving Station • Triple Smoked Baked Ham
• Slow Roasted Breast of Turkey • Home made Pan Gravy • Cranberry Sauce • Rolls and Butter
• Dessert Station • Assortment of Freshly Baked Desserts and Pastries • Fresh Fruit
PLUS TAX & GRATUITY. NO COUPONS OR DISCOUNTS.
$21.95PP CHILDREN UNDER 10 - $8.95 CHILDREN UNDER 4 - FREE
MOTHER’S DAY BUFFET
11am - 4pm (Reservations Suggested)
MOTHER’S DAY
BUFFET 11AM-4PM
themetrobarandgrill.com
1174 Memorial Hwy • Dallas • 675-3663
M E T R O
• Chicken Pastina Soup • Penne Pasta with Marinara Sauce
• Metro Alfredo with Farfalle Pasta
• Chicken Marsala • Kielbasa • Beef Cacciatore • Stuffed Flounder
• Garlic Mashed Potatoes • Candied Sweet Potatoes
• Green Beans Almandine • Salad Station • Caesar Salad
• Italian Garden Salad • Pasta Salad • Potato Salad • Carving Station
• Triple Smoked Baked Ham • Slow Roasted Breast of Turkey
• Home made Pan Gravy • Cranberry Sauce • Rolls and Butter
• Dessert Station • Assortment of Freshly Baked Desserts and Pastries
• Fresh Fruit
$21.95PP CHILDREN UNDER 10 - $8.95 CHILDREN UNDER 4 - FREE
PLUS TAX & GRATUITY. NO COUPONS OR DISCOUNTS.
Reservations Suggested
Back Mountain
Affordable Family
Dining
“Visit Us on Facebook” • WiFi
Mon.-Fri. 7-11am • Sat. & Sun. 9am-1pm
We Are Now Taking Reservations For Mother’s Day
Mon-Th 11-10pm • Fri-Sat 11-11pm • Sun 10-10pm
64 E. Center Hill Rd., Dallas • 675-4511
We Accept Reservations • Gift Certificates Available
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
BUD LITE
BOTTLES
$2
ALL NIGHT
WITH
SUZANNE
FREE PIZZA
WITH YOUR
COCKTAIL
5-7 P.M.
with Kristen
CLAM
NIGHT
BARTENDER’S
CHOICE
WITH
LADIES’
NIGHT
SKINNY
GIRL
MARGARITAS
HAPPY
HOUR
5-7
P.M.
16 OZ.
LAGER
$2
ALL DAY
WE ARE NOW OPEN FOR BREAKFAST
with
Kristen
with
Mallory
with
Mallory
with
Mallory
with
Kristen
7
4
7
9
6
6
THE MUSIC BOX
DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST, SWOYERSVILLE, PA
Presents
Call: 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
Musical inspired by and
featuring the songs
of Elvis Presley
APRIL 13th to 29th
Present this ad and
receive $4 OFF the
regular $39 tickets
for Dinner & Show!
CALL 283-2195 TO
MAKE YOUR
RESERVATIONS TODAY!
7
5
0
6
7
0
20%OFF on Communion Gifts
Mon, Tues, Wed & Sat. 10-6 •Thurs & Fri 10-8:30
18 Church St., Dallas • 675-5872 • www.ochmans.com
Choose FromALarge Variety
Of Estate and New
Crosses, Rosaries and
Rosary Bracelets
(available in Gold &Silver)
2012 • 999 Silver Eagle Coins Available
Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake will once again host
the Annual Six Month Devotion to Our Lady of Fatima
Commencing this Mother’s Day, May 13th at 7:00 pm, these beautiful
and inspirational Devotions will continue on the 13th of each month
through October 13th.
End your Mother’s Day with an hour of Fellowship and Devotion to the
Blessed Mother of Our Lord Jesus Christ. Devotions consist of the Rosary,
Old Fashion Marian Hymns, and Benediction to the Blessed Sacrament.
Complimentary Light Refreshments and Homemade Baked Goods are
available immediately after the service in the Parish Hall.
For further information call 639-1535.
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
h
GET THE TIMES LEADER APP!
Download it FREE at your app store.
• Local news
• National news
• Sports
• Weather
• More
C M Y K
PAGE 8 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Kingston • 287-9631 Exeter • 655-8801
Building? Remodeling?
See Voitek’s for all the top names, and many of the
premium brands you won’t find anywhere else.
Discount prices everyday! Free layaway!
LET US HELP YOU MAKE
YOUR DREAM KITCHEN A REALITY!
PROFILE
CAFE
MONOGRAM
N
O
W
O
P
E
N
!
COUPONS VALID AT • TRUCKSVILLE • WEST PITTSTON • PITTSTON • EDWARDSVILLE
13 CARVERTON ROAD
TRUCKSVILLE
696-9600
CHECK OUT OUR CATERING OPTIONS
• GIANT SUBS
Feeds 5 to 50
People
• SANDWICH PLATTERS
Feeds 5 to 40
People
• Cookies
• Drinks
• Box Lunches
Excludes premium and double meat subs. Prices and Participation may vary. Plus tax where applicable. No cash value. One
coupon per customer per visit. Not good with any other coupon offers or discount cards. Coupons must be surrendered with
visit. © 2011 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc. All rights reserved.
Pittston By-Pass
Pittston
801 Wyoming Ave.
West Pittston
Gateway Shopping Center
Edwardsville
Carverton Road
Trucksville
Excludes premium and double meat subs. Prices and Participation may vary. Plus tax where applicable. No cash value. One
coupon per customer per visit. Not good with any other coupon offers or discount cards. Coupons must be surrendered with
visit. © 2011 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc. All rights reserved.
Pittston By-Pass
Pittston
801 Wyoming Ave.
West Pittston
Gateway Shopping Center
Edwardsville
Carverton Road
Trucksville
FREE Breakfast
Sandwich
Get a regular 6” breakfast sub or
6” breakfast fatbread FREE when
you buy any drink before 11am.
Excludes premium and double meat subs. Prices and Participation may vary. Plus tax where applicable. No cash value. One
coupon per customer per visit. Not good with any other coupon offers or discount cards. Coupons must be surrendered with
visit. © 2011 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc. All rights reserved.
Pittston By-Pass
Pittston
801 Wyoming Ave.
West Pittston
Gateway Shopping Center
Edwardsville
Carverton Road
Trucksville
Dinner
Two-Night For $8
Get two regular 6” subs, two bags of chips
and two 21 oz. drinks for only $8 after 4pm.
$
5 Footlong
$5 Any Regular
Footlong Sub
Expires 5/5/12 Expires 5/5/12 Expires 5/5/12
Open
Early for
Breakfast
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE 9
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
BACK MOUNTAIN BOWL
Memorial Hwy Dallas • 675-5026
Eat in and Take Out!
Sicilian Pizza • Wings
Hoagies and More!
You stopped to smell the flowers …
now stop and see us.
Af ter-Hour s Care
Allergy season is here and the Careworks After-Hours clinics in MountainTop and Dallas are here
to help. Our providers treat injuries or illnesses that require immediate treatment, but may not be
serious enough to warrant an emergency room visit. Even better, our centers welcome both Geisinger
patients and those who have never visited us before.
For care when you need it most, visit Geisinger Careworks After-Hours in MountainTop or in Dallas.
Visit us online at mycareworks.com and mycareworks.com/facebook.
Most major insurances accepted, cash and credit welcome.
Hours
Monday – Friday 5 pm – 11 pm
Saturday – Sunday 9 am – 9 pm
Careworks After-Hours - MountainTop
229 South Mountain Blvd.
Mountain Top, PA 18707
Phone: 570-474-5847
Fax: 570-474-6952
Careworks After-Hours - Dallas
114 Lt. Cleary Drive
Dallas, PA 18612
Phone: 570-255-1178
Fax: 570-255-1174
7
4
9
8
7
2
at the
Back Mountain Memorial Library
Mon, Tues, Th 1pm-7pm
Wed 10pm-7pm
Fri 1pm-5pm• Sat 10am-2pm
675-1182
“The best book bargains in
Luzerne County”
3200 Memorial Hwy.
Dallas
Register for 2012-2013
Openings still available
Full Day Kindergarten
AM and PM
Preschool classes
2 Day Nursery School
3 or 5 Day Preschool
Extended Day PreK Option
AM Dallas
Kindergarten Extension
For more information
Call 675-1220
Licensed by
PADept of Education
Student musicians at Wyom-
ing Seminary Upper School will
present a program of classical
and contemporary music during
the annual Spring Concert at 8
p.m. on Saturday, May 5.
The concert will be held at the
Great Hall of Wyoming Semina-
ry, 228 Wyoming Avenue, just
north of Kingston Corners, and
will feature Sem’s Madrigal Sing-
ers, the Chorale, string ensem-
ble and the orchestra. The con-
cert is free and open to the pub-
lic.
One of the program’s high-
lights will be the world premier
performance of “Introduction for
Orchestra,” composed by Sem
orchestra director Anthony J.
Kubasek. Although Kubasek has
written nearly 50 musical works
and arranged several pieces for
orchestra, this is his first original
composition for orchestra.
The work is intended to high-
light the strengths of various
sections of the orchestra and to
serve as an instructional work.
The orchestra also will perform
an arrangement of favorite Dis-
ney movie themes called “Dis-
ney Magic” and Ravel’s popular
work “Pavane for a Dead Prin-
cess.”
The Madrigal Singers will per-
form music of Mendelssohn and
opera music by Vecchi and Mon-
teverdi, sung in Italian, while the
Chorale will perform selections
from the Liebeslieder Waltzes of
Brahms and “The Songs of Na-
ture” by Dvorak. The String En-
semble will present “An English
Suite” by Parry and “Two Pieces
for String Orchestra” by Shosta-
kovich.
This event is part of Sem’s
2011-12 Performing Arts Series.
For more information, call the
Sem communications office at
270-2192.
The Wyoming Seminary Orchestra will present the world premiere of a new composition for orchestra. Orchestra performers include
on violin: I-An Lin, Jonas Crass, Mengqi Wang, Yuki Narita, Chunhui Yu, Olivia Bolus, Sze Lok Cheng and Ryan Frania; on viola: Sheena
Syal, Lillian Williams and Sukanya Roy; on cello: Dong Min Shin, Kelsey Dolhon and Katherine Schraeder; on double bass: Scott Kwia-
tek; on flute: Seo Jin Oh, Chia-Yen Lee and Christina Adameck; on clarinet: Xinyi Chen, Tyler Harvey and Katherine Rogers; on sax-
ophone: Amy Shick and Caroline Reppert; on trumpet: Margaret Rupp, Matthew Blom and Morgan Dowd; on percussion: Bryden Goll-
hardt, Scott Edmunds, Jingwen Su, Adam Rinehouse and Meera Patel; on keyboard: Sienna Tabron.
