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A Master's Guide to the

UK Flag









5 October 2009


Introduction


This guide for managers, masters and senior officers of United Kingdom
registered vessels. The purpose of the guide is to provide easy to use
information regarding United Kingdom Merchant Shipping regulations and
administrative procedures. UK regulations and procedures may differ from
those you may be familiar with in other flag vessels and this guide will help
you to comply with UK requirements.

Detailed requirements for operating UK ships can be found in UK Regulations,
Merchant Shipping Notices, Guidance to Surveyors and various publication
including the Code of Safe Working Practices, MCA SOLAS V publication and
Health and Safety leaflets; this detailed information is available on the MCA’s
web site at:

www.mcga.gov.uk

Managers, masters, and seafarers serving in United Kingdom ships are
welcome to contact the Maritime and Coastguard Agency by phone, fax or e
mail for further advice and guidance. You may contact your company’s
nominated MCA Customer Service Manager or contact the MCA Infoline 24
hours a day on:

Tel: + 44 (0) 870 6006 505
Fax: + 44 (0) 178 2369 005
infoline@mcga.gov.uk

Mailing address:

Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
United Kingdom
SO15 1EG









The MCA would welcome any feedback and suggestions for improvements to
this document. Please forward suggestions to mcatyne@mcga.gov.uk or fax
+44 (0) 191 496 9901.
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Contents

1 MANNING AND STCW REQUIREMENTS.............................................................................. 5
1.1 Manning on board.................................................................................................. 5
1.2 United Kingdom Certificates of Equivalent Competency....................................... 5
1.3 Watch Keeping Ratings ......................................................................................... 6
1.4 Medical Certificates ............................................................................................... 6
1.5 UK Discharge Books.............................................................................................. 6
2 HOURS OF WORK AND REST............................................................................................. 6
2.1 Rest........................................................................................................................ 6
2.2 UMS....................................................................................................................... 7
2.3 Hours of Rest Schedule......................................................................................... 7
2.4 Records.................................................................................................................. 7
2.6 Exceptions ............................................................................................................. 8
2.7 Leave ..................................................................................................................... 8
3 CREW AGREEMENTS AND LISTS OF CREW.......................................................................... 9
3.1 Forms..................................................................................................................... 9
ALC(NFD)1(d) ........................................................................................................................... 10
Lists of Crew - Forms ALC 1(a), (b) & (c). .............................................................................. 11
ALC 1(a) .................................................................................................................................... 12
ALC 1(b) .................................................................................................................................... 13
ALC 1(c) .................................................................................................................................... 13
3.2 Posting up a crew agreement .............................................................................. 13
3.3 Terminating a crew agreement ............................................................................ 14
4 OFFICIAL LOG BOOKS .................................................................................................... 14
Page 1 - Front cover ........................................................................................................ 14
Pages 2 to 7 - Record of seamen employed in the ship .............................................. 15
Pages 8 and 9 - Births and deaths............................................................................... 16
Pages 10 to 14 - Record of musters, boat drills etc ..................................................... 16
Pages 15 to 18 - Record of test drills and inspections of steering gear .......................... 17
Pages 19 to 23 - Record of inspections of crew accommodation. .................................. 17
Pages 24 to 28 - Record of inspections of food and water .......................................... 18
Page 29 - Load line, depth of loading etc. ................................................................. 19
Pages 30 to 39 - Dates of departure from and arrival at each dock ............................ 19
Posting the FRE 13/ MSF 2004 Form............................................................................. 19
Pages 40 to 76 - Narrative section............................................................................... 20
5. GMDSS LOG BOOK....................................................................................................... 21
Radio tests required:........................................................................................................ 22
6 HEALTH AND SAFETY...................................................................................................... 23
6.1 Safety Officials and Committees ......................................................................... 23
6.2 Master’s Responsibility........................................................................................ 25
6.3 Risk Assessments ............................................................................................... 25
7 ACCIDENT REPORTING................................................................................................... 25
8 MEDICAL STORES REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................. 26
8.1 Medical equipment............................................................................................... 26
8.2 Person in charge of medical care on board ship................................................. 26
9 SURVEYS AND AUDITS.................................................................................................... 26
9.1 Surveys................................................................................................................ 26
9.2 Authorised Survey Organisations........................................................................ 27
9.3 DoC for Dangerous Goods .................................................................................. 27
9.4 Audits................................................................................................................... 27
ISM Shipboard Audits ................................................................................................................ 27
Interim audits ............................................................................................................................. 27
Intermediate audits .................................................................................................................... 28
Renewal audits .......................................................................................................................... 28
ISPS Verification Audits............................................................................................................. 28
9.5 ILO 178 inspections............................................................................................. 28
10 STOWAWAYS AND REFUGEES ..................................................................................... 29
11 CONTINUOUS SYNOPSIS RECORD............................................................................... 29
11.1 Making amendments to the CSR......................................................................... 29
11.2 Receiving an amended CSR............................................................................... 30
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12 UK PUBLICATIONS REQUIRED TO BE ONBOARD ............................................................ 30
13 CADET TRAINING - OVERSEEING OF NVQ PORTFOLIOS ................................................ 31
14 ALCOHOL................................................................................................................... 32
ANNEX 1 EXAMPLE OF COMPLETED RISK ASSESSMENT FORM.................................................. 33
ANNEX 2 MSF 4605 (RBD 1)................................................................................................. 34
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1 Manning and STCW Requirements

1.1 Manning on board

(See MSN 1767)

1.1.1 All merchant ships on the United Kingdom register over 500 GT must
have a Safe Manning Document issued by the MCA. Safe Manning
Documents are only issued after consultation with the Owner or Manager.
Class and other organisations are not permitted to issue Safe Manning
Documents for United Kingdom ships.

1.1.2 The Safe Manning Document will state the numbers and categories of
officers and crew members that are required to be on board. The crew
numbers on board must never be allowed to go below the minimum stated in
the Certificate.

1.1.3 If due to exceptional circumstances a seafarer has to be removed
from the vessel and a replacement cannot join the ship in time it may be
possible for the vessel to continue to operate, for a limited period, with one
seafarer less than specified on the Safe Manning Document. If a Master plans
to sail a vessel in non compliance with the Safe Manning Document he must
request the MCA to issue an Exemption Certificate; however the Master must
ensure that the remaining crew continue to comply with the Hours of Work
Regulations.

1.2 United Kingdom Certificates of Equivalent Competency

(See MGN 221 & MIN 340)

1.2.1 All officers who do not possess a UK Certificate of Competency must
hold a United Kingdom Certificate of Equivalent Competency issued by the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

1.2.2 The Master must ensure that all the officers who require a United
Kingdom Certificate of Equivalent Competency hold one and that they also
hold the original of their national certificate of competency. If an officer does
not hold a United Kingdom Certificate of Equivalent Competency when he
joins then you should check that an application for a Certificate of Equivalent
Competency has been applied for. Applications are usually made by the
owner/manager and if an application has been made a stamped Confirmation
of Receipt of Application from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency will be
available. These are sent to the manager or owner as soon as the application
is received by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. A copy of the
Confirmation of Receipt of Application should be retained on board until such
time as the officer’s Certificate of Equivalent Competency arrives on board.
The officer can sail for a maximum period of 3 months without a full Certificate
of Equivalent Competency.

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1.2.3 These procedures are important and must be followed to show any
Port State Control Inspector that the Company has followed the correct
procedures for the application for a United Kingdom Certificate of Equivalent
Competency. This should eliminate the possibility of the ship being detained.

1.3 Watch Keeping Ratings

(See MGN 97)

1.3.1 The Safe Manning Document will state the grades of Deck Ratings
required refer to MGN 97 for information as to the training required for the
different grades.

1.3.2 All Deck and Engine Room Ratings assigned to watch keeping duties
must be in possession of Watch Rating Certificates appropriate to their duties.
Watch Rating certificates issued by countries other than the United Kingdom
are quite acceptable in United Kingdom ships provided they are issued by
countries which are parties to the STCW Convention.

1.4 Medical Certificates

(See MSN 1815)

MSN 1815 has a list of countries whose medical certificates are accepted as
equivalent to a UK medical certificate.

1.5 UK Discharge Books

(See MGN 134)

All officers and crew on a UK ships can apply for a UK Discharge Book.
Vessels have had problems with Port State Control where officers and crew
did not hold UK Discharge Books.


2 Hours of Work and Rest

(See MSN 1767)

The applicable United Kingdom regulations are the Merchant Shipping (Hours
of Work) Regulations 2002 (SI 2002 No. 2125)

2.1 Rest

2.1.1 Every seafarer must be provided with not less than 10 hours rest in
total in any 24 hour period, provided that:

• The 10 hour period may be divided into not more than two periods
one of which shall be not less than 6 hours; and

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• The interval between consecutive periods of rest shall not exceed 14
hours; and

• The minimum hours of rest shall not be less than 77 hours in any 7
day period.

2.1.2 Situations when a seafarer is on call but is free to sleep may be
counted as rest, but if at any time the normal period of rest is disturbed by
call-outs to work the Master, or a person authorised by him, has to ensure that
the seafarer is provided with an adequate compensatory period of rest.

2.2 UMS

The time when the designated duty engineer officer in a ship with a UMS
class notation is free to sleep may also be counted as “rest”. However, any
time that the officer is called to answer an alarm condition has to be
considered as work and as a break in that rest and when that happens the
amount of rest due to him has to be recalculated.

2.3 Hours of Rest Schedule

2.3.1 Your ship should have an “Hours of Rest Schedule”. This is a
document, or a computer display, that has been drawn up by the owner or
manager (whoever is responsible for operating the ship) in conjunction with
the Master. It has to show the maximum watch periods and minimum rest
periods to be observed by all crew members.

2.3.1 The “operator” cannot change this document without consulting with
yourself as Master. The operator has a duty to ensure that sufficient personnel
are provided so that the rest periods can be complied with. The “hours of rest
schedule” or an accurate print out of it if it is kept as a computer file, must be
posted up in a prominent place on board accessible to all the crew. Port State
Control Officers, and United Kingdom Surveyors, will expect to see this when
they come on board and will record a deficiency if it is not available and
posted up.

2.4 Records

2.4.1 Accurate records of hours of rest should be maintained one copy
should be held by the Master and a copy given to the seafarer.

2.4.2 Any deviations from the hours of rest in the schedule must be
recorded with an explanation of why the deviation occurred. These records
must be available for inspection on board at any time. You can decide where
the deviations are recorded and you can use any method that is effective
provided that the records are available.

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2.5 'Properly rested'

The regulations place a duty on the Master to ensure that all crew involved in
watch keeping are properly rested and that arrangements are adequate to
maintain a safe watch at all times. You are required to ensure that your ship
does not sail from any port unless the officers in charge of the watch
immediately after sailing have received sufficient rest to allow them to
maintain a safe watch.

2.6 Exceptions

2.6.1 There will obviously be times such as:

- Emergencies and situations likely to become emergencies unless
action is taken,

- Musters and drills,

- Essential work on board which cannot be delayed for safety or
environmental protection reasons; and

- Factors beyond the control of the Master or the operator other
than commercial needs.

2.6.2 When these things occur it is often necessary for crew members who
are involved to miss out on their minimum rest as stated in the schedule. You
have the authority as Master to permit this but you must record the fact and
the reason for them, for missing out on the minimum rest for those men
affected.

2.6.3 In deciding what factors might come within “factors outside the control
of the Master or the operator other than commercial needs” you will need to
take into account the circumstances. The definition was written to take
account of situations such as when a Port Authority demands that the ship
vacate the berth when you had planned to stay longer, or when a shift of berth
is demanded unexpectedly. On the other hand a request by the charterer to
sail earlier so that he may minimise port dues is not a valid factor under this
definition and counts as a commercial need.

2.7 Leave

The regulations state that a seafarer is entitled to paid annual leave of at least
four weeks, or a proportion of four weeks in respect of a period of employment
of less than one year. This may be taken in instalments but may not be
replaced by a payment in lieu, except where the seafarer's employment is
terminated.




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3 Crew agreements and lists of crew

(See MGN 148)

3.1 Forms

3.1.1 The Merchant Shipping Act 1995, requires that every United Kingdom
ship shall have an agreement in writing between each person employed and
the person employing him. For United Kingdom ships these are known as
crew agreements and they are required to be in writing and in a form
approved by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. These official crew
agreements are additional to and separate from any company contract or
similar document.

3.1.2 Note that UK regulations do not allow a person to be signed on ships
articles for more than 11 months at any one time.

3.1.3 There is a standard form of approved crew agreement supplied by the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency for each ship in conjunction with the Official
Log Book. The crew agreement and the official log book are closely related
documents.

3.1.4 The crew agreement is a requirement of both the Merchant Shipping
Act and an ILO Convention, it must be used and its correct use is of
importance. Failure to keep an approved crew agreement constitutes an
offence.

3.1.5 This guidance sets out the main requirements for opening,
maintaining, and subsequently closing a crew agreement, for the guidance of
Masters and others who may be involved in this task and who may be
unfamiliar with these requirements.

3.1.6 Crew agreements are delivered to ships as a white standard folder,
identified as Crew Agreement and List of Crew ALC1 containing all the
necessary sections for completion. It must be noted that this form of crew
agreement must be used whether or not there is in place any other contract or
agreement with the ship’s crew.

3.1.7 Note that although the MCA provides crew agreement documentation
there is no objections to companies downloading copies from MGN 148, or
making their own documentation so long as all the required information is
recorded.

3.1.8 The front page of the main folder has sections to be completed with
details of the ship and her owners. All the necessary information can be found
in the ship’s Certificate of Registry, and the details should be entered exactly
as found in that document. Also recorded are the date and place of
commencement and termination of the agreement

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3.1.9 Inside the front cover should be attached the approved contractual
clauses. Only approved clauses may be used in a crew agreement. The
appropriate approved clause is an ALC(NFD)1(d)

3.1.10 Owners may submit agreements other than the pre printed one, or
modifications to the pre-printed one to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
for approval.

3.1.11 If such modified agreements are approved the owner should arrange
to incorporate the approved version with the set of crew agreement
documents when they are sent out to the vessel.

ALC(NFD)1(d)

3.1.12 The master, on opening a crew agreement for the first time, should
insert at the top of the ALC(NFD)1(d) in the first section, the name of the
employer and his address. Each seaman who then signs on the list of crew
becomes a party to this agreement between himself and the employer.

An example is:

THIS AGREEMENT is made between (here insert name and address
of the employer)
Honest Shipping Company Lt d,
123 London Road, Sout hampt on, Unit ed Kingdom SO 14 3HL
(herein called ‘the employer’) and each of the seamen whose name is
included in the list of crew incorporated in this Agreement

3.1.13 At sub-section (ii) within the contractual clauses there is a space for
geographical limits. (normally 75°N/S) and the agreement is not to last more
than 6 months from the date of the first person signing the agreement. The
country of the final port of destination should be inserted (insert United
Kingdom).

An example is:

(ii) this Agreement shall be for a voyage or voyages within (geographical
limits to be stated, e.g. near coastal, unlimited or by reference to
latitude and longitude)
75 degr ees Nor t h and Sout h
and is not to extend beyond the expiration of six months from the date
of the first signature to this Agreement or the time at which the ship
first arrives at the port of final destination (country to be stated, e.g.
United Kingdom)
Unit ed Kingdom
after that period or the discharge of cargo consequent on that return;

3.1.14 At sub-section (iii) there is a line at which the notice period for
termination of employment on arrival at a port should be entered. A figure
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should be entered here. It should be the same notice period as any other
notice period contained in any other contract of employment that applies. If
there is no notice period specified in any other contract of employment then a
reasonable figure should be entered, not normally more than 14 days. The
country of the port should be entered (insert UK)

An example is:

(iii) after either

(a) one voyage has been completed by a seaman under this
Agreement or

(b) seven days have elapsed since a seaman’s employment under
this Agreement commenced;

either the seaman or the employer may give to the other notice (in
writing or orally before a witness) to terminate the seaman’s
employment under this Agreement such notice to take effect at a Port
in
Unit ed Kingdom (state country) and to be given
not less than 14 days*
(exclusive of Saturdays Sundays and Public Holidays) either before
the ship is due to arrive at that port or if the employment is to
terminate at the port where the ship is when the notice is given before
it is due to sail.

3.1.15 Section (vi) should be left blank unless the owner has had
agreements approved by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

3.1.16 At the end of this page is a space for the signature of the Master, or
the employer. In almost all cases this will be signed by the master as the
person opening the agreement and dated as the day on which the agreement
is opened.

3.1.17 Once an agreement is opened the appropriate entry should be made
in the official log book.

Lists of Crew - Forms ALC 1(a), (b) & (c).

3.1.18 Also supplied with the crew agreement are a supply of forms ALC1(a),
ALC1(b) and ALC1(c)

3.1.19 Form ALC1(a) is used to record the details of every member of the
crew when they join the ship. Details of the Master and any non crew
members such as superintendents, or riding crews should not be entered on
Form ALC1(a), this form is only for crew members other than the master.


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ALC 1(a)

3.1.20 The individual entries on this form are completed as follows;

Reference Number

This is simply a consecutive number starting with 1 and with a new
number assigned to each person as they sign the agreement. It will
be the same number as that which appears against the same crew
member in list of crew in the official log book.

Name of Seaman (Block Letters)

Discharge Book No. (if any) or Date and Place of Birth.

In this box should be entered the crew member’s discharge book
number if he has one. If he holds a non UK or United Kingdom
discharge book the number of that book can be entered but it should
be accompanied by a note in brackets specifying the issuing country.

Name of ship in which last employed.

Address of Seaman

Name and Relationship of next of kin and address if different from above

Rate of wages

This box should contain the agreed rate of wages expressed as rate/
month or rate/ week as appropriate. It must be entered as a currency
or alternatively the box may be filled in as “as per scale”. When this
entry is used a list of the rate of wages for all crew members must be
attached to the ALC1 form. The agreement is not valid if the rate of
wages is not specified in either form.

If discharged the reason for discharge

This box will only be filled in when the crew member leaves the ship.
The entry will normally be “leave” but it may also be, for example,
“dismissed” “hospitalised” or “deserted”. An entry of “mutual consent”
can be used when the crew member gives notice and leaves in
accordance with the terms of employment , or an entry of “agreement
terminated” when a crew agreement is ended and the crew member
signs on again on a new agreement or an other appropriate reason
should other circumstances apply.

Date of commencement of employment on board

Date and Place of leaving the ship

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Signatures

3.1.21 The final column is for the signature of the crew member on joining
the ship and signing the crew agreement (a). Parts (b) and (c) of the final
column which are shaded should only be filled in when the seaman leaves the
ship. On leaving the crew member signs (b) and the master signs (c).

3.1.22 If the crew member is not available to sign off the agreement, through
desertion or through being hospitalised, for example, or if he dies then the
reason is entered in (b) and the master should sign (c).

3.1.23 On each occasion that a crew member signs off in this column a
suitable entry must be made in the official log book as well. It is not necessary
to make an entry in the official log book when a crew member signs-on, only
his name added in the list of crew at the front.

3.1.24 The lower section of the ALC1(a) form is to be filled in with details of
the certificates of competency held by each officer. In the 4th Column along
details of any tanker endorsements or other appropriate qualifications required
for the ship in which they are engaged.

ALC 1(b)

3.1.25 This form is for the use of Masters and other persons on board other
than members of the crew. Superintendents, riding squads, contract staff, etc.
The entries are similar to those on the form ALC1(a) except that each
reference number is preceded by an “E”.

3.1.26 In the case of the Master it will normally be the relieving Master who
will sign section (b) in the final column in respect of the Master he is relieving.

ALC 1(c)

3.1.27 This form is required to be completed whenever there are any
persons aged under 18 employed in the ship. Entries on this form are in
addition to those for the same persons on the ALC1(a) form and the reference
number on the ALC1(c) will be the same as the reference number assigned
on the ALC1(a) form.

3.2 Posting up a crew agreement

Once the crew agreement is opened there is a requirement to post up a copy
of it in a conspicuous place; a sheet (ALC 6) is provided for this purpose with
a second copy of Form ALC1(d) which should be completed and attached to
the right hand side of the copy where it states “Attach here the contractual
clauses.”



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3.3 Terminating a crew agreement

3.3.1 At the end of the crew agreement it must be closed and all persons on
it who have not already done so must sign off in section (b) of the final column
while the master should ensure that all the other shaded boxes are
completed. The entry for “Date and Place of leaving the ship” should be left
blank if the crew member is to sign on another crew agreement immediately
and is not therefore leaving the ship and, as noted above, the reason for
discharge in this case will be “agreement terminated”.

3.3.2 As soon as a crew agreement is closed and another one opened, the
old one complete with all its parts and including:

• Form ALC 1 - the cover.
• Form ALC(NFD)1(d) - the contractual clauses with any attached wage
scales.
• Forms ALC1(a), (b), and (c) - the lists of crew.
• The completed Official Log Book, and
• Radio log books covering the period of the agreement.

Should be sent to your Customer Service Manager at the MCA.

By signing the crew agreement the crew member is agreeing to be bound by
the 'Code of Conduct for the Merchant Navy'.


4 Official Log Books

Cargo ships only -

4.1 The Merchant Shipping (Official Log Book) Regulations 1981 make it
a requirement for all United Kingdom ships (except fishing vessels, ships less
than 25 tons, and pleasure vessels) to carry and keep an Official Log Book.

4.2 The Official Log Book (OLB) has guidance notes on the front cover
that should be read along with these guidance notes. It is essential that all the
relevant entries are fully completed. For example the absence of proper
entries could prejudice the position of the Master in the event of an accident. It
is an offence to fail to keep the Official Log Book or to make incorrect entries.

Page 1 - Front cover

4.3 The first entries are simply the details of the ship, name, port of
registry, official number, gross tonnage, and net tonnage. The details should
be taken from the ship’s certificate of registry, noting that the official number is
a unique British ship number; it is NOT the IMO number.

4.4 The second section is for the names of successive Masters of the
ship. The Master opening the Official Log Book should enter his name and
certificate details on the first line, successive Masters should add their details
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when they take over command. If a Master has been on the ship before and
returns while the log book is still in use, he does not need to add his name a
second time.

4.5 The third section is for the details and address of the registered
owner, or the managing owner, manager etc.

4.6 The final section on page 1 is for the date and place at which the log
book is opened, because the OLB is connected closely with the requirement
to keep a crew agreement, the OLB will always be opened on the same day
that a new crew agreement is opened. The closing date for the OLB will be
the date on which the crew agreement is closed.

4.7 All the entries in the boxes on page 1 must be made by the Master.

Note that the 'superintendent' referred to at the bottom of the page is an
official at the Registry.

Pages 2 to 7 - Record of seamen employed in the ship

4.8 This section records all the crew members. The first column
“Reference number in list of crew” is for the consecutive number given to each
entry in the crew list (ALC1(a)), which is part of the articles. When each crew
member signs the articles, the number opposite to his entry in the articles is
entered in this first column, his name is in the second column and the capacity
in which employed is in the third. These three parts should be filled in at the
same time that the crew member signs the crew agreement.

4.9 If a crew member leaves the ship and then returns while the log book
is still in use, he should be entered again with his new number from the list of
crew. It may happen that the same crew member will have several entries in
this section of the OLB.

4.10 Column 4 “If entry made in narrative section give relevant page.”
forms an index. If any entry in respect of a crew member is made in the
narrative section of the log book (pages 40 onwards) then the narrative
section page number is entered at the same time in column 4. If there are a
number of entries then the page number of each is added, separated by a
comma.

An example of the completed section will look like:

Reference
Number in
list of crew

Name of Seaman
(Use capital letters please)
Capacity in
which employed
If entry made in
narrative section
give relevant page
2 SERGIY TANASHCHUK Chief Officer 42
3 ANDRIY GRYPACHOV Second Officer 42, 43, 46

4.11 All entries in this section should be made by the Master.

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Pages 8 and 9 - Births and deaths

4.12 Instructions for completion are at the top of the section. It should be
noted that in the section for births, the signature of the mother is required
while in the section for deaths, the signature of the master AND the signature
of a member of the crew are both required. The crew member may be any
crew member.

4.13 It is essential that the mother’s signature is given in the case of a birth
and essential that the entries in respect of deaths are signed by the master
and by a crew member. A failure to sign and witness these entries can
invalidate them and can cause serious legal problems.

4.14 The form MSF 4605 (formerly RBD.1) referred to is available at Annex
2, from the Registry of Shipping and Seamen or any Marine Office.

Pages 10 to 14 - Record of musters, boat drills etc

4.15 This section must be completed at the time of every drill. Attention is
drawn to MGN 71 'Muster, drills, on-board training and instructions and
Decision Support Systems'. This sets out the current requirements for the
frequency of drills and content.

A typical entry will look like:

Date of
muster, drill,
training,
instruction
or
inspection.
Nature of muster drill, training, instruction or
inspection. (including the condition in which
the life-saving and fire appliances were
found), and a record of the occasions on
which the lifeboats were swung out and
lowered
Date of
entry
Signatures of
master and
member of
crew
02/01/05 General alarm sounded, all crew mustered on
Boat Deck for paint locker fire, fire pumps,
breathing apparatus and paint locker sprinkler
tested. Crew mustered for Abandon Ship
stations. Davit launch liferaft training carried out.
All equipment satisfactory

02/01/05 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer
09/01/05 General alarm sounded Crew mustered for
Abandon Ship stations. Freefall lifeboat launched
and recovered
All equipment satisfactory

09/01/05 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer
11/01/05 Weekly inspection of lifesaving appliances
General alarm tested, freefall lifeboat and rescue
boat engine run.
All equipment satisfactory

11/01/05 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer

4.16 Every entry MUST be signed by the master and by one other crew
member. If it is not signed by BOTH, the entry is invalid and will not be
accepted as proof that the drills have been carried out.

version 3 - 5/10/09 16
4.17 If for any reason a muster or drill is not held then a statement as to
the reason why should be entered in column 2. Valid reasons might include
"vessel rolling and pitching heavily, unsafe to carry out drills".

4.18 If a drill is postponed or cancelled then it should take place at the next
suitable opportunity.

4.19 An additional UK requirement is for Entry into Dangerous Spaces
Drills. The master of:

(a) any tanker or gas carrier of 500 tons and over, and
(b) any other ship of 1000 tons and over

must ensure that drills simulating the rescue of a crew member from a
dangerous space are held at intervals not exceeding two months, and that a
record of such drills is entered in the Official Log Book.

Pages 15 to 18 - Record of test drills and inspections of steering gear

4.20 This section is self explanatory. The regulations require steering gear
to be tested within 12 hours before sailing (or once per week for ships making
one voyage or more per week from the same port) and emergency steering
systems to be tested every 3 months.

Typical entries might appear as:

Date, time and
place of test
drill, inspection
or pre-sea
check
Nature of Inspection, test
drill or check of Steering
Gear
Date of
Entry
Signatures of master and
officer
02/03/05 1700 LT
Riverside Quay
South Shields
Steering gear tested
Satisfactorily in all modes
02/03/05 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer
15/05/05 1100 LT
54°50´ N
01°00´ E
Emergency steering gear
tested, control from steering
gear compartment and
communications all
satisfactory
15/05/05 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer

4.21 As with most sections of the OLB all entries MUST be signed by the
master and an officer to be valid.

Pages 19 to 23 - Record of inspections of crew accommodation.

4.22 This section is for records of mandatory inspections of crew
accommodation. The regulations require that an inspection of the crew
accommodation, to ensure that it is being kept clean and that all the
requirements of the crew accommodation regulations are being followed, is
carried out every 7 days. The inspection must be carried out by the master
version 3 - 5/10/09 17
and he must be accompanied by one other member of the crew. All entries
must be signed by the master and a member of the crew, who will normally be
the same person who accompanies the master on the inspection.

4.23 It is acceptable in large ships for the inspections to cover areas of the
accommodation on each occasion so long as the whole of the accommodation
is inspected in sequence.

Typical entries might appear as:

Time and
date of
inspection
Names and
ranks of
persons making
the inspections
Particulars of any
respects in which crew
accommodation, or any
part of it is found not to
comply with the
Regulations
Date of
entry
Signatures of
master and
member of
crew
1700 LT
01/04/06
P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer
Accommodation inspected
all areas satisfactory
01/04/06 P Hatch
Master

S Tanashchuk
Chief Officer
1030 LT
08/04/06
P Hatch
Master

A Grypachov
Second Officer
Crew mess room lighting
defective - repaired
satisfactorily
08/04/06 P Hatch
Master

A Grypachov
Second Officer


Pages 24 to 28 - Record of inspections of food and water

4.24 Guidelines for food hygiene and fresh water systems are contained in
MGN 397.

4.25 There are no minimum requirements as to the minimum amount of
food. The Regulations state:-

"4. It shall be the duty of the employer and master of every ship to ensure
that there shall be provided on their ship provisions and water which

(a) are suitable in respect of quantity, nutritive value, quality and
variety having regard to the size of the crew and the character
and nature of the voyage;
(b) do not contain anything which is likely to cause sickness or
injury to health or which renders any provision or water
unpalatable; and
(c) are otherwise fit for consumption."

4.26 The records of inspections in this section are similar to those in the
previous section. The Convention and the United Kingdom Regulation
requires that inspections are carried out at intervals not more than 7 days.

4.27 The inspections in this section must be made by the Master and any
member of the crew. In practice it will usually be possible to inspect
version 3 - 5/10/09 18
provisions, store rooms, galleys etc. with a member of the catering
department during the course of the accommodation inspection.

4.28 Entries in this section must be signed by the Master and by the
member of the crew making the inspection.

Typical entries might appear as:

Date of
inspection
Names and
ranks of
persons
making the
inspections
Result of inspection of
supplies of food and fresh
water
Date of
entry
Signatures of
persons
making the
inspection
01/01/06 P Hatch
Master

W Academia
Cook
Food and fresh water
satisfactory
01/01/06 P Hatch
Master

W Academia
Cook
08/01/06 P Hatch
Master

W Academia
Cook
Food and fresh water
satisfactory
08/01/06 P Hatch
Master

W Academia
Cook


Page 29 - Load line, depth of loading etc.

4.29 This section is self explanatory. The information must be completed
and the necessary data can be found on the ship’s load line certificate. The
section should be completed by the Master at the same time as the log book
is opened.

Pages 30 to 39 - Dates of departure from and arrival at each dock

4.30 This section records the date of sailing and the draughts and
freeboards of the ship on departure for each voyage and the dates of arrival at
the next port. It must be completed at departure.

Posting the FRE 13/ MSF 2004 Form

4.31 Column (15) refers to the date and time of posting the notice FRE13/
MSF 2004 which is a copy of the data in this section and which must be
posted up in a conspicuous place accessible to the crew at sailing.

4.32 If the actual mean freeboard is greater than the appropriate salt water
freeboard Columns 8, 9,10,11, 12, 13 & 14 need not be filled in.

4.33 Copies of FRE13/ MSF 2004 are available in MSN 1752 page 75 or
from Marine Offices.

4.34 Normally it will be convenient for the person completing Form FRE13/
MSF 2004 to enter the details in the OLB at the same time for the master’s
version 3 - 5/10/09 19
signature as a final check. Normally the officer completing the data for the
FRE13/ MSF 2004 will be the second signatory for this section.

Pages 40 to 76 - Narrative section

4.35 This section is for explanatory entries. A complete list of the
categories of entry to be made is contained in the Official Log Book
Regulations. In general terms this section should contain entries relating to:

• changes of master
• the annexing of other documents to the OLB.
• accidents
• casualties
• disciplinary matters
• discharge of crew members, i.e. when they sign off the articles ( note
there is no need to make an entry when crew members sign on to the
articles, this is covered above).
• details of crew left behind
• desertions
• complaints
• promotions and demotions
• criminal convictions during a voyage
• illness
• deaths
• appointments of safety officers, representatives and committees.
• meetings of safety committees.
• wages disputes
• closing of articles and OLB.

4.36 If it is not practicable due to its length, or for any other reason for an
entry to be contained in the narrative section, it shall be contained in a
separate document annexed to the OLB and referred to in an entry in the
narrative section.

4.37 Some fictional examples, designed to illustrate the type of entries that
might commonly be made, are below. Every entry MUST be signed by the
Master and by a member of the crew.

Date and
hour of
occurrence
Place of the
occurrence, or
situation by latitude
and longitude at
sea
Date of
entry
Entries required to be made under
Section 77 of the Merchant Shipping
Act 1995
1200 UTC
04/02/06
South Shields 04/02/06 On this day I have opened crew articles
and signed on crew members Nos 1 – 15
in the List of Crew.
P Hatch Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer
version 3 - 5/10/09 20
0900 UTC
05/02/06
South Shields 05/02/06 A Grypachov Second Officer appointed as
Safety Officer. Safety Representative J
Pamis elected
P Hatch Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer
1630 LT
15/02/06
Malta 15/02/06 On this day signed off Nos 2, 4 & 10 in list
of crew to proceed on leave
P Hatch Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer
0900 LT
06/03/06
Rotterdam 06/02/06 On this day P Hatch was replaced by
G Johnson as Master. All documents
handed over in good order
P Hatch G Johnson
1730 LT
15/04/06
At sea
55°10´ N
01°01´ E
15/04/06 Dangerous Space drill carried out. All
equipment satisfactory
G Johnson Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer
0642 LT
21/04/06
Kotka 21/04/06 Whilst vessel alongside M.V. Jen IMO No
9122222 suffered engine failure and
contacted port quarter. No damage noted.
IRF form faxed to MAIB
G Johnson Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer
1300 LT
28/04/06
Rotterdam 28/04/06 Crew agreement and official log book
closed
G Johnson Master
S Tanashchuk Chief Officer

4.38 The page number for every entry in the narrative section which refers
to a crew member should be entered in column 4 of the list of crew section.

4.39 In the event that an OLB becomes full while the articles are still open,
another OLB should be started. An entry should be made in the narrative
section of the second or subsequent book should reflect that this is a
continuation book. All the books should be returned with the completed
articles at the end of the voyage.


5. GMDSS Log Book

5.1 All UK ships are required to carry a GMDSS log book, see MGN 395,
MCA GMDSS radio logs are available from book shops eg.
www.tsoshop.co.uk/. The log book is to keep records of communications
relating to distress, urgency and safety radio traffic, regular positions of the
ship and results of tests on radio equipment.

5.2 Instructions for completing the log book are contained in the book.
GMDSS Log Books should be returned to the MCA with the Official Log Book
and Crew Agreements when these are closed.

5.3 It is not compulsory to carry an MCA GMDSS Log books however the
following tests, listed in the front of the UK GMDSS Log, must be carried out
and recorded in some form:

version 3 - 5/10/09 21
Radio tests required:

Daily

(a) The proper functioning of the DSC facilities shall be tested at least
once each day, without radiation of signals, by use of the means
provided on the equipment.

(b) Batteries providing a source of energy for any part of the radio
installations shall be tested daily, and where necessary, brought up to
the fully charged condition.

(c) Printer(s) shall be checked daily to ensure there is an adequate
supply of paper.

Weekly

(a) The proper operation of the DSC facilities shall be tested at least once
a week by means of a test call when within communication range of a
coast station fitted with DSC equipment. Where a ship has been out
of communication range of a coast station fitted with DSC equipment
for a period of longer than one week, a test call shall be made on the
first opportunity that the ship is within communication range such as a
coast station.

(b) Where the reserve source of energy is not a battery (for example, a
motor generator), the reserve source of energy shall be tested
weekly.

Monthly

(a) Each EPIRB and satellite EPIRB shall be tested at least once a month
to determine its capability to operate properly using the means
provided on the device and without using the satellite system.

(b) Each search and rescue radar transponder shall be checked at least
once a month using the in-built test facility and checked for security
and signs of damage.

(c) A check shall be made at least once a month on the security and
condition of all batteries providing a source of energy for any part of a
radio installation. The battery connections and compartment shall also
be checked.

(d) A check shall be made at least once a month on the conditions of all
aerials and insulators.

(e) Each survival craft two-way VHF equipment shall be tested at least
once a month on a frequency other than 156.8 MHz (VHF Channel
16).
version 3 - 5/10/09 22

6 Health and Safety

6.1 Safety Officials and Committees

(See Code of Safe Working Practices Chapter 3)

6.1.1 Every person on board a ship has a responsibility for safety. Merchant
Shipping regulations places specific responsibilities on those personnel,
"safety officials", with designated duties to ensure the safety of those on the
ship. A ship’s safety culture is dependent upon the strong support and
encouragement from the ship’s senior management. In every ship in which
five or more persons are employed the owner or the manager is required to
appoint a Safety Officer.

Safety Officials

6.1.2 The Master is required to record this appointment of a Safety Official
in the official log book. The Safety Officer should have suitable training, be
familiar with the statutory responsibilities for health and safety and with the
principles and practice of risk assessment.

6.1.3 Amongst the duties of the Safety Official it is the responsibility to
ensure that:

• The provisions of the Code of Safe Working Practices and the
Company’s/Operator’s occupational health and safety policies are
complied with.
• Carry out occupational health and safety inspections of each
accessible part of the ship in which the crew may be required to work
at least once every three months or more frequently if there have been
changes in the working conditions.
• Stop any work which he reasonably believes may cause an accident
and inform the Master who shall be responsible for deciding when
work can safely be resumed.
• Ensure the minutes of each safety committee meeting are accessible
to all the crew.

6.1.4 On every ship in which five or more persons are employed the
Company/Operator is required to make rules and arrangements for the
officers and ratings to elect safety representatives.

Safety Representative

6.1.5 A safety representative must be someone who has at least 2 years
sea service since he was 18. If the ship is a tanker he also needs at least 6
months service in tankers (oil, gas, or chemicals as appropriate).

6.1.6 The Master is required to record the election of safety representatives
to a safety committee in the Official Log Book, in the narrative section. There
version 3 - 5/10/09 23
are rules covering the number of representatives that have to be elected
depending on the total crew size. In general:

• If the ship carries less than 16 crew, one safety representative elected
by the officers and ratings together,
• If the ship carries 16 or more crew; one safety representative elected
by the officers and one elected by the ratings,
• If the ship carries more than 30 ratings one safety representative
elected by the ratings from each of the deck engine and catering
departments.