Sem musicians plan Spring Concert for May 5
The final performance of
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s
“Once Upon a Mattress” will be
presented at 2:30 p.m. today,
April 29 at Lake-Lehman High
School.
Students, under the direction
of Gina Major, have been in re-
hearsal since early January. Se-
nior Hunter Root plays the role
of “King” while Matt Gorski, al-
so a senior, plays “Dauntless.
The cast includes 13 seniors
who have been active members
of Lake-Lehman theatre
throughout their high school
years.
Basedonthestoryof thePrin-
cess and the Pea, “Once Upon a
Mattress” found its first success
onBroadway many decades ago
with a young Carol Burnette in
the lead role as “Princess Wi-
nifred,” the 13th young royal to
finally pass the tests of Queen
Aggravain and win the hand of
her son Dauntless – and no one
else in the kingdom can marry
until he does.
In more recent years, Sarah
JessicaParkerledthecastinare-
vival onBroadway.
Tickets, at $7 each, will be
sold at the door. The box office
opens 45 minutes prior to cur-
tain.
The final performance of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Once
Upon a Mattress” will be presented at 2:30 p.m. today, April
29 at Lake-Lehman High School. Senior Hunter Root plays the
role of “King” while Matt Gorski, also a senior, plays “Daunt-
less.”
‘Mattress’ ends
today at Lehman
The team named The Zinc
Saucier, featuringbrother andsis-
ter duo John Whitesell and Ruth
Whitesell, of Harveys Lake, and
Matthew Zito, of Freeland, won
the fast-paced Ultimate Campus
Chef Competition sponsored by
Metz & Associates at Misericor-
dia University.
The team’s three-dish menu
that includedhand-craftedcream
of mushroom soup, Panko en-
crusted chicken in raspberry
sauce andCrème Brulee received
top honors.
The Ultimate Chef Competi-
tion is similar to the spirited
cooks-offs featured on the Food
and Bravo networks. During the
frantic culinary battle, each team
hadone hour toprepare three dis-
hes using a mystery market bas-
ket of ingredients that included a
unique array of items andpresent
them to the judges. The judges,
Christine Somers, director of
Campus Ministry, Glen Bozinski,
director of Admissions, and Pau-
lette Wolanski, administrative
specialist in Student Activities,
evaluatedthedishes ontaste, pre-
sentation, originality andname.
Brother, sister team wins competition
The winning team in the Miser-
icordia Ultimate Campus Chef
Competition was The Zinc
Saucier. From left, are siblings
John Whitesell and Ruth White-
sell, of Harveys Lake; and Mat-
thew Zito, of Freeland.
Sem ensembles
plan concert
The Wyoming Seminary
Wind Ensemble, Jazz En-
semble and Percussion En-
semble will present a concert
of jazz and music for percus-
sion ensemble and classical
wind ensemble at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, May 1 in the Bucking-
ham Performing Arts Center,
North Sprague Avenue, King-
ston.
The concert is free and open
to the public. For more in-
formation, call 270-2192.
PSU Day at Knoebel’s
Amusement Park
Several Penn State Alumni
Societies from Northeast
Pennsylvania will offer a day at
Knoebel’s Amusement Park on
Saturday, May 12 for 2012
Penn State Day.
Admission is $20 for adults
and $10 for children. Both
include a $10 food/ride book-
let. PSU lunch only is $10.
Penn State Day t-shirts will be
sold for $10.
Reservations are due by
Friday, April 27 by calling
386-6262.
Sem Dance Company
sets performance
The Wyoming Seminary
Dance Company will present
its annual performance, titled
“Dance Portraits,” at 8 p.m. on
Friday, May 11 and Saturday,
May 12 in the Buckingham
Performing Arts Center, North
Sprague Avenue, Kingston.
The performance is free and
open to the public. For more
information, call 270-2192.
Sem seniors
plan recital
Wyoming Seminary student
musicians will present the
annual Farewell/Senior Recital
at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 25 in
the Great Hall of Wyoming
Seminary, 228 Wyoming Ave.,
just north of Kingston Cor-
ners.
The performance is free and
open to the public. For more
information, call 270-2192.
DHS Class of 1987
plans reunion
The Dallas High School
Class of 1987 is planning its
25th anniversary class reunion
for Friday, July 27 at The
Checkerboard Inn.
Any class member who has
moved from the area or wants
to confirm that they are on the
mailing list can e-mail Staci
(Robbins) Miller at left-
lane@ptd.net.
S C HOOL B RI E F S
The Misericordia University
Speech-Language Pathology
(SLP) Department will host a re-
ception to introduce the works of
artists fromVerveVertuArt Studio
ondisplayinthe Speech-Language
and Hearing Center. The free re-
ceptionwill beheldfrom5to8p.m.
Thursday, May 3 on the second
floor of JohnJ. PassanHall located
onthelowercampus. Reservations
arerecommended.
The rotating art collection is en-
titled, “Exceptional Art – Excep-
tionalArtists.”Itfeaturestheworks
of artists from the Deutsch Insti-
tute’s Verve Vertu Art Studio. The
DeutschInstituteoffersrecreation-
al and leisurely activities to people
witha widerangeof disabilities.
Verve Vertu Studio artists will display works at Passan Hall
C M Y K
PAGE10 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Call for an appointment! 696-3899
(walk-ins also welcome)
40 Knob Hill Road, Trucksville, Pa 18708 • www.TrucksvilleECEC.com
(formerly Trucksville Nursery School)
Meeting and exceeding PA Learning Standards for Young Children
And Teacher/Child Ratio’s
Now Enrolling – Summer Camps – call for more info!
• Preschool Programs for 2 to 6 year olds • Dallas Kindergarten Enrichment Extension
• Learning Lab w/computers • Music & Movement Program
• Extended hours: Art Classes, Math & Language, FitKids, PlayPals
• Hands-on Science Room • Indoor Play Area
• New Playground w/rubber mulch • Summer Camps
Now Offering
5 day – Daily Extension – 4/5 Year Old Class!
9:30 to 2:30
Openings Still Available - Creative Kids Kindergarten Extension
Trucksville Early Childhood
Education Center
BOTH LOCATIONS
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
AT 11AM
532 MOOSIC ST., SCRANTON (570) 341-5100
761 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON (570) 287-2750
ANY
REGULAR
SIZE FRIES
FREE
COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS
EXP. 5/31/12
Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Bressler
III, Wyoming, announce the en-
gagement of their son, Dr. Herb-
ert Bressler, to Dr. Colleen Kroll,
daughter of Joe and Karen Kroll,
Allison Park.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of Rosemary Bernosky,
Pittston; the late Simon Bernos-
ky and the late Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Bressler Jr., Kingston.
Dr. Kroll is a graduate of
Hampton High School, Penn
State University and earned a
Doctor of Optometry degree
fromthe Pennsylvania College of
Optometry at Salus University,
Philadelphia in 2010. She is em-
ployed as an optometrist with Ir-
win Eye Care, Irwin.
Dr. Bressler is a 2002 graduate
of Dallas High School, a 2006
graduate of Penn State Universi-
ty andearneda Doctor of Optom-
etry degree from the Pennsylva-
nia College of Optometry at Sa-
lus University in 2010. He is em-
ployed by Lenscrafters,
Monroeville.
The couple will exchange vows
in September at St. Mary of the
Mount, Pittsburgh.
Bressler, Kroll engagement
Dr. Herbert Bressler, Dr. Colleen Kroll
The 45th Annual Senior Din-
ner Dance, sponsoredbytheArea
Agency on Aging for Luzerne-
Wyoming Counties will be held
from 2 to 6 p.m. on Thursday,
May 10 at Genetti’s Hotel and
Conference Center, Wilkes-
Barre.
The theme this year is “Danc-
ing with the Stars.” Entertain-
ment will be provided by King
Henry and the Showman. A
dance contest will be featured
andis opento anyone over age 50
who can enter in the following
categories: waltz, swing-jitterbug
and the polka.
Prizes and trophies will be
awarded to the winners of each
dance and prizes will be awarded
to all participants.
For more information on the
dance contest, call Sandy Acorn-
ley or Jean Spindler at 287-1102.
Dinner-dance tickets are $21
for those over age 60 and $23 for
anyone under age 60. A ticket in-
cludes dinner, dancing and over
65door prizes, includingadinner
for two and a show for two prize
donated by United Central Penn
Gas.
Tickets may be obtained at lo-
cal senior citizens centers or by
calling Rhonda Adams at 822-
1558, ext. 3337.
For more information on the
dinner dance, call Brenda Lispi at
822-1158, ext. 3333.
Senior Dinner Dance slated for May 10
The Tiger Cubs of Cub Scout Pack 281 recently enjoyed the antics of the Harlem Globe-
trotters game at the Mohegan Sun Arena. The Tigers are part of Pack 281 in Dallas, chartered
by the Dallas United Methodist Church. From left, are Den Leader Aric Gingo, Maxim Gingo,
AndyGoodrich, James Antall, Parker Bolesta, CharlieKappler, MatthewMaxfieldandDenChief
Ivan Gingo.
PACK 281 TIGER CUBS
ATTEND GLOBETROTTERS GAME
Alzheimer’s group
meets may 3
The Dallas Alzheimer’s Sup-
port Group will meet at 10:30
a.m. on Thursday, May 3 in the
board room of the Meadows
Nursing and Rehab Center, 4 E.
Center Hill Road, Dallas.
Chicken dinner
at Kunkle Fire Co.
The Kunkle Fire Company
will hold its annual chicken
dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. on
Saturday, May 5 at the Kunkle
Fire Company Society Hall.
Tickets for this all-you-can-
eat family-style dinner are $9
for adults and $5 for children
and will be available at the
door. Take-outs will also be
available.
For information, call 675-
3334.
Society plans
classic car show
The Luzerne County Histor-
ical Society will hold its Sec-
ond Annual Classic Car Show
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sun-
day, May 6 at the historic Swet-
land Homestead, 885 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
The show will be open to
any vehicle, including classic
cars, race cars, muscle cars,
tuners, trucks, motorcycles,
choppers and bicycles. Entry
fee is $15 per vehicle and free
for spectators.
The show is sponsored by
Stell Enterprises and will fea-
ture DJ Steel Dragon, 50/50, a
prize raffle and food. Trophies
will be awarded to the Top 25
entries as well as Best of Show
and People’s Choice award.
Dash plaques and goody bags
will be given to the first 100
entries.
The Swetland Homestead
will be open for tours. Rain
date will be May 20.
For more information, call
Mark Riccetti at 823-6244 ext.