6.1.7 Those who are elected as safety representatives do not have to stay
in that role for the whole voyage, others can be elected to take over. You
should ensure that any safety representative is briefed on his duties and
responsibilities. They can:

• Participate in any investigations or inspections carried out by the
Safety Official subject to his agreement, or after notification to the
Master, undertake similar investigations or inspections himself,
whether or not they have been carried out by the Safety Officer,
• Consult with the Master and Safety Official on behalf of the crew on
matters affecting occupational health and safety of crew members,
• Request through the safety committee an investigation by the Safety
Official of any such safety matter,
• Inspect any of the records required to be kept by the Safety Official.

Safety Committee

6.1.8 Once the safety officials have been appointed or elected the Master is
required to appoint a Safety Committee which includes the Safety Official and
each safety representative. The Master is also on the Safety Committee as
Chairman and the creation of this committee must be recorded in the Official
Log Book. The safety committee should meet whenever it chooses as long as
the intervals between meetings are not greater than 6 weeks.

6.1.9 A Safety Committee has to:

• Ensure that the provisions of the Code of Safe Working Practices,
relevant legislation, Marine Guidance Notices and Merchant Shipping
Notices are complied with to improve the standard of safety
consciousness among the crew,
• Make representations and recommendations on behalf of the crew to
the Company/Operator on matters relating to occupational health and
safety of the crew,
• Ensure the Company’s/Operator’s occupational health and safety
policies are observed and to make recommendations for their
improvement,
version 3 - 5/10/09 24
• Inspect any of the records required to be kept by the Safety Official
and ensure that any conclusions reached on matters of safety are
followed up.

6.1.10 There is a legal duty on the company to help the Safety Committee to
work and the company has to:

• Provide access to any necessary safety information, documents,
Merchant Shipping Notices, Marine Guidance Notices and relevant
regulations,
• Inform the Safety Official, safety representatives and safety committee
of any hazards on board the ship known to them, which may endanger
the ship or her crew,
• Permit occupational health and safety inspections of any accessible
part of the ship where crew members may be required to work.

6.2 Master’s Responsibility

It is very important that the Master takes a close interest in the work of the
safety officials, checking that the Safety Official is fulfilling his responsibilities
effectively, while giving support and encouragement. The Master is the best
person to ensure that the safety committee works successfully by encouraging
all crew members to participate in the ship’s safety culture.

6.3 Risk Assessments

6.3.1 Master should ensure that a risk assessment has been carried out to
cover all work activities on board where there is a realistic risk of harm to
personnel. Refer to the Code of Safe Working Practices Chapter 1.

6.3.2 The aim of risk assessments is to minimise accidents and ill health on
board. Masters should ensure that not only are risk assessments prepared,
but work activities are carried out in accordance with the risk assessments.

6.3.3 Many accidents and fatalities could have been prevented if crew
members had followed the precautions highlighted in a risk assessment. An
investigation into a recent fatality involving an accident during cargo
operations found that had the seaman followed the precaution of standing at
least one container away from the container being worked, the fatality would
not have happened.

6.3.4 An example of a completed risk assessment is given at Annex 1.


7 Accident Reporting

(See MGN 289)

7.1 While it is appreciated that your Safety Management System has a
procedure covering accidents and injuries on board, there is also a
version 3 - 5/10/09 25
requirement for the Master or Operator to report Accidents and Major Injuries
by the quickest means possible and as soon as possible after the occurrence
to the Marine Accident Investigation Branch. Serious Injuries should be
reported within 14 days and whilst there is no requirement to report a
Hazardous Incident it is recommended that a report is sent.

7.2 The definitions of Accidents and Major Injuries and Serious Injuries
are contained in MGN 289.

7.3 Accidents should be reported to the Marine Accident Investigation
Branch on form IRF and you should have copies of this form on board. It can
also be downloaded from the Marine Accident Investigation Branch website:
www.maib.gov.uk.


8 Medical Stores Requirements

8.1 Medical equipment

A full list of medical equipment that must be carried is contained in MSN 1768

8.2 Person in charge of medical care on board ship

Any person designated to take charge of medical care on board ship, must
have successfully completed an approved Medical Care training programme
meeting the standards laid down in STCW Code A-VI/4-2 within the preceding
5 years.


9 Surveys and Audits

9.1 Surveys

(See MSN 1751)

Statutory surveys (Loadline, Safety Construction, MARPOL, Safety
Equipment, Safety Radio etc.) should be arranged in plenty of time. Annual
and periodical/ intermediate surveys must be completed within the 6 month
window occurring three months before and after the Anniversary Date of the
certificate. The Anniversary Date is the day and month of the expiry date of
the full term certificate. If a periodical or an annual survey is not carried out
within the “window” then the certificate must be renewed after a renewal
survey. This takes longer and often costs more than an annual or a periodical
survey. A certificate that has not been validated by an annual or a periodical
survey within the “window” becomes invalid and the ship risks detention.
Renewal surveys must be carried out in the three month window prior to the
expiry of the certificate.

version 3 - 5/10/09 26
9.2 Authorised Survey Organisations

9.2.1 Ships on the ACS program, see MGN 345, can arrange all surveys
directly with their Classification Society, except for ISM and ISSC audits and
ILO inspections.

9.2.2 On non ACS ships surveys for Load Line, Safety Radio, Safety
Construction, and MARPOL have been fully delegated to your classification
society and can be arranged directly with Class.

9.2.3 Where ships are not classed contact the MCA for surveys.

9.2.4 Surveys for Safety Equipment should be arranged through MCA
Customer Service manager or through MCA HQ e mail:
hqsurvey.branch@mcga.gov.uk
Tel + 44 (0) 2380 329 224.

The MCA will normally authorise Class to carry out the survey however the
MCA will conduct surveys themselves -

• in the UK
• at 1 survey in 5
• where the MCA feel the need to inspect the ship eg. after a detention

9.3 DoC for Dangerous Goods

Annual survey for arrangements for Document of Compliance for Carriage of
Dangerous Goods is considered by the MCA to be included in the Safety
Equipment Survey.

9.4 Audits

9.4.1 ISM SMC, ISPS audits and ILO 178 inspections should be carried out
at the same visit and this may need to be planned to ensure that this will be at
a port where enough time is available.

ISM Shipboard Audits

9.4.2 All shipboard audits for the International Safety Management (ISM)
Code will be carried out by MCA surveyors. ISM shipboard audits should be
arranged in plenty of time with the MCA Customer Service Manager via your
Designated Person Ashore (DPA).

Interim audits

9.4.3 Required at delivery of new buildings or where ships change their ISM
Management Company. The DPA should contact the MCA to arrange this
audit.

version 3 - 5/10/09 27
Intermediate audits

9.4.4 A 12 month 'window' exists (between the 2nd and 3rd Anniversary
Dates of the certificate) in which to arrange intermediate audits. We
recommend you begin arranging this audit as soon as the 'window' opens to
avoid problems later on when the time available is less and availability of
auditors may affect the ability to carry out the audit in the most convenient
location.

Renewal audits

9.4.5 To be completed in the three months prior to the expiry of the Safety
Management Certificate. Again, arrange these early to ensure the certificate
does not expire – this would almost certainly result in a major non-conformity.

ISPS Verification Audits

9.4.6 All verification audits for the International Ship and Port Facility
Security (ISPS Code) will be carried out by surveyors from the MCA, normally
at the same time as the ISM audit. ISPS audits should be arranged as above.

9.5 ILO 178 inspections

(see MSN 1769)

9.5.1 The ILO Convention 178 and Recommendation 185 require the MCA
to inspect seafarer’s working and living conditions within specified time
intervals. The requirements apply to United Kingdom registered sea-going
vessels of 500 gt and over including sea-going tugs.

9.5.2 UK registered vessels will be inspected initially at first ISM audit
(following registration) and at intervals not exceeding 3 years afterwards. This
will usually be carried out during an ISM or ISPS audit to minimise the
inconvenience to ship-owners and Masters or in conjunction with other
surveys where ISM compliance is not covered. The MCA is also required to
investigate if a complaint is received or there is evidence that a ship does not
conform to existing legislation in respect of seafarer’s working and living
conditions.

9.5.3 After the inspection the surveyor will issue a Report of Inspection of
Seafarers Working and Living Conditions. The “Ships Notice Board Copy”
must be posted up in a suitable position in the accommodation where it can
be seen and read by all crew members. The “Masters Copy” will be left with
the Master. If any deficiencies are found these will be reported to the Master
for rectifying within an agreed time frame.

9.5.4 The ILO 178 inspection will generally cover areas such as:

• Standards of maintenance and cleanliness of the ship’s living and
working areas.
version 3 - 5/10/09 28
• Minimum age of seafarers.
• Articles of Agreement (crew agreements).
• Food, catering and the standards and cleanliness of food and
provisions arrangements.
• Crew accommodation arrangements.
• Manning, medical examination of seafarers, medical provisions on
board and the qualifications and training of crew members.
• Hours of work and rest periods and the records kept.
• Arrangements on board for the prevention of occupational accidents
and for reporting and investigation of accidents, and
• Articles of Agreement, contracts of employment and/or any collective
bargaining agreements in place relating to the terms and conditions of
employment on board.


10 Stowaways and Refugees

See MGN 70.


11 Continuous Synopsis Record

11.0.1 Every ship is now provided with a document called a “Continuous
Synopsis Record” (CSR). This is a form of log book that stays with the ship for
its whole life and records all changes of owner, flag, name, Class, ISM etc.
Whenever a change occurs a new section or a new document is issued and
then each has a consecutive number. The numbers should show a complete
record. If a ship is sold this document must stay with the ship.

11.0.2 The Master is responsible for the proper upkeep of the CSR on board
UK ships. When you first receive a new CSR, or first join the ship, you should
check that the details are correct. There is a process for amending details
which you can use and it is important that the details are always correct. Port
State Control will check the CSR as a matter of routine at inspections.

11.1 Making amendments to the CSR

When any data entry in the current CSR requires an amendment you must act
as quickly as possible. To do this you should fill in the changes on the Form 2
and send this to the Registry of Shipping and Seamen. The Registry of
Shipping and Seamen will enter the new changes in the ship’s master record
and issue a new CSR sheet with the next consecutive number to be attached
to the record on board. After this is done you must ensure that the Index of
Amendments (Form 3) is kept up to date and also attached to the current CSR
in date order.

version 3 - 5/10/09 29
11.2 Receiving an amended CSR

11.2.1 When you receive a new CSR or an amendment sheet, you should
check its sequential number to make sure it is the correct next one, review the
data entries to make sure they are correct and they cover all amendments in
the Index of Amendments.

11.2.2 If you find that there are amendments that are not included in the
CSR you should:

• Complete a new Amendment Form 2 relating to each outstanding
amendment and attach it to the latest CSR. List the amendments in
the Index of Amendments (Form 3) attached to the latest CSR; and
• Forward copies of the original Amendment Form(s) to the Registry of
Shipping and Seamen

11.2.3 If, for any reason, the ship’s CSR records are lost or damaged it is
essential that they are restored as quickly as possible in order to avoid
potential delays to the ship’s voyage. You should contact the Registry of
Shipping and Seamen as quickly as possible who will provide signed and
stamped duplicates.

12 UK Publications required to be onboard

The following UK publications are required to be carried:

• Official Log Book (MCA)
• Crew Agreement forms (MCA)
• Code of Safe Working Practices (MCA) - The following numbers are
required to be carried:
- 5 crew or less - 1 copy
- More than 5 crew but less than 20 - 4 copies
- More than 20 crew - 6 plus

• International Code of Signals (IMO)
• Mariners' Handbook (UKHO)
• Merchant Shipping Notices, Marine Guidance Notes and Marine
Information Notes (MCA) [Only (M) and (M+F) designated notices are
required for Merchant ships]
• Notices to Mariners (UKHO)
• Notices to Mariners – Annual Summary (UKHO)
• Lists of Radio Signals (UKHO)
• Lists of Lights (UKHO)
• Sailing Directions (UKHO)
• Nautical Almanac (UKHO)
• Navigational Tables
• Tide Tables
• Tidal Stream Atlases
version 3 - 5/10/09 30
• Operating and Maintenance Instructions for Navigational Aids Carried
by the Ship
• Ship Captains Medical Guide (MCA)


13 Cadet Training - Overseeing of NVQ portfolios

(Refer also to the MNTB guidelines for training at sea, the introduction to
Vocational Qualifications at the beginning of the NVQ Portfolio and MSN
1634)

13.1 As soon as possible after the candidate first joins the ship, it is the
Master’s duty to ensure that the necessary opportunities are presented to
enable the candidate to complete the Priority Familiarisation and Safety
Tasks.

13.2 The tasks completed thereafter should be inspected and signed upon
joining the vessel, each month thereafter and at the end of the voyage.

13.3 For deck cadets - a steering certificate should be completed and
signed when the candidate has obtained the necessary experience and
reaches the required standard. It is extremely important that the candidate is
given adequate supervised bridge watchkeeping experience after the first sea
phase. The MCA require that all deck candidates for a first certificate of
competency must spend six of their final 12 months qualifying sea time
engaged in bridge watchkeeping duties under the supervision of a deck
officer. This requirement means that the balance of emphasis in terms of
training during the latter sea phases should be directed towards
watchkeeping.

13.4 In the event that some tasks are not able to he completed, then a
suitable alternative task to a similar standard may be completed and recorded
in the relevant section of additional tasks provided for each unit. This space
may also he used for any additional tasks not specified and so provide further
evidence that such training and experience has been acquired.

13.5 Officers who act as witnesses to the tasks should sign and date the
appropriate tasks and enter his/her name in the “Record of Authenticating
Officers” list. Any task should only be signed as complete when the demands
of the task have been met. The signature will attest to the Authentication
statement shown in each task and where more than one activity is detailed
within a task, this statement must be true for all activities.

13.6 The number of tasks specified has no bearing on how many times the
candidate must complete the task, it may take several attempts. However, for
each attempt not reaching full competence, the officer must give clear
information on the areas that are lacking so that the candidate may address
these deficiencies. This is particularly important at the end of the voyage,
where the candidate may he joining another vessel where the officers will
have limited indications of his/her progress. In this respect, notes may he
version 3 - 5/10/09 31
version 3 - 5/10/09 32
attached to the Cumulative Evidence Summary to explain the level of
competence indicated.

13.7 Masters and Officers need to know that the standards expected of the
candidate (when competence is reached) is that of a person about to take up
the job for which the award is made. Cadets are expected at the end of their
training to be competent to start to undertake the job of watchkeeping officer,
but they will clearly be lacking in experience.

14 Alcohol

14.1 The alcohol limits set out below apply to masters and seamen at all
times. The limits reflect the UK drinking and driving regulations.

(a) In the case of breath, 35 microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres

(b) In the case of blood, 80 millilitres of alcohol in 100 millilitres
Annex 1 Example of Completed Risk Assessment Form

Company Document Cont r ol Number RA02/ Rev12/ 05

DETAILED RISK ASSESSMENT - SPECIMEN

Ship name_________MV Example_________________________________

Record Number_______Example / Risk Assessment / File 01-001____

Current assessment date: 12/ 05 Last assessment date: 12/ 04

Work activity being assessed:
Wor king alof t on t he Main Mast

Section 1
Hazard Analysis of the Intended Work Activity
Hazard
no.
Description of Identified
Hazards
Existing Control Measures to Protect Personnel from Harm
1
Wor king alof t (a) Per mit t o-Wor k issued f or wor k while alof t
(b) Per mit -t o-Wor k pr ocedur e f ollowed
2
Falling of f ladder while
climbing
(a) Use appr opr iat e saf et y har ness
(b) Supply appr opr iat e PPE
(c) Obey guidance f r om local saf et y sign
(d) Endor sement of wor king alof t pr ocedur es and t r aining
3
Falling f r om height s whilst
wor king
(a) Saf et y har ness secur ed
(b) Endor sement of wor king alof t pr ocedur es and t r aining
4
Ships whist le being sounded
whilst alof t
(a) I solat e whist le
(b) Place “Man Alof t ” signs on all whist le cont r ols
5
Being hit by a r ot at ing r adar
aer ial
(a) I solat e r adar t o st op r ot at ion
(b) Place “Man Alof t ” sign on r adar s
6
Radiat ion hazar d f r om r adar
and r adio aer ials
(a) I solat e r adar
(b) I solat e all aer ials
(c) Place appr opr iat e saf et y not ices on mast
7
Elect r ocut ion hazar d (a) I solat e elect r ical equipment as appr opr iat e
(b) Place appr opr iat e saf et y not ices on isolat or s
8
Obj ect f alli ng f r om
alof t / above
(a) Adequat e t r aining of suppor t st af f below
(b) Supply appr opr iat e PPE
9
Weat her and Sea hazar d (a) Ar r ange wor k in daylight condit ions
(b) Ar r ange wor k in dr y condit ions
(c) Ar r ange wor k in calm weat her
(d) Ar r ange wor k t o be car r ied out in por t or calm seas

Section 2
Assessment of Risk Factor
Severity of Harm Hazard
no.
Likelihood of
Harm
Severity of
Harm
Risk
Factor
1
Ver y Unlikely Moder at e Ver y Low Likelihood of
Harm
Slight
Harm
Moderate
Harm
Extreme
Harm
2
Unlikely Moder at e Medium
3
Unlikely Moder at e Medium
Very Unlikely
VERY
LOW
RISK
VERY LOW
RISK
HIGH RISK
4
Ver y Unlikely Slight Ver y Low
5
Ver y Unlikely Slight Ver y Low
Unlikely
VERY
LOW
RISK
MEDIUM
RISK
VERY
HIGH RISK 6
Ver y Unlikely Slight Ver y Low
7
Ver y Unlikely Slight Ver y Low
Likely
LOW
RISK
HIGH RISK
VERY
HIGH RISK 8
Likely Moder at e High
9
Ver y Unlikely Moder at e Ver y Low
Very Likely
LOW
RISK
VERY
HIGH RISK
VERY
HIGH RISK

10
To assess the risk factor arising from the hazard:
1. Select the expression for likelihood which most applies to the hazard;
2. Select the expression for severity of harm which most applies to the hazard;
3. Cross reference using the above table to determine the level of risk.
4. If the Risk Factor is MEDIUM or above (Yellow, Orange or Red) additional control measures should be implemented
and recorded in Section 3.
Section 3
Additional Control Measures to Reduce the Risk of Harm
Hazard no. Further Risk Control Measures Remedial Action Date Review Date
1
2
Can wor k be delayed t o enable ot her means of
access
As of j ob dat e Next annual r eview
3
Can wor k be delayed t o enable ot her means of
access
As of j ob dat e Next annual r eview
4

5

6

7

8
Secur e all t ools appr opr iat ely As of j ob dat e I mmediat e
9
Monit or local condit ions As of j ob dat e Next annual r eview
10

Additional comments:
Remedial act ion will be addr essed at t he next assessment r eview dat e
Assessment review date ____December 2006_________________________________________
version 3 - 5/10/09 33
Annex 2 MSF 4605 (RBD 1)