3.
Aging program
planned at Masonic
Masonic Village at Dallas is
offering a free healthy aging
program, “Memory Loss and
Ask the Doc,” from 2 to 3 p.m.
on Wednesday, May 9 at the
Irem Clubhouse, 64 Ridgeway
Drive, Dallas.
This two-part presentation
will begin with a discussion on
memory loss, followed by a
question and answer session
with Dr. Kenric Maynor, of
Geisinger Wyoming Valley.
Reservations must be made
by May 8 by calling 675-1866.
Program about
garden pests slated
If garden pests are making
more work for you in your
garden that you would like, join
Sharon Telesky at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday, May 9 at the Lu-
zerne County West Side An-
nex, 2009 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort. Telesky will discuss the
life cycle of various garden
pests, the damage that they
cause and different methods to
control them.
To register, contact Penn
State Extension Luzerne Coun-
ty at 825-1701 or 602-0600.
WVCOC meeting
set for May 9
The Wyoming County Cham-
ber of Commerce monthly
luncheon will be held from
11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednes-
day, May 9 at Twig’s Café,
Tunkhhannock.
Helen Lavelle, president and
chief creative strategist of the
Lavelle Strategy Group, will be
the speaker.
To make a reservation, call
Deborah at 875-8325 or e-mail
Deborah@wyccc.com.
Diabetes class set
A free diabetes education
class, entitled “Diabetes Facts,
Medication and Monitoring,”
will be held at 1 p.m. on Thurs-
day, May 10 at St. Therese’s
Church hall, 64 Davis St., Sha-
vertown.
The class is hosted by Cook’s
Pharmacy of Shavertown. To
make a reservation, call Mea-
gan at 674-3607.
Music Box Theatre
Academy scheduled
Enrollment is now open for
the Music Box Theatre Acade-
my, a musical theatre work-
shop for students ages 13-20, at
the Music Box Dinner Play-
house, 196 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville.
Sessions begin May 14 and
students will perform on June
15, 16 and 17. Students will
learn techniques in acting,
singing and dancing.
For more information, call
283-2195.
‘Wizard of Oz’
at Music Box
The Music Box Repertory
Company will present a musi-
cal for children, “The Wizard of
Oz” on May 18-20 at the Music
Box Playhouse, 196 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville.
All tickets are $12 and in-
clude a McDonald’s Fun Meal.
Performance times are 6 p.m.
Friday, 1 and 5 p.m. Saturday
and 1 p.m. Sunday.
Tickets are now on sale and
can be purchased by calling
283-2195.
Hope Center to
offer new program
The Hope Center, in conjunc-
tion with the Wilkes University
School of Pharmacy, will initi-
ate a Pharmaceutical Patient
Assistance Program.
This program will be for the
uninsured and underinsured.
Call 696-5233 for qualifications
and appointments.
C I V I C B RI E F S
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE11
THEDALLAS POST
Sports
The Back Mountain Black-
hawks finished the NEPASHL
varsity ice hockey season in first
place with a 10-2-2 record.
The Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia Scholastic Hockey League
varsity playoffs included teams
from Crestwood, Back Moun-
tain, Valley West, Paupack, Sus-
quehanna Valley, Holy Redeem-
er, Scranton, Pittston and
Wyoming Area.
The Blackhawks defeated the
Scranton Lightning, 9-6, in the
first roundtoface the third-place
Wyoming Valley West Spartans.
The Blackhawks came out
strong against the Spartans, fin-
ishing with a 10-7 victory.
Crestwood posted wins over
the Pittston Area Patriots and
the Susquehanna Valley Stam-
peded to advance to the cham-
pionship round.
The Blackhawks returned to
the championship round on
March 11 to defend their title
against Scranton.
Blackhawk Alex Hoyt would
strike first off a rebound shot
from Tom Brady with 3:50 re-
maininginthe first period. With-
in two minutes, Eric Smith
scored an even strength goal off
a pass from Tom Brady.
Crestwood answered with
two goals of its own until Cap-
tain Casey McAndrew buried a
bread-away bid on a short-hand-
ed pass from David Payne.
With a 3-3 score, Eric Goto-
weski made a perfect wrap-
around pass to teammate David
Payne at center ice. Payne
ripped a blast over the Crest-
wood goalie’s glove side with
five seconds remaining on the
clockfor the game-wininnggoal.
John Henchak and Hunter
Mackling played exceptional de-
fense in front of outstanding
goal tender Sean Jenkins, who
stopped 33 of 36 shorts.
First-year varsity coach Paul
Ciaccia was assisted by Jerry
Martindale and George Hocken-
bury.
Members of the Back Mountain Blackhawks high school ice hockey championship team are, from left, first row, goalies Sean Jen-
kins and Corey McAndrew. Second row, Eric Yenchak, Paul Ciacci, Eric Smith, Logan Obes, Patrick Newhart, Don Hockenbury, Jim-
my Loefflad. Third row, Coach Jerry Martindale, Eric Anderson, Tyler Steve, Johny Yenchak, Dylan Pilger, Casey McAndrew, Eric
Gotoweski, Lewis Hackling, David Payne, Kenny Burkhardt, Hunter Hackling, Alex Hoyt, Coach George Hockenbury and Head Coach
Paul Ciacci.
Blackhawks finish first with 10-2-2 slate
The Lake-Lehman girls la-
crosse team defeated Tunkhan-
nock, 16-1, last week but lost to
Lewisburg, 15-7, and Midd-
West, 11-5.
Lake-Lehman 16
Tunkhannock 1
Scoring for the Lady Black
Knights were Alysa Adams, 5;
Mallory Wilson, 4; Amelia Jen-
kins, 3; Emily Galasso, 2; Ra-
chel Pilch, 1; Courtney Tho-
mas, 1.
Makenzie Borum and Lydia
Forster combined for nine
saves in goal.
Kathy Cowher scored for
Tunkhannock.
Lewisburg 15
Lake-Lehman 7
Mallory Wilson scored four
goals for Lehman while team-
mate Alysa Adams added
three.
Makenzie Borum had 12
saves in goal.
Midd-West 11
Lake-Lehman 5
Lake-Lehman goals were
scored by Alysa Adams, 2; Cas-
sie Keiper, Amelia Jenkins and
Mallory Wilson with one goal
each.
Lydia Forster had eight saves
in goal.
Lehman lacrosse
girls split games
The 7/8th grade Back Moun-
tain Bandits girls lacrosse team
completed a furious second-half
comeback to tie the Saucon Val-
ley Panthers, 15-15.
The Lady Bandits found
themselves down by four goals
in the second half to the unde-
feated Panthers but turned it
around with four unanswered
goals to close the gap with Sa-
mantha Delamater scoring the
tying goal with less than 10 sec-
onds left in the game.
Leading the scoring for the
Bandits were Samantha Dela-
mater with six goals, Amanda
Miller and Jordon Kelly with
three goals each while Katie
Snedeker, Katie Roberts and
Lauren Delamater each scored
once.
Julia Hutsko, Katie Strohl and
Katie Kapral each had two as-
sists in the game with Claudia
Waltz, Lauren Finnegan each
getting one assist.
In goal for the Bandits was
Grace Butler (16 saves) while
Nina Johnson, Melinda Ratch-
ford and Bella Waltz won mul-
tiple ground balls on defense.
Bandits rally to 15-15
tie after comeback
Back Mountain Bandits Girls 7/8 lacrosse teamparticipated in the 2012 “Queen Of The Turf” Clinic & Tournament at Blooms-
burg University this month. Bloomsburg University Head Coach Erin Cunnane and the entire Bloomsburg University girls la-
crosseteamhostedtheevent andteams fromPennsylvania, NewYork, NewJerseyandMarylandparticipated. Shownherewith
members of the university team are, from left, Sam Delameter (No. 16), Jordan Kelly (No. 3), Grace Butler (No. 99) and Katie
Strohl (No. 15).
LOCAL LACROSSE PLAYERS ATTEND CLINIC
An open western horse show
will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Sat-
urday, June 23 at the Luzerne
County Fair Grounds, Route 118,
Dallas.
The show is one of the seven
western horse shows in the
NPHA series. Exhibitors do not
need to be an NPHA member to
participate, but may join at the
showto become eligible for year-
end awards.
The horse show is being spon-
sored by Megan Lee, a student at
Lake-Lehman, as part of her se-
nior project. All proceeds from
the horse showwill be donatedto
the Make-A-Wish Foundation,
Scranton office, and the Luzerne
County Fair.
The horse show will consist of
54 classes. There will be Halter,
Showmanship, Horsemanship,
Pleasure, Driving andGymkhana
classes. There will be 16 divi-
sions, including Halter, Lead
Line, Beginner Rider, Adult Be-
ginner Rider, 13 & under Youth
Rider, 12 & Under Youth Rider,
Novice Rider, 14-18 Youth Rider,
Senior Rider, Open, Jack Benny,
Junior Horse, Senior Horse,
Open Driving, Novice Gymkha-
na, Open Gymkhana.
There will also be a special
Make-A-Wish Division, open to
eligible riders in which the cham-
pion will receive a custom em-
broidered chair and $100.
Also, there is The HobbyHorse
Rookie Rewards Horsemanship
Class sponsoredbyHobbyHorse.
This class is open to any novice
rider who has not won more than
three blue ribbons in any inde-
pendent riding class, anywhere,
any time. Hobby Horse has pro-
vided gift certificates. First place
will receive a $50 gift certificate,
second place, a $30 gift certifi-
cate and third place, a $20 gift
certificate. Ribbons will be pre-
sented to those finishing in first
through fifth place.
There will be an additional
$700 added to stake class
payouts. Eachclass will beaward-
ed ribbons for first through sixth
placeandfirst-placeawards. Each
division will have champion and
reserve champion awards.
There will be a food stand, si-
lent auction, 50-50 drawing and
tack shops on the grounds the
day of the show.
Admission is free for the pub-
lic.
For more information on the
“Make-A-Wish Benefit Horse
Show” or tomake a donation, call
406-8208 or e-mail
meg.lee37@aol.com.
All persons or businesses do-
nating will be recognized in the
Horse Show Program Guide.
ADressage Horse Showwill al-
sobeheldonthegrounds onJune
23.
For more information ,call Mi-
chelle LaBarre at 328-8849.
Open western horse
show set for June 23
The Dallas boys tennis team
defeated Hazleton, 3-2, last
week.
In singles action, L.J. Sidari
(H) defeated Ryan McCarthy,
6-3, 6-7, 7-5; Donald Tedesco (H)
defeated Blake Donovan, 6-3, 5-7,
6-4; andFrancois Ross (D) defeat-
ed Kurtis Miesowitz, 0-6, 6-4, 7-5.
Doubles actionsawthe teamof
Tyler Tuck / Aleksey Gitelson
(D) defeat Mauro Nataro / An-
thony Sidari, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2; and the
team of Zach Downs / Steve
Wempa (D) defeat Jose Arias/
Nick Franzosa, 6-0, 6-0.
Mountaineer boys tennis team
defeats Hazleton, 3-2, last week
LIVESTRONG 5K
run slated
The Misericordia University
Sport Management Association
will host the LIVESTRONG
Livelong 5K Run/Walk charity
event at 11 a.m. today, April 29
at Pavilion #3 at Frances Slo-
cum State Park.
LIVESTRONG provides
support to guide people
through the cancer experience,
bringing them together to fight
cancer.
Registration will be held
from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Registration fee is $25.
For more information, e-mail
livestrong.live-
long5k@gmail.com.
Open Horse
Show planned
Borrowdale Acres Inc. will
hold an Open Horse Show at 8
a.m. on Sunday, May 13 at the
Lehman Horse Show Grounds.
For more information, call
Carole Malig at 675-8974.
Rock Rec plans
summer camps
The Rock Rec Center, 340
Carverton Road, Trucksville is
accepting registrations for its
summer camps which include
basketball, soccer, tennis and
Super Sport Camp.
The camps are open to girls
and boys kindergarten through
sixth grade and run from June
18 to August 17.
For more information, call
696-2769.
Gymnastics program
begins registration
Shooting Starz Gymnastics,
250 Johnston St., Wilkes-Barre,
will accept enrollment for 2012
on June 11 and 25, August 18
and 27, October 15 and October
29 and December 22.
For more information, con-
tact Joelle Rose at 822-1212.
Softball organization
seeking players
Wyoming Valley Vipers travel
softball organization is looking
for a few players. Pitching is a
plus.
If interested, contact Jim
Dunn at 333-4398 or 332-8027.
BMYS hosts
futsal/soccer league
Back Mountain Youth Soccer
will host an indoor Futsal/
Soccer league continuing
through March for ages U6 to
high school age at the Penn
State Lehman Campus gym.
FIFA futsal ball and rules will
be used. Games will be played
on weekends.
All area intramural and travel
teams are welcome. All area
individual players seeking a
team can sign up online as well.
Divisions will be set to insure
fair competition.
More information and sign
up sheets are available online at
www.bmysa.org.
Blast fastpitch teams
seek new players
The U12 and U14 Endless
Mountains Blast fastpitch
teams are still looking for a few
qualified players to fill their
2012 rosters.
Those interested in U12
should contact John Keefe at
885-5808. Interested U14 play-
ers should contact Bill Kern at
498-5991.
The Endless Mountains Blast
is a travel fastpitch softball
organization based in Tunk-
hannock. Additional informa-
tion can be found at http://
www.eteamz.com/endlessmt-
blast, or by e-mailing
ronh@sbsmod.com.
S P ORT S B RI E F S
C M Y K
PAGE12 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
◆ PUZZLE ANSWERS
Puzzles, Page 2
At public hearing April 17 in
HarveysLakeBorough, aresident
mentioned a cost-saving tactic
adoptedbycouncil –cuttingpow-
er toseveral streetlights.
Council president Larry Radel
said during the budgeting proc-
ess, council approves the budget
in December and new council
members are allowed to review
and make changes in January, af-
ter theyareswornintooffice.
Radel said no official vote was
taken to adopt the measure,
thoughpowerwascut tothelines.
Thestreetlightswerejustoneof
several ways council attemptedto
cut a $43,000 deficit, including
givinguptheir monthlystipends.
Eleven streetlights were affect-
ed, but Radel saidtheywerelocat-
ed randomly throughout the bor-
ough, and it didn’t appear safety
was a factor in their installation a
fewyears ago.
Radel approved the measure
because the borough-owned
streetlights were not energy effi-
cient.
“Theywerenot environmental-
ly-friendly, they had a glare, they
weren’t dark-sky compliant,” said
Radel. “I personallydidn’t want to
havethelight pollution.”
He said cutting power to the
lights will save the borough $10
perlightpermonth. Hesaidsafety
isn’t a concern because there are
more privately-owned lights
around the lake than there were
borough-ownedanyway.
-SarahHite
Power cut to some HL streetlights
2002, with an option to buy the
property.
Musial said the force was locat-
ed within the current municipal
offices, which also shares the
space with the Harveys Lake Mu-
nicipal Authority.
Prior tothedepartment’s move,
the force used state police investi-
gators and was comprised of
mostly part-time officers, accord-
ing to Dallas Post archives.
Despite the building’s condi-
tions, Musial said the department
made limited upgrades and phys-
ical changes to the space before
moving in.
“We were enthused to be get-
ting out of the broom closet we
were in,” he said. “…We sort of
started nickel and diming this
place just to get through.”
He said the building was open
spaceanddesks andwalls werein-
stalled after its purchase to suit
the police department’s needs
within a constrained budget.
Musial attributes a separation
of the flooring, visible through
carpeting, and cracks in the walls
to sinking of the building. He said
nearbytownhouseshadtobebuilt
upon pilings due to issues with
wetlands, but the current police
station is a modular building on
no foundation.
He also blames the townhouse
construction in 2003 for plaguing
the police building with water is-
sues.
“The toilet, we can get one
flush out of it every 20 minutes,”
he said. “(With the sink), if we
giveit about ahalf hour wecanget
about three seconds of water.”
Musial said the fact that he
spends much of his time at the
building when not on patrol al-
lows him to address these issues,
as he has seen the building dete-
riorate over time.
“The borough looked at trying
to get …public water ran into this
building but … the cost was too
high,” he said.
He said the sewer systemin the
building was installed “illegally,”
andagrinder pumpwasneededto
pumpthesewage. Musial feels the
changesmademaynot bedeemed
appropriate by the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion.
Musial andMayor ClarenceHo-
gan said not much has been said
about the police station’s condi-
tions inorder to protect the safety
of officers on duty and also to en-
sure the department isn’t evicted
from the building due to several
infrastructure issues.
“I honestly wouldn’t want
someone to come in just in case
they deem it unsafe and we’d get
kicked out,” said Musial.
The holding bench is a wooden
and metal park-style unbolted
bench next to a handicap shower
bar. Officers cuff thoseapprehend-
ed to the bar while doing paper-
work, but its proximity to a desk
poses a safety risk, said Musial.
“We hadtwo (benches), but the
one, a prisoner picked up and
threw at us and it broke,” he said.
“We had a woman while we were
typing upcharges onthis comput-
er; she picked it up and threwit at
us. We had one put his head
through the wall. We had people
spit at us while we were doing the
charges. Several times we had to
take the person out and put them
inthebackof thecar andleavethe
door open to keep an eye on them
because they were so bad.”
Musial saidthebuildingwasde-
signed by former Police Chief Jeff
Butler, and moving the holding
bench isn’t an option.
“There’s not too many places
where we could put it in the room
without (those who have been ap-
prehended) being behind the offi-
cers,” said Musial.
The current building is a wood-
en exterior, which Musial said is
rotting, with drywall inside. Mu-
sial saidthe newbuildingwill also
be studded with drywall, but the
concrete will ensure no one can
penetrate the exterior.
He also said a secure bench
bolted to the floor along with a
mechanism bolted to the floor
will ensure those apprehended
cannot disrupt or pose a safety
risk to police duties.
Musial said the current build-
ing is also not compliant with the
Americans with Disabilities Act
Standards for Accessible Design.
Musial invites anyone interest-
ed in seeing the condition of the
building to visit. He said he gave
tours to residents after the public
hearing on the issue on April 17.
Boice said she has taken photo-
graphs of the building’s exterior,
but has not toured the facility.
“I was over at the police station
on (April 21 in the) morning and
took several photos. When I ar-
rived, the police were exiting the
side door. We had a charity run at
the lake on Saturday and I as-
sumed they must be heading to
that event, so I didn’t bother to
ask for a tour,” Boice wrote in an
e-mail. “Honestly, since I never
heard a word at any borough
meeting either before I was elect-
ed or since with regard to our po-
lice station being in deplorable
condition, I have no reason to be-
lieve it is unsafe/unhealthy or in
deplorable condition.”
Musial said the building has
served the department sufficient-
ly over the years but the current
conditions, paired with the grant
availability, have led to the quick
execution of the project.
Newbuilding promises
The former recreation center is
located at 22 Little League Road,
adjacent to the Little League
fields and just down the street
from Lake-Noxen Elementary
School on Westpoint Avenue.
It’s also about four miles away
fromthe current site, whichBoice
dubbedthe“metropolitanarea” of
Harveys Lake. Boice has said hav-
ing police presence at the en-
trance of the lake lets visitors
know the borough is protected.
Musial said calls to the depart-
ment arehandledwithpriority, no
matter where police are located.
He said having the building at the
entrance to the lake poses safety
threats to the community.
“Criminals coming into your
town, they generally use the main
part of your town and they see all
three cars here, the lake’s open,”
said Musial.
The former recreation center is
approximately 600 square feet
larger than the current building,
andoriginal drawings providedby
Homeworks Construction of
Sweet Valley feature two interro-
gationrooms, tworest rooms, one
shower, one kitchenette, a police
chief office, storage and a utility
room.
Musial said two interrogation
rooms are necessary because, ac-
cording to state law, juveniles and
incarcerated adults cannot be
housed in the same room once in
police custody.
Residents at the April 17 public
hearing expressed concerns
about parking and the safety of
children playing near the recre-
ation center during the summer
months.
Musial said signage will be in-
stalled at the site and parking or-
der will be enforced. He said the
police department will request
five spaces at the site, and earth
nearbyhas alreadybeenleveledto
create additional room for the
parking spaces.
Musial has no worries about
transporting and keeping those
apprehended at the site despite
the proposed station’s closeness
to a location where a concentrat-
ednumber of childrenspendtheir
time.
“We’re not dealing with 100
prisoners,” said Musial. “We will
have themcuffed and nobody will
see them. They will be securely
placed and we don’t have anyone
here longer than two hours be-
cause then they have to go to the
magistrate’s office.”
Boice has concerns about heat-
ing the building. She saidyears af-
ter the building was constructed
in1979, “it cost a small fortune to
heat it,” and it was abandoned.
According to The Dallas Post
archives, thelast knownuseof the
building was a reading center cre-
ated by Charlotte Williams in
June 2007. The center was avail-
able to young children during
summer but, due to illness, Wil-
liams couldnolonger runthe cen-
ter, said Hogan.
He estimates it has been vacant
for one or two years.
The building is currently being
heated by an electric heater to
keepwater pipes fromfreezing, as
thepipesarealsoconnectedtothe
nearby borough garage. Records
showing the costs of heating the
building for occupation could not
be obtained.