version 3 - 5/10/09 34

version 3 - 5/10/09 35
MERCHANT SHIPPING NOTICE
MSN 1767 (M)
1
Hours of Work, Safe Manning and Watchkeeping
Revised Provisions from 7 September 2002
Application of the Merchant Shipping (Hours of Work) Regulations 2002 and STCW 95
Notice to Shipowners, Companies, Managers, Masters, Deck and Engineering Officers and all
seafarers on Merchant Ships
With effect from 7 September 2002, this Notice supersedes Merchant Shipping Notice MSN 1682(M)
and should be read in conjunction with Merchant Shipping Notice MSN 1758(M), and Marine
Guidance Notes MGN 50(M), MGN 137(M+F), and MGN 179 (M) (or subsequent amendments)
Summary
This Merchant Shipping Notice contains the detailed mandatory requirements specified by the
Secretary of State under the Merchant Shipping (Hours of Work) Regulations 2002 which come into
force on 7 September 2002, and Regulations 1-5 and 11-18 of the existing Merchant Shipping (Safe
Manning, Hours of Work and Watchkeeping) Regulations 1997
1
. It gives guidance on the
application of the Regulations.
The guidance is in 3 Sections with Annexes:
Section 1 - Hours of Work
Section 2 - Safe Manning
Section 3 - Watchkeeping
Key Points
Section 1 - The requirements of the new 2002 Regulations:
● apply to all seafarers (including masters) employed or engaged in any capacity on board a
seagoing ship other than fishing vessels, pleasure vessels, offshore installations whilst on their
working stations and tugs which do not ordinarily go beyond the limits of categorised waters
● provide for a minimum of 10 hours rest in any 24 hour period and 77 hours in any 7-day
period and 4 weeks annual paid leave
● require records of hours of rest to be maintained (suggested pro-formas at Annexes A and B)
● provide for inspection and enforcement by the MCA
Sections 2 and 3 of this Notice, which supersedes MSN 1682(M), have been reissued to incorporate
editorial amendments, to clarify the manning guidance tables (at Annexes C and D) and to
incorporate International Maritime Organization Resolution A21/Res 890 on the Principles of Safe
Manning.
1
SI 1997/1320, as amended by SIs 1997/1911 and 2000/484
SECTION 1 - HOURS OF WORK
1.0 Introduction
1.1 The Merchant Shipping (Hours of Work)
Regulations 2002, (referred to in Section 1 of
this Notice as “the Regulations”) which
come into force on 1 September 2002, revoke
Regulations 6 to 10 of the Merchant Shipping
(Safe Manning, Hours of Work and
Watchkeeping) Regulations 1997, as
amended, and replace them with provisions
on hours of work and annual leave which
implement the Annex (the Social Partners’
Agreement) to Council Directive
1999/63/EC of 21 June 1999 (the Maritime
Working Time Directive). The requirements
of clause 13 of the Annex, relating to medical
certification, are implemented separately in
the new Merchant Shipping (Medical
Examination) Regulations 2002.
1.2 The Regulations also implement Council
Directive 1999/95/EC concerning inspection
and enforcement and provide for penalties
in the event of non-compliance.
1.3 Regulations 1-5 and 11-18 of the 1997
Regulations remain extant and details of
requirements are given in Sections 2 and 3 of
this Notice.
2.0 Application
2.1 The requirements of the EU Directive apply
to:
seafarers employed or engaged in any
capacity on board every seagoing ship,
whether publicly or privately owned, which
is registered in the territory of any Member
State and is ordinarily engaged in
commercial maritime operations.
For the purposes of these Regulations, the
terms a) “seafarer”, b) “seagoing ship” and
c) “commercial maritime operations” are
considered below, in paragraphs 2.2-2.4.
2.1.1 The requirements of these
Regulations do not apply to seafarers
employed or engaged on fishing
vessels, offshore installations whilst
on their working stations and tugs
which do not ordinarily go beyond
the limits of categorised waters, as
defined in Merchant Shipping Notice
MSN 1758 (M).
2.2 Seafarer
2.2.1 A seafarer is a person employed or
engaged in any capacity on board a
seagoing ship on the business of the
ship. This is taken to mean a person
employed either directly by a
shipping company or through a
manning agency, whose usual place
of work is on board a seagoing ship,
and includes masters, crew members,
resident entertainers and franchise
employees on passenger ships.
Boatmaster’s licence holders
operating on seagoing passenger
vessels (carrying more than 12
passengers) are also covered.
2.2.2 The Regulations will not be taken to
apply to those whose normal place of
work is ashore but who are working
on a seagoing ship on a temporary or
short term basis eg fitters, guest
lecturers and entertainers, research
scientists, riding crews, trainees and
volunteers on sail training ships who
are not carrying out safety-critical
roles (see para 2.4.2 below), provided
such workers are covered by the
requirements of the Working Time
Regulations 1998
2
2.3 Seagoing Ship
2.3.1 For the purpose of these Regulations
a seagoing ship is one which is
certificated under Merchant Shipping
legislation for navigation at sea.
2.3.2 Vessels certificated under MCA
Codes of Practice in terms of the
Merchant Shipping (Vessels in
Commercial Use for Sport or
Pleasure) Regulations 1998
3
, are
covered by the separate provisions of
those Regulations and the Codes to
which they refer.
2
2
SI 1998/1833
3
SI 1998/2771
3
2.4 Commercial Maritime Operations
2.4.1 All vessels engaged in trade, carrying
cargo or fare-paying passengers are
covered, as are sail training vessels.
Government ships such as those
operated by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary,
which are not ordinarily engaged in
commercial maritime operations, are
not covered by the Regulations.
Sail Training Vessels
2.4.2 - For the purposes of the Regulations,
“seafarers” on sail training vessels
includes all contracted crew (or those
listed on the Safe Manning
Document, if applicable) and any
person in charge of a navigational or
engineering watch and/or with a
safety-critical role. These seafarers
will sign on the crew agreement.
Volunteers and trainees who have no
safety-critical responsibilities are not
covered by the Regulations.
2.4.3 The Owner/Operator of a sail
training vessel should make a
declaration of the minimum manning
requirement for contract crew, for
approval by the Seafarers’ Training
and Certification Branch of the MCA
(unless the vessel is already covered
by a Safe Manning Document).
2.5 Definition of Hours of Work
2.5.1 For the purposes of the Regulations,
hours of work are when seafarers are
required to do work on the business
of the ship.
2.5.2 On-Call Time - The Regulations
provide that a seafarer whose normal
period of rest on board ship is
disturbed by a call-out, should have
adequate compensatory rest. This is
intended to cover situations such as
when a seafarer, having set the
alarms in an unattended machinery
space, retires to his bunk but has his
rest disturbed by a call-out to work.
In such circumstances the seafarer is
entitled to compensatory rest to make
up for the rest time lost because he
was called out to work.
3.0 General Duties (Regulation 4)
3.1 The Regulations require that any company
(defined as the owner or any other person or
organisation, such as the manager or
bareboat charterer who has assumed
responsibility for the ship from the owner),
and the master must ensure that seafarers
are provided with at least the minimum
hours of rest. This will include the managers
of franchises, who are responsible for the
personnel working for the franchise, and any
other employer of a seafarer working on
board the vessel.
3.2 It is the responsibility of all seafarers to
ensure that they are properly rested when
they begin duty on a ship and that they
obtain adequate rest when not on duty.
4.0 Minimum Hours of Rest (Regulation 5)
4.1 The hours of rest shall be not less than:
a) 10 hours in any 24-hour period; and
b) 77 hours in any 7-day period.
Note: Hours of rest may be divided into no more
than 2 periods, one of which should be at least 6
hours long, and the interval in between should
not exceed 14 hours.
4.2 It is expected that employers and employees
will reach agreement on the arrangements
for conducting emergency drills such as
musters, fire-fighting and lifeboat drills, in a
way which minimises the disturbance to rest
periods and provides compensatory rest for
seafarers whose normal rest is disturbed by
call-outs for drills.
Exceptions to the Limits on Hours of Rest
(Regulation 6)
4.3 Exceptions to the limits on the hours of rest
may be allowed (Regulation 6) provided that
they are the result of an agreement between
employers and seafarers and have due
regard to the general principles of health and
safety of workers. Agreements can be made
by “collective agreement” (between the
employer and an independent trade union)
or “workforce agreement” (Schedule 1 to
the Regulations). Exceptions may take
account of more frequent or longer leave
periods or the granting of compensatory
4
leave for watchkeeping seafarers or seafarers
working on board ships on short voyages.
4.4 A workforce agreement is made with elected
representatives of the workforce in most
cases (see below.) It can apply to the whole
workforce or to a group of workers. To be
valid, a workforce agreement must :
- be in writing;
- have been circulated in draft to all workers
to whom it applies together with guidance
to assist their understanding of it;
- be signed before it comes into effect either:
- by all the representatives of the
members of the workforce or group of
workers; or,
- if there are 20 or fewer employed by a
company, either by all representatives of
a workforce or by a majority of the
workforce
- have effect for a specified period of no
more than five years.
4.5 Applications for authorisation of exceptions
should be made in writing to any MCA
Marine Office (listed at Annex E).
5.0 Posting-up of Table of Duties (Regulation 7)
5.1 Companies should ensure that a table or
schedule of duties is produced setting out
the hours of work and rest periods. The table
should be in the same format as Annex A(i)
to this Notice or in a format substantially
like it. The table must be in English and in
the working language of the ship, if that is
not English, and should specify for every
position at least:
● the daily schedule of duties at sea and
duties in port; and
● the daily minimum hours of rest as
required by the Regulations (see para 4.1
above) or any collective or workforce
agreements in force.
In devising the schedule, operators should
take account of factors such as:
a) trade and type of operation;
b) type and size of ship;
c) construction and technical equipment of
the ship;
d) manning levels and changes in crew
numbers due to crew changes and
sickness;
e) the maximum period of continuous
watchkeeping;
f) minimum rest periods;
g) total workload;
h) the seriousness of irregular working
hours and their contribution to causing
fatigue and the importance of scheduling
reasonably stable working hours over a
voyage.
5.2 Changes should not be made to the schedule
of duties unless they can be justified by
substantially altered work patterns made
necessary, for example, by a change in
trading pattern or other significant factor.
Where it is known that a ship engages in an
irregular trading pattern or that working
hours are unlikely to be uniform, this can be
taken into account and recorded in the
schedule.
5.3 It is not necessary to draw up a new
schedule of duties for each voyage, so long
as it is applicable to the voyage in question
and the composition of the crew for whom it
was originally intended has not changed.
5.4 It is the responsibility of the master or
authorised person to post up the table in a
prominent and easily accessible place in the
ship. Where there is more than one table, the
master is responsible for ensuring that all
tables are posted in a suitable place.
5.5 When first drawing up a schedule of duties
for a ship, companies should seek the views
of the master, who should in turn seek the
views of the officers, the ship’s safety
committee, or the seafarers or their
representatives or a trade union as
appropriate. The final decision on the
schedule lies with the operator who will be
responsible for ensuring that it is
appropriate in relation to the safety of the
ship and the performance of duties.
6.0 Exceptions for Emergencies (Regulation 8)
6.1 The Regulations recognise that situations
may arise in which a seafarer may be
required to work during scheduled hours of
rest. These include emergencies which
threaten the safety of the ship or the cargo or
5
put life at risk. In these circumstances, the
limits may be exceeded provided
compensatory arrangements are made to
avoid fatigue.
7.0 Records (Regulation 9)
7.1 The master or authorised person is
responsible for ensuring that records of
hours of rest are maintained for each
seafarer serving on the ship. The records
should be completed monthly in arrears and
these should be in the format at Annex B to
this Notice or an equivalent format showing
at least this information. Each record should
be endorsed by the master or authorised
person and the seafarer. A copy should be
given to the seafarer.
7.2 In an emergency or when unforeseen events
occur (as described in paragraph 6 above),
changes may be unavoidable. In these cases
records should reflect all deviations from the
schedule.
7.3 All records should be kept for a minimum of
one year and should be available for
inspection by MCA surveyors at any time. If
during the year, a company ceases to
operate, the duty to retain the records
remains with that company.
7.4 Checking the ship’s documentation will be
carried out by the MCA as part of the normal
routine of vessel inspection and will include
a check that the appropriate schedules are
posted and records maintained. Following
examination, the records will be endorsed as
part of the process.
8.0 Night Workers (Regulation 10)
8.1 The definition of “night” relates to a period
of 9 consecutive hours including the period
between midnight and 5 am. Although the
Regulations are expressed in “local” time, it
is recognised that “ship’s time” may be
different when a vessel is at sea.
9.0 Young Persons (Regulation 5(5) and
Schedule 2, paragraphs 1 and 4)
9.1 The Regulations prohibit the employment on
a ship of any young person under the age of
16 by amending section 55 of the Merchant
Shipping Act 1995. This supersedes the
provision in section 55 which prohibits the
employment of anyone under school leaving
age.
9.2 The requirements of the Regulations do not
override any of the provisions relating to
young persons in the existing Merchant
Shipping health and safety legislation
relating to the employment of young
persons.
10.0 Annual Leave (Regulation 12)
10.1 For the purposes of these Regulations, a
seafarer is entitled in each leave year to a
period of leave of at least four weeks, for
which he is entitled to be paid at the rate of a
week’s pay in respect of each week of leave.
It is considered that this entitlement to
annual leave will be separate from, and in
addition to, periods of rest and
compensatory leave which seafarers receive
as part of their working arrangements.
However, it is for employers and seafarers to
decide on the details of how this entitlement
is to be provided by negotiation and
arrangement between themselves.
10.2 Annual leave may be taken in instalments
but may not be replaced by a payment in
lieu except where the seafarer’s employment
is terminated.
11.0 Enforcement Provisions (Regulations 14-20)
11.1 Council Directive 1999/95/EC concerning
enforcement provisions is also implemented
in these Regulations. Compliance with the
requirements of Regulations 4, 7 and 9 will
be checked as part of the MCA’s inspection
regime. Inspection may also be triggered by
a complaint from a person or body with a
legitimate interest in the health and safety of
the crew. In such cases the identity of the
complainant will remain confidential.
11.2 Inspection will include a check that
schedules of duties are posted up and that
records of work and rest periods are being
maintained. If an inspector has grounds for
believing that seafarers may be unduly
fatigued he will check in more detail that the
hours of rest recorded conform to the
standards and that they have actually been
observed. If the evidence indicates that
manning levels are so low that the schedules
cannot be observed, the MCA will require
that manning levels are adjusted so that the
6
vessel can be operated safely within the
hours available. Where conditions are clearly
hazardous to safety or health, the ship may
be detained.
SECTION 2 - SAFE MANNING
12.0 Introduction
12.1 The Merchant Shipping (Safe Manning,
Hours of Work and Watchkeeping)
Regulations 1997, place responsibilities on
companies owning or operating UK
registered seagoing ships and other ships
whilst in UK national waters, to ensure that
their vessels are manned with personnel of
appropriate grades who have been properly
trained and certificated. The numbers of
certificated officers, and certificated and
non-certificated ratings must be sufficient to
ensure safe and efficient operation of the
ship at all times.
13.0 Responsibilities of Owners and Operators :
General Principles
13.1 In fulfilling their responsibility to ensure that
ships are safely and sufficiently manned,
owners and operators should :
.1 make an assessment of the tasks, duties
and responsibilities of the ship’s
complement required for its safe
operation, for the protection of the
marine environment and dealing with
emergency situations;
.2 assess the numbers and grades/capacities
in the ship’s complement required for the
safe operation and for the protection of
the environment, and for dealing with
emergency situations, including the
evacuation of passengers where
applicable;
.4 ensure that the manning level is adequate
at all times and in all respects, including
meeting peak workloads and is in
accordance with the principles contained
in this MSN;
.5 in case of changes in trading area(s),
operations, construction, machinery,
equipment or operation and maintenance
of the ship, which may affect the
manning level, review the manning level.
13.2 In conjunction with these factors the owner
or operator should: -
.1 identify all the functions to be
undertaken on board during a
representative voyage or operational
period, including determination of the
number of personnel required to
undertake the relevant tasks and duties
under both peak and routine work load
conditions;
.2 identify those functions that constitute a
normal operation and determine the
numbers of personnel required to
undertake the concurrent tasks and
duties safely;
.3 identify the skills and experience
required to perform those functions;
.4 establish working arrangements to ensure
that the master and crew are capable of
undertaking concurrent and continuing
operations at the appropriate level(s) of
responsibility, as specified, with respect
to their skills and training; and
.5 ensure that the working arrangements
allow for sufficient rest periods to avoid
fatigue and to comply with the Hours of
Work Regulations 2002.
13.3 In applying these principles, proper account
should be taken of the International
Maritime Organization (IMO), International
Labour Organization (ILO), International
Trade Union (ITU), World Health
Organization (WHO) and European Union
(EU) instruments with respect to:
.1 watchkeeping;
.2 hours of work or rest;
.3 safety management;
.4 certification of seafarers;
.5 training of seafarers;
.6 occupational health and hygiene;
.7 crew accommodation.
7
14.0 Establishing Safe Manning Requirements
14.1 Specific factors to be taken into account in
determining the safe manning level include :
.1 frequency of port calls, length and nature
of the voyage;
.2 trading area(s), waters and type of
operations in which the ship or vessel is
involved and any special requirements of
the trade or operation;
.3 number, size (kW) and type of main
propulsion units and auxiliaries;
.4 size, type of ship, and layout;
.5 construction and equipment of ship;
.6 cargo to be carried or operational
requirements;
.7 method of maintenance;
.8 extent to which training activities are
conducted on board; and
.9 how the proposed complement will deal
with various emergency situations that
may arise;
.10 navigational duties and responsibilities as
required by STCW 95 including the
following:
.1 plan and conduct safe navigation;
.2 maintain a safe navigational watch;
.3 manoeuvre and handle the ship in all
conditions and during all operations;
.4 safely moor and unmoor the ship;
and
.5 maintain safety whilst in port.
.11 Cargo handling and stowage:
.1 plan and monitor the safe loading,
stowage, securing, carriage and
unloading of cargo.
.12 Ship specific operations:
.1 the nature and duration of the
operation(s) the ship undertakes and
local environmental conditions.
.13 Ship operations and care for persons
onboard, and maintaining life-saving,
fire-fighting and other safety systems in
operational condition:
.1 maintain the safety and security of
all persons on board and keep life
saving, fire fighting and other safety
systems in operational condition,
including the ability to muster and
disembark passengers and non-
essential personnel;
.2 operate and maintain watertight
closing arrangements;
.3 perform operations necessary to
protect the marine environment;
.4 provide medical care on board;
.5 undertake administrative tasks
required for the safe operation of the
ship; and
.6 participate in mandatory safety drills
and exercises.
.14 Marine engineering tasks and duties:
.1 operate and monitor the ship’s main
propulsion and auxiliary machinery;
.2 maintain a safe engineering watch;
.3 manage and perform fuel and ballast
operations; and
.4 maintain ship’s engine equipment,
system and services.
.15 Electrical, electronic and control
engineering duties:
.1 operate ship’s electrical and
electronic equipment; and
2 maintain ship’s electric and
electronic systems.
.16 Radio communications:
.1 transmit and receive information
using ship communication
equipment;
.2 maintain safe radio watch;
.3 provide communications in
emergencies.
.17 Maintenance and repair:
.1 carry out maintenance and repair
work to the ship and its machinery,
equipment and systems, as
appropriate to the method of
maintenance and the repair system
used.
8
14.2 In addition, the level of safe manning should
also take into consideration:
.1 the management of safety functions of a
ship underway, not underway or
operating in near stationary mode;
.2 except in ships of limited size, the
provision of qualified deck officers to
ensure that is not necessary for the master
to keep regular watches by adopting a
three watch system;
.3 except in ships of limited propulsion
power or operating under provisions for
unattended machinery spaces, the
provision of qualified engineering
officers to ensure that it is not necessary
for the chief engineer to keep regular
watches by adopting a three watch
system;
.4 the maintenance of applicable
occupational health and hygiene
standards on board; and
.5 the provision of proper food and
drinking water for all persons on board.
15.0 Guidance on Appropriate Manning Levels
15.1 In determining what constitutes a minimum
safe manning level, useful guidance may
also be obtained by use of risk and hazard
management tools such as formal safety
assessment.
15.2 The minimum safe manning levels referred
to in this Notice are those required for all
reasonably foreseeable circumstances and
working conditions to permit the safe
operation of the ship under normal
operational conditions.
15.3 The tables at Annexes C and D provide
guidance on the numbers of certificated deck
and engineer officers appropriate to different
sizes of ships, tonnages and trading areas.
As the watchkeeping arrangements for the
engineering department and the demands
placed on personnel vary significantly
according to the level of automation, these
tables only provide guidance; owners and
operators must take all relevant factors into
account before finalising their manning
proposals.
15.4 The number of ratings required will be
determined by the factors summarised in
paragraphs 13 and 14 above.
16.0 Nationality Restrictions
16.1 The Merchant Shipping (Officer Nationality)
Regulations 1995
4
do not permit foreign
nationals (other than Commonwealth
citizens, EEA nationals, or a national of a
State other than an EEA State which is a
member of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization) to serve as master of a
strategic ship. This is defined as a UK ship of
500 gt or more which is a cruise ship, a
product tanker or a ro-ro ship. There are no
other nationality restrictions applying to the
manning of UK registered ships.
17.0 Consultation on Safe Manning Levels
17.1 Owners and operators should consult with
the master, seafarers’ representatives and the
MCA (where appropriate) on their proposed
manning levels. Once agreed, a record of the
consultation process should be retained by
the owner or operator, together with a
record of the agreed manning level.
17.2 If agreement cannot be reached between the
owners or operator and master, and
seafarers or seafarers’ representatives
regarding manning levels, the MCA will
consider the views put forward and, if
appropriate, require the manning levels to be
revised. When disagreement occurs, it may
be necessary to arrange a practical
demonstration of the crew’s ability to carry
out the essential tasks in the context of the
principles of safe manning.
17.3 The manning level need not be reviewed for
each voyage or operational cycle provided it
is applicable to the voyage or cycle in
question and the composition of the crew for
whom it was originally intended has not
changed.
17.4 Changes should not be made to the manning
level unless they can be j ustified by
substantially altered work patterns made
necessary, for example, by a change in
trading pattern, operation or other
significant factor. Where a vessel is known to
4
SI 1995/1427
9
engage in an irregular trading pattern or
have working hours that are unlikely to be
uniform, this should be taken into account
when considering the manning level.
17.5 Once agreed, the owner or operator should
ensure the safe manning level is maintained
and that ship operations are in compliance
with the Merchant Shipping (Hours of
Work) Regulations 2002.
18.0 Safe Manning Document
18.1 The Merchant Shipping (Safe Manning,
Hours of Work and Watchkeeping)
Regulations 1997 require owners or
operators of all UK seagoing vessels of 500 gt
or more to obtain and carry a Safe Manning
Document specifying the minimum manning
levels. Owners and operators of ships below
500gt may also choose to hold a Safe
Manning Document.
19.0 Application for a Safe Manning Document
19.1 Any application for a Safe Manning
Document should be made by the owner, or
a person authorised to act on their behalf, on
form MSF 4227 (or subsequent amended
form), which can be obtained from any MCA
Marine Office or the Seafarers’ Training and
Certification Branch. All applications,
together with the appropriate fee, should be
sent to the Seafarers’ Training and
Certification Branch at the address on the
form.
19.2 When applying to the MCA for a Safe
Manning Document, owners or operators
should submit a clear and concise
explanation of: -
1 how the proposed manning level has
been determined;
2 how it takes account of the guidance of
this Notice; and
3 how it takes account of the hours of work
provisions in the Regulations.
20.0 Approval of a Safe Manning Document by
the MCA
20.1 A proposal will only be approved and a Safe
Manning Document issued provided the
manning level fully satisfies the principles,
recommendations and guidelines outlined in
this Notice. The MCA may require an owner
or operator to amend a proposal if, after
evaluation, the proposal is considered
inadequate.
20.2 When the MCA has agreed a proposal
regarding manning of a particular ship, a
Safe Manning Document will be issued for
that ship in a format which complies with
the requirements of SOLAS, as amended. It
should be retained on board and be available
for inspection by an authorised person,
whenever required.
20.3 In the event of any change in equipment,
construction or use of the ship, which may
affect the safe manning level, the owner or
operator should make an application for the
issue of a new Safe Manning Document.
20.4 A Safe Manning Document of a ship may be
withdrawn if an owner or operator fails to
submit a new proposal where a ship changes
trading area(s), construction, machinery or
equipment, or operation and/or method of
maintenance have changed, or a ship
persistently fails to comply with the rest
hours requirements.
SECTION 3 - WATCHKEEPING
21.0 General
21.1 The principles applying to the keeping of a
safe watch are given in Chapter A-VIII of the
STCW Code
5
and must be followed in order
to comply with the Regulations.
21.2 The Regulations require the master of any
ship to be responsible for the overall safety
of the ship. He must also ensure that the
watchkeeping arrangements are adequate
for maintaining safe navigational watches at
5
Available from the Publications Department, International Maritime Organization, 4 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7SR
10
all times, including the provision of a
lookout as required by the International
Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions
at Sea 1972, as amended. Masters, owners
and operators are reminded that the UK
does not consider it safe for the officer of the
navigational watch to act as sole look-out
during periods of darkness or restricted
visibility.
21.3 The chief engineer officer of any ship is
responsible to the master for ensuring that
arrangements are adequate at all times for
maintaining a safe engineering watch.
22.0 Further Information
22.1 Any queries relating to this Notice should be
addressed to the MCA at :
● Seafarer Health and Safety Branch (for
enquiries in relation to Section 1 on
Hours of Work)
Tel 02380 329216
Fax 02380 329251
Email: seafarer_H&S@mcga.gov.uk
or
● Seafarers’ Training and Certification
Branch (for enquiries in relation to
Section 2 on Safe Manning and Section 3,
on Watchkeeping)
Tel 02380 329231
Fax 02380 329252
Email: exams_section@mcga.gov.uk
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
S015 1EG
September 2002
File Reference MC 110/13/6
Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas
An executive agency of the
Department for Transport
11
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.
ANNEX A(ii)
13
ANNEX B(i)
M
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_
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_
_
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_
_
_
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M
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_
_
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_
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(
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14
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(
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15
ANNEX C
GUIDANCE ON APPROPRIATE MANNING LEVELS - DECK OFFICERS
Trading Area Size of Ship (gt) Number of Officers to be carried - STCW 95 Regulation
Reg II/2-Master Reg II/2-Ch.Mate Reg II/1-OOW Reg II/3-OOW
Unlimited 3000 or more 1 1 2 –
Unlimited 500 or more but less 1 1 1 –
than 3000
Unlimited less than 500 1 – 2(a) –
Near-coastal 3000 or more 1 1 1 –
Near-coastal 500 or more but less
than 3000 1 1 1(b) –
Near-coastal Less than 500 – – – 2(c)
Key:
(a) may be 1 if the master keeps watch;
(b) need not be carried if the master keeps watch;
(c) one of these II/3 certificates must have an endorsement for the capacity of master.
16
ANNEX D
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17
ANNEX E
MCA Marine Offices
1. Aberdeen Marine Office Tel: 01224 597900
Blaikies Quay Fax: 01224 571 920
Aberdeen AB11 5EZ
2. Belfast Marine Office Tel: 02891 475310
Bregenz House Fax: 02891 475321
Quay Street
Bangor
Northern Ireland BT20 5ED
3. Cardiff Marine Office Tel: 02920 229 556
Oxford House Fax: 02920 229 017
Hills Street
Cardiff CF1 2TD
4. Dover Marine Office Tel:01304 227710
Langdon Battery
Swingate
Dover CT15 5NA
5. Falmouth Marine Office Tel: 01326 310811
Pendennis Point
Castle Drive
Falmouth
Cornwall TR11 4WZ
6. GlasgowMarine Office Tel: 01475 5533550
Navy Buildings
Eldon Street
Glasgow PA16 7QY
7. Great Yarmouth Marine Office Tel: 01493 744300
4
th
Floor Fax: 01493 744329
Havenbridge House
Great Yarmouth NR 30 1HZ
8. Harwich Marine Office Tel: 01255 682107
East Terrace
Walton-on-Naze
Essex CO14 8PY
9. Hull(Beverley) Marine Office Tel: 01482 866 606
Crosskill House Fax: 01482 869 989
Mill Lane, Beverley
North Humberside HU17 9JB
10. Leith Marine Office Tel: 0131 554 5488
1, John’s Place Fax: 0131 554 7689
Leith
Edinburgh EH6 7EL
18
11. Liverpool Marine Office Tel: 0151 931 6600
Hall Road West Fax: 0151 931 6615
Crosby
Liverpool L23 8SY
12. London Marine Office Tel: 01689 890 400
Central Court, Fax: 01689 890 446
1B Knoll Rise, Orpington
Kent BR6 0JA
13. Milford Haven Marine Office Tel: 01646 693272
Gorsewood Drive, Hakin
Milford Haven
Pembrokeshire SA73 3HB
14. Newcastle Marine Office Tel: 0191 496 9900
MCA Tyne Fax: 0191 496 9901
Compass House
Unit 1, Tyne Dock
South Shields, Tyne and Wear NE34 9PY
15. Plymouth Marine Office Tel: 01752 266 211
Fish Market Fax: 01752 225 826
Baylys Wharf, Fish Quay
Plymouth PL4 OLH
16. Shetland Marine Office Tel: 01595 743514
The Knab, Knab Road
Lerwick
Shetland ZE1 0AX
17. Southampton Marine Office Tel: 023 80329329
Spring Place Fax: 023 80329351
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
18. Stockton On Tees Marine Office Tel: 01642 611040
3
rd
Floor, Victoria House
Pearson Court, Pearson Way
Teesdale Park
Stockton On Tees TS17 6PT
TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION GUIDANCE – PART 19
Certificates Of Equivalent Competency
Notice to Owners, Operators, Managers, Masters, and Officers of Merchant Vessels
This Note supersedes Marine Guidance Note MGN 179 (M)
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
Summary
This Marine Guidance Note (MGN) is Part of a series which gives guidance on the application of the
Merchant Shipping (Training and Certification) Regulations 1997
1
and the revised International
Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW 95)
2
.
In order for the guidance to be easy to use and to keep up-to-date, the individual Parts will retain the
same Part number but the MGN number may change if and when revisions are necessary. The front
sheet of any revised Part will list the latest MGN numbers. Any reference to "Part" in this MGN relates
to this series of Guidance Notes as listed below.
Key Points
This Part largely reproduces information on UK Certificates of Equivalent Competency (CECs)
previously published in Merchant Shipping Notice MGN 179 and incorporates the following changes:
• Additional methods of assessment of UK Legal and Administrative Processes (UKLAP) and of
English language skills;
• Conditions relating to the issue of temporary CECs;
• The use of photocopies;
• Companies permitted a role in assessing UKLAP and English;
• Maritime and Coastguard Agency’s (MCA) audit role.
MGN 221 (M)
1
1
SI 1997/348 as amended by SIs 1997/1911 and 2000/836
2
Available from the Publications Department, International Maritime Organization, 4, Albert
Embankment, London SE1 7SR
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 1
LATEST INDEX TO PARTS
Part No. Subject Latest MGN Number Issue Date
1 General requirements for MGN 91(M) April 2000
certification and
medical fitness
2 Certificates of competency MGN 92(M) April 2000
- deck department
3 Certificates of competency MGN 93(M) April 2000
- engine department
4 Certificates of competency MGN 214(M) May 2002
- radio personnel
5 Special training requirements MGN 95(M) April 2000
for personnel on certain types
of ship
6 Emergency, occupational MGN 96(M) April 2000
safety, medical care and
survival functions
7 Alternative certification MGN 7(M) April 2000
- dual certification
8 Education and MGN 8(M) April 2000
training schemes
9 Procedure for the issue MGN 9(M) April 2000
and revalidation of
certificates of competency,
marine engine operator
licences and
tanker endorsements.
10 Ratings MGN 97(M) April 2000
11 Conduct of MCAoral MGN 69(M) April 2000
examinations
12 Safety training for MGN 120(M) April 2000
concessionaires working
on passenger ships
13 Use of fishing vessel MGN 121(M) April 2000
certificates of competency
in standby, seismic survey,
and oceanographic
research vessels –
revised arrangements
2
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 2
3
14 STCW 95 application to MGN 116(M) April 2000
certificates of service
15 Certification of inshore MGN 209(M) April 2002
tug personnel
17 Certificates of competency MGN 156(M) February 2001
or marine engine operator
licences for service as an
engineer officer on
commercially and privately
operated yachts and sail
training vessels
18 STCW 95 certificates of MGN 164(M) January 2001
competency - conversion
of tonnage limitations from
GRT to gt
19 Certificates of Equivalent This note
Competency
20 Certificates of Equivalent MGN 220(F) March 2003
Competency (Fishing Vessel)
21 Deck Officer Certificates of MGN 195(M) February 2002
Competency for service on
commercially & privately
operated yachts & sail
training vessels
Seafarer Training and Certification Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
SOUTHAMPTON
SO15 1EG
Tel: 023-8032 9231
Fax: 023-8032 9252
E-mail : exams_section@mcga.gov.uk
March 2003
MC 124/1/041
Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas
The MCA is an executive agency
of the Department of Transport
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 3
All references to "Parts" in this document are to
other Parts of this series of Training and
Certification Guidance Notes
1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 This Note describes the requirements and
procedures for the issue of a Certificate of
Equivalent Competency (CEC), which will
enable Officers holding STCW certificates
issued by certain non-UK countries to
work as Officers on UK-registered
merchant ships. This Note reiterates the
information previously contained in MGN
179 concerning who qualifies for the
certificate and how to apply for it, and
explains some additional means of
fulfilling the requirements.
2.0 BACKGROUND
2.1 Under the Merchant Shipping (Training
and Certification) Regulations 1997,
Officers serving on UK merchant ships are
required to hold a UK Certificate of
Competency (CoC) or a UK Certificate of
Equivalent Competency (CEC). The
Regulations allow Officers who hold
STCW certificates issued by certain other
Administrations (listed at Annex 1) to be
recognised for service in any position
(including Master, Mate and Chief
Engineer) on UK ships.
2.2 The position of Master on some types of
UK ships (known as strategic ships) is
restricted to nationals of certain countries
as a result of the Merchant Shipping
(Officer Nationality) Regulations 1995.
Annex 3 sets out the details as they
currently stand but those Regulations are
the subject of discussion, which is likely to
lead to amendment or reinterpretation in
due course.
2.3 CECs will be issued, on application, to
Officers holding STCW CoCs issued by
other Administrations in all cases where
the UK authorities are satisfied that there
are no substantial differences between the
standard set by the UK and that
represented by other certificates. The CEC
will carry identical rights and obligations
as a CoC and, like the CoC, it will require
revalidation at least every five years and
holders will be subject to statutory
procedures relating to their conduct.
ACEC will remain valid only as long as the
original STCW CoC remains valid. At all
times, the underlying non-UK STCW CoC
must be carried with the CEC and be
made available for inspection by duly
authorised persons.
2.4 Employers can treat a valid CEC as
meeting their obligations under the
Merchant Shipping (Training and
Certification) Regulations and for Safe
Manning Documents in exactly the same
way as they have accepted CoCs to date.
2.5 These new arrangements are consistent
with EC Directives 89/48/EEC and
92/51/EEC (as amended by 2001/19/EC),
which set out requirements for the mutual
recognition of qualifications and training.
3.0 REQUIREMENTS
3.1 The MCA must ensure that applicants for
CECs are qualified to the equivalent
standards as holders of UK CoCs. To do
this it will consider the standards of
education and training represented by the
applicant's STCW CoC and where there is
no significant difference it will issue a CEC.
However, where the MCA judges that a
difference in standard does exist, it will
assess individual applicants in those
subject areas where there is a shortfall.
3.2 There are three main areas where a
difference could exist and which would
then need to be assessed:
• Standards of Competency;
• Use of the English language;
• Knowledge of UK Legal and
Administrative Processes (UKLAP).
There are several ways in which an
individual applicant's standards in each of
the above can be ensured and these are
described in the following paragraphs.
Competency
3.3 No CEC will be issued until the standards
of technical competency of the relevant
country are found by the MCA to be
equivalent to those of the UK.
4
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 4
5
3.4 USAapplicants who hold 500gt and 3000gt
(International Tonnage) Certificates of
Competency will need to meet the
requirements set out in Annex 8 by taking
an Oral Examination of Competency at an
MCA Marine Office. This is in addition
to meeting the other requirements of
this MGN.
English Language
3.5 It is a requirement of the Merchant
Shipping (Minimum Standards of Safety
Communications) Regulations 1997 that a
common language exist among Officers on
board UK ships. Since these Officers are
required to read and understand English
publications on board, the most useful
common language for a UK ship is English.
This is also the most commonly used
language for international communication.
3.6 If the MCA is satisfied that the applicant's
original STCW CoC satisfactorily tested
oral and written English language skills no
further test in this topic will be required.
3.7 If this is not the case, there are various
forms of evidence acceptable to the MCA.
These are set out in Annex 4.
UK Legal and Administrative Processes (UKLAP)
3.8 All Officers other than Officers of the
Watch must have sufficient knowledge of
UK legal and administrative processes to
enable efficient ship operation. Unless
applicants can prove that they have this
knowledge they must be assessed in one of
the ways outlined below.
3.9 Masters applying for CECs may, with
MCA approval, undertake an oral
examination conducted by an MCA
examiner, using the MCA’s syllabus
(see Annex 6 for details of the Grade
1 syllabus).
3.10 Alternatively, they may take the UKLAP
Grade 1 open book written test. The test
can be taken by arrangement with SQA
(Scottish Qualifications Authority) at one
of their UK examination centres or at
British Council centres abroad.
3.11 As an alternative to the examination route
Masters who are nationals of EEA states
may attain the required UKLAP
knowledge during a shipboard adaptation
period of up to 36 months served on board a
UK ship. The exact period is at the
discretion of the MCA and will be advised
on application. As a guide Adaptation
Periods normally vary between 2 and 6
months. This should be requested on the
Application to Serve an Adaptation Period
Form MSF 4206/REV 0895. They will be
issued with a temporary CEC at a lower
rank, valid for up to six months.
3.12 On completion of the Adaptation Period an
Adaptation Report Form MSF 4271/REV
0601 must be completed by the Master of
the vessel carrying out the assessment. This
is a numbered document and it attests that
the candidate has an adequate knowledge
of UKLAP. A Master, holding either an UK
CoC or a full UK CEC, should complete the
form and return it to MCA. If the Master of
the vessel holds a temporary CEC,
responsibility for the assessment during
Adaptation Periods must lie with the
shipping company. The Adaptation Report
form must additionally be counter-signed
and returned to MCA by a senior
representative of the shipping company.
This representative must be satisfied that
they can attest to the candidate’s
knowledge of UKLAP. A covering letter
explaining that the Master holds a
temporary CEC should be sent with the
form. The CEC will be upgraded once the
Adaptation Period has been completed and
the Adaptation Report has been submitted
to the MCAand approved.
3.13 Chief Mate, Chief or 2nd Engineer
applicants for CECs at the above levels will
be required to undertake the UKLAP
Grade 2 open book examination taken by
arrangement with SQA at one of their UK
examination centres or at British Council
centres abroad. See Annex 7 for details of
the Grade 2 syllabus.
3.14 As an alternative to the examination route
applicants may attain the required UKLAP
knowledge during a shipboard adaptation
period of up to 36 months served on board a
UK ship. The exact period is at the
discretion of the MCA and will be advised
on application. As a guide Adaptation
Periods usually vary between 2 and 6
months. On completion of the Adaptation
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 5
6
Period the Master carrying out the
assessment, who holds either an UK CoC
or a full UK CEC, should sign and return
the MCA’s Adaptation Report Form. If the
Master of the ship carrying out the
assessment holds a temporary CEC,
responsibility for assessment during
Adaptation Periods must lie with the
shipping company. The Adaptation Report
form must additionally be counter-signed
and returned to MCA by a senior
representative of the shipping company.
This representative must be satisfied that
they can attest to the candidate’s
knowledge of UKLAP. A covering letter
explaining that the Master holds a
temporary CEC should be sent with the
form. The CEC will be upgraded once the
Adaptation Period has been completed and
the Adaptation Report has been submitted
to the MCAand approved.
Medical fitness
3.15 Applicants will be required to prove an
appropriate standard of medical fitness
and eyesight. Annex 2 gives details of
countries whose medical certificates are
currently recognised by the MCA. These
are, however, due to be reviewed and
amendments to Annex 2 will be published
in due course.
4. APPLICATION PROCEDURES
AND DOCUMENTATION
4.1 All documentation and evidence required
by the MCA should be submitted as
originals with the application. Photocopies
of Certificates of Competency and other
documents may be submitted as long as
they are endorsed as true copies of the
original by the issuing country’s
administration or a MCA official.
Alternatively, companies may elect to
endorse copies on behalf of their applicants
by entering into a formal agreement with
the MCA. In such cases, the company must
see the original documentation.
NB Where copies of documents have been
submitted a temporary CEC only will be
issued. Original documents must be sent to
the MCA for verification before a full (5
year) CEC will be issued.
4.2 Original documents must be sent to the
MCA for verification at the end of the
current tour of duty.
4.3 The following is a brief checklist of the
necessary documentation, which should be
submitted to the MCA’s Seafarer Training
and Certification Branch at the address
given in paragraph 10.1:
• Application form (MSF 4203) completed
by the seafarer with the seafarer’s
original signature, together with four
attested photographs and the
appropriate fee, currently £70 per
seafarer. See also Annex 9 for the range
of fees, which are currently under review.
Consequent changes will be published
separately. Payment should be by
cheque, banker’s draft or postal order
made payable to the Maritime and
Coastguard Agency. Credit cards are also
now accepted;
• Non- UK CoC - All pages of CoCs issued
by recognised countries MUST be
included – the CoC must bear an
STCW95 endorsement;
• Valid UK Medical Certificate (ENG1) or
other medical certificate acceptable to the
MCA(see Annex 2);
• Passport or Discharge Book – proof of
national identity is required preferably
the Discharge Book, but a full passport
will be accepted as an alternative;
• Evidence of competency in English and
UKLAP (see paragraphs 3.5 – 3.14 and
Annexes 4,5,6 and 7).
4.3 On receipt of the above documentation, the
Seafarer Training and Certification Branch
will assess the application in accordance
with the requirements specified in
Section 3.
4.4 Applicants who fully meet the
requirements and have submitted original
documentation will be issued with a full
UK CEC. Where photocopies are
submitted, a temporary CEC will be issued
for up to six months pending receipt of the
original documentation.
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 6
7
4.5 Applicants who do not fully meet the
requirements will be issued with a Notice
of Assessment explaining the measures
they must take in order to enable a CEC to
be issued.
5.0 COMPANY BASED ASSESSMENTS
5.1 Where there is an urgent need to ensure
that a ship is able to sail under the UK flag
with appropriately certificated crew, and in
order to minimise the risk of Officers being
without documentation during a Port
State Control Inspection, the following
may apply:
• certain Companies, with prior approval
from the MCA, may be allowed to
attest, by letter signed by a senior
company official, to candidates’,
knowledge and understanding of
English based on the MCA criteria
checklist (see Annex 5). We recommend
the approach outlined in Annex 5,
against which Company procedures will
be audited, and the completed criteria
checklist should be copied to the MCA
with the application. All sections must be
completed and endorsed with the
company stamp;
• Certificates of Competency and other
documents may be faxed from the ship to
the Company, but they need to be
accompanied by confirmation from the
ship’s Master that they are faxes of the
original; original documents must be sent
to the MCA for verification at the end of
the current tour of duty;
• Companies that carry out these
assessments will be subject to an audit of
either the Company or the ship, where
the auditor may require to see
documentation and evidence of
assessments and, if possible and where
appropriate, to speak to the Officer(s).
6.0 TEMPORARY CECs
6.1 Temporary CECs may be issued in the
following circumstances:
• Masters of UK ships flagging in, who,
for operational reasons, cannot be
replaced immediately in order to fulfil
the UKLAP requirements, may be
given temporary CECs for up to six
months (see paragraph 3.11);
• in order to enable Officers other than
Masters and OOW to complete an
Adaptation Period (see paragraph 3.14);
no further fee will be charged for issuing
full CECs at the end of successfully
completed Adaptation Periods;
• where attested photocopies are
submitted at the time of application, a
temporary CEC will be issued pending
receipt of the original documentation;
• only Companies meeting the MCA
standards for flagging in may carry a full
complement of Officers serving an
Adaptation Period, at or below the rank
specified on their CoC.
6.2 A Temporary CEC will be issued for a
period of 6 months. During this time, the
applicant is expected to meet fully the
requirements for issue of a full CEC and
provide all remaining information and
documentation to the MCA. An extension
will not normally be granted.
6.3 If there are genuine and compelling
reasons for an applicant not being able to
meet fully the requirements within the 6
month period, a further temporary CEC
may exceptionally be issued at the
discretion of the MCA for a maximum
period of a further 3 months.
6.4 Full justification for the extension must
be provided with the application
together with the appropriate fee and
application form.
6.5 All remaining requirements must be met
within this further 3 month period.
No further extension will be granted.
7.0 RECOGNITION OF COMPETENCE
7.1 Those countries whose standards of
competency have been considered as being
equivalent to those in the UK are listed in
Annex 1. This will be updated as and when
the position changes by means of a Marine
Information Note (MIN)..
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 7
8.0 REVALIDATION
8.1 Original Certificates of Competency will
need to be duly revalidated before a
revalidated UK CEC can be issued. Form
(MSF 4272) for revalidating UK CECs is
available from Seafarer Training and
Certification Branch at the address below.
All Officers will need to send in their
existing CEC, their revalidated CoC and a
valid medical certificate.
8.2 If additional endorsements or a higher
certificate are requested, relevant
supporting documentation will be
required. This requires a new application
and fee.
9.0 IMMIGRATION RULES
9.1 CEC applicants who are not nationals of
EEA countries should note that they might
need to have a work permit if they are
intending to work on a ship which operates
solely within UK territorial waters.
10.0 APPLICATION FORMS
10.1 All relevant forms and further information
are available from:
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Seafarer Training and Certification Branch
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
or from MCAMarine Offices.
8
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 8
9
ANNEX 1
COUNTRIES WHOSE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY HAVE BEEN EVALUATED FOR THE
PURPOSES OF COMPARING STANDARDS OF COMPETENCY WITH THOSE OF THE UK
To date, the following countries’ standards of competency and administration arrangements have been
evaluated by the MCAand are considered to be equivalent to UK arrangements for the purpose of issuing
Certificates of Equivalent Competency. CECs are normally issued to applicants with capacities and
limitations equivalent to their own national CoCs. However, CECs may be issued with lower capacities
and limitations if requested.
We accept all those listed below under STCW 95. Up to date information is available from the MCA and
changes will be published in Marine Information Notes (MINs) as necessary.
If you wish to apply for a CEC for an applicant from a country not listed above, please contact
the MCA.
* Holders of USCG CoCs must also refer to Annex B
EU/EEA Member States Non EU/EEA Countries
Belgium
Bulgaria
Czech Republic
Denmark
Faroe Islands
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Iceland
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Portugal
Republic of Ireland
Spain
Sweden
Australia
Canada
Croatia
Estonia
Hong Kong
India
Jamaica
Latvia
Lithuania
Malta
Myanmar
New Zealand
Pakistan
Philippines
Poland
Romania
Russia
Singapore
South Africa
Ukraine
USA*
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 9
ANNEX 2
COUNTRIES WHOSE MEDICAL TEST CERTIFICATES ARE ACCEPTED BY THE UK TOWARDS A
MERCHANT NAVY CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY
Following the implementation of the Merchant Shipping (Medical Examination) Regulations 2002 on the
1st September 2002, only medical certificates issued by countries whose medical standards have been
assessed and found to be equivalent to the UK will be accepted towards a UK CEC. These countries are
listed in Merchant Shipping Notices MSN 1765(M) and 1766(M).
In addition, a live list of those countries assessed to date and found acceptable can be viewed on the MCA
website: www.mcga.gov.uk Publications/ Statutory Information/ UK Equivalent Medical Certificates.
Transitional arrangements: For those seeking revalidation and holding a medical certificate which was
issued prior to the 1st September 2002 by those countries previously accepted, (as listed below) these
certificates will be allowed to run for their full validity.
10
EU &EEA Member States Non EU & EEA Member States
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Iceland
Italy
Luxembourg
Netherlands
Norway
Portugal
Republic of Ireland
Spain
Sweden
Australia
Bulgaria
Canada
Hong Kong
India
Jamaica
Lithuania
New Zealand
Pakistan
Poland
Romania
South Africa
Algeria
Angola
Argentina
Azerbaijan
Bangladesh
Barbados
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Brazil
Costa Rica
Croatia
Cyprus
Djibouti
Egypt
Ghana
Guinea-Bissau
Iraq
Israel
Japan
Korea, Republic of
Kyrgyzstan
Lebanon
Liberia
Lithuania
Macedonia, The former
Yugoslav, Republic of
Malta
Morocco
Panama
Peru
Poland
Russian Federation
Singapore
South Africa
Tajikistan
Tunisia
Ukraine
United States of America
Uruguay
Yugoslavia
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 10
11
ANNEX 3
STRATEGIC SHIPS
1. Vessels registered in the UK which are defined in the Merchant Shipping (Officer Nationality)
Regulations 1995 as "strategic" will be required to have a British, British Commonwealth, NATO
or EU national, or a national of a state which is party to the EEAAgreement, as Master.
2. "Strategic" vessels are defined as:
a) Fishing Vessels over 24 metres in length;
b) other British ships of 500gt or more which are Passenger Ships with a Class 1 passenger vessel
certificate certified to carry more than 200 passengers;
c) Ro-Ro vessels i.e. ships provided with cargo or vehicle spaces in which cargo or vehicles can be
loaded and unloaded in a horizontal direction; or
d) Product Tankers i.e. namely oil tankers constructed for the carriage of petroleum products in
bulk or chemical tankers constructed for the carriage in bulk of any liquid chemical.
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 11
ANNEX 4
EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE
The following is acceptable evidence of competency in English. The MCA will need to see documented
proof of attainment in one of the following methods:
• Confirmation of proficiency by an MCAsurveyor on board ship or in a Marine Office.
• Passing the Marlins test at an approved Marlins Test Centre (currently available in Poland,
Croatia, Ukraine, the Philippines, India, Latvia, Russia and Spain – addresses available from MCA
and the Marlin company home page http://www.marlins.co.uk/). At present, this needs to be
accompanied by a Company interview to confirm that the owners/managers assess the seafarer’s
spoken English to be of an acceptable standard in order to carry out their shipboard duties. The
results of the interview can be relayed in a letter from the Company to the MCA.
The minimum acceptable pass marks (to be submitted on a Marlins approved centre stamped
computer printout) are as follows:
• Satisfying the MCAthat English is the candidate’s mother tongue (first language).
• Holding a STCW Certificate of Competency for which the examinations were conducted
in English.
• Holding an advanced English Language Certificate issued by the British Council or an
International Language Testing System (IELTS) Test Report showing Overall Band of at least 6.
• Holding a Certificate of TOEFL (Test Of English as a Foreign Language) as applicable for
admission into US universities.
• Holding a Berlitz Language School Level 2+ Certificate endorsed by the Company.
• Passing the MCA English language test administered for MCA by the Scottish Qualifications
Authority (SQA) and conducted by arrangement with SQAin any British Council office anywhere
in the world.
12
Deck Officers
Senior Deck Officers 90%
Junior Deck Officers 80%
Engineering Officers
Senior Engineering Officers 80%
Junior Engineering Officers 70%
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 12
13
ANNEX 5
RECOMMENDED CRITERIA FOR COMPANY-BASED ENGLISH ASSESSMENTS FOR
CERTIFICATES OF EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY
WHEN TO USE
The assessment method outlined below is for use particularly where applicants for UK Certificates of
Equivalent Competency (CECs) are newly or recently recruited and the Company is not otherwise aware
of their level of English. The checklist should be used to confirm standards of English and as an auditable
record for all CEC applicants.
THE ASSESSMENT
This is to be conducted on a one-to-one basis with a native English speaker (‘the interviewer’). Where
possible the assessments should be tape-recorded. It should consist of three separate sections of
approximately one hour in duration altogether. Where there is doubt as to whether certain criteria are
being met there may be a need to retry during the assessment, but if the point has to be pressed it should
be left.
Section 1 - oral interview
This should cover general topics, for example career to date, future plans. The questions should enable
and encourage discursive responses allowing the seafarer the chance to ask questions or seek clarification.
Section 2 - live listening/comprehension
The interviewer should, at a steady pace, read a passage lasting 3-5 minutes of a generally maritime
nature, e.g. an incident or a procedure. The seafarer may take notes throughout (in their own language if
preferred). They should be allowed 2-3 minutes to look over their notes and then be asked to describe the
incident in their own words, summarising the main points.
Section 3 - specific/job focused communications
This Section needs to be tailored to the vocabulary relating to the specific functions to be undertaken by
the seafarer. This may need to include listening to radio messages, loudspeaker announcements, and
should certainly include the testing of comprehension and communication of the type of orders,
statements and requests that the seafarer is likely to hear or have to make.
CRITERIA CHECKLIST
These criteria are to help establish levels of listening and speaking abilities and are to be filled in each time
an assessment of new recruits is made and in all CEC applications to confirm established competence. The
criteria are to be used as a checklist and where the interviewer decides that one/some are not met that is
to be noted for the record against the criterion (a tick for met and a cross for not met). It will be for the
Company to decide whether failure to meet any of the criteria means the seafarer’s level of English would
not be sufficient to carry out their functions safely and effectively.
The completed criteria sheet and, where available, the tape recording will form the basis of the
documentation required for audit.
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 13
CRITERIA CHECKLIST (insert ✔ for met or ✗ for not met)
Speaking
1. Clarity - language is sufficiently clear and accurate to be understood by native and
non-native speakers of English; any inaccuracies, faults in intonation or hesitation do not
impede comprehension of the points being made.
2. Initiation of dialogue - there is evidence of the seafarer not simply echoing or responding,
but also of taking the conversation forward, asking questions and raising other issues.
3. Vocabulary - the seafarer can speak about their main job functions and communicate in
both familiar and unfamiliar situations;
- their vocabulary is extensive enough to allow some flexibility of expression, and is
appropriate to the context/topic.
Listening
4. The seafarer shows he can understand the overall theme in ways other than repeating
back to the examiner word for word.
5. Key points can be identified.
6. Inferences and conclusions can be drawn.
7. The seafarer can demonstrate understanding of work-related communications delivered
in a variety of registers and in varying degrees of complexity.
Comments Company Stamp
Company assessment
I can confirm that the standard of English of
................................................................................................................. (name)
................................................................................................................. (function)
was assessed today..........................................(date) / has been tested over ............mths/yrs*
(period of employment)
and was found to be acceptable
not acceptable
by .................................………….(signature)..............................................................(print name)
date ………………………………………..
(*delete/complete as appropriate)
14
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 14
15
ANNEX 6
CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY
EXAMINATION IN UK LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES (UKLAP)
GRADE 1 – MASTERS
INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES
and
ORAL SYLLABUS
You will be allowed to use any or all of the documents listed in the Permitted Examination Materials in
the examination. The use of other documents, notes or CD-ROMs is not permitted.
a) Period and validity of SAFCON, SEC and Radio Certificates on UK cargo ships;
b) Period and validity of PC on UK passenger ships
2 Role and function of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, including:
a) Registry of Shipping and Seamen;
b) HM Coastguard;
c) Enforcement Unit;
d) Statutory surveys;
e) Port State Control.
3 Certificate of British Registry:
a) Information contained within;
b) Period of validity;
c) Procedure in event of loss or destruction of Register.
4 Assistance overseas: role of the British Consul to assist the Master.
5 Documentation required to be presented on signing on:
a) Officers;
b) Ratings;
c) Procedure for verifying authenticity of UK seafarers’ Certificates.
6 Entries to be made in Official Log Book:
a) Dedicated pages;
b) Narrative section to include disciplinary procedures;
c) Procedure for return to RSS.
7 Crew Agreement:
a) Format of Crew Agreement;
b) Role of Master as Company Agent;
c) Procedure for closing an Agreement;
d) Engagement and discharge;
e) Law relating to young persons.
8 Seaman left behind:
a) Failed to return from shore leave;
b) Hospitalised.
9 Death onboard:
a) Crew member or passenger.
The examination questions will be drawn from the following topics and will assess your knowledge
and understanding
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 15
16
10 Role of the MAIB:
a) Master’s role in reporting accidents, collision, fire, grounding, personal injury, etc.
11 Provision of Muster, Drills and Training on board.
12 Provision of Health and Safety on UK ships: Safety Officials, safety meetings and the Code of Safe
Working Practices for Merchant Seamen, including risk assessment.
Permitted Examination Material
You may use the following documents in the examination. ONLY the following documents may be taken
into the examination room. The use of CD-ROMS is not permitted.
Reference Books:
Shipmasters Business Companion (and annual supplements)
by Malcolm Maclachlan from: The Nautical Institute
202 Lambeth Road
London SE1 7LQ
Tel: 020 7 928 1351
Fax: 020 7 401 2817
e-mail: pubs@nautinst.org
Business and Law Self – Examiner
for Deck Officers
By Malcolm Maclachlan from: Kelvin Hughes
26 Holland Street
Glasgow G2 4LR
Tel: 0141 221 5452
Fax: 0141 221 4688
e-mail: glasgow@kelvinhughes.co.uk
Guidance and Information:
Merchant Shipping Notices
M 1379 Accommodation- Inspection
M1725 Port State Control
MGN 17 Musters, Drills and Training
MGN 20 MS&FV (Health & Safety at Work) Regulations
MGN 88 Employment of Young Persons
MGN 111 Maintenance of Lists of Crew Ashore
MGN 115 Accident Reporting and Investigation
MGN 134 Issue of Discharge Books to UK Seafarers
MGN 136 Changes to the amount that may be deducted from seafarers’ wages in respect of breaches
of obligations under a Crew Agreement.
MGN 148 Approval of Crew Agreements
Merchant Shipping Notices are available individually or by annual subscription from;
Mail Marketing (Scotland)
Unit 6, Bloomsgrove Industrial Estate
Norton Street
NOTTINGHAM
NG7 3JG
Tel: 0115 901 3336
Fax: 0115 901 3334
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 16
17
Or by annual subscription from:
The Marine Information Centre
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
SOUTHAMPTON
SO15 1EG
Tel: 023 8032 9106
Fax: 023 8032 9388
They can also be accessed from the MCA’s web page on www.mcga.gov.uk under Publications/
Statuatory Information/M Notices or from MCAMarine Offices.
Legislation:
Primary Merchant Shipping Act 1995
Statutory Instruments
Official Log Book Regulations SI 1981/569
(Amend) SI 1985/1828
(Amend) SI 1991/2145
(Amend) SI 1997/1511
Seaman’s Document Regulations SI 1987/408
(Amend) SI 1995/1900
(Amend) SI 1999/3281
Repatriation Regulations SI 1979/97
Returns of Births and Deaths Regulations SI 1979/1577
Crew Agreement, List of Crew and
Discharge of Seamen Regulations SI 1991/2144
Health & Safety at Work Regulations SI 1997/2962
H&S Employment of Young Persons Regulations SI 1998/2411
Many Statutory Instruments are available, free to read and download, on the MCAwebsite or HMSO
website at the following addresses:
www.mcga.gov.uk/publications/si/index
www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/stat
Statutory Instruments prior to 1987 are not available on these websites. They can be purchased from
TSO at the following address:
The Stationary Office Ltd
PO Box 29
Norwich
NR3 1GN
Tel: 0870 600 5522
Fax: 0870 600 5533
Further related documents
Training and Certification series of MGNs: Parts 1-21
Training and Certification Regulations SI 1997/348
(Amend) SI 1997/1911
(Amend) SI 2000/836
Minimum Standards of Safety Communications Regulations SI 1997/529
(Amend) SI 1999/1704
Safe Manning, Hours of Work & Watchkeeping Regulations SI 1997/1320
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 17
ANNEX 7
CERTIFICATE OF EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY
EXAMINATION IN UK LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES (UKLAP)
GRADE 2 – MATE, CHIEF & SECOND ENGINEER
INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES
and
ORAL SYLLABUS
You will be allowed to use any or all of the documents listed in the Permitted Examination Materials in
the examination. The use of other documents, notes or CD-ROMs is not permitted.
1 List of Certificates and documents required to be carried on a UK flagged vessel.
a) SAFCON, SEC and Radio Certificates.
b) Loadline compliance.
c) Period and maintenance of validity on UK ships.
d) Understanding of survey procedures.
2 Role and function of the MCA.
a) Registry of Shipping and Seamen.
b) HM Coastguard.
c) Port State Control.
d) M. Notices: Merchant Shipping Notices (MSNs), Marine Guidance Notes
(MGNs) and Marine Information Notes (MINs).
3 Provision of Muster, Drills and Training on board.
4 Provision of Health and Safety on UK ships to include:
Safety officials and safety meetings; a comprehensive understanding of the Code of Safe
Working Practices, including entry into enclosed spaces, safe movement aboard ships,
hatches and lifting appliances, means of access and risk assessment.
5 An outline knowledge of entries to be made in Official Log Book.
a) Dedicated pages
b) Narrative section to include disciplinary procedures.
Permitted Examination Material
You may use the following documents in the examination. ONLY the following documents may be taken
into the examination room. The use of CD-ROMS is not permitted.
Reference Books:
Shipmasters Business Companion (and annual supplements)
by Malcolm Maclachlan from: The Nautical Institute
202 Lambeth Road
London SE1 7LQ
Tel: 020 7928 1351 Fax: 020 7 401 2817
e-mail: pubs@nautinst.org
18
The examination questions will be drawn from the following topics and will assess your knowledge
and understanding
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 18
19
Business and Law Self -Examiner for
Deck Officers by Malcolm Maclachlan
from: Kelvin Hughes
26 Holland Street
Glasgow G2 4LR
Tel: 0141 221 5452 Fax: 0141 221 4688
e-mail: glasgow@kelvinhughes.co.uk
Guidance and Information:
Merchant Shipping Notices
M 1379 Accommodation- Inspection
M1725 Port State Control
MGN 17 Musters, Drills and Training
MGN 20 MS&FV (Health & Safety at Work) Regulations
MGN 88 Employment of Young Persons
MGN 111 Maintenance of Lists of Crew Ashore
MGN 115 Accident Reporting and Investigation
MGN 134 Issue of Discharge Books to UK Seafarers
MGN 136 Changes to the amount that may be deducted from seafarers’ wages in respect of
breaches of obligations under a Crew Agreement.
MGN 148 Approval of Crew Agreements
Merchant Shipping Notices are available individually or by annual subscription from;
Mail Marketing (Scotland)
Unit 6, Bloomsgrove Industrial Estate
Norton Street
NOTTINGHAM
NG7 3JG
Tel: 0115 901 3336
Fax: 0115 901 3334
They can also be accessed from the MCA’s web page on www.mcga.gov.uk under Publications/
Statuatory Information/M Notices or from MCAMarine Offices.
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 19
Legislation:
Primary Merchant Shipping Act 1995
Statutory Instruments
Official Log Book Regulations SI 1981/569
(Amend) SI 1985/1828
(Amend) SI 1991/2145
(Amend) SI 1997/1511
Seaman’s Document Regulations SI 1987/408
(Amend) SI 1995/1900
(Amend SI 1999/3281
Health & Safety at Work Regulations SI 1997/2962
Many Statutory Instruments are available, free to read and download, on the MCAwebsite or HMSO
website at the following addresses:
www.mcga.gov.uk/publications/si/index
www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/stat
Statutory Instruments prior to 1987 are not available on these websites. They can be purchased from
TSO at the following address:
The Stationary Office Ltd
PO Box 29
Norwich
NR3 1GN
Tel: 0870 600 5522
Fax: 0870 600 5533
Further related documents
Training and Certification series of MGNs: Parts 1-21
20
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 20
21
ANNEX 8
ORAL EXAMINATION OF COMPETENCY- HOLDERS OF USCG CoCs
Applicants holding USCG 500gt and 3000gt (International Tonnage) Certificates of Competency will be
required to pass the following MCAoral examination of competency, for which an additional fee is
payable (see Annex 9), in addition to meeting the other requirements of this MGN:
For candidates wishing to use their CEC in Merchant Vessels:
Chief Mate 500gt near coastal Oral D from MGN 69 from appropriate perspective
Chief Mate 500gt Oceans Oral D from MGN 69 from appropriate perspective
Master 3,000gt Oceans Oral B from MGN 69 from appropriate perspective
For candidates wishing to have their CEC limited to yacht service only (e.g. for use under the Code of
Practice for Large Commercial Sailing and Motor Vessels):
Mate 500gt near coastal OOW oral from MGN 195
Mate 500gt Ocean OOW oral from MGN 195
Mate 3,000gt near coastal OOW oral from MGN 195
Mate 3,000gt Ocean OOW oral from MGN 195
Master 500gt near coastal Master 500gt oral from MGN 195
Master 500gt Ocean Master 500gt oral from MGN 195
Master 3,000gt near coastal Master 3,000gt oral from MGN 195
Master 3,000gt Ocean Master 3,000gt oral from MGN 195
All candidates should note that any limitation as to area of operation or capacity on the original
Certificate of Competency will be carried forward to the Certificate of Equivalent Competency. A‘near
coastal’ certificate issued by the USCG will have the CEC endorsed ‘USAnear coastal area only’.
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 21
ANNEX 9
22
FEES FOR CERTIFICATES OF EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY (As at July 2002 )
Certificates Payable to MCA
Issue of a CEC
Revalidation of a CEC to STCW 95
Revalidation of a STCW 95 CEC
Upgrade of a current CEC
Addition of Tanker Endorsement to CEC
£70.00
£50.00
£30.00
£70.00
£20.00
UKLAP FEES
Examination
Grade 1 (MN)
Grade 2 (MN)
Payable to MCA
Oral Examinations
£74.00
£74.00
Payable to SQA*
Written Examinations
£60.00
£60.00
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ORAL EXAM FEES
Examination
English Language
Payable to MCA
Oral Examinations
£74.00
Payable to SQA*
Oral Examinations
£60.00
ORAL EXAM OF COMPETENCY
Payable to MCA £111.00
Payable to MCA at time of application
Payable to MCA or SQA at time of application
Payable to MCA or SQA at time of application
Payable to MCA at time of application
*Details of how to apply to the SQAare given on the Notice of Assessment
MGN-221 25/3/03 4:41 pm Page 22
- 1 -
MARINE INFORMATION NOTE



MIN 340 (M+F)


Certificates of Equivalent Competency – Amendment
of Procedures

Notice to all Owners, Operators, Managers, Masters, Skippers and Officers of Merchant
Ships and Fishing Vessels.

This notice should be read in conjunction with Marine Guidance Note 220 (F) and Marine
Guidance Note 221 (M) and replaces Marine Information Note 242 (M+F).
This notice expires on 7 November 2010.


PLEASE NOTE:-
Where this document provides guidance on the law it should not be regarded as definitive.
The way the law applies to any particular case can vary according to circumstances - for
example, from vessel to vessel and you should consider seeking independent legal advice if
you are unsure of your own legal position.

Summary
Details for obtaining Certificates of Equivalent Competency for officers on board Merchant
Ships and Fishing Vessels are found in Marine Guidance Note 221 (M) and Marine Guidance
Note 220 (F).

This Marine Information Note has been issued to restate the guidance contained in Marine
Information Note 242 (M+F). It also includes new sections on: oral examination requirements
for applicants holding US Coastguard Chief Engineer (Limited-Oceans) Licenses; the
measures taken by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) to prevent fraud and other
unlawful practices involving the certification process; and right of appeal.

The layout of the document and minor aspects of the text have been updated for clarity.

1. Introduction
1.1 Marine Guidance Note 221 (M) and Marine Guidance Note 220 (F) were issued in
March 2003 to explain the requirements for obtaining Certificates of Equivalent
Competency for officers serving on board UK-registered Merchant Ships and Fishing
Vessels. The MCA constantly reviews procedures to ensure they remain relevant. In
reviewing the processes for obtaining Certificates of Equivalent Competency, the MCA
has streamlined a number of procedures and improved quality control to enhance
maritime safety.
1.2 This notice repeats procedures set out in Marine Information Note 242 (M+F). In
particular those relating to the application procedure including: the issue of
Confirmation of Receipt of Applications and temporary certificates; Medical Fitness and
Sight Test Certificates; requirements for UK Legal and Administrative Processes and
English Language (UKLAP); and acceptance and verification of Certificates of
- 2 -
Competency. It also includes new sections on oral examination requirements for
holders of US Coastguard Chief Engineers (Limited Oceans) Licenses; the measures
taken by the MCA to prevent fraud and other unlawful practices involving the
certification process; and right of appeal.

2. Application Procedure
2.1 A table of the procedures for obtaining a Certificate of Equivalent Competency is set
out in Annex 1. Applications must be submitted to the Seafarer Training and
Certification Branch with the full supporting documentation specified in that Annex.
2.2 The MCA endorses the Confirmation of Receipt of Application, presented in Annex 2,
to acknowledge receipt of the Certificate of Equivalent Competency application and
cover the applicant for up to three months service on board a UK vessel; in accordance
with Regulation 1/10 paragraph 5 of the International Convention on Standards of
Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) 1978, as amended. It is the
responsibility of the applicant (or company in the case of company applications) to
ensure that all applications are made in accordance with the Regulations i.e. that
applicants hold recognised Certificates of Competency, Medical Fitness and Sight Test
Certificates (where appropriate) and meet the English Language requirements. It is an
offence under the Merchant Shipping Act to knowingly make a false application.
2.3 The MCA will verify all Certificates of Competency with the issuing administration to
confirm validity and authenticity. Once confirmation has been received, a Certificate of
Equivalent Competency will be issued, subject to all other requirements being met.
2.4 Temporary Certificates will only be issued in limited circumstances, for instance where
a Master requires longer than three months to complete the UK Legal and
Administrative Procedures (UKLAP) Grade 1, or where verification of the Certificate of
Competency has not been received.
3. Medical Fitness and Sight Test Certificates
3.1 Attention is drawn to the list of Medical Fitness and Sight Test requirements for
Certificate of Equivalent Competency applicants contained in Marine Guidance Note
221 (M) and Marine Guidance Note 220 (F). In particular, countries whose medical
fitness and sight test certificates are accepted by the MCA. Full details on UK medical
requirements can be found in Merchant Shipping Notice 1765 (M)
1
and Merchant
Shipping Notice 1818 (M)
2
. Please note that it is an offence under the Merchant
Shipping Act to employ a seafarer on a UK-registered vessel who does not hold
an appropriate medical fitness or sight test certificate.
3.2 Applicants are no longer required to submit the Medical Fitness or Sight Test Certificate
with the application for a Certificate of Equivalent Competency. However it is
emphasised that it remains the responsibility of the company to ensure that seafarers
employed on its vessels fully comply with the Regulations. Medical Fitness and Sight
Test certificates must be verified by the Master or Skipper when the applicant reports
for duty and will be liable to Flag State Inspection.



1
Merchant Shipping Notice 1765 (M): Seafarer Medical Examination System and Medical and Eyesight
Standards
2
Merchant Shipping Notice 1818 (M): Approved Medical Practitioners (Approved Doctors) with effect from 1
June 2008
- 3 -
4. UK Legal and Administrative Procedures Requirements
4.1 Grade 1
4.1.1 Masters and Skippers are required to obtain UK Legal and Administrative
procedures (UKLAP) Grade 1 by undertaking the MCA oral examination or Scottish
Qualifications Authority written test. A temporary Certificate of Equivalent Competency
may be issued for up to six months to enable the Master or Skipper to obtain the
qualification. European Union and European Economic Area nationals may
alternatively serve an Adaptation Period of up to six months in a lower rank. A full (five
year) Certificate of Equivalent Competency will only be issued once all requirements
have been met and verified by the MCA.
4.2 Grade 2
4.2.1 The company will be responsible for ensuring that Chief Mate, Chief Engineer and
Second Engineer are sufficiently familiar with UK Legal and Administrative procedures
(UKLAP) requirements equivalent to the Grade 2 syllabus. The on board Adaptation
Period has been streamlined and companies will no longer be required to submit
completed Adaptation Period Reports to the MCA. A written record confirming that each
officer has attained the necessary standard must be kept on board. The written record
should be in the form at Annex 3 for Merchant Vessels and Annex 4 for Fishing
Vessels. This may be verified by Flag State Inspection.
5. English Language
5.1 Merchant Navy
5.1.1 The requirements for English Language remain as set out in Marine Guidance Note 221
(M).
5.1.2 However, for applicants choosing to prove competence in English language by taking
the Marlin’s test, there is an additional alternative. Previously applicants were required
to supply evidence of a pass in the Marlin’s test supported by evidence of a company
interview confirming that the applicant’s standard of spoken English was satisfactory.
MCA approved Marlin’s test centres offer a Test of Spoken English (TOSE), which will
be accepted in lieu of the company interview, provided that it is accompanied by the
normal Marlin’s test certificate indicating a pass at the levels indicated in Marine
Guidance Note 221 (M). This offers applicants the option to complete both parts of the
requirements at one test centre.
5.2 Fishing Vessels
5.2.1 The MCA expects there to be a common language between officers on board UK-
registered fishing vessels.

5.2.2 Applicants for a Fishing Certificate are not required to provide evidence of knowledge of
English language. However, to maintain the necessary standards of safety, especially
for ship/shore communication and for the understanding of UK Safety Publications, it is
the responsibility of the owners and operators to ensure that at least one officer on
board every fishing vessel is competent in English language to the standard specified in
Annex 5.

6. Certificates of Competency
6.1 The MCA requires evidence of the authenticity and validity of the applicant’s Certificate
of Competency. Ideally, the original should be submitted with the application. However,
the MCA recognises that this may be difficult in some circumstances and therefore will
accept photocopies attested by:
- 4 -
• an MCA Marine Office;
• the issuing administration; or
• the company responsible for the day to day operation of the vessel (subject to
entering a formal attestation agreement with the MCA. Please contact the Seafarer
Training and Certification Branch for further details).
6.2 The Master or company representative should check the Certificate of Competency to
ensure it is authentic and valid when the officer reports for duty.
7. US Coastguard Chief Engineer (Limited Oceans) Licenses
7.1 Certificates of Equivalent Competency will be endorsed for US Coastguard Chief
Engineer (Limited Oceans) Licenses for use on yachts only. Applicants will be required
to pass either a Yacht 1 or Yacht 2 oral examination from Marine Guidance Note
(MGN) 156 as applicable. Full details are included in Annex 6.
8. Prevention of Fraud and other unlawful practice.
8.1 The UK is required under European law to take and enforce appropriate measures to
prevent fraud and other unlawful practices involving the certification process and to
provide for penalties that are effective, proportionate and dissuasive.
8.2 In the UK, the authorities that are competent to detect and combat fraud and to
exchange information concerning the certification of seafarers with other Member
States are the MCA and the police. If a document is thought to be fraudulent the matter
should in the first instance be reported to the MCA. The MCA can be contacted using
the contact details at the end of this Marine Information Note. A list of addresses for
local police stations can be found on the following websites: www.police-
information.co.uk or www.scottish.police.uk
8.3 A list of contact details for designated authorities in other Member States can be found
on the International Maritime Organization (IMO) website at www.imo.org

9. Right of Appeal in relation to applications for Certificates of Equivalent
Competency

9.1. The Merchant Shipping (Training and Certification) (Amendment) Regulations 2008
introduced a right of appeal in relation to applications for Certificates of Equivalent
Competency. An applicant for a Certificate of Equivalent Competency whose
application is refused, or deemed to have been refused because no response has been
given within 28 days of making the application, may have the application reviewed at
an inquiry. An applicant who wishes to exercise this right should contact the MCA in
writing within 28 days of the refusal or deemed refusal (the relevant contact details can
be found at the end of this Marine Information Note) and arrangements will be made for
a panel to review the application and for the applicant to be advised of the outcome.










- 5 -






























More Information

Seafarer Training and Certification Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Bay 1/17
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
SO15 1EG

Tel : +44 (0) 23 8032 9231
Fax : +44 (0) 23 8032 9252
e-mail: cec@mcga.gov.uk

General Inquiries: infoline@mcga.gov.uk

MCA Website Address: www.mcga.gov.uk

File Ref: MC 034/030/0011

Published: November 2008
Please note that all addresses and
telephone numbers are correct at time of publishing

© Crown Copyright 2008

Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas

Printed on material containing minimum 75% post-consumer waste paper
- 6 -

Annex 1
Merchant Navy
Application Procedures for Certificates of Equivalent Competency

A B C D
Application
For:
Application Requirements Company Action MCA Action

Master

• Completed Application
Form
• Fee
• Photographs
• Proof of English
Language
• Original or properly
attested copy of CoC
• CRA with Section 1
completed
• Original or properly
attested copy of
Passport or Discharge
Book

• Verify validity of medical
fitness or sight test
certificate
• Check original CoC for
correctness
• Complete application in
accordance with the
Regulations &
requirements in Column
B and send to MCA
• Send proof of UKLAP
Grade 1 to MCA as soon
as obtained

• Complete Section 2 of
CRA and return
• Verify CoC with issuing
administration
• Issue Temporary CEC
and instruction to take
UKLAP Grade 1
• Issue Full (5 year) CEC
when proof of
successfully passing
UKLAP Grade 1
received from the
company and all other
checks are complete

Chief Mate
Chief
Engineer
2
nd
Engineer

• Completed Application
Form
• Fee
• Photographs
• Proof of English
Language
• Original or properly
attested copy of CoC
• CRA with Section 1
completed
• Original or properly
attested copy of
Passport or Discharge
Book


• Verify validity of medical
fitness or sight test
certificate
• Check original CoC for
correctness
• Ensure officer receives
sufficient training to
satisfy the knowledge
requirements of UKLAP
Grade 2 and retain
records
• Complete application in
accordance with the
Regulations &
requirements in Column
B and send to MCA


• Complete Section 2 of
CRA and return
• Verify CoC with issuing
administration
• Issue Full (5 year) CEC
when checks are
complete

OOW Deck
OOW
Engineering

• Completed Application
Form
• Fee
• Photographs
• Proof of English
Language
• Original or properly
attested copy of CoC
• CRA with Section 1
completed
• Original or properly
attested copy of
Passport or Discharge
Book

• Verify validity of medical
fitness or sight test
certificate
• Check the original CoC
for correctness
• Complete application in
accordance with the
Regulations &
requirements in Column
B and send to MCA


• Complete Section 2 of
CRA and return
• Verify CoC with
issuing administration
• Issue Full (5 year)
CEC when checks are
complete
- 7 -
Fishing Vessels

Application Procedures for Certificates of Equivalent Competency

A B C D
Application
For:
Application
Requirements
Company Action MCA Action

Skipper

• Completed Application
Form
• Fee
• Photographs
• Original or properly
attested copy of CoC
• Original or properly
attested copy of
Passport or Discharge
Book


• Verify validity of medical
fitness or sight test
certificate
• Check original CoC for
correctness
• Complete application in
accordance with the
Regulations &
requirements in Column
B and send to MCA
• Send proof of UKLAP
Grade 1 to MCA as soon
as obtained
• Ensure at least one
officer on board is
competent in English
Language to the
standard specified in
Annex 4

• Verify CoC with issuing
administration
• Issue Temporary CEC
and instruction to take
UKLAP Grade 1
• Issue Full (5 year) CEC
when proof of successfully
passing UKLAP Grade 1
received from the
company and all other
checks are complete

2
nd
Hand
and
Engineer

• Completed Application
Form
• Fee
• Photographs
• Original or properly
attested copy of CoC
• Original or properly
attested copy of
Passport or Discharge
Book


• Verify validity of medical
fitness or sight test
certificate
• Check original CoC for
correctness
• Ensure officer receives
sufficient training to
satisfy the knowledge
requirements of UKLAP
Grade 2 and retain
records
• Complete application in
accordance with the
Regulations &
requirements in Column
B and send to MCA

• Verify CoC with issuing
administration
• Issue Full (5 year) CEC
when checks are
complete



- 8 -
Annex 2

Bay 1/20
Applicant - please enter name and address in the box below Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
SOUTHAMPTON
SO15 1EG
Applicant - please enter name and address in the box below
TEL : +44 (0) 2380 329254
DDI : +44 (0) 2380 329231
GTN : 1513 231
Fax : 02380 329252




CONFIRMATION OF RECEIPT OF APPLICATION – CERTIFICATE OF
EQUIVALENT COMPETENCY

SECTION 1 – TO BE COMPLETED BY THE COMPANY
I/we enclose applications for Certificates of Equivalent Competency for the following seafarer(s).

MCA use
only
Surname Initials Date of Birth COC Number Capacity of the COC or lower rank
if required
Received







Declaration (the maximum penalty for a false declaration is £5000)
I declare that all the applicants listed above hold a valid Certificate of Competency, a valid medical fitness
certificate, and where appropriate sight test certificate, accepted by the MCA for the issue of a Certificate of
Equivalent Competency as detailed in MGN 221 (M). All required supporting documentary evidence is enclosed,
as detailed in MGN 221 (M).

Signed …………………………………………… Date

Name ……………………………………… Position in Company ...............................................

SECTION 2 – TO BE COMPLETED BY MCA

We confirm receipt of the above applications on . This notice may be used as documentary
evidence that the above applications have been submitted to the MCA in accordance with STCW78 as amended,
Regulation I/10 paragraph 5, and will remain valid until (Only valid when stamped, dated and signed by
an authorised MCA official)

Signed ……………………………………

Name ……………………………………………
Duly Authorized Official

Date ……………………………………………




e-mail cec@mcga.gov.uk
MCA Stamp
Company name and address:






Email address:

MSF 4359 – REV 0806
CEC CRA 1
- 9 -
Annex 3
Merchant Vessels

WRITTEN RECORD OF UKLAP GRADE 2 FAMILIARISATION TRAINING

A report must be completed for each officer serving with the company holding a Certificate of
Equivalent Competency.
Name of officer


Name of ship


Capacity in which served


Period of assessment

From To

UKLAP – in this section confirmation is required of the officer’s knowledge of the
subject areas listed below. Confirm in the space provided that the officer has been
assessed and would, if required, be able to demonstrate knowledge.
List of certificates and documents required to be carried on a UK-registered vessel
SAFCON, SEC and Radio Certificates


Loadline Compliance


Period and Maintenance of Validity on
UK ships

Understanding of survey procedures



Role and function of the MCA and its organs
Registry of Shipping and Seamen


HM Coastguard


Port State Control


M Notices



Provision of Muster, Drills and Training on Board
Muster, Drills and Training



Provision of Health and Safety on UK Ships to include
Safety Officials, meetings


Comprehensive understanding of the
Code of Safe Working Practices

Entry into enclosed spaces, safe
movement aboard ship


Hatches and lifting appliances


Means of access and risk assessment


An outline knowledge of entries to be made in the Official Log Book
Dedicated pages
Narrative section to include disciplinary
procedures

- 10 -
COMMUNICATION, CONDUCT AND SOBRIETY – in this section, a report is required of
the officer’s ability to communicate in written and spoken English within the context of
VHF, official and social communication, integrate within the ship’s community,
establish relationships and maintain discipline. A report is also required upon signs of
alcohol or drug abuse.
Communication
Clarity of speech


Initiation of dialogue, ability to continue and
progress of conversation

Vocabulary, including job functions


Understanding of the overall theme of the
conversation/radio report

Clarity of written English


Conduct and Sobriety
Relations with colleagues


Conduct and ability to maintain discipline


Alcohol and drug related problems



Overall Assessment – use this space to summarise the report and provide any relevant
information not included elsewhere






I am personally satisfied that the content of this report is a fair and accurate reflection of the
performance, competence and conduct of the officer during the period and assess the officer
as follows:

PASS – I am satisfied that the officer has met the full requirements of UKLAP
Grade 2 and English and has demonstrated a satisfactory standard of conduct,
discipline and sobriety

EXTENSION – the officer has made good progress toward the necessary standard
but requires some further improvement in the following areas:





I expect the necessary standard to be reached by…………………………………………

FAIL – the officer has failed to reach the standard in the following area(s):





Signature of Company Representative
Full Name of Company Representative
Company


Company stamp
- 11 -
Annex 4
Fishing Vessels

WRITTEN RECORD OF UKLAP GRADE 2 FAMILIARISATION TRAINING

A report must be completed for each officer serving with the company holding a Certificate of
Equivalent Competency.
Name of officer


Name of vessel


Capacity in which served


Period of assessment

From To

UKLAP – in this section confirmation is required of the officer’s knowledge of the
subject areas listed below. Confirm in the space provided that the officer has been
assessed and would, if required, be able to demonstrate knowledge.
List of certificates and documents required to be carried on a UK-registered fishing vessel
UK FVC or IFVSC


Period and Maintenance of Validity on
UK ships

Understanding of survey procedures



Role and function of the MCA and its organs
Registry of Shipping and Seamen


HM Coastguard


M Notices



Provision of Muster, Drills and Training on Board
Muster, Drills and Training



Provision of Health and Safety on UK Ships to include
Safety Officials, meetings


Crew Agreement & Crew
Accommodation Regulations


Hatches and lifting appliances


Means of access and risk assessment



An outline knowledge of entries to be made in the Official Log Book
Dedicated pages


Narrative section to include
disciplinary procedures


- 12 -

CONDUCT AND SOBRIETY – in this section, a report is required of the officer’s ability to
establish relationships and maintain discipline. A report is also required upon signs of
alcohol or drug abuse.
Conduct and Sobriety
Relations with colleagues


Conduct and ability to maintain discipline


Alcohol and drug related problems



Overall Assessment – use this space to summarise the report and provide any relevant
information not included elsewhere






I am personally satisfied that the content of this report is a fair and accurate reflection of the
performance, competence and conduct of the officer during the period and assess the officer as
follows:

PASS – I am satisfied that the officer has met the full requirements of UKLAP Grade
2 and has demonstrated a satisfactory standard of conduct, discipline and sobriety

EXTENSION – the officer has made good progress toward the necessary standard
but requires some further improvement in the following areas:





I expect the necessary standard to be reached by………………………………………

FAIL – the officer has failed to reach the standard in the following area(s):

















Signature of Company
Representative

Full Name of Company
Representative

Company


Company stamp
- 13 -
Annex 5


Acceptable Evidence of Knowledge of English Language for Service on Board

The following is acceptable evidence of competency in English. Candidates for Fishing Vessel
Certificates of Equivalent Competency are not required to demonstrate this evidence at the
application stage. However, the company must ensure that AT LEAST ONE OFFICER on
board is able to demonstrate competency in English to the satisfaction of the Maritime and
Coastguard Agency (MCA) which may be verified at Flag State Inspection.

• Confirmation of proficiency through passing an oral examination in English from an MCA
surveyor on board the vessel or in a Marine Office.

• Passing the Marlins written test and Test of Spoken English (TOSE) at an approved
Marlins Test Centre – the minimum acceptable pass mark is 70%. Addresses of
approved centres are available from the MCA and the Marlin company website at
www.marlins.co.uk

• Satisfying the MCA that English is the candidate’s mother tongue.

• Holding a Certificate of Competency for which the examinations are conducted in
English.

• Holding an advanced English language certificate issued by the British Council or an
International Language Testing System (IELTS) test report showing Overall Band level of
at least 6.

• Holding a certificate of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) as applicable for
admission to US universities.

• Passing the MCA English language test administered for the MCA by the Scottish
Qualifications Authority (SQA) and conducted by arrangement with the SQA in any
British Council Office.
- 14 -
Annex 6
Oral Examination of Competency
Holders of US Coastguard Chief Engineer (Limited Oceans) Licenses

Applicants holding US Coastguard Chief Engineer (Limited-Oceans) Licenses are required to
pass the following Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) oral examinations, for which an
additional fee is payable.

Chief Engineer (Limited-Oceans) Motorships
limited to 3000 kW or more Y2 oral from MGN 156
Chief Engineer (Limited-Oceans) Motorships
limited to 9000 kW or more Y1 oral from MGN 156

The Certificate of Equivalent Competency will be limited to yacht service only, for use under
the Large Commercial Yacht Code (LY2)
3
.

To be eligible for the Y2 oral examination, applicants require proof of three months sea service
as a yacht engineer on a yacht less than 3000gt and more than 350 kW propulsion power
whilst in possession of their Chief Engineer (Limited-Ocean) License.

To be eligible for the Y1 oral examination, applicants require proof of six months sea service
as a yacht engineer on a yacht between 500gt and 3000gt and not less than 1500 kW
propulsion power whilst in possession of their Chief Engineer (Limited-Ocean) License.

All candidates should note that any limitations as to area of operation or capacity on the
original US Coastguard License will be carried over to the Certificate of Equivalent
Competency.