Plans outlined in the grant ap-
plication specify the installation
of a newheating systemand insu-
lation, which Musial said will en-
sure energy efficiency within the
building.
Hogan doesn’t foresee an addi-
tional monthly cost for the bor-
ough. He believes the heating and
electrical costs for the new build-
ing will be “cheaper” because of
the improved energy efficiency,
but wasn’t sure howthat could be
determined before the new heat-
ingsystemandinsulationwere in-
stalled.
Most recent estimates from
PennEastern Architects, the bor-
ough engineer, state the project
will cost $76,440 for the recre-
ation building renovations. Emil
Jarolen, who signed the estimate
documents, did not return mess-
ages prior to deadline.
Public awareness issues
Boice has questioned members
of council and Hogan about why
the public wasn’t presented with
the information regarding the po-
lice department’s current state
andtheideatomovethefacilityto
the former recreation building.
“I don’t know,” Hogan said of
the reason why no public hearing
was held prior to applying for the
grant. “I didn’t think it had to be.
The opportunity was there to ap-
ply for a grant, and I was hoping
that we would get it.”
Hogan said, if the project were
to be undertaken without the aid
of grant money, public input
would have been solicited before
beginning the project.
“It’s free money,” he said.
Hogan said Radel and Kopko
spent time working with him on
the grant application, and it
wasn’t the first time the project
has been proposed.
Musial didn’t want to address
the safety risks to the public be-
cause that would put officers in
danger.
“Wecouldn’t gotoofar –theold
council was aware of it,” said Mu-
sial. “I didn’t want to go too far
withcriminalsknowingthecondi-
tion of the building to just pop in
here whenever they wanted to
when we weren’t here.”
Boice, who took office in Janu-
arybut attendedcouncil meetings
frequently, saidshe never heardof
the issues with the building. At a
public hearing April 17 on the is-
sue, former council member
Diane Dwyer didn’t recall any
mention of the project, while an-
other former council member,
Rich Williams III, clearly remem-
bered mention of the project at a
work session meeting.
Examination of work session
meeting minutes mentioned dur-
ing the public hearing hadno doc-
umented mention of the project.
Former council member Ryan
Doughton also wrote a letter to
the borough, stating he remem-
bered the project being men-
tioned.
Boice recently said she is going
to see if state officials can investi-
gate whether the grant applica-
tion process was conducted legal-
ly. She said the project was un-
known to the community and felt
some members of the municipal
government have been dishonest
about it.
Hogan signed a letter sent to
Harrisburg dated Nov. 29, 2011,
stating the project had communi-
ty support, though he admitted
during a public hearing on April
17 his comments were based on
“word-of-mouth.”
Boice contacted state legisla-
tors and officials on April 19, ask-
ing for a formal investigation.
“While I am100 (percent) in fa-
vor of grants and making certain
my small community receives its
fair share, I want to make sure we
go about it in a fair and honest
matter,” she wrote in an e-mail to
officials.
Boice said the project will cost
taxpayers because she believes
the recreation building needs
more extensive work than what
has been reported. The borough
has had a deficit in the last two
years.
“I have other serious concerns
about the deceit andmisrepresen-
tations made on the part of our
elected officials and would like to
address them with the proper in-
vestigative authority,” Boice
wrote.
Boice said if she doesn’t hear
from officials soon, she will con-
tinue topursue the issue withoth-
er state authorities.
Borough office relocation
Another part of the project out-
lined in the grant application is
the relocation of the borough sec-
retary and zoning officer into the
current police building.
In the original grant applica-
tion, that aspect of the project is
mentioned first, and Hogan said
the idea stemmed from a request
from General Municipal Author-
ity Director Richard Boice, hus-
band of Michell’e Boice and a for-
mer Harveys Lake Borough may-
or, to expandhis offices where the
boroughsecretaryandzoningoffi-
cer are currently located.
Richard Boice said on April 25
that he had no intention of ex-
panding.
“It sounds like we’re trying to
push them out,” he said.
The grant application also said
the purpose of the move was out
of concern for the health of bor-
ough employees. The building
acts as the sewer authority’s main
pumping station, and Richard
Boice said there are odors in-
volved in the process.
“I’veworkedherefor years andI
haven’t gotten sick,” he said.
Hogan said as the police reloca-
tion project will use much of the
grant monies, the borough office
relocation project will become an-
other phase of the project.
Hesaidinthebuilding’scurrent
condition, some upgrades will
need to be made to house those
two offices, including remedying
the water and sewage issues.
“I’mgoing to have to see if I can
get another grant,” said Hogan.
He also said the former recre-
ation building has room to ex-
pand, which may be another op-
tionfor housingtheboroughoffic-
es.
Hogan said the current police
building is not appropriate for a
stationbecauseof its condition, as
the department needs specific
tools, layout and access to the
building.
He said it would suit borough
offices because they are only open
from7a.m. to3:30p.m. anddonot
require the same needs as the po-
lice department.
In the initial grant application,
it states “no renovations” would
needtobemadetothecurrent po-
licebuildingtohousetheborough
secretary and zoning officer.
POLICE
Continued from Page 1
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Harveys Lake Police Chief Charles Musial demonstrates how offenders have to be hand-cuffed to a
park bench in the station office while being held. He thinks the station needs a newer and more se-
cure facility.
garten classroom with its own
restroom for little ones. Some
of the school’s curriculum ma-
terials will also be on display
for parents to peruse.
DiPippa said one exciting
aspect of the nearly-ready
school is the recent donation
from the Weatherly Area
School District of 13 SMART
Boards.
“One of the things we were
concerned about was having
technology and being technol-
ogy-based,” he said. “Now
with these 13 SMART Boards,
one for every classroom, that’s
something super for us.”
Jerry Harteis, president of
Rock Sold Academy’s board of
directors, said tuition was re-
cently reduced significantly to
ensure the school is available
to everyone during tough eco-
nomic times.
“We decided as a board to
open this up to as many stu-
dents as possible,” he said.
Tuition per child will nowbe
$3,950, a decrease from the
initial $6,240 price. Harteis
said there will also be scholar-
ships available for qualifying
students.
He said the board hasn’t de-
termined where cuts will be
made to cover the tuition re-
duction, but he felt it was im-
portant to do this for the first
year.
“We’re hoping to attract and
show people the quality of
education and excellent indi-
vidual teacher attention stu-
dents will get from this
school,” he said.
DiPippa said the school
hopes to hire all teachers by
July1, and a formal application
process will begin in about two
weeks. He said he’s already re-
ceived about 50 resumes from
interested teachers.
Harteis said the hiring of ad-
ministrative staff will depend
on how many students enroll.
“We want to keep our costs
as lowas possible, and our cur-
rent staff may have to perform
those tasks if necessary,” he
said.
The school is set to begin its
first year on August 27. DiPip-
pa said 16 students have al-
ready applied to the school.
ROCK
Continued from Page 1
Rock Solid Academy Head of School Mark DiPippa is excited by
the construction progress at the new school in the Twin Stacks
Center in Dallas.
“This shows us as being different than other
schools. A lot of Christian schools get their start
in a church basement.”
Mark DiPippa
Head of School
Rock Solid Academy
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE13
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
7
5
1
1
7
2
Te Joan Harris Centre Proudly Presents
Te Grieving Wood - An Original Rock Fusion Ballet
E.L. Meyers Auditorium
Carey Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Curtain Times:
Saturday, April 28th
1:00 & 5:00 PM
Sunday, April 29th
2:00 PM Matinee
Tickets Only $14 In Advance,
$16 At Te Door
Available At
Te Harris Conservatory for the Arts
545 Charles Street, Luzerne PA
A Summer Teater Workshop
For Children
Presented by:
Te F.M. Kirby Center
and the Harris Conservatory For Te Arts
For More Information Call 287-7977 or 718-0673
www.joanharrisdancers.com
Featuring Te Joan Harris Dancers
From Te Original Story By Dr. Kenton Harris
Musical Score Features Symphonic Treatments To Te Works Of
Led Zeppelin And Pink Floyd
Directed By Elisabeth Harris & Jennifer Harris
Corciev
SeeYour Name In The Kirby Lights
For Boys And Girls
Ages 12Through
18Years
For Boys And Girls
Ages 5Through
11Years
This Superior Theater Course Will Include Instruction In:
Character Acting - Method Acting - Auditioning
Voice - Theater Movement - Costuming
Stage Direction - Theater Dance - And Much More!!
Course Will Conclude With A Full Student Musical
At The Kirby Center
AND NOWWITHANADDED BONUS:
Every Student Will See Their Name
In Lights On the Kirby Center’s Marquee
NOWWITHTWOAGE GROUPS
Call
718-0673
Today
3
T
H
E
B
A
C
K
MOUNTAINAC
A
D
E
M
Y
Registration is required two weeks in advance of class date. Unfortunately, at this time, walk-ins are not permissible.
Classes are held from 7:00-8:30 pm at the Dallas Senior High School ***The Christianity class
will be held at a different location.; Chinese workshop at the Dallas Middle School
Each class session is $25. Multiple discounts are applied when registering for two or more classes.
(20% for up to four sessions; 30% for fve or more.)
*The Chinese Workshop fee held in June is $125. ** Tutorial rates are available upon request.
For more information or to request a downloadable
registration form, please email us at
backmountainacademy@yahoo.com
A CLASS MUST ROSTER 4 STUDENTS TO RUN
Is Pleased To Announce It’s
T
H
E
B
A
C
K
M
O
U
N
T
A
IN
A
C
A
D
E
M
Y
SU
M
M
ER
C
O
U
RSE
PRO
G
RA
M
JUNE
LANGUAGE
The First Annual Back Mountain Academy
ChineseWorkshop (Ages K-8th Grade)
This workshop focuses on Chinese cultural
elements with developing accompanying Mandarin
Chinese language skills. Monday, June 25-Friday, June
29th (10am - 2pm)*
THE LAW
First Amendment - Part 1
This class examines the frst amendment and
its interpretations.
RELIGION
The Back Mountain Academy is pleased to announce
a series of lectures covering global religions
Introduction to Belief Systems/Primal Faiths
(Wed - June 20)
Eastern Faiths - Hinduism and Buddhism
(Wed - June 27)
HEALTHCARE_
Managing Diabetes (Mon - June 25)
This course explores diabetes and proper
management techniques.
HOMEAND DESIGN
Sell Your House! (Mon - June 17)
This course teaches the basics on how
to stage a house for sale.
TECHNOLOGY
Modern Gadgetry (Wed - June 13)
This course drills down on the modern gadgetry
and social media that impacts our daily world.