3
MSN 1792 (M) or any subsequent update.
1
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
MGN 97 (M)
1
SI 1997/348 as amended by SI 1997/1911
TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION GUIDANCE – PART 10
Ratings
Notice to Owners, Masters, Deck and Engineer Officers and Ratings of Merchant Vessels and those
concerned with Maritime Training.
This Note supersedes Marine Guidance Note MGN 10(M) and should be read in conjunction with Merchant
Shipping Notices Nos MSN 1692(M) and MSN 1740(M) (or subsequent amendments).
Summary
This Marine Guidance Note (MGN) is part of a series which gives guidance regarding the application
of the Merchant Shipping (Training and Certification) Regulations 1997
1
.
In order for the guidance to be easy to use and to keep up-to-date, the individual Parts will retain the
same Part number but the MGN number may change if and when revisions are necessary. The front
sheet of any revised Part will list the latest MGN numbers. Any reference to “Part” in this Note
relates to this series of Guidance Notes as listed below.
Key Point
This Part gives information and guidance regarding the grading and training requirements for
ratings employed on different types of ship. The requirements are framed to meet those of STCW 95,
the International Labour Organisation – Able Seamen Convention 1946 and the IMO Safety of Life at
Sea Convention.
LATEST INDEX TO PARTS
Part No. Subject Latest MGN Issue Date
Number
1 General requirements for certification MGN 91(M) April 2000
and medical fitness
2 Certificates of competency – deck department MGN 92(M) April 2000
3 Certificates of competency – engine MGN 93(M) April 2000
department
4 Certificates of competency – radio personnel MGN 94 (M) July 1999
5 Special training requirements for personnel MGN 95(M) April 2000
on certain types of ship
6 Emergency, occupational safety, medical care MGN 96(M) April 2000
and survival functions
2
7 Alternative certification – dual certification MGN 7(M) April 2000
8 Education and training schemes MGN 8(M) April 2000
9 Procedure for the issue and revalidation of MGN 9(M) April 2000
certificates of competency, marine engine operator
licences and tanker endorsements.
10 Ratings This Note
11 Conduct of MCA oral examinations MGN 69(M) April 2000
12 Safety training for concessionaires MGN 120(M) April 2000
working on passenger ships
13 Use of fishing vessel certificates of competency MGN 121(M) April 2000
in standby, seismic survey and oceanographic
research vessels – revised arrangements
14 STCW 95 application to certificates of service MGN 116(M) April 2000
15 Certification of inshore tug personnel MGN 117(M) April 2000
16 Certification of inshore craft personnel MGN 126(M) Not yet issued
(other than tugs)
An executive agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
Seafarer Standards Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
Tel: 02380 329231
Fax: 02380 329252
E-mail: exams_section@mcga.gov.uk
April 2000
MC124/1/029
© Crown copyright 2000
3
All references to “Parts” in this document are to other Parts of this series of Training and Certification
Guidance Notes
1.0 Introduction
1.1 The Merchant Shipping (Training and Certification) Regulations 1997 (the Regulations)
implement in the United Kingdom some of the requirements of the International Convention on
Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended in 1995
(STCW 95)
2
, and its associated Code (STCW Code).
1.2 The three international instruments which regulate the training and certification of ratings are:
.1 The International Labour Organisation (ILO) – Able Seaman -Convention 1946;
.2 The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for
Seafarers, 1978, as amended in 1995 (STCW 95) and its associated STCW Code; and
.3 The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, and its Protocol of 1978, as
subsequently amended (SOLAS)
2
.
1.3 These Conventions specify certain training and experience requirements for all seafarers and
further requirements for those who have designated safety and pollution prevention duties on
board. All ratings must be properly trained, with appropriate certification, in accordance with
the requirements of the relevant Conventions.
1.4 The United Kingdom is a party to all three Conventions. The intention of this guidance note is to
summarise and explain the requirements of the Conventions, and the UK regulations which
implement them, insofar as they relate to ratings.
1.5 Those seafarers who were serving as Category 1 or 2 seamen on or before 1 August 1998 may
continue in this capacity until 31 January 2002. By this date they must obtain a STCW 95 watch
rating certificate (see also paragraph 4.5).
1.6 In the context of this Part the term “seafarer” does not include hairdressers, entertainers,
shop assistants or other staff employed by concessionaires on ro-ro ferries or passenger vessels.
These are dealt with separately in part 12.
2.0 Mandatory Requirements
2.1 STCW 95 requires all seafarers to be medically fit with special emphasis on sight and hearing:
the sight requirement being especially relevant to deck personnel. In order to meet this
requirement all seafarers should meet the appropriate requirements of the Merchant Shipping
(Medical Examinations) Regulations 1983,
3
as amended, before they are employed for shipboard
duties. Further information about medical fitness requirements is provided in Part 1 and
Merchant Shipping Notices MSN 1745(M&F) and MSN 1746(M).
2.2 All seafarers having undertaken less than 6 months sea-service on 1 August 1998 must , to meet
the requirements of STCW Code A-VI/1.1, successfully complete approved familiarisation
training in Personal Survival Techniques before they are assigned to shipboard duties. Ship
owners and operators must also ensure that all those employed on the ship, are, on joining,
given Familiarisation training in respect of emergency duties as well as routine duties and
functions for the safe operation of the ship and the protection of the marine environment.
2
Available from the Publications Section, The International Maritime Organization, 4, Albert
Embankment, London SE1 7SR.
3
SIs 1983/808, 1985/512, 1990/1985
4
2.3 The shipowner or operator must ensure that all seafarers are able to communicate in the
common working language determined for the ship.
2.4 All seafarers having undertaken less than 6 months sea-service on 1 August 1998 who have been
assigned designated safety or pollution prevention duties must also successfully complete those
elements of approved basic training, as appropriate to their duties and functions. The four
elements of basic training are:
.1 personal survival techniques (STCW Code-Table A-VI/1-1);
.2 fire prevention and fire-fighting (STCW Code-Table A-VI/1-2);
.3 elementary first aid (STCW Code-Table A-VI/1-3);
.4 personal safety & social responsibilities (STCW Code-Table A-VI/1-4).
3.0 Grading of Seafarers
3.1 Seafarers are graded according to their training, qualifications and experience. The Merchant
Shipping (Safe Manning, Hours of Work and Watchkeeping) Regulations 1997
4
require
shipowners to ensure that their manning arrangements provide a good balance of experience
and skill within the crew as a whole. The grading of seafarers described below should assist in
achieving this aim.
3.2 Trainee Rating (Deck or Engine Departments)
3.2.1 Trainee ratings must be at least 16 years of age, medically fit and have undertaken Personal
Survival Techniques training and the Familiarisation training referred to in paragraph 2.2 above
before being assigned to duties. However, young persons sponsored by Job Centres in the UK,
who are not employed as part of the normal crew and do not accumulate more than one month
service in total on board the vessel, are not required to undertake the training in Personal
Survival Techniques.
3.3 Deck Department
3.3.1 Deck Rating Grade 2. To qualify for this grading, a seafarer must be at least 17 years old and
should have either successfully completed the four elements of basic training described in
paragraph 2.4.1–4 above; or
.1 have completed, prior to 1 August 1998, acceptable survival and fire-fighting training and
more than 6 months sea-service; and
.2 have obtained a Navigational Watch Rating Certificate (known as a Watch Rating Certificate)
after meeting the requirements of STCW Code A-II/4, as described in paragraphs 4.1 to 4.5
below; or
.3 be the holder of an Efficient Deck Hand (EDH) certificate, (for which qualification and
application details appear in paragraph 3.5 below and Annex 1 ), in which case the seafarer
must obtain a Watch Rating Certificate within one month of joining the vessel; or
.4 be the holder of a VQ2 in Marine Vessel Operation, in which case the seafarer must obtain a
Watch Rating Certificate within one month of joining the vessel.
3.3.2 Deck Rating Grade 1. To qualify for this grading, a seafarer must hold an AB certificate; or
.1 have completed 36 months sea service in total, of which at least 12 months must have been
served in the deck compartment; and
4
SI 1997/1320 as amended by SI 1997/1911
5
.2 have met the requirements for Deck Rating Grade 2.
3.4 AB Certificate
3.4.1 To qualify for the issue of an AB certificate, a seafarer must have:
.1 attained the age of 18;
.2 obtained a Watch Rating Certificate;
.3 obtained an EDH certificate or a VQ2 in Marine Vessel Operation;
.4 obtained a Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft and Rescue Boats (CPSC&RB) or
a Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft (CPSC) or a Lifeboatman certificate;
.5 produced proof of medical fitness; and
.6 completed at least 24 months sea-service in the deck department or 36 months as a General
Purpose (GP) rating, of which at least 12 months was on deck duties.
3.4.2 Sea-service performed in a deck capacity on sea-going fishing vessels of more than 16.5m in
registered length, Royal Naval ships or Mobile Offshore Units (MOU) will be counted in full
but at least 6 months sea-service on merchant ships will be required for certification as an
AB seaman.
3.4.3 Seafarers with MOU sea service unable to complete the required 6 months on merchant ships
will be issued with an AB certificate suitably endorsed with a limitation for use on MOUs. This
limitation will be removed at a Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) Marine Office on
completion of 6 months sea service on merchant ships.
3.4.4 An AB certificate may be obtained from any MCA Marine Office listed at Annex 4 on completion
of an application form and on production of supporting evidence to confirm that all the
conditions listed in paragraph 3.4.1 above have been met. A prescribed fee will be charged for
this service.
3.5 Efficient Deck Hand (EDH) Certificate
3.5.1 EDH is the qualifying examination for AB and deck rating certification. This can be taken after a
seafarer has:
.1 attained the age of 17;
.2 served at least 12 months in the deck department of sea-going merchant ships; and
.3 obtained a Navigational Watch Rating Certificate or a Steering Certificate
3.5.2 Service in the deck department in High Speed Craft (HSC), tugs, dredgers, standby vessels,
survey vessels, RN ships and fishing vessels of more than 16.5m registered length is also
acceptable. Service in MOUs will be counted if serving as part of the deck crew.
3.5.3 Six months service in the deck department in HSC will be accepted in place of the 12 months
service specified in paragraph 3.5.1.2 above, towards the issue of an EDH limited to HSC. This
limitation may be removed on completion of 12 months sea service.
3.5.4 The syllabus for EDH training and certification is given in Annex 1.
3.5.5 Training providers must obtain approval from the MCA both to conduct EDH courses and for
individual examiners. With effect from the date of issue of this MGN, there is no requirement for
existing training providers to seek re-approval.
6
3.5.6 Approved training providers will issue certificates on behalf of the MCA and are required to
maintain full records of all certificates issued. These certificates must be in the approved format
as shown in Annex 2 of this note.
3.5.7 Holders of a level 2 VQ in Marine Vessel Operations may obtain an EDH certificate without
further examination.
3.6 Engine Department
3.6.1 Engine-Room Rating. To qualify for this grading, a seafarer must be at least 17 years old and
have:
.1 obtained an Engine-Room Watch Rating Certificate after meeting the requirements of
STCW Code A-III/4, as described in paragraphs 4.1 to 4.5 below; and have either
.2 successfully completed the four elements of the basic training described in paragraph 2.4.1–4
above; or
.3 completed prior to 1 August 1998 acceptable survival and fire-fighting training and more
than 6 months sea service.
3.7 General Purpose (GP) Ratings
3.7.1 GP ratings are those who have been trained in both deck and engine-room duties. Such ratings
may be employed in either department according to the needs and requirements of the company.
3.7.2 GP Ratings Grade 2 are those who hold a navigational Watch Rating Certificate as well as an
engine-room Watch Rating Certificate. They can be employed where the Safe Manning Document
(SMD) stipulates the requirements for Deck or GP Rating Grade 2 or Engine-Room Rating.
3.7.3 GP Ratings Grade 1 are those who meet the requirements for Deck Rating Grade 1 and hold an
engine-room watch rating certificate. They can be employed where the SMD stipulates the
requirements for Deck Rating Grade 1 or 2, Engine-Room or GP Rating.
4.0 Watch Rating Certificates
4.1 UK companies may apply to the MCA for approval to issue Watch Rating Certificates on its behalf.
Companies to which the International Safety Management Code applies, must be in full
compliance before issuing Watch Rating Certificates which must be in the approved format shown
at Annex 3 of this Part. Applications for authorisation to issue Watch Rating Certificates should be
addressed to the MCA, Seafarer Standards Branch, at the address given at the front of this Part.
In their application, companies must demonstrate that they have adequate arrangements for
training and assessing watchkeeping ratings and an acceptable quality control system. They will
also be required to provide details of any special training they may propose to give in the case of
the requirements at paragraph 4.3.2 below. Any approved special training may be undertaken
either ashore or on board and may form part of a pre-sea training programme.
4.2 MCA approval will be subject to periodic review and evaluation and may be withdrawn if the
MCA’s requirements are not met.
4.3 Once a company has been approved by MCA, it may issue approved Watch Rating Certificates
to any rating who meets the following STCW 95 requirements:
.1 is not less than 17 years old;
.2 has completed, either at least 6 months approved sea-going service in the relevant
department or has completed special training and at least 2 months approved sea going
service; and has either
7
.3 successfully completed all 4 elements of the basic training specified in paragraph 2.4.1–4
above; or
.4 has completed, prior to 1 August 1998, acceptable survival and fire-fighting training and
more than 6 months sea-service; or
.5 has an EDH certificate; or a level 2 VQ in Marine Vessel Operations (deck); and
.6 has been assessed by a responsible officer of the ship appointed by the company, and has
been found to have met the requirements and performance standards specified in STCW
Code A-II/4 or A-III/4 in the case of deck and engine-room ratings respectively.
4.4 A copy of each certificate issued must be forwarded for registration to the Seafarer Standards
Branch of the MCA, at the address given at the front of this Part, as soon as possible after issue
of the original to the rating. The company must also maintain full records of all certificates
issued to enable questions on validity to be answered and checks to be made.
4.5 Companies approved by the MCA for the issue of Watch Rating Certificates should ensure that
ratings holding STCW 78 Watch Rating Certificates (EXN 87 and 88) are issued with STCW 95
certificates, following the procedure outlined above, by 1 February 2002.
5.0 Additional Training Requirements
5.1 STCW 95 includes additional training requirements for ratings serving on certain types of ship.
These requirements are detailed in Part 5 but are summarised as follows.
5.2 Tankers
5.2.1 Any rating who is assigned specific duties and responsibilities related to cargo or cargo
equipment (eg pumpman) must have successfully completed:
.1 an advanced fire fighting training programme as specified in section A-VI/3 of the STCW
Code; and
.2 at least 3 months approved sea-going service on tankers in order to acquire adequate
knowledge of safe operational practices; or
.3 a tanker familiarisation training programme approved by the MCA covering at least the
syllabus given in paragraphs 2 to 7 of section A-V/1of the STCW Code; or
.4 at least 30 days service under the supervision of qualified officers on a tanker of not less
than 3000gt engaged on voyages not exceeding 72 hours.
5.2.2 Ratings or trainees meeting the above requirements should present the evidence to a MCA
Marine Office where their discharge books will be appropriately endorsed. Those meeting the
above requirements but not holding a UK discharge book will be issued with a paper certificate.
5.3 Ro – Ro Passenger ships
5.3.1 Ratings and other personnel on ro-ro passenger ships are required to undertake the training
specified in STCW Code A-V/2 paragraphs 1 to 3 (crowd management, familiarisation and
safety training for direct services to passengers).
5.3.2 For continued service, appropriate refresher training in respect of crowd management is required to
be undertaken at intervals not exceeding five years, or evidence, must be produced to the employer
or official of an authorised body of having achieved the required standard of competence within the
previous five years. This may be achieved by 12 months sea service in the relevant type of ship
within the previous 5 years.
8
5.4 Passenger Ships other than Ro-Ro Passenger Ships
5.4.1 Ratings and other personnel on passenger ships designated on muster lists to assist passengers in
emergency situations are required to undertake training specified in STCW Code A-V/3 paragraphs
1 to 3 (crowd management, familiarisation and safety training for direct services to passengers).
5.4.2 For continued service, appropriate refresher training in respect of crowd management is
required at intervals not exceeding five years or evidence of having achieved the required
standard of competence within the previous five years must be produced to the employer or an
official of an authorized body. This may be achieved by 12 months sea-service in the relevant type
of ship within the previous 5 years.
5.5 Deck ratings on High Speed Craft (HSC) and Mobile Offshore Units (MOUs)
5.5.1 Ratings employed on HSC must receive instructions and training, as specified in section 18.3.6 of
the IMO’s HSC Code
2
in addition to other training requirements specified in this Note, as
applicable.
5.5.2 Ratings employed on MOUs may be required by the Health and Safety Executive, to undertake
additional training.
5.5.3 The grading structure for ratings described in paragraph 3 above also applies to ratings on
HSC and MOUs.
5.6 Marine Evacuation System Training
5.6.1 Owners/operators are required to ensure that ratings with designated duties on the deployment
of Marine Evacuation Systems (MES) are trained in accordance with the requirements of
Regulation III/19.3.3.8 of SOLAS 74
2
(as amended). Appropriate documents should be issued to
those trained in the deployment of MES.
6.0 Maintenance of Records
6.1 Companies, in line with the responsibilities given to them by STCW 95 (Regulation I/14),
should maintain records and provide documentary evidence in respect of any person meeting
the appropriate standard for all certificates and training requirements described above.
7.0 Further Advice
7.1 Further information if required, is available from the MCA at any MCA Marine Office or at the
address given at the beginning of this MGN.
9
ANNEX 1
EFFICIENT DECK HAND (EDH) CERTIFICATES
1.0 Entry Requirements
1.1 Candidates must:-
.1 be at least 17 years of age;
.2 have successfully completed the basic training required by STCW Code A-VI/1;
.3 hold a Navigational Watch Rating Certificate ; or
a steering certificate; or
proof of having obtained sufficient experience;
.4 meet the medical fitness requirements; and
.5 have completed 12 months sea service in the deck department; or hold a deck officer
certificate of competency (Fishing).
1.2 Candidates with other types of sea service or training may be considered by the MCA for entry
to the examination on an individual basis.
2.0 Examination Syllabus
2.1 Meaning of common nautical terms.
2.2 Navigational watchkeeping duties as follows:
.1 duties of a bridge lookout and the reporting of lights and objects;
.2 knowledge of the compass card in 360
o
notation;*
.3 understand helm orders.**
Note: * holders of Watch Rating and Steering Certificates will not be examined on this
section; and
** holders of steering certificates will not be examined on this section.
2.3 Life saving appliances and fire fighting appliances as follows:
.1 understand the importance of musters and drills and know what action to take on hearing
alarm signals;
.2 understand the general arrangement and the dangers of fixed smothering systems;
.3 understand correct operation, precautions and dangers of lifeboat release gear;
.4 understand the procedures for boat preparation and launching;
.5 understand the precautions to be observed when maintaining lifeboats and davits;
.6 understand the importance of fire and watertight doors.
2.4 Practical work as follows:
.1 Common knots, bends and hitches including:
reef knot, timber hitch, clove hitch, bowline, bowline on the bight, sheet bend, double sheet
bend, sheepshank, rolling hitch, round turn and two half hitches, figure of eight knot,
fisherman’s bend, monkey’s fist, wall and crown knot;
.2 Common splices including:
eye splice in eight strand plaited rope; eye, back and short splice in three strand rope;
eye splice with locking tuck in wire rope.
10
.3 parcel and serve a splice;
.4 whippings and seizings;
.5 care, use and storage of ropes and wire;
.6 the correct fitting of wire grips (e.g. ‘Bulldog’ grips);
.7 use and selection of stoppers for wires and ropes;
.8 slinging of stages and bosun’s chair;
.9 rigging of pilot ladders, gangways and accommodation ladders;
.10 rigging of a hydrostatic release unit;
.11 rigging a derrick;
.12 securing the deck for severe weather;
.13 opening and closing of hatches and watertight doors including bow, stern and other
shell doors;
.14 marking of anchor cables.
2.5 Code of Safe Working Practice for Merchant Seamen (COSWP) 1998
2.5.1 In each of the sections below, the candidate will be expected to have a good working
knowledge of the COSWP relevant to a seaman’s duties and responsibilities as follows:
Duty and Responsibility Relevant section of COSWP
.1 Protective clothing and equipment Ch.4
.2 Safety signs and to include standard Ch.5
signs and colours for dangerous goods,
pipe lines, fire extinguishers and
gas cylinders
.3 Safety induction Ch.8
.4 Fire precautions Ch.9
.5 Emergency procedure Ch.10, sections 1-6
.6 Safe movement on board ship Ch.13
.7 Working aloft and outboard Ch.15, sections 1-6
.8 Work in machinery spaces Ch.15, sections 7-10
.9 Permit to Work Ch.16, sections 1-2
.10 Enclosed spaces Ch.17, sections 1-5 and 8-11
.11 Boarding arrangements Ch.18
.12 Manual lifting and carrying Ch.19
.13 Use of work equipment Ch.20, sections 1-4 and 7-10
.14 Lifting plant Ch.21, sections 1-7 and Annex 21.1
.15 Hydraulic and pneumatic equipment Ch.22, section 10
.16 Batteries Ch.22, section 16
.17 Anchoring and mooring Ch.25
.18 Hatches Ch.26
11
ANNEX 2
SPECIMEN EFFICIENT DECK HAND CERTIFICATE
(To be produced and registered locally by the issuing Training Provider.)
No. [Training Inst. to allocate]
Name of Issuing Training Provider Address and Contact Details
EFFICIENT DECK HAND CERTIFICATE (Qualifying examination for AB)
This is to certify that:
Full Name of Candidate [ ]
Date of Birth [ ]
Discharge Book No. [ ]
or other national ID
has met the requirements laid down in the International Labour Organisation Certification of
Able Seamen Convention 1946 (No. 74)
This Certificate is issued under the authority of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, an executive agency of the
Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions.
Name and Signature of Training Provider’s Training Provider
Authorised Representative Stamp and Date
[ ]
Signature of Seaman
[ ]
Inquiries concerning the validity of this certificate should be addressed to the Training Provider at the
address on the certificate.
12
ANNEX 3
SPECIMEN WATCH RATING CERTIFICATE
(To be produced and registered locally by the issuing company. A copy of each certificate issued
should be sent to the MCA at the address below.
No. [Company to allocate]
Name of Issuing Company Address and Contact Details
[NAVIGATIONAL][ENGINE-ROOM]* WATCH RATING CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that
Full Name of Candidate [ ]
Date of Birth [ ]
Discharge Book No. [ ]
or other national ID
has met the requirements laid down in Regulation [II/4 (deck)][III/4 (engine-room)]* of
STCW 95 and the standards of competence specified in section [A-II/4][A-III/4]* of the STCW
Code, and is competent to serve as a rating forming part of a [navigational][engine-room]*
watch on a seagoing ship of 500gt/750kW* or more.
This Certificate is issued under the authority of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, an executive agency of the
Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions.
Signature and Name of Company’s Company Stamp and Date
Authorised Representative
[ ]
Signature of Rating
[ ]
*Delete as appropriate
Inquiries concerning the validity of this certificate should be addressed to the company at the address
above or to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, Seafarer Standards Branch, Spring Place,
105 Commercial Road, Southampton SO15 1EG. Tel. 02380 329231. Fax: 02380 329252.
E-mail: exams_section@mcga.gov.uk
13
ANNEX 4
MCA MARINE OFFICES ISSUING AB CERTIFICATES
1. Aberdeen Marine Office Tel: 01224 574 122
Blaikies Quay Fax: 01224 571 920
Aberdeen AB11 5EZ
2. Beverley Marine Office Tel: 01482 866 606
Crosskill House Fax: 01482 869 989
Mill Lane
Beverley
North Humberside HU19 9JB
3. Cardiff Marine Office Tel: 02920 229 556
2nd Floor Fax: 02920 229 017
Oxford House
Hills Street
Cardiff CF1 2TD
4. Glasgow Marine Office Tel: 0141 427 9400
6000 Academy Park Fax: 0141 427 9401
Gower Street
GIasgow G51 1TR
5. Liverpool Marine Office Tel: 0151 471 1142
Graeme House Fax: 0151 471 1143
2nd Floor
Derby Square
Liverpool L2 7SQ
6. London Marine Office Tel: 01689 890 400
Central Court Fax: 01689 890 446
1B Knoll Rise
Orpington
Kent BR6 OJA
7. Newcastle Marine Office Tel: 0191 285 7171
Government Buildings Fax: 0191 284 7464
Broadway West
Gosforth
Newcastle upon Tyne NE3 2JL
8. Southampton Marine Office Tel: 02380 329 329
Spring Place Fax: 02380 329 351
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
- 1 -
MERCHANT SHIPPING NOTICE



MSN 1815 (M)


Countries whose Seafarer Medical Certificates are
accepted as equivalent to the UK Seafarer Medical
Certificate (ENG1) from 1 July 2007

Notice to all Shipowners, Agents, Masters, Seafarers, MCA Approved Medical
Practitioners and Approved Medical Referees.

This Notice replaces the list published in MSN 1798 (M). It should be read in conjunction with
MSN 1765 (M)


Summary

This Notice is effective from 1 July 2007 and lists the countries whose seafarer medical
certificates are accepted as equivalent to the UK ENG1 medical certificate. This Notice
replaces the list published in MSN 1798(M).


1.0 Introduction

1.1 The Merchant Shipping (Medical Examination) Regulations 2002 as amended, make it
a legal requirement for any seafarer (as defined in the Regulations), to hold a valid
certificate attesting to their medical fitness for the work for which they are employed.

1.2 The requirement for a medical fitness certificate does not apply to anyone employed on
a fishing vessel, a non commercial pleasure vessel, an offshore installation while on its
working station, or to those specified in paragraph 2.2.2 of MSN 1765(M).

2.0 Acceptable Medical Fitness Certificates

2.1 The following certificates are acceptable for seafarers on sea-going United Kingdom
ships (as defined in the Regulations):

(i) a UK seafarer medical certificate (known as an ENG1) issued in accordance
with the provisions of the Regulations by an MCA approved medical practitioner
(known as an approved doctor), listed in a Merchant Shipping Notice, (currently
MSN 1814 (M)); or

(ii) a valid national seafarer medical certificate issued in accordance with the
requirements of the Maritime Authority of any country listed in Annex A of this
Notice. The certificate is one which would normally be issued to a national of
that country, by a doctor approved by the Maritime Authority of that country,
wherever he/she may be located. It does not entitle these doctors to issue UK
seafarer medical certificates (ENG1s).
- 2 -

2.2 In order to obtain an equivalent medical certificate from one of the countries listed in
Annex A, the Maritime Authority of the respective country should be contacted, to direct
the seafarer to a doctor authorised by their authority to conduct seafarer medical
examinations.

2.3 As a standard for working on a UK ship, it is expected that the equivalent medical
certificate has an English translation in order for the Master of the ship and / or any
Inspectors / Surveyors who may wish to sight the medical certificate to be able to
identify any restrictions to the duties for the voyage for which they are embarked.

Further countries may be added to this list as and when their standards have been
assessed for equivalency.

3.0 Further Information

3.1 The list is also available on the MCA's webpage at:

www.mcga.gov.uk/seafarer information/health and safety/seafarer medical information

and is updated whenever any new country is assessed and accepted as equivalent.









More Information

Seafarer Health and Safety Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Bay 2/09
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
SO15 1EG

Tel : +44 (0) 23 8032 9247/9
Fax : +44 (0) 23 8032 9251
e-mail: seafarer.h&s@mcga.gov.uk

General Inquiries: 24 Hour Infoline
infoline@mcga.gov.uk
0870 600 6505

MCA Website Address: www.mcga.gov.uk

File Ref: MC 011/003/0027

Published: July 2007

© Crown Copyright 2007

Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas

Printed on material containing minimum 75% post-consumer waste paper
- 3 -
ANNEX A

COUNTRIES WHOSE SEAFARER MEDICAL CERTIFICATES ARE
ACCEPTED AS EQUIVALENT TO THE UK MEDICAL CERTIFICATE






Australia
Austria*
Belgium*
Bulgaria*
Canada
Croatia
Cyprus*
Czech Republic*
Denmark*
Estonia*
Finland*
France*
Germany*
Greece*
Hong Kong
Hungary*
Iceland**
India
Ireland (Republic of)*
Italy*
Jamaica
Latvia*
Lithuania*
Luxembourg*
Malta*
Mauritius
Netherlands*
New Zealand
Norway**
Pakistan
Poland*
Portugal*
Romania
Slovakia*
Slovenia*
South Africa
Spain*
Sri Lanka
Sweden*
Ukraine


* EU Member States
** EEA (European Economic Area) States

This list reflects the Merchant Shipping (Medical Examination) Regulations as amended, which
came into effect on 1 September 2002. Medical certificates issued by countries previously
recognised as equivalent before 1 September 2002 will be acceptable until the date of expiry.

Further countries may be added to the list as and when medical standards and systems have
been assessed for equivalency.

Any queries relating to this list should be directed to:

MCA’s Seafarer Health and Safety Branch

Tel: 023 80 329 249 / Fax: 023 80 329 251 / Email: seafarer.h&s@mcga.gov.uk




The following are countries whose national seafarer medical certificates are accepted as
equivalent to the UK’s ENG 1 medical certificate. It does not authorise doctors from these
countries to issue ENG 1 certificates.
1
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
MGN 134 (M+F)
Issue of Discharge Books to UK Seafarers -
Changes to Catergories of Eligible Seafarers
Notice to Shipowners and Managers, Masters, Officers and Crew of Merchant Ships, Skippers,
Officers and Crew of Fishing Vessels and Masters, Officers and Crew of Pleasure Vessels
(including Yachts) who receive Wages for their Employment.
Summary
This Marine Guidance Note sets out details of changes to the regulations governing the issue of UK
Discharge Books which, in certain circumstances will permit the issue of UK discharge books to UK
seafarers on non-UK registered ships. Changes have also been made to the categories of seafarers
eligible to apply for a UK discharge book.
(A) ISSUE OF DISCHARGE BOOKS TO UK
SEAFARERS ON NON-UK SHIPS
1. The Merchant Shipping (Seamen’s
Documents) Regulations 1987 provided that
seafarers of whatever nationality who were, or
had been, employed on a UK registered vessel
could apply for a UK discharge book unless they
already held a discharge book issued by one of
the administrations listed in those regulations.
Seafarers employed on non-UK vessels who had
not previously served on a UK registered vessel
were however ineligible to apply even if they
were UK citizens.
2. The MCA recognises that inconvenience can
be caused to UK seafarers who are unable to
obtain a discharge book from either the UK or the
flag state of the vessel upon which they are
serving. The Merchant Shipping (Seamen’s
Documents) (Amendment) Regulations 1999
which came into force on 1 January 2000 seek to
remedy this problem. They provide that if a
person is a British Citizen as defined in the British
Nationality Act 1981 (i.e. a person having the
right of abode in the UK) they may be issued with
a UK discharge book if they are unable to obtain
a discharge book from or acceptable to the flag
state of the vessel upon which they are serving.
3. Seafarers holding discharge books issued by
one of the Governments listed in the annex to this
MGN will, however, still not be eligible for the
issue of a UK Discharge Book.
(B) ISSUE OF DISCHARGE BOOKS TO UK
SEAFARERS PREVIOUSLY INELIGIBLE TO
APPLY FOR ONE
4. Following a review of the restrictions on the
issue of discharge books, applications can now be
accepted from:-
(i) persons employed in ships, other than “light
ships”, belonging to a general lighthouse
authority;
(ii) persons employed in ships of less than 80
registered tons engaged solely on coastal
voyages;
(iii) persons employed in pleasure vessels
(including yachts) provided that they receive
wages for their employment and that the
vessels go to sea;
(iv) persons employed in a ship solely to provide
goods, personal services or entertainment on
board, and employed by a person other than
the owner or the person(s) employing the
master, and who is not a member of the
medical or catering staff in the ship;
(v) persons employed in fishing vessels.
5. Only the following will continue to be
excluded from applying for a UK discharge book
(i) persons employed in vessels which do not
go to sea;
(ii) persons employed in pleasure vessels who
receive no wages for their employment;
(iii) persons employed in ships engaged on
coastal voyages around the UK solely for the
purpose of trials of the ship, its machinery or
equipment, where such persons are not
ordinarily employed as masters or seamen;
(iv) persons in the employment of the Crown
who are not ordinarily employed as masters
or seamen;
(v) persons employed in a ship solely in
connection with the construction, alteration,
repair or testing of the ship, and not engaged
in the navigation of the ship unless such
person is a normal member of the crew;
(vi) persons holding documents containing
substantially the same information, issued
by one of the governments listed in the
annex to this MGN;
(vii) persons employed on un-registered vessels;
(viii) persons, other than UK seafarers, employed
on non-UK registered vessels.
APPLICATIONS
6. New application forms will be available in due
course covering these changes. These will be
available from Marine Offices and the Registry
of Shipping, to whom applications should continue
to be made in person or by post as appropriate.
However existing forms may be used provided that
the following additional information is provided:-
(a) SEAFARERS ON UK REGISTERED
VESSELS
(i) a declaration stating the name of the
seafarer together with the name and
registered number of the vessel and
confirming that the seafarer has served or
is, or will be, serving on that vessel and
that he does not hold a discharge book
issued by one of the administrations
listed in the Annex to this MGN. The
declaration is to be on company headed
paper and is to be signed by the master,
employer or employer’s representative
and be stamped with the company or
ship’s stamp; or
(b) UK SEAFARERS ON NON-UK
REGISTERED VESSELS
(i) a declaration stating the name of the
seafarer together with the name,
registered number and flag state of the
vessel and confirming that the seafarer is
or will be serving on that vessel. In
addition the declaration should state why
it has not been possible to obtain a
discharge book from or acceptable to the
flag state. The declaration is to be on
company headed paper and is to be
signed by the master, employer or
employer’s representative and be
stamped with the company or ship’s
stamp, and;
(ii) evidence that the applicant is a UK
seafarer. This can be proved by sending a
UK passport, Birth Certificate or Certified
Extract of Registration of the seafarer’s
birth or any other document issued by a
British Government representative or the
Home Office which proves the seafarer’s
right of abode in the UK.
MSPP3C
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
Tel 02380 329246
Fax 02380 329165
January 2000
© Crown copyright 2000
2
An executive agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
3
ANNEX TO MGN 134 (M+F)
COUNTRIES WHOSE DISCHARGE BOOKS OR SIMILAR DOCUMENTS ARE ACCEPTABLE
FOR SEAMEN ON UK VESSELS - THE HOLDERS OF DOCUMENTS ISSUED BY THESE
COUNTRIES SHOULD NOT APPLY FOR UK DISCHARGE BOOKS
Bangladesh Jamaica Sierra Leone
Barbados Kenya Singapore
Canada Kiribati South Africa
Falkland Islands Malaysia Sri Lanka
Fiji Malta Tanzania
Ghana Mauritius Tonga
Guyana Nigeria Trinidad & Tobago
Hong Kong Pakistan Tuvalu
India Papua New Guinea Western Samoa
Republic of Ireland Saint Lucia Zambia
Isle of Man Seychelles
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
MGN 148 (M)
1
Approval of Crew Agreements – Merchant Ships
Notice to all Employers of Merchant Seamen, and Masters and Seafarers
This Note supersedes M.1498
Summary
This Note gives advice on Crew Agreements incorporating changes arising from the UK
implementation of STCW 95
1. Section 25(3) of the Merchant Shipping Act
1995 states that the provisions and form of a
crew agreement must be of a kind approved
by the Secretary of State (in practice the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) and
different provisions and forms may be so
approved for different circumstances.
Following the coming into force of the
Merchant Shipping (Training and
Certification) Regulations 1997, which
implement in the UK the requirements of the
International Convention on Standards of
Training, Certification and Watchkeeping 1978,
as amended in 1995 (STCW 95), the trading
limits for UK certificate holders have changed.
2. The Agency, in consultation with the
shipping industry, has produced revised
standard agreements which take account of
changes arising from STCW 95 and also
recognise that many UK registered ships no
longer operate to/from UK ports. These
revised crew agreements are available from
Marine Offices and proper officers abroad.
There are two standard agreements:
(1) An agreement appropriate for use on
ships formerly operating under National
Maritime Board (NMB) conditions.
(Form ALC(BSF) l(d));
(2) A minimum agreement for other
merchant ships (Form ALC(NFD) 1(d))
which complies with the requirements of
ILO Convention 22;
There is no reason why employers who were
not previously bound by the old NMB
agreements should not adopt Form ALC(BSF)
1(d) if they wish to do so. That crew
agreement adopts the NMB agreements as
they stood on 30 September 1990 and, if either
party wishes to amend the terms of the NMB
agreements it will be necessary to seek MCA
approval for a new form of crew agreement
(see Paragraph 3).
These standard agreements are regarded as
approved agreements and subject to the
comments in Paragraphs 10 and 13 below may
be used without individual submission to the
Agency for approval.
3. Employers who wish to use agreements other
than the standard forms or who wish to use
modified versions of the standard forms will
be required to submit them to the MCA for
approval not less than 14 days before the
agreement is to be used. To be approved such
agreements must comply with ILO
Convention 22 (Seamen’s Articles of
Agreement). In addition, the terms of
employment must not conflict with the
general law of the United Kingdom nor place
the UK in breach of its international
obligations (e.g. ILO Convention 87 (Freedom
of Association and Protection of the Right to
Organise)). Where the terms of an existing
agreement are to be modified following
agreement between the employer and a
seafarers’ organisation it will still be
2
necessary to notify the change to the MCA to
ensure that the new agreement does not
conflict with any of the criteria outlined
above. All crew agreements must be in a form
prescribed for standard agreements (see
Paragraph 7 below) and contain contractual
provisions dealing with the matters set out in
Paragraph 8 of this Notice. In considering
requests for approval of non-standard
agreements the MCA will have regard to the
need to ensure that the seafarers are as
adequately protected under these agreements
as they would be under the standard form of
agreement. Before approving a non-standard
agreement the MCA will wish to know the
views of the organisation(s) representing the
seafarers concerned on the proposed
agreement or modification.
4. ILO Convention No. 22 (Seamen’s Articles of
Agreement) permits national authorities to
approve crew agreements that will run
without time limit in the same way as shore-
based contracts of employment. The Merchant
Shipping (Crew Agreements, Lists of Crew
and Discharge of Seamen) Regulations 1991
modified the procedures for depositing crew
agreements and lists of crew with the
Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen
and, as a result, the MCA can consider
approving such agreements. Because a
seafarer employed under an indefinite crew
agreement will be able to give notice at any
time, irrespective of the location of the ship,
the MCA will only approve such agreements,
which are restricted to the Near Coastal Area
in order to protect employers from
unexpectedly high repatriation costs.
EXEMPTION FROM REQUIREMENT TO
HAVE A CREW AGREEMENT
5. The Secretary of State may grant exemptions
from the requirement to have a crew
agreement where he is satisfied that the
seafarers to be employed otherwise than under
a crew agreement will be adequately protected.
APPROVAL OF NON-STANDARD
AGREEMENTS OR EXEMPTIONS
6. Non-standard agreements, indefinite
agreements, modifications to standard
agreements or applications for an exemption
from the requirement to have a crew
agreement, should be submitted for approval
direct to MSPP 3C, Maritime & Coastguard
Agency, Spring Place, 105 Commercial Road,
Southampton, SO15 1EG. Tel 02380 329246 or
Fax 02380 329165.
CONDITIONS AND PROCEDURES APPLYING TO
ALL CREW AGREEMENTS
Form of Agreement
7. By the form of agreement is meant its size,
shape, layout and provision for information,
as distinct from the contractual clauses.
Note – Although the MCA provides crew
agreement documentation, there is nothing to
prevent companies producing their own
versions of the crew agreement, lists of crew,
and list of persons under 18, providing it
replicates exactly the information on the
MCA’s versions or has been submitted to and
approved by MCA. Computer generated
versions of the forms are acceptable provided
they are printed out, prior to signing and are
sent in printed form to the Registry of
Shipping and Seamen. Copies of the,
contractual clauses outer cover and lists of
crew etc. are to be placed on the MCA
Website at www.mcagency.org.uk to facilitate
companies or masters downloading the most
up to date documentation as and when they
need it. Copies of all the documentation in A4
format is also annexed to this MGN to
facilitate production on a PC or photocopier
Outer Cover
An outer protective cover should be provided,
on the front of which provision should be
made for the following information to be
recorded:-
• name of the ship, port of registry and
official number;
• description of the ship, e.g. passenger,
tanker, ferry, general cargo, bulk carrier;
• register (net) tonnage;
• name and address of registered owner or
manager;
• Dates and places of commencement and
(if appropriate) termination of the
agreement.
Provision should be made on the Inside of the
Outer Cover for entries to be made by
superintendents and proper officers. A
specimen of an outside cover [ALC1] in A4
format is at Annex 1.
3
Incorporation of Contractual Provisions
The contractual provisions should be enclosed in the
outer cover and attached to it. Provision should be
made for the signature of the employer or master.
Specimens of the contractual provisions in A4
format are at Annex 2.
Incorporation of List of Crew
In accordance with regulations made under
section 78 of the 1995 Act the list of the crew may
be enclosed in the outer cover. In addition to the
particulars of the seafarers required by
regulations made under section 78, the crew list
contains provision for the insertion of rates of
pay, and for the signatures of the seafarers as
parties to the agreement.
Specimens of the Lists of Crew [ALC 1(a) & ALC
1(b)] in A4 format are at Annex 3.
Rates of pay
The entry for each seafarer in the list of crew must
indicate the rate of pay at which he is serving at
the time of engagement. If more convenient,
Company pay scales from which this may be
determined may be annexed to the agreement but
the entry “As agreed” is not acceptable.
List of young persons
In accordance with section 55 of the Merchant
Shipping Act 1995, and the Merchant Shipping
and Fishing Vessels (Health and Safety at Work)
(Employment of Young Persons) Regulations
1998, a summary of the provisions of the
regulations and a list of all young persons under
the age of 18 are required to be included in every
crew agreement. The summary to be included is
contained in form ALC 1(c) Rev 10/98, which
supersedes previous versions of this form. A
specimen of ALC 1 (c) in A4 format is at Annex 4.
Contractual provisions
8. The MCA will expect a crew agreement to
contain contractual provisions governing the
following matters:
• the persons between whom the agreement
is made;
• the description of the voyage or voyages
to which the agreement relates and their
geographical limits and/or the duration
of the employment;
• the capacity in which each seafarer is to be
employed;
• the pay, hours, leave and subsistence,
which may be dealt with wholly or in part
by the incorporation of the provisions of
industrial agreements between the
employer and the relevant trades unions
or the old NMB Agreements current on
30 September 1990;
• the other rights and duties of the parties
to the agreement;
• the terms under which either of the parties
may give notice to terminate the
agreement;
• the circumstances in which, notwith-
standing the provisions governing the
giving of notice, the agreement may be
terminated by either of the parties.
9. The provisions of the standard agreement
cover the matters set out in paragraph 8 of
this notice. These provisions would be
regarded as approved provisions and subject
to the comments in paragraphs 10 and 13 may
be used without seeking prior approval from
the MCA. The provisions of the standard
agreements are set out in Annex 2 to this
notice. A copy of the crew agreement must be
displayed for the crew to refer to at any time.
Form ALC 6 is available for this purpose. A
specimen of ALC 6 in A4 format is at Annex 5.
10. The clauses dealing with the duration and
scope of the voyage and the rate of wages
require the insertion of further particulars
before they are complete. Subj ect to the
limitations set out in paragraph 13 of this
notice the particulars agreed between the two
parties may, without a specific request for
approval, be inserted within the approved
provisions.
Opening a Crew Agreement
11. Employers and masters are no longer required
to notify a superintendent or proper officer
when they intend to open a crew agreement,
to deliver a (red) copy of an agreement and list
of crew within three days of the agreement
being opened nor to notify the department of
crew changes as they occur. Forms ALC l(a),
(b) and (c) (list of crew, exempt list of crew
4
and young persons) are now only printed in
black and carbon copies are not necessary.
Older versions of these forms can still be used
by discarding the red copies
12. Seafarers joining or leaving a ship must be
signed on or off the Crew Agreement as
before and the changes notified to the
employers / managers / owners by the most
expeditious means.
CONDITIONS AND PROCEDURES FOR
FIXED TERM AGREEMENTS ONLY
Limitation on Use of Voyage Clauses
13. The voyage clauses approved for use in the
standard agreement may leave open for
agreement between the parties the details of
the voyage or the duration of the agreements.
These provisions may only be used as
approved when taken with the notice clauses
to provide for employment for the following
periods:
• 6 months for a running agreement for
vessels engaged in frequent short voyages
e.g. cross-channel ferries, unless the vessel
has a small crew and a low staff turnover,
in which case the agreement may be
extended to 12 months;
• 12 months for any other running
agreement;
•24 months or first call at a port for a voyage
agreement
These periods are subject to any additional
period provided for in the associated
approved notice clauses. The geographical
limitations of a voyage clause should be
clearly stated when the clause is completed
and used.
Submission of Crew Agreements and Lists of
Crew
14. The crew agreement and list of crew together
with the Official Log Book for the same period
must be forwarded to a superintendent or
proper officer within 3 days of the expiry of
the agreement. If the vessel closes an
agreement at a port outside the United
Kingdom which does not have a resident
British Consul the documents may be sent by
letter post only to The Registrar General of
Shipping and Seamen (address at Annex 6).
CONDITIONS AND PROCEDURES FOR
INDEFINITE CREW AGREEMENTS ONLY
15. The concept of fixed term crew agreements
embodies certain features, which impose
conditions in addition to those listed in
Paragraph 8. Wages are due only on discharge
or termination of the agreement and any
earlier payments are considered to be
advances; similarly there is no requirement
for leave to be allowed and the circumstances
in which a seafarer or employer can give
notice are related to the location of the vessel.
It would be inappropriate to apply these
conditions to agreements which are to run
indefinitely and so in addition to the
requirements of Paragraph 8, such
agreements must state:
• the intervals at which wages are to be
paid;
• the method of calculating leave
entitlement;
• the maximum period that a seafarer can
be required to remain on board between
leave periods (in many cases a copy of the
duty rosters will be sufficient);
• the notice required from each party to
terminate a seafarer’s employment under
the agreement which should be not less
favourable than the provisions of Section
49 of the Employment Protection
(Consolidation) Act 1978 except in the
following cases:
(a) by mutual consent;
(b) if medical evidence indicates that a
seafarer is incapable of continuing to
perform his duties by reason of illness
or injury;
(c) if, in the opinion of the Master, the
continued employment of the seafarer
would be likely to endanger the ship
or any person on board;
(d) if a seafarer, having been notified of
the time the vessel is due to sail, is
absent without leave at the time fixed
for sailing and the vessel proceeds to
sea without him or if substitutes have
been engaged. Substitutes shall not,
however, be engaged on a crew
agreement more than 2 hours before
the time fixed for sailing
5
Limitation on Voyage Clauses
16. For the reasons given in Paragraph 4 above,
indefinite crew agreements will normally only
be approved for vessels which trade within
the Near Coastal Area unless the employer is
prepared to accept the higher repatriation
costs that could arise from an unlimited
agreement. Employers of the crews of such
vessels will have the choice of using either a
fixed term or indefinite crew agreement.
Submission of Crew Agreements and Lists of Crew
17. Where an indefinite crew agreement is
opened, a copy must be submitted to the
appropriate superintendent or proper officer
on opening. Thereafter, the employer must
submit a list of crew and the official log book
at six monthly intervals, showing all seafarers
who have joined or left the vessel(s) since the
previous list was submitted with their dates of
joining or leaving. If more convenient, an
updated crew list can be submitted but it must
show all the changes in the six-month period.
Crew Lists on Demand
18. In order that the MCA can have up to date
information on the composition of the crews
of vessels, the Registrar General of Shipping
and Seamen is empowered to demand a list of
crew at any given date and this must be
supplied within 28 days. These checks will be
made on a random basis or whenever there is
cause to question the composition of the crew
of a particular vessel.
Multiple Agreements
19. Section 25(2)(b) of the Merchant Shipping Act
1995 provides that agreements with the
several persons employed in a ship shall be
contained in one document, except that in
such cases as the MCA may approve one crew
agreement may relate to more than one ship.
The MCA will approve crew agreements
(known as multiple ship agreements) in
circumstances where several ships regularly
making journeys between the same ports need
to be able to employ individual crew
members on any of these ships during the
currency of an agreement. These multiple ship
agreements will be in the same form and
contain the same provisions as those for other
crew agreements except that the name of each
of the ships to which they relate will he
entered on the outer cover.
Crew Not Required to Sign Off on Leaving the
Vessel
20. Where prior MCA approval has been
obtained, it will not be necessary for seafarers
who work regular periods of duty followed
by regular periods of leave (e.g. 2 weeks on/2
weeks off or 2 weeks on/3 weeks off) and
who are paid continuously throughout the
period of the agreement to sign off the crew
agreement on each occasion that they leave
the vessel to go on leave provided that they
are expected to return to the vessel at the end
of the leave period and before the expiry of
the crew agreement. If, for any reason, a
seafarer does not rej oin the vessel in
accordance with the roster arrangements he /
she must be signed off in his/her absence and
re-signed when he/she rejoins the vessel. The
same action must be taken if the seafarer joins
another vessel of the same fleet; a seafarer
cannot be on two crew agreements at the
same time. The seafarer’s discharge book
must also be completed in the same manner.
The joining and leaving of all members of the
crew must be recorded in the ship’s Official
Log Book using their reference numbers in the
list of crew.
21. The MCA maintains a record of the approvals
given for this practice and where seafarers
require to prove sea service in order to qualify
for the Agency’s examinations, the period of
time that they are signed on the crew
agreement will be adjusted to reflect the
actual time at sea.
22. Further information on crew agreements for
merchant ships can be obtained from MSPP3C,
Seafarer Health & Safety Branch, Maritime &
Coastguard Agency, Spring Place, 105
Commercial Road, Southampton, S015 1EG
Tel 02380 329 246
Fax 02380 329 165
MC 23/1/0246
May 2000
An executive agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
6
ALC 1 (Rev 4/98)
Crew Agreement and List of Crew
The form and provisions of this agreement are approved by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency under Section 25(3) of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995.
If the form and provisions of this agreement are amended or clauses added without the prior approval of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency it will not
be regarded as approved under the said section of the Act.
Name of ship: Port of registry Official number
Gross tonnage
*M/V
Nett tonnage
*S/S
Kilowatts
(*Delete whichever is inappropriate)
Name and address of registered owner Description of the ship (e.g. whether passenger
ship, tanker, ferry, general cargo, bulk carrier)
Date and place of commencement of agreement and list of crew Date and place of termination of agreement and list of crew
Date _______________________ place _____________________ Date ________________________ place_____________________
Signature of master _______________________________________ Signature of master _______________________________________
OFFICIAL USE
Received by the superintendent/proper officer
at the port of ______________________________on:_______________
Annex 1
An executive agency of
7
CONTRACTUAL CLAUSES
THIS AGREEMENT is made between .....................................*
...........................................................................‘the employer’*
and each of the seamen whose name is included in the list of
crew incorporated in this Agreement.
It is agreed that
(i) the employer will employ each seaman and the
seaman will serve in the capacity and at the rate of
wages expressed against his name in the list of crew
incorporated in this Agreement:
(insert appropriate voyage and notice clauses (ii) and (iii)
(These clauses will be produced by the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency or
may be produced by the shipowner)
* In here insert name and address of employer
(iv) (a) Each National Maritime Board Agreement as in effect
on 30 September 1990 shall have effect in relation to
each seaman employed hereunder who is of a
description to which such agreement relates as if it
were incorporated herein: and each such agreement
shall have effect as it is set out in the National Maritime
Board Year Book current on 30 September 1990.
(b) The National Maritime Board Agreements referred to
in paragraph (a) of this clause are those made by the
Board or by a Panel of the Board relating to:
(i) pay, hours of work leave and subsistence; and
(ii) the section of the Officers Hours Agreement
indicated against an Officer’s name in the list of
crew incorporated in this Agreement; and
(iii) the other National Maritime Board Agreements as
in effect on 30 September 1990 and which are not
inconsistent with the terms of this Agreement or the
Merchant Shipping Acts for the time being in force:
(c) (Insert here appropriate clause)
(d)
(v) wages will not accrue for any hours during which a seaman
refuses or neglects to work when required or is absent
without leave or for any period during which a seaman is
incapable of performing his duties by reason of illness or
injury which has been caused by his own wilful act or default;
(vi) (a) Unless the seaman indicates to the contrary in writing
the Trust Deed and Rules constituting the ‘Merchant
Navy Officers’ Pensions Fund’ shall be deemed to be
incorporated herein to the effect and intent that each of
the parties hereto (and the master) who is or is eligible
to be a member of the said Fund hereby agrees for the
purposes of this Agreement to be bound by all the
provisions of the said Deed and Rules and to authorise
the deduction from the wages payable to him
hereunder of the contributions payable by him
respectively to the said Fund; and the employer hereby
undertakes that the contributions payable under the
said Deed and Rules by the employer shall be paid to
the Fund in respect of such member;
(b) Unless the seaman indicates to the contrary in writing
the Trust Deed and Rules constituting the ‘Merchant
Navy Ratings’ Pension Fund’ shall be deemed to be
incorporated herein to the effect and intent that each of
the parties hereto who is or is eligible to be a member
of the said Fund hereby agrees for the purposes of this
Agreement to be bound by all the provisions of the said
Deed and Rules and to authorise the deduction from
the wages payable to him hereunder of the
contributions payable by him to the said Fund; and the
employer hereby undertakes that the contributions so
deducted and the contributions payable under the said
Deed and Rules by the employer shall be paid to the
Fund in respect of such member; any reference above
to the Merchant Navy Ratings’ Pension Fund shall be
taken as a reference to an exempt private fund as
defined by the said Rules when the rating is a member
of such an exempt private fund:
(vii) in all cases of salvage awards a cadet who has not
completed two years service shall be deemed of the
rating of Ordinary Seaman and a cadet of two years
service or over the rating of an Able Seaman;
Annex 2
ALC(BSF)1(d)
8
(viii) any seaman who incompetently performs his work in the
capacity in which he was first employed under this
Agreement may be rerated by the Master and transferred
to other duti es; but re-rati ng shal l not effect hi s
remuneration under this Agreement;
(ix) in relation to an individual seaman this Agreement may be
terminated:
(a) by mutual consent;
(b) i f medi cal evi dence i ndi cates that a seaman i s
incapable of continuing to perform his duties by
reason of illness or injury;
(c) by appropriate notice in accordance with the terms of
this Agreement;
(d) i f, i n the opi ni on of the master, the conti nued
empl oyment of the seaman woul d be l i kel y to
endanger the ship or any person on board;
(e) if a seaman, having been notified of the time the vessel
is due to sail, is absent without leave at the time fixed
for sailing and the vessel proceeds to sea without him
or if substitutes have been engaged. Substitutes shall
not, however, be engaged on a Crew Agreement more
than two hours before the time fixed for sailing;
(f) if the master is satisfied that an appropriate breach of
the Code of Conduct for the Merchant Navy for the
time being in force has occurred;
(x) each seaman agrees:
(a) to join the ship by the time specified by the master
and subsequentl y duri ng the peri od of hi s
employment to rejoin the ship by the time specified by
the master;
(b) to submit to inoculation, vaccination and any other
health precautions as may be directed by the master;
(c) in the event of the employer becoming liable for any
expenses under section 45 of the Merchant Shipping
Act 1995 to afford the employer every facility to
prosecute in his name and claim in respect of such
expenses and to allow the employer reasonable
discretion in the conduct of any proceedings for the
settlement of any claim in respect of such expenses;
(d) to take all steps within his power to preserve in good
condition the equipment of the ship and all property
on board;
(e) to return i n good condi ti on (fai r wear and tear
excepted) before the termination of his engagement
all articles provided for his personal use during the
voyage by the employer;
(f) that all stores and provisions issued to the crew are
only for use and consumption on board the ship and
any unused or unconsumed stores or provisions
remain the property of the employer;
(g) to comply with the Code of Conduct for the Merchant
Navy for the time being in force;
(h) in the event of the Agreement being terminated outside
the UK or the Near Coastal Area in accordance with
clause (ix) (f) above, to the deduction from his wages
of an amount being the actual expenses of his
repatriation. Such amount shall not exceed one week’s
pay at the begin at or base rate as specified against
the seaman’s name in the Crew Agreement;
(i) to keep his quarters clean and tidy and in readiness for
inspection by the master or officer deputed by him; and
(j) at the time when a seaman finally leaves the ship at
the termi nati on of hi s empl oyment under thi s
Agreement, to leave his quarters in a clean and
orderly condition to the satisfaction of the master (or
his authorised deputy). When he is ready to leave the
ship, the master (or his authorised deputy) shall, on
request made by the seaman, issue to the seaman a
certificate that the quarters are clean
(xi) the employer agrees
(a) if a seaman shows to the satisfaction of the master or
employer that he can obtain command of a vessel or
an appointment as mate or engineer or to any post of a
higher grade than he actually holds, or that any other
circumstance has arisen since his engagement which
renders it essential to his interests that he should be
permitted to take his discharge, he may claim his
discharge provided that without increased expense to
the employer and to the satisfaction of the employer or
his agent he furnishes a competent and reliable man in
his place. In such case the seaman shall be entitled to
his wages up to the time of his leaving his employment;
(b) if a seaman is discharged otherwise than according to
the terms of this Agreement before the commencement
of the voyage, or before one month's wages are earned
by him hereunder, without fault on his part justifying his
discharge or without his consent, then he shall be
entitled to receive from the employer in addition to any
wages he may have earned up to the time of his
discharge, if an officer one-thirtieth of his monthly wage
or one-seventh of his weekly wage; if a rating one-fifth
of his weekly wage for each day for which basic pay
would have been paid under the Crew Agreement for
each day until he shall have been offered suitable
employment by the employer provided always that his
maximum entitlement under his clause shall not exceed
one month's wages under this Agreement;
(c) notwithstanding anything contained in regulations
made under Section 32 of the Merchant Shipping Act
1995, no deduction shall be made from wages due to a
seaman under this Agreement in respect of any breach
by him of his obligations except in breach of clauses
(x) (a), (x) (d), (x) (e), and (x) (g), but nothing in this
clause shall in any way affect any other rights of the
parties to this Agreement in relation to such breach;
(d) where there is a dispute relating to the amount
payabl e to a seaman empl oyed under thi s
Agreement, the master will, if the seaman desires,
agree to the di spute bei ng referred to a
superintendent or proper officer for decision under
section 33 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995
ADD ANY ADDITIONAL CLAUSES BELOW
(Important:- All such clauses must have been approved by
the Maritime and Coastguard Agency)
...................................................................................................
Signature of employer, master or any other
person authorised by the employer
Date ...........................................................................................
Place .........................................................................................
9
NON-FEDERATED SHIPS
CONTRACTUAL CLAUSES
THIS AGREEMENT is made between (here insert name and
address of the employer)
...................................................................................................
...................................................................................................
..............................................(herein called ‘the employer’) and
each of the seamen whose name is included in the list of crew
incorporated in this Agreement
IT IS AGREED THAT
(i) the employer will employ each seaman and the seaman
will serve in the capacity and at the rate of wages
expressed agai nst hi s name i n the l i st of crew
incorporated in this Agreement,
(ii) this Agreement shall be for a voyage or voyages within
(geographical limits to be stated, e.g. near coastal,
unlimited or by reference to latitude and longitude)
............................................................................................
and is not to extend beyond the expiration of six months
from the date of the first signature to this Agreement or
the time at which the ship first arrives at the port of final
destination (country to be stated, e.g. United Kingdom)
............................................................................................
after that period or the discharge of cargo consequent on
that return;
(iii) after either
(a) one voyage has been completed by a seaman under
this Agreement or
(b) seven days have el apsed si nce a seaman’ s
employment under this Agreement commenced;
either the seaman or the employer may give to the other
notice (in writing or orally before a witness) to terminate
the seaman’s employment under this Agreement such
notice to take effect at a Port in
...........................................(state country) and to be given
not less than....................................................hours/days*
(exclusive of Saturdays Sundays and Public Holidays)
either before the ship is due to arrive at that port or if the
employment is to terminate at the port where the ship is
when the notice is given before it is due to sail.
(iv) In relation to an individual seaman this Agreement may
be terminated:-
(a) by mutual consent;
(b) i f medi cal evi dence i ndi cates that a seaman i s
incapable of continuing to perform his duties by
reason of illness or injury;
(c) by appropri ate noti ce i n accordance wi th the
provisions of this Agreement;
(d) if a seaman is absent without leave at a time for
sailing;
(e) i f i n the opi ni on of the master the conti nued
empl oyment of the seaman woul d be l i kel y to
endanger the vessel or any person on board
(v) the employer agrees that if a seaman shows to the
satisfaction of the master or the employer that he can
obtain the command of a ship or an appointment as mate
or engineer or to any post of higher grade than he actually
holds, or that any other circumstance has arisen since his
engagement which renders it essential to his interests
that he should be permitted to take his discharge he may
claim his discharge provided that without increased
expense to the employer and to the satisfaction of the
employer or his agent he furnishes a competent and
reliable man in his place In such case the seaman shall
be entitled to his wages up to the time of leaving his
employment;
(vi) insert any further provisions about pay and any provision
about hours of work, leave and subsistence.
(These clauses will be produced by the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency or
may be produced by the shipowner)
Note:- Only clauses for which the employer has the approval
of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency may be included as
contractual clauses except for those in (vi) above relating to
pay, hours of work, leave and subsistence, which may be
included without the need for such approval provided they
comply fully with the requirements of current Merchant
Shipping Legislation or Merchant Shipping Notices in respect
of those matters
Signature of employer, master or any other person authorised
by the employer.
...................................................................................................
Date ...........................................................................................
Place..........................................................................................
ALC(NFD) I(d)
10
(ii) the employment shall be in respect of a voyage of not
exceeding .... calendar months’ duration to any ports or
places within the limits of ........... degrees north and .........
degrees south latitude commencing at ..............................
proceeding thence to .................................. and/or any
other ports within the above limits trading in any rotation
and to end at such port in .................................. (state
country) as may be required by the Master;
Notice Clause
(iii) (a) any member of the crew who has served under this
Agreement for a minimum period of three calendar
months may give notice to the Master in writing or
verbally before a witness, not later than seven days
before the shi p i s due to arri ve at any port i n
.........................................(state country) to terminate
his engagement after the expiry of the notice at a port
within this country which shall be nominated by the
Master. Provided that any such notice shall not take
effect (a] if the ship is due to proceed to a port in the
United Kingdom without leaving the Near Coastal
Area or (b) if the ship is due to reach a port in the
United Kingdom within seven days of leaving the
Near Coastal Area.
The Master may give the like notice to terminate the
engagement of any member of the crew who has
served under the Agreement for the minimum period
aforesaid.
If the voyage is not ended within seven days after the
shi p has arri ved at the fi rst port of cal l i n
……………………..(state country) then after the
expiry of that period any member of the crew who has
served under this Agreement for a minimum period of
six calendar months may give not less than 48 hours’
notice to the Master, in writing or verbally before a
witness to terminate his engagement at that port or a
subsequent port of call before the final port.
If the voyage is not ended within 14 days after the
ship has arrived at the first port of call in the country
of final destination, then after the expiry of that period
any member of the crew who has served under this
Agreement for a minimum period of three calendar
months may give the like notice as aforesaid.
The Master may give the like notice to terminate the
engagement of any member of the crew who has
served under this Agreement for the minimum period
of six or (as the case may be) three calendar months
aforesaid.
If the voyage is ended at a port in the Near Coastal
Area) it is agreed that wages will continue until the
arrival of the crew members in the United Kingdom
provided that no wages shall be due or payable to
any such crew member for any period of delay
caused through his act or default; and
(b) any member of the crew who has served under this
Agreement for a minimum period of 12 calendar
months may (subject to the proviso hereinafter
mentioned) at any time after the expiry of that period
give not less than 28 days’ notice to the Master in
writing or verbally before a witness. to terminate his
engagement at the expiry of that notice, or, if the ship
is then at sea at the next port of call thereafter unless
the shi p i s then bound for a port i n the Uni ted
Kingdom or Near Coastal Area). Provided that, if at
any time, any member of the crew is offered the
opportunity, on not less than seven days’ notice, of
repatriation (by sea, air or other reasonable means at
the sole discretion of the Master) and refuses that
offer, he shall be required to serve for a further
minimum period of seven calendar months from the
date of that refusal (if the voyage shall last so long)
before being able to give 28 days’ notice as aforesaid.
A member of the crew shal l not be enti tl ed to
terminate his engagement under this Agreement at a
port which is only a bunkering port or a port of refuge.
The Master may give the like notice to terminate the
engagement of any member of the crew who has
served under this Agreement for the minimum period
aforesaid.
(These clauses will be produced by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
for insertion as required or may be produced by shipowner.)
UNLIMITED TRADING ALC I (d)(i)
Voyage Clause
11
Voyage clause
(ii) the employment shall be in respect of a voyage or
voyages from................................................................
to ..................................................................................
and/or any other ports or places within the limits of
............................north latitude and.............................
south latitude under a Running Agreement for a
period not to extend beyond the...................................
(here state date of termination – not more than 12
months hence) next unless on that date the ship is
engaged on a voyage to a port in ................................
(here state the name of a country) in which case this
Agreement shall end on the first return of the ship to a
port in ............................... (here state the same
country as above) after that date or the fi nal
discharge of cargo consequent upon that return.
Notice clause
(iii) (a) After one voyage outside the Near Coastal Area or
....* ....days’ service has been completed (whichever
fi rst occurs) by any member of the crew hi s
engagement may be terminated in ..............................
(state country) by not less than................hours/days#
notice (such period of notice not to include Saturdays,
Sundays or publ i c hol i days) gi ven i n wri ti ng
or verbally before a witness by either party before
the shi p i s due to arri ve at sai l from a port i n
...................................................(country to be stated)
Provided that if after arrival at a port in the country of
final destination the ship is due to proceed to another
port or ports in that country then notwithstanding any
such notice as aforesaid the engagement shall
automatically continue either until the ship’s arrival at
that other port or (as the case may be) the last such
port or until the expiry of seven days from the date of
her arrival al the first said port (whichever first occurs).
* The period to be inserted shall not exceed 28 days.
# Delete whichever is inapplicable.
and
(b) any member of the crew. who has served under this
Agreement for a minimum period of three calendar
months may give notice to the Master in writing or
verbally before a witness not later than seven days
before the ship is due to arrive in any port on the
Continent of Europe within the Near Coastal Area to
terminate his engagement after the expiry of the notice
at a port within these limits which shall be nominated by
the Master. Provided that. if at any time the ship has
returned to the United Kingdom and sailed therefrom
again any member of the crew who has not given due
notice to terminate his engagement in the United
Kingdom shall be required to serve for a further
minimum period of 42 days from the date of the ship’s
departure from the United Kingdom before being able to
give notice as aforesaid, and always provided that the
minimum period of three calendar months has expired.
Provided furthermore that any such notice shall not
take effect (a) if the ship is due to proceed to a port in
the United Kingdom without leaving the Near Coastal
Area or (b) if the ship is due to reach a port in the
United Kingdom within seven days of leaving the
Near Coastal Area.
The Master may give the like notice to terminate the
engagement of any member of the crew who has served
under this agreement for the minimum period aforesaid.
(These clauses will be produced by the
Maritime and Coastguard Agency for
insertion as required or may be
produced by the shipowner)
RUNNING AGREEMENT (UNLIMITED) ALC l(d)(ii)
12
Voyage Clause
(ii) the employment will be in respect of a voyage or voyages
within the Near Coastal Area for a period not to extend
beyond the ..........................................................................
(here state date of termination-not more than 12 months
hence or six months in the case of cross channel ferries)
next unless on that date the ship is engaged on a voyage
to a port in the United Kingdom in which case this
Agreement shall end on the first return of the ship to a
port in the United Kingdom after that date or the final
discharge of cargo consequent upon that return
Notice Clause
(iii) After one voyage or seven days’ service has been
completed (whichever first occurs) by any member of the
crew his engagement may be terminated in .......................
...........................................(state country) by not less than
....................................hours’ notice (such period of notice
not to include – Saturdays, Sundays or public holidays)
given in writing or verbally before a witness by either party
before the shi p i s due to arri ve at/sai l from a port
in ..................................................................(state country)
* As defi ned i n the MS (Trai ni ng and Certi fi cati on)
Regulations 1997
RUNNING AGREEMENT (NEAR COASTAL AREA)* ALC l(d)(iii)
RUN AGREEMENT ALC l(d)(iv)
Voyage Clause
(ii) the employment shall be in respect of a voyage from
...........................................................................................
to .......................................................................................
(Both these clauses will be produced by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
for insertion as required or may be produced by the shipowner)
13
ALC l(d) (vi)
(c) Provided that the terms of the Agreement dated............................................
and made between.........................................................................................
(employer)
and .................................................................................................................
(seafarer’s organisation)
shall as may be appropriate apply in relation to each seaman referred to
below in substitution for or in addition to the provisions of the National
Maritime Board Agreements referred to in sub-clause (b) above and any
subsequent revision which may become effective during the seaman’s
employment.
.......................................................................................................................
.......................................................................................................................
(identify by reference nos. in list of crew)
(d) Provided that the terms of the Agreement dated............................................
and made between.........................................................................................
(employer)
and .................................................................................................................
(seafarer’s organisation)
shall as may be appropriate apply in relation to each seaman referred to
below in substitution for or in addition to the provisions of the National
Maritime Board Agreements referred to in sub-clause (b) above and any
subsequent revision which may become effective during the seaman’s
employment.
.......................................................................................................................
.......................................................................................................................
(identify by reference nos. in list of crew)
(To accommodate
special company
agreements in
respect of officers/
ratings where
these are in
operation.
The clauses will
be produced by
MCA for insertion
if required or may
be produced by
the shipowner)
14
A
L
C
1
(
a
)