TUTORIALS
Tutorials in Math and English
are available
upon request.
(Ages K-12th
Grade)**
JULY
THE LAW
First Amendment - Part 2
This class examines the frst amendment and
its interpretations.
RELIGION
The Back Mountain Academy’s continued
series on Global Religions
Judaic Thought (Thur - July 5)
Christianity Explored (Wed - July 11)***
Tenants of Islam (Wed - July 18)
HEALTHCARE_
ManagingYour Pet’s Healthcare (Mon - July 9)
This course discusses managing your
pet’s healthcare.
HOMEAND DESIGN
Let Them Eat Cake! (Mon - July 16)
This course teaches the ins-and-outs of cake and
cupcake design.
TUTORIALS
Tutorials in Math and English are available upon
request. (Ages K-12th Grade)**
AUGUST
THE LAW
First Amendment - Part 3
This class examines the frst amendment and
its interpretations.
HEALTHCARE
Managing Diabetes (Wed - Aug 8)
This course explores diabetes and
proper management techniques.
TECHNOLOGY
Modern Gadgetry (Wed - Aug 15)
This course drills down on the modern gadgetry
and social media that impacts our daily world.
TUTORIALS
Tutorials in Math and English
are available upon request.
(Ages K-12th Grade)**
C M Y K
PAGE14 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@mydallaspost.com
mydallaspost.com
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
551 Other 551 Other
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
Lawn Care
Technician
Looking for career change?
We provide initial & ongoing training.
Our technicians apply fertilizer, lime & weed
preventatives as well as insect control & turf
aeration services for residential & commercial
customers. Full time work. Monday-Friday.
8 AM – 5 PM. Must have good math skills, clean
driving record & pass physical & drug test.
Apply online at:
www.grasshopperlawns.com
Or stop in for application at:
470 E. State Street Larksville, PA 18651
Questions? Email Brian Phillips at:
Grasshopper.jobs@gmail.com
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
Immediate Openings:
Groundskeeper–
Part Time: $12.33/hour
Substitute Custodians and
Housekeepers: $8.50/hour
For clearance information and to download a
district application, refer to the district web site,
www.dallassd.com, Employment page. Please
submit a letter of interest, district application,
references, Act 34, 151 and 114 clearances and
any other supporting materials to:
Mr. Mark Kraynack,
Supervisor of Buildings & Grounds,
Dallas School District, PO Box 2000, Dallas,
PA 18612
DEADLINE: May 14, 2012
LOCAL PROS
The Dallas Post Call 1-800-273-7130
GLASS
We Do It All!
822-8133
Auto • Commercial
Residential
596 Carey Ave,. W-B
ROOFING
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
ELECTRICIAN
WOOD-COAL STOVES/FIREPLACES
“Back To Basics ”
DeLeur’s
I
N
C.
A Fireplace & Stove Shoppe
Dallas, PA 675-2266 Hours: Tues. 9-7 • Wed., Thurs., Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-4 • Closed Sun. & Mon.
“The Best Kept Secret in the Back Mountain”
Visit Our Beautiful 20,000 Sq. Ft. Country Showroom!
Wood, Coal, Pellet, Gas & Oil...Find out what’s RIGHT for YOU!
C
a
n
Y
O
U
R
e
a
l
l
y
A
f
f
o
r
d
N
o
t
T
o
?
FREE
LAYAWAY
Gas and Oil Prices...THRU THE ROOF!!
www.deleursbacktobasics.com
HVAC
MB Collins
Mechanical Services
HIC#PA088092
Commercial Refrigeration; Ice Machines;
Central A/C& Heat; and Ductless Systems.
Call Now! 570-885-1416
LANDSCAPING
RESIDENTIAL
LAWN SERVICE
Grass cutting, trimming,
leaf clean-up. Free Estimates
Call 570-574-5800
WASHER/ DRYER/ RANGE
REFRIGERATOR
Bring in old part with model # and serial #
APPLIANCE PARTS &SUPPLY
936 Market Street, Kingston
Open 9-4:30-Sat ‘til Noon - 288-5526
APPLIANCES
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
ENERGY SOLUTIONS
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
PA018418
• Windows
• Siding
• Enclosures
• Fiberglass Doors
• Storm Doors
• Vinyl Railings
• Roofng
• And More
AUTO BODY
PHONE: (570) 823-2211
FAX: (570) 824-0553
INSURANCE ESTIMATES • COLLISION REPAIRS
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC • QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP
CALL
RICK OR NICK
105 WEST SAYLOR AVE.
PLAINS, PA 18702
Rick’s Body Shop
Fender Benders
CONTRACTOR
THOMAS DANIELS
570-675-2995 General Contractor
COMPLETE REMODELING
KITCHENS & BATHROOMS
Additions, Decks, Roofng, Soffts, Porches,
Replacement Windows, Blown In Insulation
Call/Email Greg To Schedule A
Free Estimate
375-4219 • gcronconstt@aol.com
PA37871
BUILDING &
REMODELING
ECO CONSTRUCTION LLC
Fully Licensed & Insured
Specializing in decking, siding, roofing,
kitchens & bathrooms, additions & more.
In house licensed Architect & Engineer.
Summer Special
10%OFF decking, siding and roofing
Senior Discount
www.Ecobsc.com
570-945-EC04 (3264)
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
110 Lost
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
120 Found
FOUND: adult gray,
fluffy female cat in
Duryea area. Yellow
eyes, very friendly.
570-457-3983
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE `00 DURANGO
SPORT
4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd
row seat, runs
good, needs body
work $1900.
570-902-5623
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
412 Autos for Sale
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
DESOTO CUSTOM
‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
421 Boats &
Marinas
GRUMMAN ‘95 DEEPV
16’ 48hp Evinrude
50 lb thrust electric
motor. All tackle
and life vests
included. Live well,
fish finder. $4,000
570-579-3975
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$15,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘07
SCREAMING EAGLE
DYNA
Assembled by
Custom Vehicle
Operations. Very
Unique, Fast Bike.
1800cc. 10,000
miles. Performance
Rinehart pipes,
comfortable
Mustang seat with
back rest and
detachable rack ,
Kuryakyn pegs and
grips, color
matched frame, SE
heavy breather air
filter comes with
HD dust cover and
gold CVO owners
key. Excellent
condition. Silver
Rush/ Midnight
Black. Asking
$13,500
Call Ron @
570- 868-3330
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Findthe
perfect
friend.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LLLE LE LEE LLE LE LLEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNNLL NNNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLE LEE LE LE LLE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE15
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI METALS
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487
GOLD - SILVER
COINS - JEWELRY
Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee
We will beat any competitors
advertised price by up to 20%
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Price reduced
$10,250. Call
570-474-6028
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
REDUCED! REDUCED!
FORD `10 F150
BLACK KING RANCH
4X4 LARIAT 145”
WB STYLESIDE
5.4L V8 engine
Electronic
6 speed auto-
matic. Brown
leather “King
Ranch” interior.
Heat/cool front
seats. Power
moonroof, rear
view camera,
18” aluminum
wheels, tow
package,
navigation
system.
23,000 miles.
Asking $30,000
Call Jeff @
570-829-7172
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $7595.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Experienced gener-
al office. Car deal-
ership experience
preferred.
Send resume to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 4000
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
Architectural
Woodworkers Needed
A large architectural
woodworking com-
pany located in
Kingston, PA is look-
ing for experienced
cabinet makers and
finishers. Great pay
and benefits. Only
solid, mature, and
positive people
should apply.
Call: 570-283-5934
Or email: agata
@4daughters.net
522 Education/
Training
TEACHING POSITION
Two openings,
adjunct days. One
for MASSAGE THERA-
PY INSTRUCTOR and
one for HEALTH
INFORMATION
instructor. Qualified
applicants must
have minimum 3
years work experi-
ence in related
field. Teaching
experience a plus
but not required.
Fax resume to:
570-287-7936
Or send to
Director of
Education
Fortis Institute
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort PA 18704
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
BODY SHOP
MANAGER
Our company is
seeking an individ-
ual that has exten-
sive experience in
all BODY SHOP
OPERATIONS.
Applicants must
have first hand
knowledge of DRP
repair require-
ments and esti-
mating systems.
They must show
leadership skills
with an emphasis
on production,
quality, and cus-
tomer satisfaction.
PA State Apprais-
ers Licenses
Required. A full
benefit package &
competitive salary
is offered.
COCCIA FORD
LINCOLN
COCCIA COLLISION
CENTER
577 East Main St
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18701
Rudy Podest
570-823-8888
rpodest@
cocciacars.com
ALL APPLICANTS
ARE CONFIDENTIAL.
GasSearch Drilling
Services
Corporation is look-
ing for the following
position:
Experienced Mechanic
- Medical, Dental,
Vision Insurance
- 401K
- Quarterly Safety
Bonus
- Paid Holidays
- Paid Vacation
Apply within or
online: GasSearch
Drilling Services
Corporation
8283 Hwy 29
Montrose, PA 18801
570-278-7118
www.
gassearchdrilling.
com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LANDSCAPE
FOREPERSON
3 years experience
& Valid PA Driver’s
License a must.
570-779-4346
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
PLUMBERS AND
PIPEFITTERS
Penn State Mechan-
ical Contractors has
openings for ener-
getic, motivated,
experienced
plumbers and pip-
efitters. Experi-
enced foremen are
also encouraged to
apply. We offer
competitive wages
and a comprehen-
sive benefit pack-
age based on expe-
rience. We are an
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Send resume with
work history to:
Penn State
Mechanical
Contractors, Inc.
PO Box 1027
Wilkes Barre, PA
18703
Fax: 570-823-0736
Kimberly@pennstate
mechanical.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL-A DRIVER
Gas field/landscape
drivers plus hands
on labor required.
Operate dump
trucks & load equip-
ment on lowboy.
Deliver to job site.
Must operate skid
steer excavator,
hydro-seed truck,
etc. Will plow in win-
ter. Must have clean
driving record and
pass drug test. Top
Wages Paid.
Call Harvis
Interview Service @
542-5330. Leave
message. Will send
an application.
Or forward resume:
varsity.harvis@
gmail.com
Employer is
Varsity, Inc.
No walk-ins. EOE
Drivers CDL-A:
Local Hazleton ded-
icated route! Home
every night! Great
Pay, Benefits!
Estenson Logistics
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
FORKLIFT
FORKLIFT OPERATORS
NEEDED FOR 2ND SHIFT
IN THE PITTSTON AREA.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED.