(
2
/
9
8
)
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(
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a
b
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)
Annex 3
L
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2
5
(
5
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d
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15
R
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1
(
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2
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E E E E E E E
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16
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9
(
2
)
)
N
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p
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18
Annex 5
ALC 6 (2/98)
Copy of Crew Agreement
Name of ship
Port of registry
Official number
Register (net) tonnage or in
caseof a fishing vessel its
registered length
Name and address of
registered owner
Place and date of date
commencement of
agreement.
place
Attach here the contractual clauses
(ALC 1 (d), ALC(FSG) 1(d) or ALC(NFD) 1(d))
19
Annex 6
The address to which crew agreements may be sent, as indicated in paragraph 14 is as follows:-
The Registry of Shipping and Seamen
Anchor House
Cheviot Close
Parc Ty Glas
Llanishen
Cardiff
CF14 5JA
Tel 02920 768200
Fax 02920 747877
1
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
MGN 71 (M)
Summary
This note and annex provides guidance to the relevant requirements in the Regulations listed in
paragraph 1 in respect of:
1. muster lists, the holding of musters and drills and the provision of on-board training and
instruction in the use of fire and life-saving appliances, and the provision of a Decision Support
System to Masters of certain passenger ships;
2. the provision of training manuals, and for the manning of survival craft and handling of
launching arrangements; and
3. the closing of openings in the hull and in watertight bulkheads.
Musters, drills, on-board training and instructions,
and Decision Support Systems
Notice to Owners, Masters, Officers and Ratings
This Note Replaces Marine Guidance Note MGN 17 (M) and should be read in association with
MGN 5 and MGN 6.
1. The statutory requirements primarily
associated with the recommendations and
guidance in the Annex to this Notice are
prescribed in the following Regulations:
(a) The Merchant Shipping (Musters
Training and Decision Support Systems)
Regulations 1999 (SI.1999 No.2722) which
contains requirements in respect of
muster lists, the holding of musters and
drills and the provision of on-board
training and instruction in the use of fire
and lifesaving appliances, and the
provision of a Decision Support System to
Masters of certain passenger ships;
(b) The Merchant Shipping (Life-Saving
Appliances for Ships Other Than Ships of
Classes III to VI(A)) Regulations 1999
(SI.1999 No.2721), and the Merchant
Shipping (Life-saving Appliances for
Passenger Ships of Classes III to VI(A))
Regulations 1999 (SI.1999 No.2723), which
contain requirements in respect of the
provision of training manuals, and for the
manning of survival craft and handling of
launching arrangements; and
(c) The Merchant Shipping (Passenger
Ship Construction: Ships of Classes I, II
and II(A)) Regulations 1998 (SI.1998
No.2514) which contain requirements in
respect of the closing of openings in the
hull and in watertight bulkheads.
2. The Regulations referred to in
subparagraphs 1(a) and (b) above implement the
1983 and 1988 and 1996 Amendments to Chapter
III of the International Convention for the Safety of
Life at Sea 1974. One of the principal objectives of
the 1983 Amendments to the Convention was to
prescribe minimum standards of training and
instruction, in particular on-board training in the
use of ship’s fire appliances, ship’s life-saving
2
appliances including launching and embarkation
equipment, in methods of survival and in the use
of personal protective equipment. An essential
part of such training and instruction involves
participation in periodic practice musters and
drills. The 1996 Amendment introduced the
requirement for Decision Support Systems for
Masters of certain passenger ships.
3. The purpose of this Note and its Annex is
to draw attention to relevant requirements in the
Regulations listed in paragraph 1 and to specify
how such requirements should be met.
MSPP2c
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
S015 1EG
Tel: 01703 329184
Fax: 01703 329204
October 1999
MS 050/005/0005
© Crown Copyright 1999
An executive agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
3
ANNEX
Section CONTENTS
1 Application
2 Muster Lists
3 Emergency Instructions
4 Emergency Signals
5 Musters and Drills - General
6 Abandon Ship Drills
7 Fire and other Emergency Drills
8 Drills in Closing of Doors, Side
Scuttles and Other Openings
9 Survival Craft Muster and Drill
10 Survival Craft Drills held in Port
11 Rescue Boat and Emergency
Boat Drills
12 Davit-Launched Liferaft
On-Board Training
13 On-Board Instruction, Training and
Training Manuals
14 Weekly and Monthly Inspection
of LSA
15 Decision Support Systems
16 Records
1 Application
1.1 Except where otherwise specified the
contents of this Annex are addressed to ships of
Classes I, II, II(A), III, VII, VII(A), VII(T), VIII,
VIII(T), VIII(A), VIII(A)(T) and IX and to ships of
Class XI engaged on international voyages.
2 Muster Lists
2.1 The requirements relating to muster lists
apply to ships engaged on international voyages
and to passenger ships of Classes II(A) and III.
The Master is responsible for compiling the
muster list, keeping it up to date and ensuring
that copies are exhibited in conspicuous places
throughout the ship, including the navigating
bridge, engineroom and crew accommodation.
The format of muster lists for ships of Classes I, II,
II(A) and III must be approved by the Maritime
and Coastguard Agency (MCA).
2.2 In ships with significant numbers of non-
English speaking crew members, the muster list
should include translations into the appropriate
language or languages.
2.3 The muster list must contain details of the
general emergency alarm and other emergency
signals and the action to be taken by the crew and
passengers in respect of the former, and by the
crew in respect of the latter. Where appropriate,
communication equipment, channels and
reporting chain to be used during an
abandonment or other emergency should be
specified. The means by which the order to
abandon ship is to be given must also be
included.
2.4 The muster list must show the duties to
be carried out by each member of the ship’s
complement in an emergency. Such duties
include the preparation, swinging out or
deploying of survival craft and other life-saving
appliances, the closing of watertight and fire
doors, and all other openings such as skylights,
portholes and side scuttles and any openings in
the hull. Duties in connection with fire-fighting,
the use of communication equipment and the
equipping of survival craft must also be shown.
2.5 Where passengers are carried duties
include warning and assembling passengers,
controlling their movement, seeing that they are
suitably clad and wearing their lifej ackets
correctly or, where appropriate, distributing and
assisting with the donning of lifejackets, and,
where carried, taking a supply of blankets to the
survival craft.
2.6 In assigning crew members to assist
passengers in emergency situations on ships of
Classes I, II, II(A) and III masters should ensure
that all such personnel have received instruction
in crowd management.
2.7 As far as practicable each individual
should only be allocated one duty, or series of
duties related to one emergency party. On
passenger ships key persons who would be last to
abandon ship should not be allocated to those
survival craft which are expected to be the first to
be launched.
4
2.8 When the muster list is compiled
consideration should be given to the eventuality
of key persons being unable to carry out their
emergency duties through injury or for some
other reason, and provision made for substitutes.
This provision must be shown on the muster list
and may be a detailed list or in the form of a
general statement such as “Should key persons
become disabled, those next in line, as
appropriate, should take their place”. When
allocating substitutes care should be exercised to
ensure that emergency parties are not left without
a leader or seriously undermanned.
2.9 The survival craft or launching station to
which each crew member is assigned should be
shown on the muster list.
2.10 In assigning crew members to man
survival craft and handle launching appliances on
ships engaged on international voyages and on
passenger ships of Classes II(A) and III, the
Master should take account of Merchant Shipping
Notice MSN 1682 (M).
2.11 A deck officer or certificated person must
be placed in charge of each survival craft to be
used and a deck officer or certificated person
must be assigned as second-in-command of a
lifeboat. In ships of Classes II, II(A) and III a
person practiced in the handling and operation of
liferafts may be placed in charge of a liferaft in
lieu of a deck officer or certificated person. The
person in charge of the survival craft shall have a
list of the survival craft crew and shall see that the
crew under his command are acquainted with
their duties. In lifeboats the second-in-command
shall also have a list of the lifeboat crew.
2.12 A motor lifeboat must have a person
assigned to it who is capable of operating the
engine and carrying out minor adjustments. This
person may be the coxswain if it is possible to
operate the engine and steer the lifeboat from one
position. A lifeboat with a radio installation and
each survival craft in which are placed emergency
position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs), radar
transponders (SARTs), or two-way radio-
telephone sets is required to have a person
assigned to it who is capable of operating such
equipment.
2.13 The muster list must show the name or
rank of the officers whose duty is to ensure that
the life-saving and fire-fighting appliances are
maintained in such condition as to be always
ready for use.
2.14 In passenger ships, the location of the
passenger assembly or muster station (as
appropriate) must be indicated in the muster list.
As far as practicable, public rooms will be
allocated as assembly or muster station (as
appropriate) in order that passengers are
protected from the elements prior to their
departure for the survival craft if the ship has to
be abandoned.
2.15 The master shall ensure the equitable
distribution of persons referred to in paragraph
2.6, 2.10 and 2.11 among the ship’s survival craft.
3 Emergency Instructions
3.1 In ships engaged on international
voyages and in passenger ships of Classes II(A)
and III, each crew member must be provided with
clear instructions to be followed in the event of an
emergency, eg in the form of a card showing the
assembly or muster station (as appropriate)
station, emergency duty and the lifeboat or liferaft
to which he is allocated. In ships with significant
numbers of non-English speaking crew members
emergency instructions should be provided in the
appropriate language or languages. The card or
other means should describe the general
emergency alarm signal and any other signals to
be used in an emergency and the action, if any, to
be taken on hearing such signals. The means by
which the order to abandon ship is to be given
should also be included.
3.2 Emergency instructions, illustrated where
possible, must be displayed in each passenger
cabin, in passenger assembly or muster station (as
appropriate) stations and in other passenger
spaces. Such instructions, in English and in any
other language appropriate to the principal
nationalities carried on the route on which the
ship is operating, are to inform passengers of their
assembly or muster station (as appropriate)
stations, essential actions they should take on
hearing the general emergency alarm signal and
any other signal requiring action on their part,
and the method of donning lifej ackets. The
location of lifejackets should be included in these
instructions. Safety information to be provided to
passengers is detailed in Merchant Shipping
Notices M.1386 (to be replaced by MGN 73) and
M.1409 (to be replaced by MGN 74).
4 Emergency Signals
4.1 The general emergency alarm signal is
the signal for summoning the crew and
5
passengers, if any, to their assembly or muster
station (as appropriate) stations and for initiating
the actions shown in the muster list. This signal
consists of seven or more short blasts followed by
one long blast sounded on the ship’s whistle or
siren and on a bell, klaxon or similar warning
system on ships required to be provided with
such systems.
4.2 On a cargo ship with a fire alarm system
which can be manually activated from locations
within the accommodation or where a system
such as a fire or smoke detection system
automatically activates alarms throughout the
ship, the signal made by such means may be used
to summon the crew to their muster stations. Such
alarm signal should be accompanied by the
general emergency alarm signal sounded on the
whistle or siren.
4.3 Signals for incidents not requiring a
muster of the passengers or of the whole crew, or
for dealing with a minor incident, are at the
Master’s discretion.
4.4 On a cargo ship a signal may be allocated
to summon the crew to survival craft embarkation
stations only, for the purpose of a drill or
mustering the crew at the survival craft
embarkation stations during an emergency.
4.5 The means by which the order to
abandon ship is given is at the Master’s discretion
and may be by a signal or by word of mouth, but
arrangements should be such that everyone on
board including those in emergency parties in
remote locations will receive it.
4.6 All signals must be described in the
muster list, in the crew emergency instructions
and, as appropriate, in the emergency instructions
for passengers.
4.7 The relevant signals referred to in this
section should be used when musters and drills
are to be conducted. All persons on board should
be notified beforehand that a practice muster or
drill is about to be held.
5 Musters and Drills - General
5.1 An abandon ship drill consists of a
muster of the crew (and of passengers, if
appropriate) at the stations referred to in the
muster list, and a muster and drill at survival
craft stations. Where practicable, passengers on
Class I passenger ships should be strongly
encouraged to attend abandon ship drills. It is
recommended that a fire drill be held
simultaneously with the first stage of the abandon
ship drill. Drills for emergencies other than fire,
eg collision, damage control, grounding, cargo or
bunker spillage, rescue of personnel from
dangerous spaces, or medical treatment, may be
conducted in lieu of or in addition to a fire drill,
provided each crew member participates in at
least one fire drill each month. Whether a fire or
other emergency drill is to be conducted, it may
be found useful on occasions to discuss
beforehand, with those taking a direct part in the
drill, the object and execution of the drill in order
that those taking part can derive the maximum
benefit from the drill. When planning procedures
and associated drills dealing with rescue of
personnel from dangerous spaces, account should
be taken of Chapters 16 and 17 of the Code of Safe
Working Practices for Merchant Seamen, 1998
Edition.
5.2 Each crew member must participate in at
least one abandon ship drill and one fire drill
every month. These drills must be held within 24
hours of leaving port if more than 25% of the crew
have not taken part in drills on board the ship in
the previous month. If circumstances are such
that it is not practical to hold full drills within the
24 hours then musters should be held within this
period and instructions given to crew members
on their emergency duties and on abandon ship
procedures, but in the case of Ro-Ro passenger
ferries these instructions should be given before
any passenger carrying voyage is commenced.
Full drills should be held as soon as
circumstances permit. In addition, in ships of
Classes I, II, II(A) and III, an abandon ship drill
and a fire drill must be held weekly and as many
of the crew as practicable should take part in
these drills which should be so arranged that each
crew member participates in at least one abandon
ship drill and one fire drill every month.
5.3 On any ship carrying passengers where
the passengers are scheduled to be on board for
more than 24 hours, a muster of the passengers
must take place within 24 hours of their
embarkation. Passengers must be given
instruction in how to don their lifejackets and the
action to take on hearing the general emergency
alarm signal. If only a small number of passengers
embark after the muster has been held, it will be
sufficient, instead of holding another, to draw the
attention of these passengers to the emergency
instructions referred to in paragraph 3.2.
Similarly, on ships of Classes other than the above
6
carrying passengers, if a muster of the
passengers is not held on departure, their
attention must be drawn to the emergency
instructions referred to in paragraph 3.2. This
can be done by means of a broadcast on the
ship’s public address system or by direct oral
announcement.
5.4 It should be drawn to the attention of the
passengers that the general emergency alarm
signal is for the purpose of summoning them to
their assembly or muster station (as appropriate)
stations and is not a signal to abandon ship. The
means by which the order to abandon ship will be
given should be explained. The importance of
being properly clad, of proceeding to their
assembly or muster station (as appropriate)
station in an orderly fashion, and of following
instructions at all times should be emphasised.
Where appropriate they should be advised to
which type of survival craft they have been
allocated, and how they will be embarked. They
should be advised that only as a last resort will it
be necessary to jump into the water. They should
be informed of the dangers of jumping overboard,
particularly from heights in excess of 6 metres
and advised that if it should be necessary to jump
into the water, the lifejacket must be held down
with one hand and the nose protected with the
other hand.
5.5 Lifejackets should be worn by passengers
and crew when attending musters and drills.
Crew members taking part in fire and other
emergency drills may remove their lifejackets if
these would be a hindrance in the execution of
their duties. Where lifejackets are removed, a
member of the emergency party concerned
should be appointed to be responsible for these
lifej ackets and to ensure that they will be
available for return to the members of an
emergency party on completion of their relevant
tasks. Where inherently buoyant lifej ackets
unduly hinder crew members in the execution of
their duties, consideration should be given to the
provision of inflatable lifejackets, although such
lifejackets are not always suitable for use by
members of fire hose parties due to the possibility
of inadvertent activation of the automatic
inflation system. Lifejackets should always be
worn by members of survival craft preparation
parties and at survival craft musters and drills.
5.6 On passenger ships consideration should
be given to the identification of crew members,
particularly those whose duties are concerned
with passenger control. This can be achieved in a
variety of ways, eg by the use of headgear,
distinctive marking on lifejackets, loose covers
worn over lifejackets, armbands, etc.
5.7 On passenger ships as many key persons
as possible should carry two-way portable radios
during musters and drills and such radios and
any fixed two-way communication systems
should be used for communications between the
bridge, emergency control stations, assembly or
muster station (as appropriate) and embarkation
stations, especially internal Marine Evacuation
System (MES) embarkation stations. Where key
persons do not have a two-way portable radio on
permanent issue there should be arrangements
whereby radios can be readily obtained at the
outset of a drill or actual emergency. Where
portable loud hailers are carried these should be
used where appropriate for communicating or for
simulating communicating with passengers at
assembly or muster station (as appropriate) and
embarkation stations. The arrangements for
communication should be as recorded in muster
lists and, where applicable, training manuals.
6 Abandon Ship Drills
6.1 The commencement of an abandon ship
drill is announced by the general emergency
alarm signal. Crew and passengers, if any, should
proceed to their assembly or muster station (as
appropriate) stations. Crew members allocated to
the handling of passengers should as appropriate
clear or simulate the clearing of accommodation
not used for the mustering of passengers,
marshall passengers taking part in the drill and
control the flow of passengers on the stairways, in
passages and doorways and guide them towards
their assembly or muster station (as appropriate)
stations. At the assembly or muster station (as
appropriate) stations they should ensure that
passengers have donned their lifejackets correctly,
or give instruction in donning as appropriate, and
that child lifejackets are allocated to persons of
less than 32 Kg. Passengers should be advised on
the matters referred to in paragraph 5.4. Where a
proportion of the survival craft consists of
throwover liferafts boarded by means of ship’s
side ladders provision should be made for
allocating only able bodied passengers to these
liferafts. It should also be determined that crew
members know how the order to abandon ship
will be announced, that they are suitably dressed
and that their lifejackets have been donned
correctly.
7
7 Fire and other Emergency Drills
7.1 A fire or other emergency drill shall as far
as practicable be conducted as if it were an actual
emergency.
7.2 A fire or other emergency drill should be
held simultaneously with the first stage of the
abandon ship drill.
7.3 For the purpose of a fire drill an outbreak
of fire should be assumed to have occurred in
some part of the ship and fire control measures
simulated as appropriate. The complete co-
operation of the personnel of all departments is
essential in fire fighting. The type and position of
the supposed fire should be varied from time to
time and can include:
(1) Cargo fires in holds or other
spaces;
(2) Fires involving oil, gas or chemical
cargoes as appropriate;
(3) Fires in engine, pump or boiler
rooms;
(4) Fires in crew or passenger
accommodation; and
(5) Fires in galleys due to burning oil
or cooking fats.
7.4 The engine room staff should ensure that
the fire pumps in the machinery spaces are
prepared for operation, started, and that full
water pressure is on the fire mains. Where there is
an emergency fire pump situated outside the
machinery space, this pump should be started up
as indicated below. The fire party or parties at the
scene of the assumed fire should lay out hoses
and where practicable water should be played
through them, the water being supplied first from
the machinery space pump and then from the
emergency pump only, with the machinery space
isolating valve closed. A number of portable fire
extinguishers should be available and members of
the fire party should be instructed in the use of
the type of fire extinguisher for a particular type
of fire.
7.5 The crew should be exercised as
appropriate in the closing of openings, ie side
scuttles, deadlights, doors, ventilating shafts, fire
doors, the annular space around the funnel, etc
both to reduce the supply of air to a fire and
isolate it from other parts of the ship, especially
stairways and lift shafts. As many of the crew as
possible and particularly the officers should be
made familiar with the position of remote
controls for ventilation fans, oil fuel pumps and
oil tank valves and be instructed in the method of
operation thereof.
7.6 Fixed installations for extinguishing fire,
such as Halon, CO
2
, foam, or water spray in the
machinery spaces, CO
2
, inert gas, steam or
drencher systems in the cargo spaces, and
sprinkler systems in passenger accommodation
together with fire alarm and detection systems
should be tested with as much realism as
practicable. The fire party should also be
exercised in the use of the breathing apparatus
and protective clothing and such emergency
appliances as axes and safety lamps, which
should be brought out, checked and deployed by
appointed members of the party at all fire drills.
Where the number of sets of breathing apparatus
permits, it is recommended that persons using
them should practice in pairs.
7.7 It is important that members of the crew
who are not allocated to fire parties are familiar
with the use of and can identify the types of fire
extinguisher they will encounter in the
accommodation and in their work areas. Such
crew members should be instructed in the use of
the type of extinguisher appropriate to the kind of
fire, eg those discharging water, foam, dry
powder, CO
2
, etc.
7.8 At each fire drill at least one extinguisher
should be discharged by a different crew member
in order that both crew members in fire parties
and other crew members gain experience in using
fire extinguishers. Crew members should also be
familiar with the location and means of activating
the fire alarms in the accommodation and in their
working areas. It is also important that all crew
members and particularly those whose place of
work is in a machinery space are familiar with the
escape routes from any part of the ship they are
likely to be in when on or off duty. Such
familiarity should enable escape to be made in
darkness or through smoke and should include
familiarity with the location and the means of
opening any emergency escape windows or
hatches.
7.9 All fire protection systems and appliances
should at all times be in good order and available
for immediate use during the voyage and in port.
Compressed air bottles of breathing apparatus
8
and fire extinguishers should be refilled after any
drill. Where refilling facilities are not available on
board additional equipment may be carried to
facilitate training. Discharged equipment should
be clearly marked and stored for refilling when in
port. Equipment dedicated for training purposes
should be marked ‘for training purposes only’.
7.10 Participation in fire drills may not
necessarily imply direct involvement with
fighting a fire and may include back-up to fire
parties, being a member of the first aid party or
controlling passengers at their assembly or
muster station (as appropriate) stations while the
fire fighting part of the drill is being undertaken.
On the other hand, on cargo ships with small
crews it will usually be necessary for every
member of the crew to be familiar with all aspects
of fire-fighting and the use of all the fire-fighting
equipment provided on board the ship.
7.11 Instruction should cover fire prevention,
particularly in galleys, machinery spaces, cargo
compartments, pumprooms and accommodation
spaces. On-board instruction in fire-fighting is
supplementary to training available at firefighting
courses ashore and is primarily concerned with
the particular equipment available on board and
the nature of on-board fire hazards.
7.12 To ensure the ready availability of fire
protection systems and appliances periodic
checks should be performed. The following
checklist may be used as guidance for this
purpose.
7.12.1 Monthly testing and inspection should be
carried out to ensure that:
(1) all firemans outfits, fire
extinguishers, fire hydrants, hose and
nozzles are in place and in serviceable
condition;
(2) all escape routes including
stairways and corridors are free of
obstructions and properly maintained;
(3) public address system and ship’s
alarms are serviceable;
(4) all fixed fire fighting installation
valves are set in the correct operational
position;
(5) dry pipe sprinkler systems are
pressurised, where appropriate, and
gauges indicate correctly;
(6) sprinkler system pressure tank
water levels are correct as indicated by
glass gauges;
(7) all sprinkler system pumps operate
automatically on pressure loss in the
systems;
(8) all fire pumps are operational; and
(9) all fixed gas fire extinguishing
installations are free from leakage.
7.12.2 Quarterly testing and inspection should
be carried out to ensure that:
(1) all fire extinguishers are at correct
pressure and are not due for servicing;
(2) all automatic alarms for sprinkler
systems activate using the section test
valves;
(3) the international shore connection
is serviceable;
(4) fire fighting equipment lockers
contain their full inventory and the
equipment they contain is in serviceable
condition; and
(5) all fire doors, fire dampers and
closing devices can be operated locally.
7.12.3 Annual testing and inspection should be
carried out to ensure that:
(1) all fire doors, and ventilation
dampers where appropriate, operate
remotely;
(2) where practicable all aqueous foam
and water spray fixed fire fighting
installations operate correctly;
(3) all accessible components of fixed
fire fighting systems, typically nozzles,
are free from damage or obstruction on
visual inspection;
(4) all fire pumps, including sprinkler
system pumps, develop correct pressures
and flow rates;
(5) all hydrants operate;
(6) all antifreeze solutions are correctly
maintained and cross connection between
9
fire main and sprinkler system operates
correctly; and
(7) fixed fire detection systems operate
correctly, according to manufacturers test
instructions.
7.13 Fire or other emergency drills should be
followed by the second stage of the abandon ship
drill ie the muster and drill at the survival craft
stations. This stage of the abandon ship drill
should be announced by the abandon ship signal
or by the particular means by which abandon
ship is announced, or by a signal used for the
purpose of summoning crew members to their
survival craft stations.
8 Drills in Closing of Doors, Side Scuttles
and Other Openings
8.1 In passenger ships, drills for practicing
the closing of watertight doors, deadlights,
scuppers, ash-shutes, rubbish-shutes and other
similar devices are required to be carried out to
comply with the Merchant Shipping (Passenger
Ship Construction: Ships of Classes I, II, and II(A))
Regulations 1998, or the Merchant Shipping
(Passenger Ship Construction: Ships of Classes III
to VI(A)) Regulations 1998. These Regulations
also require inspections, at intervals of not more
than 7 days, of watertight doors and mechanisms,
indicators and warning devices connected with
such doors, valves, the closing of which is
necessary to make watertight any compartment
below the margin line, and valves, the operation
of which is necessary for the efficient operation of
damage-control cross-connections.
8.2 In all seagoing ships, with certain
exceptions, the Merchant Shipping (Musters
Training and Decision Support Systems)
Regulations 1999 require practice fire drills to
include checking of the operation of watertight
doors, in the drill area.
8.3 Masters should familiarise themselves
with the Regulations referred to in paragraphs 8.1
and 8.2, particularly in regard to the instruction of
crew members in the safe operation of watertight
doors and to those watertight doors, side scuttles,
deadlights and other devices required to be
securely closed before the ship proceeds to sea
and to be kept securely closed while the ship is at
sea.
Account should also be taken of the contents of
Merchant Shipping Notice M.1326 (to be replaced
by MGN 35 (M)) on the dangers associated with
power operated watertight doors, and of the
Instructions for the Guidance of Surveyors
(Passenger Ship Construction Classes I, II and
II(A)) and (Passenger Ship Construction Classes
III to VIA).
9 Survival Craft Muster and Drill
9.1 Crew members other than those who
cannot be relieved from their normal duties
should muster, wearing lifej ackets, at their
lifeboat and liferaft stations. The person in charge
of each survival craft must have a list of its crew
and ensure that they are fully acquainted with
their duties. The second-in-command of a lifeboat
must also have a list of the lifeboat crew.
9.1.1 On passenger ships, the lifeboats
used in the drill should where
practicable, include some from each side
of the ship and should be distributed as
to enable the crews of the other lifeboats
to watch the operations. Different groups
of lifeboats should be used at successive
drills.
9.1.2 In cargo ships provided with
totally enclosed lifeboats which are
boarded and launched from the stowed
position, drills should periodically
include the boarding of a lifeboat in its
stowed position in order that crew
members can become practiced in
boarding a boat rapidly, locating a
seating position and using the seat belts.
9.1.3 In the case of other totally enclosed
lifeboats equipped with seatbelts, crew
members should be periodically drilled in
using the seatbelts but such lifeboats
should not be boarded at the stowed
position by the full complement at any
one time. When a drill is being carried
out inside a totally enclosed lifeboat, crew
members should also be made familiar
with the launching procedures and made
aware of what to expect when the engine
and air support and water spray systems,
where fitted, are in operation.
9.1.4 Arrangements should always be
made to ensure that those crew members
who cannot be relieved from their duties
to attend a particular drill can be relieved
to attend the next drill.
10
9.2 On passenger ships when the drill is held
at sea, a number of lifeboats should, if weather
and other circumstances permit and subject to
overriding safety constraints, be cleared, swung
out, and lowered to embarkation deck level in the
case of lifeboats boarded at this position, and side
ladders and embarkation arrangements prepared.
On cargo ships at least one lifeboat should be
lowered when weather and other circumstances
permit.
9.3 Each lifeboat and rescue boat engine
must be tested by being run ahead and astern for
a total period of not less than 3 minutes provided
that the engine can be safely run for this period
when out of the water and the ambient
temperature is above the minimum required for
starting the engine. Where lifeboats are fitted with
mechanical hand-propelling gear, this gear
should be examined and tested ahead and astern.
9.4 Liferaft davits must be swung out and
winches operated.
9.5 Emergency lighting for mustering and
abandonment must be tested at each such drill.
9.6 In cargo ships provided with lifeboats
and throwover liferafts some drills should include
preparation for abandonment involving use of
liferafts in conjunction with lifeboats. This may
include mustering at locations other than those
used for embarkation into lifeboats
10 Survival Craft Drills Held in Port
10.1 When a drill is held in port as many as
possible of the lifeboats should be cleared, swung
out and lowered. Each lifeboat must be launched
with its assigned operating crew aboard and
manoeuvered in the water once every 3 months
during an abandon ship drill. In lifeboats not
fitted with engines the crew should be exercised
in rowing or in the use of the mechanical hand-
propelling gear. Every opportunity should be
taken to test the lifeboat disengaging gear where
fitted.
10.2 If the berthing arrangements in port and
the trading patterns of ships of Classes II,
II(A),VIII or VIII(A) make the launching of
lifeboats on one side impracticable then launching
of lifeboats on that side at 3 monthly intervals
need not be carried out. However all such
lifeboats must be lowered at least once every 3
months and launched at least annually.
10.3 The launching of lifeboats and rescue
boats should normally take place when the ship is
alongside or at anchor with little or no tide or
current, but if contemplated in circumstances
where there is actual or effective headway, such
launching must be carried out in accordance with
the guidelines in the Annex to Merchant Shipping
Notice M. 1218. (to be replaced by MSN 1722 (M + F).
10.4 A free-fall lifeboat may be lowered to the
water if launching is impracticable, provided that
free-fall launching with the assigned operating
crew and manoeuvering in the water is carried
out at least once every six months. If it is
impracticable to launch within a period of six
months, the Owners may apply to the MCA for
an extension to twelve months.
11 Rescue Boat and Emergency Boat Drills
11.1 As far as is reasonable and practicable
rescue boats where carried, other than those
which are also lifeboats, must be launched each
month with their rescue boat crews and
manoeuvered in the water. The interval between
such drills must not exceed 3 months. Where
climatic conditions permit, the crew of a rescue
boat should wear their immersion suits during
such in-water drills. Where possible such drills
should include the recovery of an obj ect
simulating a person in the water. Emergency
boats carried on passenger ships which do not
carry rescue boats should be launched at similar
intervals and should carry out similar drill
procedures.
11.2 In ships of Class I the crews of rescue and
emergency boats should be mustered on the first
day of the voyage as soon as possible after sailing.
The crews should be fully instructed and drilled
in their duties and thereafter should be mustered
and similarly drilled at intervals of not more than
7 days. Crews should be specifically instructed in
the procedure of sending boats away promptly in
an emergency and in recovering boats in a
seaway, and should be familiar with the signal for
mustering at the rescue or emergency boat
station.
12 Davit-launched Liferaft On-Board
Training
12.1 On-board training in the use of davit-
launched liferafts must take place at intervals of
not more than 4 months on every ship fitted with
such liferafts. Whenever practicable this training
11
includes the inflation and lowering of a liferaft.
This liferaft may be a special liferaft intended for
training purposes only or an old liferaft retained
for training and not part of the ship’s life-saving
equipment. A special liferaft intended for training
purposes only is required to be conspicuously
marked and, if intended to be used for boarding
when swung out at the embarkation deck, should
be serviced at the same intervals as the liferafts
forming part of the ship’s life-saving equipment.
12.2 In preparing an on-board training
programme for davit-launched liferafts the
procedures adopted should take full account of
the structural arrangements in way of the
launching positions. For example it may not be
possible to recover an inflated liferaft from an
overside position without subjecting it to the risk
of damage. Where procedures described in
paragraphs 12.3 and 12.5 cannot be safely
followed, other arrangements should be made
which will enable on-board training of an
equivalent standard to be carried out.
12.3 In ships of Classes II and II(A) on regular
voyages, the four monthly on-board training in
the use of davit-launched liferafts should include
an inflation of one of the ship’s liferafts. These
inflations should take place when in port and
where practical the liferaft should be lowered
unloaded onto the quay rather than into the
water. Training in boarding and using the release
hook can be carried out when the liferaft is
suspended just clear of the quay. The liferaft
should be landed on a tarpaulin or heavy
Polythene sheet to prevent any damage to the
bottom of the raft. If it is not practical to land the
liferaft on the quay, the boarding and use of the
release hook can be carried out with the liferaft
suspended just clear of the embarkation deck
following initial inflation in the overside position.
In this case the liferaft need not be lowered over
the side but a weight should be attached to the
release hook and then lowered to exercise the
winch and give crew members practice in the
handling of the winch and fall.
12.4 After this training the liferaft used should
be sent for servicing. It is recommended that
different liferafts be used at successive drills in
order to avoid wear on a small number of
liferafts.
12.5 In cargo ships and in passenger ships on
irregular voyages, eg Class I cruise ships, there
should be an inflation of one of the ship’s liferafts
at one of the four monthly on-board training
sessions in the use of davit-launched liferafts. The
training should be carried out as described in
paragraph 12.3 and the liferaft serviced as soon as
possible after use. On the other two occasions in
the twelve month period when the four monthly
on-board training is carried out, this can be done
using, for example, a practice raft and practice
container. If such training is carried out in port,
then the procedure described in paragraph 12.3
should be followed. If such training is carried out
at sea, means should be provided for suspending
and lowering the raft over a deck to provide the
opportunity for boarding and handling the
release hook.
12.6 Alternatively the procedure for ships
engaged on regular voyages can be followed if
this is more convenient.
13 On-board Instruction, Training and
Training Manuals
13.1 Before being assigned to shipboard
duties, all persons employed or engaged on a
seagoing ship other than passengers, shall receive
appropriate familiarisation training in compliance
with Reg VI/1 of the STCW95 Convention. This
training is in addition to other shore based
training required under the STCW95 Convention.
Where thermal protective aids are carried every
crew member should be trained in donning the
aid while wearing a lifejacket. Crew members
who have been allocated an immersion suit
should be trained in the donning of the suit and
given the opportunity to familiarise themselves
with the wearing of the suit.
13.2 Crew members whose emergency duties
include the guidance of passengers, and the
searching and closing down of passenger spaces
should be trained and instructed in these duties.
Such training and instruction should cover the
matters referred to in 6.1 above, in MGN 5, and
should include the use of procedures for reducing
or avoiding panic and the giving of clear
reassuring orders. The training should be given
prior to being assigned such duties on Ro-Ro
passenger ships and other passenger ships.
13.3 Crew members allocated specific key
tasks for the preparation, launching and handling
of lifeboats, rescue boats, liferafts and marine
evacuation systems should be trained in these
specific tasks. Such training should also be given
to a sufficient number of crew members to provide
substitutes for the crew members allocated these
key tasks in the muster list. The importance of
12
training, particularly in the handling of totally
enclosed and partially enclosed motor propelled
lifeboats fitted with onload release gear and in
certain cases with self-contained air support and
water spray systems, cannot be emphasised
enough due to the complexity of such equipment.
Training given on board is primarily concerned
with the particular life-saving equipment carried
and is supplementary to shore based training
given on personal survival techniques, on
proficiency in survival craft and rescue boat, and
training-courses organised by individual owners.
The training should include ship specific practices
such as the normal sequence for preparing and
safely deploying evacuation systems, launching
lifeboats and liferafts, and all other factors which
determine rate of evacuation, and may also cover
alternatives to the normal sequence of
deployment.
13.4 Where on-board training cannot be given
in the use of certain items of life-saving
equipment because of practical considerations,
on-board instructions in the use of such
equipment is required to be given at the same
intervals as the drills. Instructions are required to
be given in survival procedures including the
causes of and first aid treatment for hypothermia,
and first aid measures likely to be practiced in a
survival craft. Instructions include the operation
and use of the ship’s liferafts and embarkation
arrangements and the use of survival craft and
rescue boats in severe weather and sea conditions.
Instructions may also include actions to be taken
in the event of foreseeable equipment failures.
13.5 The basic information on which these
instructions will be based will be found in the
ship’s life-saving appliances training manual
which contains instructions and information on
the life-saving appliances carried, personal
protective equipment and its location, in addition
to information and instructions on survival,
hazards of exposure, methods of retrieval and
emergency repair of life-saving appliances. Any
part of the information to be included in the
Training Manual may be provided in the form of
audio-visual aids. Information provided in
lifesaving appliances training manuals should be
compatible with, and may reproduce, relevant
shipboard safety emergency plans which are
required to be provided in accordance with the
International Safety Management Code (SOLAS
1974 Chapter IX; reference should also be made to
MSC/Circ.760 “Guidelines for a Structure of an
Integrated System of Contingency Planning for
Shipboard Emergencies.”). (See paragraph 15.6)
13.6 The training manual can be used by the
officer or officers whose duty it is to give the
relevant instructions and it can also be used as a
source of reference and information for every
member of the crew. A copy of the training
manual should be accessible to every crew
member and except in certain ships of less than
500 GRT, a copy must be provided in each
messroom and recreation room, or in each cabin.
13.7 In ships with significant numbers of non-
English speaking crew members, copies of the full
training manual or relevant sections should be
provided in the appropriate language or
languages.
13.8 The programme of instructions must be
so arranged that every subject to be covered,
including all parts of the ship’s life-saving
systems can be treated within a two month
period. In order to carry out this programme in
cargo ships, the frequency of holding drills may
have to be increased beyond that necessary to
ensure that every crew member participates in an
abandon ship and fire drill every month. Frequent
short periods of instruction dealing with a limited
number of items will be more effective than long
sessions dealing with a considerable amount of
subject matter and held say at monthly intervals.
14 Weekly and Monthly Inspection of LSA
14.1 Weekly and monthly inspections as
described in paragraph 14.2 and 14.3 must be
carried out on all ships to which the Merchant
Shipping (Life-Saving Appliances for Ships Other
Than Ships of Classes III to VI(A)) Regulations
1999, and the Merchant Shipping (Life-saving
Appliances for Passenger Ships of Classes III to
VI(A)) Regulations 1999, apply.
14.2 At weekly intervals survival craft, rescue
boats and launching appliances must be inspected
to ensure that they are ready for immediate use.
Rescue boat and lifeboat engines must be run at
weekly intervals. The general emergency alarm
system must also be tested every week.
14.3 All lifesaving appliances including lifeboat
and rescue boat equipment is required to be
inspected at monthly intervals. For this purpose the
checklist provided in the instructions for onboard
maintenance is used. This inspection should
include the examination and testing of any fixed
radio installations and searchlight equipment,
and ensuring that the batteries can be charged
from the dynamo when the engine is running.
13
14.4 In lifeboats with water spray systems,
each system should be tested at intervals of not
more than 3 months in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions. The system should
be flushed through with fresh water after testing
with sea water.
15 Decision Support System
15.1 Passenger ships of Classes I, II and II(A)
are required to have a decision support system for
emergency management on the navigation
bridge. It can be printed on paper, or computer
based, and must identify all foreseeable
emergency situations, establish emergency
procedures for each situation, and provide
decisive support to the Master.
15.2 Reference should be made to
MSC/Circ.760 “Guidelines for a Structure of an
Integrated System of Contingency Planning for
Shipboard Emergencies”.
15.3 The Guidelines noted above are intended
to help integrate the various contingency Plans
currently required by SOLAS and MARPOL, into
a structured and consistent format. The Plans are
required be in a uniform structure, be clear and
easy to understand.
15.4 The Plans must be available in the
working language of the Master, Officers and
relevant crew members, and must be
appropriately amended if the working language
changes.
15.5 Training, drills, and records of such, of
the Decision Support System, should be
integrated into the overall training regime.
15.6 Copies of MSC/Circ.760 are available
from the Marine Information Centre of the MCA:
Tel: 01703 329297
Fax: 01703 329298
16 Records
16.1 The date on which musters, drills and
training sessions are held, the type of drill and
training held, and the occasions on which
lifeboats, rescue boats and davit-launched
liferafts, as applicable, are lowered or launched
must be entered in the official log book.
16.2 Where a full muster, drill or training
session as required by the Merchant Shipping
(Musters Training and Decision Support Systems)
Regulations 1999, is not held a record must be
made of the relevant circumstances and the extent
of any muster, drill or training session held.
- 1 -
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE



MGN 397 (M+F)


Guidelines for the Provision of Food and Fresh Water
on Merchant Ships and Fishing Vessels

Notice to all Shipowners, Shipbuilders, Operators, Masters, Skippers, Officers and all
Seafarers on merchant ships and fishing vessels

This Notice replaces Marine Guidance Note MGN 61 (M+F) and Merchant Shipping Notices
1214 and 1401.



PLEASE NOTE:-
Where this document provides guidance on the law it should not be regarded as definitive.
The way the law applies to any particular case can vary according to circumstances - for
example, from vessel to vessel and you should consider seeking independent legal advice if
you are unsure of your own legal position.

Summary
These Guidelines provide practical advice on the provision of food and water for all merchant
ships and fishing vessels. They also take account of the relevant guidelines of the
International Labour Organization Maritime Labour Convention 2006.

Key Points
• All ships should provide free of charge food and drinking water of appropriate quality,
nutritional value and quantity to meet the needs of those on board.
• Food hygiene principles and the provision and maintenance of fresh water must be
applied regardless of the age, size and type of vessel.
• Bacterial contamination is the most serious risk to food and fresh water safety.
• Those preparing or serving food must be properly trained and demonstrate a working
knowledge of the principles and practices of food hygiene.
• Prevention using a risk assessment and management approach is one of the most
effective means of ensuring food and fresh water safety.


1. Background: the legal framework

1.1 The main relevant merchant shipping regulations are the

- Merchant Shipping (Provisions and Water) Regulations 1989
- Merchant Shipping (Crew Accommodation) Regulations 1997
- Merchant Shipping (Crew Accommodation) (Fishing Vessel) Regulations 1978
- Merchant Shipping (Crew Accommodation) (Fishing Vessels) (Amendment) Regulations 1998
- Merchant Shipping & Fishing Vessel (Health & Safety at Work) Regulations 1997
- Merchant Shipping (Ships’ Cooks) Regulations 1981
- 2 -

1.2 There are also public health regulations that are relevant, including the

- Food Hygiene Regulations 2006, as amended, and
- Public Health (Ships) Regulations 1979 as amended

1.3 For merchant ships and UK registered fishing vessels over 24m in length, the Provisions and
Water Regulations specifically require the supply of provisions and water that:
• are suitable in respect of quantity, nutritive value, quality and variety having regard to the
size of the crew and the character and nature of the voyage;
• do not contain anything which is likely to cause sickness or injury to health or which
renders any provision or water unpalatable, and
• are otherwise fit for consumption.

1.4 The Crew Accommodation Regulations for both merchant ships and fishing vessels 15 metres
and over require galleys, storerooms, sanitary and cabin accommodation to be maintained in a
clean and habitable condition and that all equipment and installations be maintained in good
working order.

1.5 The MCA’s Code of Safe Working Practices for Merchant Seamen supports Merchant
Shipping Regulations and gives additional guidance on standards expected on merchant ships.
Detailed advice specific to galley operations is available in Chapter 14.

1.6 The Maritime Labour Convention 2006 also covers standards for Food and Catering for
merchant shipping (Title 3.2 of the Convention) and this guidance reflects its provisions.

2. General Principles

2.1 In providing food and drinking water on board ship, account should be taken of factors
including the duration and nature of the voyage; the number of seafarers on board; and the
quantity, nutritional value, quality and variety of the food. The religious requirements and
cultural practices of the seafarers as they relate to food should also be taken in to account.

2.2 For ships with a catering department, the organisation and equipment should be such as to
permit the provision to the seafarers of adequate, varied and nutritious meals prepared and
served in hygienic conditions.

2.3 Food hygiene principles must be applied regardless of the age, size and type of vessel. The
information contained in this Notice provides a practical food hygiene guide which supports
ILO standards and general food safety principles for the vast majority of vessels, such as
general cargo vessels, where catering arrangements relate more to a domestic environment
than a food business.

3. Training

3.1 Those with responsibility for catering should be properly trained or instructed for their
positions and have an adequate knowledge of food and personal hygiene to ensure that food is
stored, stock rotated, handled, cooked and served safely and that good practice is clearly applied.
Ships’ Cooks and other equivalent qualifications will include food hygiene training.

3.2 Periodic assessments of the effectiveness of training or instructions should be made.
Company and ship audits should be able to verify competency levels. If there is any evidence
of poor hygiene practices, designated cooks or others working in the galley should receive
refresher training or other appropriate food hygiene training.

- 3 -
3.3 Catering staff should have an awareness of the potential problems associated with food
allergy and intolerance and have a basic understanding of how to avoid cross contamination
and of the importance of providing accurate information to the crew.

4. Crew Information

4.1 Information on food and water safety should be readily available to members of the crew and
should be in a language that includes English and is clearly understood.

5. Inspection and enforcement

5.1 The Merchant Shipping (Provisions and Water) Regulations 1989 require the inspection at
least once a week of the supplies of food and water by the master or his deputy together with a
responsible member of the catering department.

5.2 Ships are inspected by marine surveyors according to the MCA’s inspection regime which
provides for food safety and hygiene standards in accordance with the relevant merchant
shipping legislation.

5.3 Environmental or Port Health Officers enforce food safety standards and issue ship sanitation
certificates as required by the International Health Regulations.

5.4 A close liaison is maintained between local offices of respective organisations to avoid
duplication of effort and to ensure that where inspections carried out by members of one
organisation reveal a situation that would clearly also be of concern to the other, appropriate
actions under respective powers can be considered.

6. More Detailed Advice

6.1 Detailed guidance in this Notice is arranged as follows:

Part 1 : Food safety and hygiene including advice on diet and nutrition

Part 2 :Water, including its supply, storage and distribution and advice on
maintenance of water systems.




- 4 -





























More Information

Inspection Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Bay 2/22
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
SO15 1EG

Tel : +44 (0) 23 8032 9549
Fax : +44 (0) 23 8032 9104
e-mail: PSC.Headquarters@mcga.gov.uk

General Inquiries: infoline@mcga.gov.uk

MCA Website Address: www.mcga.gov.uk

File Ref: MS124/002/0057

Published: July 2009
Please note that all addresses and
telephone numbers are correct at time of publishing

© Crown Copyright 2009

Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas

Printed on material containing minimum 75% post-consumer waste paper

- 5 -
PART 1

FOOD SAFETY AND HYGIENE

This Part covers construction, design, equipment and maintenance of galley areas,
health and safety, diet and nutrition, food and personal hygiene, preparation, cooking
and food service, storage and cleaning

1. Design, Construction, equipment and maintenance of galley areas

Food areas should be designed constructed, equipped and properly maintained to enable
good hygiene and suitable health and safety standards. Materials used should be durable,
non absorbent, smooth and easy to clean with no sharp edges or corners. Decks should be
anti-slip and provide adequate drainage if necessary. All spaces should be well lit.

The design and layout should enable clear access below, behind or between equipment or it
should be properly sealed/integrated to prevent the accumulation of debris in inaccessible
spaces. So far as practical, refrigeration units should not be located close to ovens or other
large galley cooking units. There should be adequate working space to provide a safe working
environment.

Ventilation should be adequate with suitable mechanical extraction to maintain reasonable
temperatures and humidity levels. Condensation particularly on deck heads can be a problem
but with suitable mechanical ventilation this can be kept under control. Supplementary
ventilation should be provided for particular hot spots. Ventilation ducting should be
accessible and regularly cleaned to minimise the risk of fire. An intervening air space should
be provided between any WC and the galley/food preparation rooms.

Equipment should be adequate for the number of crew and fit for purpose. Equipment and
utensils should be fixed in place or stored safely to avoid damage or injury when the ship rolls.
Equipment should be stored so as to protect it against contamination.

Dedicated hand wash basins with provision for soap and towels should be provided for the use
of the catering staff. In addition dedicated sinks for food preparation and equipment washing
should also be provided.

2. Health and Safety Issues

There are obvious hazards within the galley and store areas, such as wet greasy deck,
extreme temperatures and humidity, congestion particularly around the galley range, and hot
plate area. Cleaning materials, electrical appliances, fumes, knives, equipment such as deep
fat fryers, brat pans and tilting kettles are also hazardous. Practical control measures should
be in place to reduce the risk of injury in the catering environment, for example

• Anyone working in the catering areas should be provided with appropriate protective
clothing and specialist anti slip, protected toe cap footwear.
• Knives and other sharp utensils should not be left in a sink or washing up bowl
submerged in water.
• Stowage - items should be properly secured
• Pots and pans should be secured during cooking and only filled to safe levels particularly
in heavy seas.
• Protective guards shall be fitted on mechanical fans, food mixers and other kitchen
equipment with exposed blades or other dangerous parts

Electrical equipment, including wiring in galley and store areas should be regularly inspected by
either a qualified member of the crew or a shore side contractor.

- 6 -
Burns and scalds are common injuries. A first-aid box should be provided either in the galley
or a suitable area convenient to the galley. The contents of the first-aid box should be checked
and when necessary replenished at appropriate intervals. A notice stating the action to take if
someone is burned or scalded should be prominently displayed in or close by the galley.

The use of anti bacterial hand cleaners, moisturising cream and barrier creams should be
encouraged to reduce the risk of skin infections particularly dermatitis.