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY THROUGH
THURSDAY
9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. AT:
Team Employer
Solutions
20 REYNOLDS ST.
KINGSTON, PA 18704
570-714-5955
548 Medical/Health
LAKESIDE NURSING CENTER
HAS THE
FOLLOWING OPENINGS
RN: 7AM-3PM
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND
LPN: PART TIME
7AM-3PM/3PM- 8PM
CNA: PART TIME/
PER DIEM, ALL SHIFTS
245 OLD LAKE RD
DALLAS PA, 18612
(570) 639-1885
E.O.E.
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
548 Medical/Health
RESIDENTIAL WORKER
Part time positions
available days,
evenings, over-
nights & weekends
serving female
youth in 24 hour/7
day a week residen-
tial treatment facili-
ty. Experience with
youth MH/MR popu-
lation is a plus. BS in
social work or relat-
ed field is preferred
Excellent compen-
sation, salary
Fax resume to:
570-829-6547 or
e-mail
skrochta@voapa.org
EOE
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
RNS AND LPNS
needed for private
duty case in the
Dallas area for 3-11
and 11-7 shifts.
Call Jessica at
451-3050 for
immediate interview.
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALESPERSON
To work the jewel-
ry floor. Previous
experience is a
plus. Must have
great personality
and able to work
days, nights and
some weekends.
Part time or full
time. Full benefits
available.
Send resumes to:
The Times Leader
Box 3090
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
COFFEE SHOP
Turn key operation
in a wonderful area.
A must see! Deli &
ice cream. Will train,
excellent opportuni-
ty. $25,000.
570-262-1497
TURN KEY OPERATION
Located at
Wyoming Valley Mall
must sell. $125,000
negotiable. Ask for
Rob 570-693-3323
610 Business
Opportunities
FIRE FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!! YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR
YOURSELF”
INVEST IN
YOURSELF
WITH
JAN – PRO
*Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
*Insurance &
Bonding
* Training & Ongoing
Support
* Low Start Up
Costs
*Veterans Financing
Program
* Accounts available
through
0ut Wilkes-Barre
& Scranton
570-824-5774
Janpro.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
Ductless for large
room, 11,500 btu,
very good condition
$500. 388-6348
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
AIR CONDITIONERS
Frigidaire 5000 BTU,
manual $75. 11,000
BTU Frigidaire
portable, manual
$295. 570-636-3151
702 Air
Conditioners
LG AIR CONDITIONER
& Heat Pump
18,000.4 SEER
R410 Refrigerant
Wall mounted, duct-
less. 220 volt. One
indoor, one outdoor
unit with remote
control. Call
570-288-0735
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUES: China
Cabinet $500. Desk
$200. Sewing
machine $100.
570-578-0728
COINS complete Set
Franklin half dollars,
excellent condition,
in book. $450.
570-823-6035
710 Appliances
DISHWASHER 24”
white, 2 years old
$150. obo.
RANGE HOOD 30”
Broan, white $50.
obo. 570-574-3899
REFRIGERATOR
Frigidaire Gallery 26
cu. ft. with ice &
water, like new used
very little. $225.
570-457-7854
WASHER & DRYER,
full size, Maytag
$50. 570-696-3606
712 Baby Items
BABY CRIB com-
plete, excellent con-
dition, no recalls list-
ed. Dark Cherry
wood & drop down
side. Paid $250 for
crib and $40 for
mattress sell for
$90. 570-793-6040
Selling Your
Furniture?
Do it here in the
Classifieds!
570-829-7130
UMBRELLA Stroller
$7.
570-779-9791
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER, Dell
Windows XP 3GHZ
processor, 120 GB
hard drive, fast, bet-
ter than 7. $100.
570-824-7354
744 Furniture &
Accessories
COFFEE TABLE,
solid oak, great con-
dition, measures
53" Lx24" x 17" h
$75. 570-690-6087
COUCH & Loveseat
camelback, bur-
gundy, like new
$200. Chair like new
$35. green.
570-822-5460
COUCH, loveseat,
chair, glass & brass
coffee table, 2
matching end
tables, 2 table top
lamps with coordi-
nating floor lamp,
like new $450. Din-
ing room table, 4
matching chairs, 2
leafs $200. X-large
dark green recliner
chair $25. Walnut
kitchen set, 4 chairs
$2o. 570-696-3606
DINING ROOM SET
Solid Oak. Table with
2 leaves, 6 chairs,
buffet, protective
table pads included.
$800
570-299-5046
DINING ROOM SET,
walnut, table, 6
chairs (2 captain), 2
leafs, huge match-
ing glass front door
hutch $350. Dark
wood bedroom
suite, double bed,
head & footboard,
chest of drawers,
mirrored dresser, 2
night stands $200.
.570-693-3462
ETAGERE. Curved
wrought iron unit
with glass shelves.
$60. 570-288-5251
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
744 Furniture &
Accessories
HUTCH 1970s solid
walnut hutch. 6’h
x4’w, glass doors,
excellent condition.
$300. Solid walnut
bookcase, 5’hx3’w
$75. 570-881-5809.
KITCHEN TABLE 6
chairs& hutch $400
Sleeper sofa $300
Tiffany style double
light lamp $75
10,000 btu air condi-
tioner $75. All excel-
lent condition.
570-825-2888
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
ROCKING CHAIR
Boston $100.
570-847-336
744 Furniture &
Accessories
SECTIONAL, beauti-
ful 5 piece beige
leather. In perfect
condition. Includes
hide-a-bed and two
recliners. New
$3,700, now $1,500.
Call 570-474-5643
TABLE 45” drop leaf
oak table $25. Cane
oak chairs $5. each.
22” round oak lamp
table $5. Oak plant
table $8. 9 table
lamps $5 each.
570-639-1653
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LANDSCAPING
CURBING MACHINE
Whiteman multi
quipped brand
includes trailer.
Going out of busi-
ness. $6000 neg.
570-357-2753
756 Medical
Equipment
Jazzy Powerchair
1113, needs battery
$550. Wheelchair
$85. Walker with
wheels $35.
570-829-2411
WALKER for
handicap $6.
570-779-9791
758 Miscellaneous
AIR PURIFIER Oreck
XL, manual was
$299. asking $149.
2 oscillating fans
both $25. 636-3151
RECORDS LPs,
78s, 45s, $1. each.
570-829-2411
758 Miscellaneous
AUTO PAINT BASE
COAT, 1 gallon GM
rally red Corvette
color sell for $100.
obo. 570-883-7007`
BOAT 12’ aluminum
with oars, 5 HP gas
outboard engine
$600. Angle iron
rack for pickup
extends over cab
$70. 570-655-0546
COFFEE MAKER
Bunn automatic,
two burner, stain-
less $75. 847-3368
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Don't need that
Guitar?
Sell it in the
Classified Section!
570-829-7130
MAILBOX, Step 2,
heavy duty plastic,
hunter green.
Mounts over 4” x 4”
post, includes
reflective numbers.
Good condition,
$30. (sells new for
$60). 570-814-9574
MALIBU LIGHT
Expressions, tier
lights with auto
timer, 12 fixtures.
New $74. sell $50.
Aluminum fine
screen 48”w, 15’ roll
$10. 570-779-9791
758 Miscellaneous
OFFICE DESK with
pull out drawers in
great shape $25;
new bathroom sink,
white $10; bathroom
sink, tan $10; School
classroom desk
$20. 570-262-7923.
REVEREWARE,
clean, shiny & very
good condition, 8
pieces $3-$6 each.
Corelle Spring Blos-
som Crazy daisy 60
pieces @.30 each.
Flatware 26 piece
Everbrite stainless
deluxe in case $8.
Vintage style 12
piece pumpkin tea
set $10. Ceramic
Christmas tree with
lights $5. 639-1653
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA. Nikon
35mm zoom touch
470 AF. $75
570-847-3368
772 Pools & Spas
HEATER: Laars Lite
2 - gas above
ground pool heater,
4 years old, pur-
chased new asking
$200. 498-2716
776 Sporting Goods
BASKETBALL HOOP
Portable. Adjustable
height. Rim slightly
bent, otherwise
good condition.
$40. 570-881-6160
Line up a place to live
in classified!
DRIVER. Callaway
Ftiz 13 degree
Senior shaft. Very
good condition. $75
570-287-5745
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 13” color, manu-
al, remote, wall-
mount bracket $75.
570-636-3151
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
784 Tools
LAWN MOWER 19”
rechargeable rotary
mower with charg-
er, model no 247.
370480. Like new
gently used 2 years
on small townhouse
plot. New $400;
asking $150.
570-825-2961
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
LABRADOR RETRIEVER
Pups. 5 Black
males, 1 yellow
female, ACA regis-
tered, shots and
wormed. $350.
Ready April 23.
570-556-0357
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LHASA-POO &
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Shots current.
$400
570-250-9690
815 Dogs
POMERANIAN
AKC, 8 weeks,
2 females & 2
males. Chocolate
& party colors
Shots & wormed.
Vet checked.
Home Raised.
$500.
570-864-2643
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search homes in
Tunkhannock.
$275,000.
Negotiable
For appointment,
call: 570-310-1552
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LEHIGH VALLEY
Charming remod-
eled 2 story is in
excellent move in
condition. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
carpeted floors,
patio/balcony,
basement, central
heating, deck/
porch, Pool, view
& 2 car garage.
It has new roof,
windows & siding.
Located in quiet
development
close to every-
thing, walking
distance from
grocery store.
School District is
one of the best in
the area. Taxes
are cheap yet
across from a
wildlife preserve,
so you will feel like
your on vacation
when sitting on
your porch. For
sale by owner.
Act fast this
charming home
isn’t going to be
available long!
$219,000
Call 696-2009
for details or view
http://1580spring
creekcircle.
blogspot.com
MOUNTAINTOP
Move right into this
beautiful 4 bedroom
home in desirable
Rockledge develop-
ment. Many
upgrades & fea-
tures including mod-
ern kitchen with
granite countertops,
22x20 great room,
2 fireplaces, new
paint, carpet, gor-
geous 2 tier deck
& much more.
$245,000. For more
information or to
schedule a viewing
please Call
570-242-5381
SHAVERTOWN
105 Summit Street
Fire damaged
home. Sold as is.
60’ x 235’ lot. Pub-
lic sewer,
water & gas.
$34,500 negotiable
Call 570-675-0446,
evenings.
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
DOUBLE BLOCK
Easily converts to
single home. New
roof, electric,
windows & 2 car
garage. Remod-
eled. 66 x 100 feet,
fenced lot,
$120,000.
570-693-2408
912 Lots & Acreage
DURYEA
196 Foote Avenue
Corner lot, border-
ing Foote Ave and
McAlpine St. Com-
mercial zoning.
$10,000 or best
offer. Please Call
610-675-9132
UPSTATE NY
FARM LIQUIDATION!
5 Acres $19,900
10 Acres $29,900
23 Acres - Mini
Farm - $189,900
Gorgeous views,
woods, streams!
2 1/2 hours NY City!
Call (888) 793-7762
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EDWARDSVILLE
Small 2 bedroom,
water included
$500/mo.+ security.
PITTSON
Small 1 bedroom, all
included, no electric
$500/mo. + securi-
ty. 570-406-1061
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 4 rooms,
wall to wall carpet,
heat, public water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Tile
bathroom with
shower. Attic &
yard. Stove & fridge
furnished. Washer /
dryer hookup. Good
location, off street
parking, No pets. 1
year lease & securi-
ty, $650. Call
570-655-0530
HARDING
Renovated 1st floor,
2 bedroom apart-
ment. New carpet-
ing and paint. Fridge
& stove. Water
Included. $600 +
security & utilities.
Call 570-240-6620
or 570-388-6503
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple
Ave. Large Two
story, 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
Central Heat &
Air, washer/dryer
in unit, parking.
$840 + utilities &
1 month security
570-262-6947
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
Great 1st floor 1
bedroom apart-
ment, heat included,
with a detached
garage in a great
location. Hardwood
floors & appliances
included. Shared
washer / dryer.
Large yard. $750 +
electric, security &
references. Call
570-371-3271
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,200
monthly plus util-
ities. No pets. No
smoking. Call
570-472-1110
KINGSTON DUPLEX
Beautiful 1st floor. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
5 rooms. Conve-
nient residential
location. Hardwood
floors, natural wood
-work, French
doors, laundry with
washer & dryer
included. Refrigera-
tor, gas range, dish-
washer, oak cabi-
nets, off street
parking, fenced in
back yard, storage.
Available May 1.
$695 + utilities &
security.
570-690-0633
NANTICOKE
Honeypot Section
2nd floor, 3 room
apartment. Nice
neighborhood. $400
+ utilities & security.
No pets. Call
570-885-6878
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE16 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, Reverse Sensing, HID Headlamps, THX Sound Sys
with CD, 20” Polished Cast Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone Electronic
Auto Temp Control, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, Personal
Safety Sys., Safety Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC,
VIN #1LCG807268
COCCIA
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
SATURDAY SERVICE HOURS 7 A.M.-1 P.M.
Overlooking Mohegan Sun
Just Minutes from
Scranton or W-B
577 East Main St.,
Plains, PA
WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
24/7 ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
FULL TANK OF GAS
WARRANTY IS FULLY TRANSFERABLE
6 YR./100,000 MILE COMPREHENSIVE
LIMITED WARRANTY COVERAGE
200-POINT INSPECTION
VEHICLE HISTORY REPORT
M
O
S.
FRESH OIL & FILTER
NEW WIPER BLADES
FORD - LINCOLN
STARTING AT
Most with Parking Sensors,
SYNC, Moonroof, Pwr.
Leather Seats, Keyless
Entry with Keypad
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKS AWD
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.
VIN #3LCR812015
COCCIA
Leather
Seats, Personal Safety with
Anti-Theft Sys., Fog Lamps,
CD, SYNC, Side Air Curtains,
Message Center, PDL, PW,
CERTIFIED 08-09LINCOLNMKZAWD
Most with All Wheel Drive,
CD, Pwr. Leather Heated
Seats, Moonroof, SYNC,
Memory Seats,
Keyless Entry
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKZ HYBRID
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
MPG 41
Leather Seats, Message Center, Side Air Curtains, CD, Fog Lamps, SYNC,
Personal Safety with Anti-Theft Sys., PL, PW,
VIN #3LCR827357
0
$
2000
60
%
0
$
2000
60
%
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED BENEFITS INCLUDE:
1
.
9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
FOR UP TO
APR
60
M
O
S
ECOBOOST
24
Mos.
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.
VIN #2LCBL18039
24
Mos.
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
, 3.7L V6, ., Auto. Temp
Control, 18” Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac, CD, Leather
Heated/Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Satellite
Radio, Side Air Curtains, Reverse
Sensing Sys., Pwr. Liftgate,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.
NEW2012 LINCOLNNAVIGATOR 4X4
5.4L V8, Leather Seats, THX Audio Sys. with CD, Pwr. Fold Down
Flat Seat, Running Boards, Keyless Entry, Reverse Sensor
Sys., 20” Aluminum Wheels, Heated/Cooled Seats.,
Chrome Hood Accent, Heavy Duty Trailer Tow Pkg.,
Rear Air/Heat,
,
VIN #5LCEL05558
24
Mos.
PRICE INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE PLAN
0
$
1500
60
%
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 4/30/12.
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKT AWD
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L V6, , SYNC, Heat/Cool Leather
Seats, Trailer Tow Pkg., Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Push
Button Start, THX Audio Sys., Blind Spot Monitoring
Sys., Reverse Camera Sys.,
VIN #2LCBL53605
PRICE
INCLUDES
4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED
MAINTENANCE
PLAN
24
Mos.
0 60
%
TO CHOOSE
FROM
CERTIFIED 09-10LINCOLNMKXAWD
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE
FROM
C M Y K
Sunday, April 29, 2012 PAGE17
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Sell your own home!
7
5
1
2
1
9
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
378 Miller St.
Recently remod-
eled, 1st floor. 1
bedroom, living
room, large modern
kitchen with stove.
New bath, clean
basement, laundry
hookups. Enclosed
porch, parking. No
pets/smoking.
$475/mo. includes
heat and water.
570-288-9843
NANTICOKE
1st floor. 1 bed-
room. ALL UTILI-
TIES INCLUDED!
Off street parking.
Fresh paint.
NO PETS
$525 + security
570-477-6018
leave message
30+
DAY
BEING
REMODELED
NORTH
WILKES-BARRE
FIRST FLOOR
Spacious
1 bedroom with
aesthetic fire-
places, new
kitchens, wall-
to-wall, built in
appliances &
MORE. APPLI-
CATION/EMPLO
YMENT VERIFI-
CATION “being
considered” NO
PETS/SMOKING
2 YEARS @
$625+ UTILITIES.
MANAGED!
America Realty
288-1422
PITTSTON
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms. All appli-
ances included. All
utilities paid; elec-
tricity by tenant.
Everything brand
new. Off street park-
ing. $750 + security
& references. Call
570-969-9268
PITTSTON
2 or 3 bedroom, 1st
floor, full kitchen.
Heat included, no
pets. $650 + 1
month security. Call
570-451-1038
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PLAINS
Newly remodeled, 2
bedroom. Living
room, dining room,
eat in kitchen, stove
w/d hookup. Heat,
water, sewer
included. No smok-
ing or pets.
$625/month, secu-
rity and references.
570-905-0186
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
New 1st floor, 2
bedroom with off
street parking,
washer/dryer hook
up, stove. No pets.
$550/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WEST WYOMING
932 Shoemaker
Ave. 1 bedroom, 1st
floor, carpet, pri-
vate drive. Gas
heat, fridge, stove,
w/d hookup. $425
plus utilities.
No pets.
570-693-4226
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom. Heat &
hot water included.
$550 month +
security required
973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
155 W. River St.
1 bedroom, some
appliances included,
all utilities included
except electric,
hardwood floors,
Pet friendly. $600.
570-969-9268
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,000 &
3,800 Sq. Ft.
WILL DIVIDE
OFFICE / RETAIL
Call 570-829-1206
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WEST PITTSTON
OFFICE SPACE
Containing Six sepa-
rate offices, 1 large
meeting room. Seg-
regated bathrooms.
Kitchenette. Total
recent renovation.
Great location. Lot
parking in rear.
$3,500 monthly. Call
570-299-5471
950 Half Doubles
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. $700 + utilities.
570-606-7917
leave message
KINGSTON
Penn St.
1/2 Double, 2 bed-
room. Newly
remodeled. Gas
Heat. Washer &
dryer hookup, yard,
parking. Section 8
Not Approved. No
pets. $550 + utili-
ties. 570-714-1530
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
3 bedroom. Off
street parking. Pets
welcome. $550/mo.
Credit / Criminal
check required. Call
570-266-5336
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, appli-
ances included.
Quiet 55 plus com-
munity. No Pets.
One year lease.
$1675/mo + utilities
& security. Monthly
maintenance fee
included.
570-592-3023
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Summer
Home. Weekly and/
or Monthly. Starting
June to end of
August. Washer &
dryer. Free boat
slips. Call for more
details.
570-639-5041
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOUSE CLEANING
We would love to
clean your home.
We clean around
your schedule.
We clean weekly,
bi-weekly, and
monthly. We also
do one time clean-
ing. Call Eddie
570-677-0344 or
online at www.
empresacleaning.
com
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Moving, Deliver-
ies, Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
CO$T CO$T U LE$$ U LE$$
LANDSCAPING
Specializing in
Grass Cutting,
Trimming of Shrubs
& Hedges,
& Mulching
Call for estimates
570-239-4011
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIPS
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
It’s there
when you
wake up.
Get convenient home delivery.
Call 829-5000.
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
C M Y K
PAGE18 Sunday, April 29, 2012
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
Wyoming VaIIey BMW
5SS Market Street * Kingston, PA
570-2S7-1133
www.wyomingvaIIeymotorsbmw.com
|ease for
S
32S*per montn ± tax
30 montn,10,000 m||es per year |ease. S32B/montn p|us
tax. S2000 down. S2500 bu||d out cred|t. S3053 p|us tax
andtags due at s|gn|ng. S40,125 MSlP. Lxp|res 4/30/12
2011 32Si xDrive Sedan
ln a stunn|ng transformat|on, n|gn||gnted by sweep|ng contours, a revo|ut|onary Va|vetron|c
systemfor greater fue| effc|ency, and BMW's xDr|ve, |nte|||gent a||-wnee|-dr|ve system,
tne 3 Ser|es doesn't just break tne mo|d-|t smasnes |t |nto a m||||on p|eces.
l|nanc|ng ava||ab|e tnrougn BMWfnanc|a| serv|ces
BMWwiII make your hrst two payments upto S500.
AIso, receive S2500 buiId out credit &be eIigibIe for 0.9%hnancing
upto ß0 months and 1.9%hnancing upto 72 months.
3.0 ||ter ln||ne 5-cy||nder eng|ne º 5-speed S¯LP¯lÒNlC
230 norsepower º Va|vetron|c tecnno|ogy º 25 mpg
Pure joy. Measuredin smiIes per hour.
Wyoming VaIIey BMW
5SS Market Street * Kingston, PA * 570-2S7-1133
www.wyomingvaIIeymotorsbmw.com
BLOWOUTSALE
on a|| rema|n|ng 2011 BMW 32B| xDr|ve Sedans
ONLYS32S
*
PER MONTHl
ONLYS32S
*
PER MONTHl