Detailed advice specific to galley operations is available in Chapter 14 of the Code of Safety
Working Practices for Merchant Seamen.

3. Diet and Nutrition

A good variety of food provides a healthy diet. Meals should provide a balance of
carbohydrates, protein, fat and fibre, vitamins and minerals. Food should be prepared and
cooked with minimum levels of salt, fat and sugar. As a general guide,

High energy food (carbohydrates) includes bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, and breakfast cereals.

High protein food includes fish, meat, poultry, eggs, milk and other dairy products (check the
fat content of some cheeses)

Vitamins and Minerals are contained in fruit and vegetables, fresh, frozen, dried and canned
including fruit juice.

Drinks – as with food a balanced intake is important. Not too much sugar, caffeine and
calories. Water, fruit juices and low fat milk are all good alternatives.

Provision should be made for any special needs because of religion, special dietary
requirements, or customary dietary practices where certain rules or requirements in relation to
some food or with the way the food is prepared must be observed.

Catering staff should be aware of the dangers associated with food allergies. If a person with a
food allergy inadvertently eats even a small amount of that food this can make them very ill or
in extreme cases cause death. Some problem ingredients are peanuts, nuts, gluten, fish, soya,
celery, mustard, sesame seeds and sulphur dioxide.

4. Food Hygiene

4.1 HACCP

In the case of companies operating large passenger/cruise ships and other vessels with a
substantial crew complement, the philosophy of the International Safety Management Code is
likely to have been extended already to include food and fresh water safety and hygiene
issues, based on a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system. A HACCP
system is a structured and documented hazard analysis system, identifying critical control
points and specific actions to be taken at those points. HACCP is required under food safety
legislation. and is applicable to food businesses. Such systems are based on a robust food
safety policy and detailed procedures, all fully documented that will extend far beyond the
primary advice contained in this MGN.

4.2 About Food Hygiene

Traditionally the basis for food hygiene standards has been the use of clean well maintained
catering spaces and the avoidance of unsanitary conditions. Even in clean, well-maintained
galleys however, food may be handled carelessly with insufficient regard to food safety. Good
food hygiene is more than cleanliness; it requires food to be protected from the risk of harmful
- 7 -
contamination by bacteria, chemicals and other foreign bodies from point of delivery to point of
consumption. Bacterial contamination is the most serious risk to food safety and causes the
majority of food poisoning cases but physical and chemical contamination may also occur
accidentally. For example, from loose buttons, jewellery, other foreign bodies or from cleaning
agents.

Good food hygiene is also about sourcing safe food. In certain circumstances unsafe food will
always remain unsafe regardless of the measures taken.

4.3 About Bacteria

No catering environment operates without harmful bacteria being present at some time, and
plenty of food is produced in environments where microbiological environmental levels are very
low. A good HCCP system will prevent illness in these circumstances. Small numbers of certain
bacteria such as Salmonellae can cause serious illness. Most pathogenic bacteria are destroyed
by adequate cooking but harmful preformed bacterial toxin, mycotoxins and algal toxins are
unaffected by heat. Pathogenic bacteria also thrive in cool, dry and anaerobic conditions. Raw
meat is considered to be high risk because of the likely presence of E.Coli, Salmonellae, L.
monocytogenes. Depending on the source viable cysts of intestinal parasites may also exist.
Good practice before cooking or processing should prevent bacteria multiplying to the extent that
would cause illness or food spoilage

Bacteria levels rise rapidly in a warm moist environment on certain foods that support their
growth, such as high protein foods. However foods with high levels of sugar, salt or other
preservatives do not provide favourable growth conditions.

“High risk” foods, those most commonly implicated in food poisoning cases, is considered to be
food that supports bacterial growth and is ready to eat without further cooking. For example,

• cooked meat, poultry and rice
• meat products such as gravy and stock,
• milk, cream, eggs, and egg products.
• shellfish and other seafoods

Raw meat although a source of bacteria is not considered to be “high risk” because it is generally
cooked before consumption.

People often harbour some types of harmful bacteria at some point - hands are particularly
susceptible other common sources are pests such as insects, flies, rodents etc, dust and waste
food.

4.4 Bacterial Food Contamination

Contaminated food looks tastes and smells completely normal unless it is so contaminated that
spoilage occurs. Bacteria levels in high risk food and raw meat will rise rapidly in warm
conditions. Contamination usually occurs through recklessness, ignorance and people taking
short cuts, and handling or storing food carelessly.

Bacteria can pass directly from the source to high risk food, for example raw meat can
contaminate cooked meat where human, animal or insect intervention occurs. Cross
contamination, where bacteria is transferred by some other means, is a constant threat to food
safety. The main “vehicles” are hands, hand and food contact surfaces, cloths and equipment.
Other “vehicles” include water, other foods and insects.



- 8 -
4.5 10 main reasons for food poisoning

1. Preparation of food too far in advance and stored at room temperature.
2. Cooling food too slowly prior to refrigeration.
3. Not reheating food to high enough temperatures to destroy harmful bacteria.
4. Using contaminated cooked food.
5. Undercooking.
6. Not thawing frozen meat for sufficient time.
7. Cross contamination from raw food to cooked food.
8. Storing hot food below 63˚C
9. Infected food handlers
10. Improper use of leftovers

4.6 Prevention of Bacterial Food Poisoning

Food must be protected against contamination. High standards of personal cleanliness and food
safety must be observed. Any existing bacteria already in the food must be prevented from
growing to dangerous levels. Most bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking but not pre-
formed toxins. To reduce the risk of food poisoning a range of control measures should be put in
place covering

• Personal Hygiene
• Temperature control (keep food hot >63˚C or cold <5˚C)
• Segregation of raw and cooked foods
• Ensuring no risk of cross contamination via hands, cloths etc
• Thorough cooking
• Adequate and proper cleaning
• Purchasing safe supplies and ensuring safe delivery

4.7 Cross Contamination with Food Allergens

It is important for catering staff to be aware of the risk of allergen cross contamination in situations
where a seafarer has asked for food to be free of a certain ingredient that they are allergic or
intolerant to. A number of steps can be taken to reduce the risk, including preparing the food from
scratch, keeping surfaces clear of the allergen of concern, using separate utensils to prepare and
serve the allergen free food, avoiding transference of crumbs or seeds from other foods and by
using correctly labelled airtight containers.

5. Personal Hygiene

It is essential for food handlers to strictly observe and practice high standards of personal
cleanliness. They should be clean and tidy and wear suitable light coloured protective clothing.

There must be adequate wash-hand basins with soap and hand drying facilities available to the
catering staff. Disposable towels or a hot air dryer is better than a traditional towel. Food handlers
must wash their hands regularly and always on entering the galley, before handling any food or
equipment, after smoking and/or touching hair, nose, mouth, dirty clothing etc. Hands must also
be washed after visiting the WC, and in between handling raw and cooked food.

Toilets with wash-hand basins should be situated near to, but separate from, the galley.
Prominent signs about washing hands should be displayed.

Food handlers should avoid so far as possible direct contact between hands and food, by using
tongs for example. Appropriate protective gloves may be worn but they can give a false sense of
security.

Cuts, spots, sores, etc should be completely covered by coloured waterproof dressings.
- 9 -

5.1 Fitness to Work

Anyone working with food with food poisoning symptoms, for example diarrhoea and vomiting, or
suspected of carrying food poisoning organisms because of close contact with a confirmed case
should be immediately excluded from any job which might expose food/water to the risk of
contamination. If a food handler has suffered sickness and diarrhoea they should not handle food
for at least 48 hours after the symptoms have ceased. Several other conditions require infected
persons to be similarly excluded for varying lengths of time according to medical advice.
Secondary infections associated with boils and septic cuts, respiratory infections from heavy colds
may also require the suspension of food handlers until successfully treated.

6. Preparation and Cooking

Defrosting of raw meat and poultry should be carried out in controlled conditions and not simply
be left to thaw at room temperatures, particularly in a warm galley. Thawing should take place in
a cool, clean area, separate from other foods that may be exposed to risk of contamination from
thawed liquid. The food should be covered and stored in a container on a grille so that it is not
resting in the thawed liquid. If there is a food handling room within the cold stores area this may
be used. It is important to check that meat or chicken etc is thoroughly defrosted before cooking.
Bacteria thrive in warm conditions, so raw meat, poultry, fish etc should not be left in the so called
danger zone (5˚C - 63˚C) for longer than is absolutely necessary. A general rule when handling
food during and after preparation would be a single period of up to 2 hours at room temperatures.
In very high temperatures the handling period should be reduced to about 1½ hours.

Most harmful bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking. It is however acceptable to
serve a “rare” steak, or beef and lamb joint if it is a whole cut or joint of meat and the steak or
joint has been properly sealed over a high heat to destroy any bacteria that might be on the
surface. The following types of meat can have bacteria distributed throughout the mass of the
meat, they must therefore be cooked thoroughly.

• Poultry
• Pork
• Burgers, sausages, kebabs
• Rolled joints using more than one cut
• Mincemeat

A skewer may be used to test that poultry and meat joints are thoroughly cooked. - Juices
should run clear. A centre temperature of 75˚C (82˚C in Scotland) is usually required and may be
verified using a probe thermometer. The probe having been properly disinfected before use.
Furthermore the thermometer’s manufacturer’s instructions must be followed and its accuracy
verified,

Where practical, separate work surfaces should be set aside for the preparation of raw meat
which should not be used for the preparation of foods that will be eaten without further cooking. If
the same work surface has to be used, care must be taken to ensure it is cleaned and disinfected
between handling raw and cooked meats or other ready to eat products. Separate chopping
boards clearly assigned, generally, by colour may be used to maintain segregation.

6.1 Service

Ideally food should be consumed as soon as it is prepared/cooked but patterns of work and
other unplanned factors can delay meal times. If there are significant delays, cold cuts can be
stored in the fridge or in a chill display unit until the crew are ready to eat. Hot food can be
safely left in the pot over a very low heat so long as it is regularly stirred to maintain a safe
temperature of 63˚C or it can be stored in a hot press.

- 10 -
6.2 Leftovers

Cooling of high risk food must be done quickly to avoid potential health risks. Small amounts of
food should cool relatively quickly but the process can be speeded up if necessary. For example,

• If available use a larder with a lower room temperature.
• Pour liquids into shallow pans and stir frequently.
• Split food into relatively small pieces or batches.
• Use an iced water bath.

Once cold, leftovers should date marked and be suitably stored in a fridge and used within 2 days
preferably served cold for example as part of a salad. If reheating is absolutely necessary food
should be rapidly and thoroughly reheated, but only once. Reheated leftovers must have a core
temperature of 75˚C.

7. Stores

Ships should have adequate storage facilities for all stores. If storage spaces are inadequate,
stock levels should be reduced by taking on stores more frequently or if that is not possible,
additional storage should be made available. All stock should be rotated as and when necessary.

7.1 Cold Stores

Safe temperatures for cold stores are generally considered to be 5˚C or colder and minus 18˚C or
colder for chill and freezer cabinets respectively but a slight tolerance of one or two degrees is
unlikely to create any significant risk to food safety. If cabinets do not have a means of checking
temperatures, a suitable thermometer should be provided. Thermometers should be calibrated
periodically but a simple check on a monthly basis, using boiling water (99˚C to 101˚C) or melting
ice (-1˚C to +1˚C) will verify the accuracy of the thermometer.

In freezer units, the combination of high humidity and fluctuating temperatures (warmer than
minus 10˚C) accelerate mould and other spoilage bacterial growth. Fluctuating temperatures may
also cause an accumulation of ice deposits. Food should never be stored at the front of cooling
unit as this restricts the circulation of air. Suitable packaging is essential to avoid the loss of
moisture from the surface of food which can produce a freezer burn effect on exposed meat cuts
or joints.

If defrosting is not an automatic process, equipment should be defrosted regularly to maintain its
efficiency.

Although fridges and freezer cabinets should be maintained according to the ship’s planned
maintenance system, cooks and others working in the galley should regularly check the condition
of door seals and closing devices as well as routinely monitoring temperatures.

Provided food has been maintained in a hard frozen condition from production to delivery and
during storage on board ship, it may be used beyond the best before date.

Chilled raw food must always be kept apart from cooked food or milk for example that requires no
further treatment before consumption. Separate refrigerators are preferred although if in the
same unit, the raw food must always be placed at the bottom to avoid drip contaminating ready
prepared food. Food should also be covered or wrapped to prevent drying out, cross-
contamination and absorption of odour.

7.2 Dry Food Stores

Dry food stores should be dry, cool, (where possible around 10˚C), well lit and ventilated. There
should be adequate shelving and pallets to avoid stowage directly on to the deck. Care should be
- 11 -
taken to ensure stock is used in strict date rotation and that supplies have the best possible
durability date. Perishable provisions should neither be ordered nor accepted in quantities
greater than can be consumed before the expiry date. Daily checks should be made on short-life
perishable food such as fresh fruit and vegetables.

8. Cleaning

To avoid a build up of dirt and waste, a “clean as you go” routine should be applied.

Trays, knives, cutting boards, food preparation machinery and work tops etc that come into
contact with food should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. Mechanical dishwashers
disinfect by virtue of the high rinse temperature (around 82˚C) Where dishes are hand washed
they should be left to dry rather than use drying cloths, so long as they are put away as soon
as they are dry.

Cloths and towels are a perfect breeding ground for bacteria so they must be washed regularly
or discarded. Mops and waste bins should also be regularly washed and stowed in
designated places.

Galley spaces should be cleaned at the end of each working day. Time should be set aside to
do a regular systematic thorough clean of all areas including cupboards, store rooms, the deck
and bulk heads, extractor fans and canopies. Greasy ventilation ducting is a serious fire
hazard and should therefore be cleaned regularly. The frequency of cleaning should be
determined using a risk assessment process.

Care should be taken to protect food and equipment during cleaning operations. Cleaning
products and equipment should be safely stored away, preferably in a designated locker.

Garbage and food waste segregation and disposal arrangements should maintain operational
health and safety standards and be in accordance with the ship’s garbage management plan. It
should be noted that lids on waste bins can increase the risk of cross contamination.

9. Pests

Good housekeeping obviously minimises the risk of infestation and it is important to ensure that
areas, particularly refuse areas are kept in a clean and tidy condition. Waste bins should be
emptied regularly and lids should always be fitted unless they are being used. They should also
be washed after emptying.

Flies, cockroaches and rodents present a serious hazard. Food suspected of being
contaminated by rodents, flies or cockroaches must be destroyed.

A responsible member of crew should carry out routine inspections of food areas, particularly
undisturbed areas. If pests are found appropriate action should be taken to eradicate or minimise
the problem. This should include the use of a pest control book and if necessary the employment
of a certified pest control agent.

Any treatments used should comply with the "Recommendations on the Safe Use of Pesticides in
Ships".
- 12 -
Part 2
FRESH WATER

This Part covers fresh water loading and supply arrangements, disinfection, storage,
distribution systems and maintenance

1. Introduction

The Merchant Shipping (Crew Accommodation) Regulations 1997 and the Merchant Shipping
(Crew Accommodation) (Fishing Vessels) Regulations 1975 require the supply of drinking and
fresh water to be such as to prevent any risk of contamination. In addition the 1997 Regulations
require the supply of hot, fresh water and cold drinking water to any sink, wash hand basin or
other washing facility in a galley.

Improperly managed water is an established infectious disease transmission route on ships.
Outbreaks of illness have been associated with contaminated bunkered water, cross connections
between potable and non-potable water, improper loading procedures, poor design and
construction of potable water storage tanks and inadequate disinfection. Evidence from
outbreaks indicates that sewage is one of the more common sources of the pathogens that cause
waterborne disease outbreaks on ships.

The most effective means of ensuring the safety of the fresh water supply is through the use of a
risk assessment and management approach that covers the whole process from loading to
delivery at the tap and includes a planned maintenance system. All of the information gathered
should be used to develop a Fresh Water Safety Plan (FWSP), particularly for ships with a
complex system, which could be incorporated into the ship’s planned maintenance system. An
FWSP should be based on the following format.

• System assessment and hazard analysis (including an assessment of source water
loaded on to the ship)
• Management plan and control measures, (the selection and operation of appropriate
treatment processes)
• Monitoring and corrective action system in accordance with the Plan (the prevention of
contamination/re-contamination during storage and distribution).

Control measures (treatments) will be influenced by the quality of the source water. In the event
of the potable water becoming unfit for human consumption then the tank(s) and distribution
system should be drained, super-chlorinated and flushed in accordance with section 7
(Maintenance of water systems) below.

In addition to the above the ship should consider requesting water samples from the supplier prior
to bunkering.

2. Fresh Water Loading and Supply Arrangements

Freshwater obtained from shore mains supply or water barge should be transferred by a
designated fresh water hose. Hoses should be durable, with a smooth, impervious lining, and
equipped with fittings, including adapters, to permit connection to the shore potable water
hydrants and filling connections to prevent their use for loading other liquids. Hoses should
be

- clearly marked (generally coloured blue)
- stowed in a locker clear of the deck
- drained and capped at both ends after use
- flushed through and discharged to waste before loading.

- 13 -
Often ships use quayside hoses, in which case a designated crewmember should ensure that
such hoses are in good condition and that they are routinely disinfected, safely stowed and
capped in a clean environment.

Every potable water tank should have a filling line to which a hose can be attached. This line
should not be cross-connected with any line of a non-potable water system. Each line should
be clearly identified as such and painted blue with a screw cap or plug fastened by a short
chain so that the cap does not touch the deck when hanging free

3. Disinfection

There should be no facility for by-passing primary automatic disinfection systems. Automatic
disinfection systems should have a fail safe control arrangement with an audible/visual
automatic alarm to prevent the passage of water in the event of any malfunction. The power
supply required to operate the alarm should be independent of the disinfection unit power
supply.

3.1 Chlorination

The UK generally accepts chlorine as a disinfectant which requires around 20 minutes contact
time to react. It can be the case that shore mains water only contains low concentrations of free
chlorine which may be further decreased within the ship environment. Although there is no
requirement to do so and control measures will be influenced by the quality of the source water, it
is considered good practice to add chlorine as a routine when loading fresh water to a level that
produces a 0.2 mg/L (ppm) residual free chlorine or 1.0 mg/L (ppm) chloramine when
chloraminated water is supplied. Chlorine should preferably be applied as a hypochlorite
solution, using a commercial hypochlorinator designed for the purpose or by using an
automatic chlorination unit in the ship’s deck filling line. The concentration may also be
achieved by the manual method using the formula contained in the “ WHO’s Guide to Ship
Sanitation”. A commercial test kit should be used to check the free chlorine or chloramine
levels.

Some other treatments available include:

3.2 Silver-coated filter candles

These filters retain suspended matter and they have a bactericidal effect. Treatment is
instantaneous without any addition of chemicals.

3.3 Electro-Silver Ionisation

Electro-silver ionisation may be used for the automatic disinfecting of fresh water produced on
board ships. Units should be set up by the manufacturer to ensure a minimum concentration
of 0.1ppm to be added to the water under maximum flow conditions. The minimum time
required for silver to take effect is 4 hours after passing through the unit. This should ensure a
maximum 0.08 ppm in the system

3.4 Ultra-Violet Sterilisation

Although the sterilisation process is instantaneous, ultra-violet steriliser units have no dispersal
or residual properties. For this reason UV treatment is generally used only as a
supplementary system, fitted downstream of the water tank or supply pump. UV units may
however be effective in certain cases where service lines are relatively short. They should be
installed so that the direction of flow is vertical to keep deposits in the tubes to a minimum.
The water should be continuously circulated in the system through the UV unit. There should
be a means to measure the intensity of UV radiation. and a switch-off mechanism with an
- 14 -
alarm should be fitted in the event of UV radiation being too weak. The performance of the
tubes should be regularly monitored.

3.5 Thermal Disinfection (Calefaction)

Potable water supply lines contaminated with legionellae may not be reliably disinfected by
means of chemical agents. Heating the flowing water throughout the distribution system
(legionella tends to grow in dead legs and low-use areas) to a temperature of at least 60°C
and maintaining this temperature for 30 minutes is another established method used to destroy
the legionella bacteria. If the water temperature is increased the period for maintaining the
temperature will be proportionately reduced. This method may be used in conjunction with
chemical treatments.

4. Fresh Water from Water Making Plant

Sea water that is to be treated on ships should be taken from areas relatively free from
pollution, including air pollution. Twenty miles from land is generally considered to be a safe
distance but it may be in excess of the twenty miles in some cases. Judgment should be used
based on a risk assessment which should include consideration of the possible effect that ship
operations might have on the quality of the water intake.

The seawater inlets (sea chests) should be located forward and if possible on the opposite
side of the ship from all overboard waste water and ballast tanks discharge outlets. Sea water
should pass through suitable filters before entering the water making equipment.

The manufacturers’ operating instructions should be clearly posted in the plant room and
strictly followed.

By-passes should not be installed around treatment units except where necessary as part of
the treatment process. There should be an adequate store of spare replacement parts
particularly for any vital or fragile parts. Distillation units should indicate low range salinity
levels, operational temperature levels and have an automatic discharge to waste. They
should also have an alarm with trip setting or equivalent.

Any chemicals used in an injection system to a sea suction intended to prevent the growth of
organisms in the ship’s piping system serving water making plant should be suitable for that
purpose.

High pressure distillation and reverse osmosis plants are highly effective in removing micro-
organisms and chemical constituents. They can therefore be employed as a single treatment
so long as they remain effective. There is therefore a need for highly reliable on-line monitoring
linked to rapid management intervention. They can however be combined with the application
of a low level of residual chlorine or other equivalent disinfectant. Because low pressure
evaporators operate at lower temperatures, this type of plant should be fitted with an automatic
disinfecting unit, generally chlorine is used, before it is pumped to the storage tanks.

Desalinated water effectively demineralises the seawater which makes it corrosive with the
potential to damage lines, tanks etc. Also the taste of desalinated water is bland, and may be
considered unpalatable. Appropriate stabilising and mineralising chemicals treatments should
therefore be applied before the water is passed into the storage tank.

5. Filtration

Filters should be used only where necessary as part of a purification system that includes
disinfection. Terminal or tap filters often collect bacteria and accelerate its growth and for this
reason their use should be discouraged unless they can be disinfected or replacement
- 15 -
cartridges are used. Filters should be maintained or replaced according to manufacturers’
instructions.

6. Water Storage and Distribution Arrangements

6.1 Potable water storage tanks

Storage tanks should normally be sited above the inner bottom and independent of the hull
and not adjacent to tanks containing oil. They should be sited and be of such dimensions that
they are readily accessible to facilitate inspection, cleaning and coating.

Tanks should be clearly marked “Potable Water”. They should be used in regular rotation to
avoid stagnation.

Storage should normally never be less than a 2 day supply. Consideration should be given to
the size of the ship's complement of officers and crew, the maximum number of passengers,
the time and distance between ports of call and the availability of water suitable for treatment
with facilities aboard. Storage may be decreased if the water supply can be supplemented by
water produced by water making plants, but only to the amount that can be reliably supplied by
the water making plant.

Coatings systems other than cement should be specially developed for use in potable water
tanks. Manufacturer’s recommendations for application and drying or curing of the coating
must be followed. All items that penetrate the tank, for example bolts, pipes, pipe flanges
should be coated with the same product.

6.2 Distribution Systems

The freshwater distribution pumps should not be capable of being connected to any other
service. The suction lines of the pumps should not be cross-connected with the piping or
storage tank of any non-potable-water system. Lines should not be submerged in bilge water,
or pass through tanks storing non-potable liquids. Overflows, vents and drains from tanks, and
drains from the distribution system (including any treatment plant) should not be connected
directly to sewage drains.

Potable water piping should be painted or hatched blue. If the direction of flow is important,
this shall be shown by means of an arrow pointing in the respective direction. Potable water
outlets should be labelled POTABLE WATER. All non-potable outlets should be labelled
UNFIT FOR DRINKING. If hot water piping and cold water piping run adjacent to one another,
appropriate thermal insulation should be carried out.

Calorifiers and pressure tanks should be fitted with efficient connections at the lowest point of
the unit so that loose scale or sludge can be completely drained off after cleaning and
maintenance. They should have adequate access to enable thorough cleaning.

The design of the distribution system should provide maximum circulation, avoiding dead legs
and optimum conditions for bacterial growth (15°C to 50°C). The risk increases where
sections of the system are not kept in continuous use. To minimise the risk a ring main system
with circulation pumps in hot and cold water lines should be considered for large scale demand
such as passenger ships for example.

Corrosion and scale inhibitors if used should be suitable for use in fresh water systems.

6.3 Taps and Other Fixtures

Fixtures should be resistant to the corrosive effects of salt water and saline atmosphere and fit for
use with fresh water systems. They should be easy to clean and so designed to function easily
- 16 -
and efficiently. Approved mixer taps should be fitted to showers and it is recommended that
wash-hand basins should have hot and cold mixer taps.

7. Maintenance of Water Systems

All elements of the freshwater production, treatment and delivery system including filters,
pumps, calorifiers, pressure tanks etc should be inspected, cleaned, flushed out, or items
replaced where appropriate, according to the manufacturers instructions and the planned
maintenance system. The following maintenance is recommended.


Freshwater Storage Tanks

Persons inspecting or working in freshwater tanks should wear clean protective
clothing and footwear which has not been used for any other work area and they
should not be suffering from any skin infection or communicable disease.
Actions Intervals
To be thoroughly pumped out and where necessary hosed
prior to refilling.
6 monthly
To be opened up, emptied, ventilated and inspected and
thoroughly cleaned, recoated as necessary, aired and refilled
with clean freshwater chlorinated to a concentration of
0.2ppm free chlorine. The cleaning process should include
disinfection with a solution of 50ppm chlorine.
12 monthly
The system (from machinery space to furthest outlets should
be charged with super-chlorinated freshwater at a
concentration of 50ppm for a period of 12 hrs and then
completely flushed out and refilled at 0.2ppm residual free
chlorine
Refit or drydock
Pressure Tests on all FW tanks (After the pressure test, the
system to be thoroughly flushed with potable water.
Intervals not greater than
5 years

Distribution Systems Maintenance

Parts Actions Intervals
Filters Clean
Change
Monthly or according to
manufacturers
instructions
UV
exposure
area
Clean According to
manufacturers
instructions
Calorifiers To be opened up, inspected scaled and
cleaned. Before draining temperatures
should be raised to 70˚C for at least an hour
to ensure destruction of bacteria which may
have colonised the lower and cooler zone of
the unit
Periodically (general
recommendation - annual
inspection)
Shower
heads
Particularly in accommodation that has been
out of use for an extended period. Clean in a
50ppm chlorine solution.
3 monthly
FW Hoses Flush and fill with 50ppm chlorine solution and
allow to stand for at least an hour before
emptying and stowage.
6 monthly or more
frequent if required.

- 17 -

Health & Safety

Adequate care should be taken when handling chemicals or biological agents, for example
chemicals, corrosion inhibitors, filters etc. Suitable risk assessments and control measures
should be applied.

The rules for classification and construction of seagoing ships stated by the relevant classification
societies should be observed. Reference should also be made to the following British Standards
in relation to sanitary design and construction of ship water supplies.
• ISO 15748-1: 2002 – Ships and marine technology – Potable water supply on ships
and marine structures – Part 1: Planning and design.
• ISO 15748-2: 2002 – Ships and marine technology – Potable water supply on ships
and marine structures – Part 2: Method of calculation.

The WHO Guide to Ship Sanitation

This Guide provides advice on a number of topics, including the management of swimming
pools and spas on board ships, and is available on the internet as a draft at
www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/hygiene/ships/shipsanitation/en

The HSE Approved Code of Practice and Guidance for the Control of Legionella
Bacteria in Water Systems

This guide provides practical advice for the control of legionella bacteria in any undertaking
involving a work activity and to premises controlled in connection with a trade, business or
other undertaking where there is a reasonably foreseeable risk of exposure to legionella
bacteria. Although the Code of Practice is not specific to a marine environment, it does
provide advice about prevention or controlling exposure to the bacteria and treatment and
control programmes. The Code of Practice may be obtained from the Health and Safety
Executive (www.hse.gov.uk )







MERCHANT SHIPPING NOTICE
MSN 1752 (M)
1
The Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended by the Merchant Shipping (Load Line)
(Amendment) Regulations 2000
Notice to Shipowners, Masters, Assigning Authorities and Surveyors
Summary
This Notice replaces MSN 1701 (M) and advises all Shipowners, Masters, Assigning Authorities and
Surveyors of the requirements of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended
by the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) (Amendment) Regulations 2000. The 1998 Regulations as
amended are referred to as “the Regulations” in this Notice.
The Regulations now incorporate amendments to the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966
contained in the Protocol of 1988 relating to the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966. The
Protocol was adopted by the International Maritime Organization on 11
th
November 1998.
Key Points:-
• The Schedules in this Notice are an integral part of the Regulations.
• Schedules contained in this Notice apply to United Kingdom ships and to other ships whilst they
are in United Kingdom national waters. They do not apply to ships of war, ships solely engaged in
fishing, pleasure vessels, certain ships under 80 net tons engaged solely in the coasting trade while
not carrying cargo, and ships that do not go to sea.
List of Schedules
Schedule 1: Appropriate load lines and seasonal zones, areas and periods
Schedule 2: Conditions of assignment
Part 1 Ships in general
Part 2 Special requirements applicable to type “A” ships
Part 3 Special requirements applicable to certain type “B” ships
Part 4 Special requirements applicable to ships assigned timber freeboards
Part 5 General
Schedule 3: Record of particulars
Schedule 4: Freeboards
Part 1 Freeboards other than timber freeboards
Part 2 Timber freeboards
Part 3 Sailing ships and other ships
2
Schedule 5: Freeboard tables
Schedule 6: Stability
Part I Information as to stability
Part II Ships in relation to which the Secretary of State’s or the Assigning Authority’s
approval of the stability information is required.
Schedule 7: Notice of load lines to be posted up before sailing
Schedule 8: United Kingdom Load Line Certificates
In this Merchant Shipping Notice –
(1) “mean freeboard” means the mean of the freeboard measured on each side of the ship;
“mean draught” means the mean of the draughts shown on the scales of measurement on the stem
and on the stern post of the ship;
“the Regulations” means the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998 (SI 1998/2241),
as amended by the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) (Amendment) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/1335);
and other expressions used have the same meaning as they bear in the Regulations;
(2) a reference to a ship constructed on or after a specified date is a reference to a ship, the keel of
which is laid or which is at a similar stage of construction on or after that date;
(3) a reference to a ship constructed before a specified date is a reference to a ship, the keel of which is
laid or which is at a similar stage of construction before that date.
An executive agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
MSPP1E Load Line & Cargo Ship Safety Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton SO15 1EG
Tel: 023 80 329 119
Fax: 023 80 329 161
September 2000
© Crown Copyright 2000
3
Regulation 20
SCHEDULE 1
APPROPRIATE LOAD LINES AND SEASONAL ZONES, AREAS AND PERIODS
Appropriate Load Lines
1. The seasonal zones, areas and periods which determine the appropriate load line in a particular sea
area at a given time are set out in this Schedule and shown by way of illustration on Chart No
D.6083 “Load Line Regulations: Zones, Areas & Seasonal Periods, Edition No 2”; available from the
Hydrographic Office.
2. Subject to subparagraphs (d) to (g) below the load line appropriate to a ship shall be –
(a) the Summer load line, when the ship is in a Summer Zone (excluding any part of such a zone
which is a seasonal area in relation to the ship);
(b) the Tropical load line, when the ship is in a Tropical Zone;
(c) the Summer load line, the Winter load line or the Tropical load line, according to the season
when the ship is in a seasonal zone or area (including any part of a Summer Zone which is a
seasonal area in relation to the ship);
(d) the Winter North Atlantic load line, in the case of a ship of 100 metres or less in length, when it is
in these zones during the Winter seasonal periods applicable to them –
(i) North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zone I, as set out in paragraph 4(a);
(ii) North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zone II, as set out in paragraph 4(b) as lies between the
meridians of longitude 15
o
W and 50
o
W;
during the winter seasonal periods applicable in those zones;
(e) the Summer load line, in the case of a sailing ship, except in circumstances in which
subparagraph (d) above applies;
(f) an All Seasons load line, in the case of a ship marked in accordance with regulation 30;
(g) the Timber load line, corresponding to the seasons and zones, in the case of a ship marked with
Timber load lines and carrying timber deck cargo in accordance with Part IV of Schedule 2.
Ports on Boundary Lines
3. For the purposes of applying the provisions of this Schedule to a ship at a port which stands on the
boundary line between two zones or areas or between a zone and an area, or which is required by
this Schedule to be considered as being on such a boundary line, the port shall be deemed to be
within the zone or area into which the ship is about to proceed or from which she has arrived as the
case may be.
4
Zones, Areas and Seasonal Periods
NORTHERN WINTER SEASONAL ZONES AND AREA
North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zones I and II
4. (a) The North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zone I lies within the meridian of longitude 50
o
W from the
coast of Greenland to latitude 45
o
N, thence the parallel of latitude 45
o
N to longitude 15
o
W,
thence the meridian of longitude 15
o
W to latitude 60
o
N, thence the parallel of latitude 60
o
N to
the Greenwich Meridian, thence this meridian northwards.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 16th October to 15th April.
SUMMER: 16th April to 15th October.
(b) The North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zone II lies within the meridian of longitude 68
o
30’W from
the coast of the United States to latitude 40
o
N, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 36
o
N
longitude 73
o
W, thence the parallel of latitude 36
o
N to longitude 25
o
W and thence the rhumb
line to Cape Torinana.
Excluded from this zone are the North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zone I, the North Atlantic
Winter Seasonal Area and the Baltic Sea bounded by the parallel of latitude of The Skaw in the
Skagerrak.
The Shetland Islands are to be considered as being on the boundary line between the North
Atlantic Winter Seasonal Zones I and II.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 1st November to 31st March.
SUMMER: 1st April to 31st October.
North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Area
5. The boundary of the North Atlantic Winter Seasonal Area is –
the meridian of longitude 68
o
30’W from the coast of the United States to latitude 40
o
N, thence the
rhumb line to the southernmost intersection of the meridian of longitude 61
o
W with the coast of
Canada and thence the east coasts of Canada and the United States.
Seasonal periods:
For ships over 100 metres in length:
WINTER: 16th December to 15th February.
SUMMER: 16th February to 15th December.
For ships of 100 metres or less in length:
WINTER: 1st November to 31st March.
SUMMER: 1st April to 31st October.
5
North Pacific Winter Seasonal Zone
6. The southern boundary of the North Pacific Winter Seasonal Zone is –
the parallel of latitude 50
o
N from the east coast of the Russian Federation to the west coast of Sakhalin,
thence the west coast of Sakhalin to the southern extremity of Cape Krilon, thence the rhumb line to
Wakkanai, Hokkaido, Japan, thence the east and south coasts of Hokkaido to longitude 145
o
E, thence
the meridian of longitude 145
o
E to latitude 35
o
N, thence the parallel of latitude 35
o
N to longitude
150
o
W and thence the rhumb line to the southern extremity of Dall Island, Alaska.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 16th October to 15th April.
SUMMER: 16th April to 15th October.
SOUTHERN WINTER SEASONAL ZONE
Southern Winter Seasonal Zone
7. The northern boundary of the Southern Winter Seasonal Zone is –
the rhumb line from the east coast of the American continent at Cape Tres Puntas to the point
latitude 34
o
S, longitude 50
o
W, thence the parallel of latitude 34
o
S to longitude 17
o
E, thence the
rhumb line to the point latitude 35
o
10’S, longitude 20
o
E, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude
34
o
S, longitude 28
o
E, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 35
o
30’S, longitude 118
o
E, and thence
the rhumb line to Cape Grim on the northwest coast of Tasmania; thence along the north and east
coasts of Tasmania to the southernmost point of Bruny Island, thence the rhumb line to Black Rock
Point on Stewart Island, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 47
o
S, longitude 170
o
E, thence the
rhumb line to the point latitude 33
o
S, longitude 170
o
W, and thence the parallel of latitude 33
o
S to the
point latitude 33
o
S, longitude 79
o
W, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 41
o
S, longitude
75
o
W, thence the rhumb line to Punta Corona lighthouse on Chiloe Island, latitude 41
o
47’S longitude
75
o
53’W, thence along the north, east and south coasts of Chiloe Island to the point latitude 43
o
20’S,
longitude 74
o
20’W, and thence the meridian of longitude 74
o
20’W, to the parallel of latitude 45
o
45’S,
including the inner zone of Chiloe channels from the meridian 74
o
20’W to the east.
Seasonal Periods:
WINTER: 16th April to 15th October.
SUMMER: 16th October to 15th April.
TROPICAL ZONE
Northern Boundary of the Tropical Zone
8. The northern boundary of the Tropical Zone is –
the parallel of latitude 13
o
N from the east coast of the American continent to longitude 60
o
W, thence
the rhumb line to the point latitude 10
o
N, longitude 58
o
W, thence the parallel of latitude 10
o
N to
longitude 20
o
W, thence the meridian of longitude 20
o
W to latitude 30
o
N and thence the parallel of
latitude 30
o
N to the west coast of Africa; from the east coast of Africa the parallel of latitude 8
o
N to
longitude 70
o
E, thence the meridian of longitude 70
o
E to latitude 13
o
N, thence the parallel of latitude
13
o
N to the west coast of India; thence the south coast of India to latitude 10
o
30’N on the east coast
of India, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 9
o
N, longitude 82
o
E, thence the meridian of
longitude 82
o
E to latitude 8
o
N, thence the parallel of latitude 8
o
N to the west coast of Malaysia,
thence the coast of South-East Asia to the east coast of Vietnam at latitude 10
o
N, thence the parallel
of latitude 10
o
N to longitude 145
o
E, thence the meridian of longitude 145
o
E to latitude 13
o
N and
thence the parallel of latitude 13
o
N to the west coast of the American continent.
6
Saigon is to be considered as being on the boundary line of the Tropical Zone and the Seasonal
Tropical Area.
Southern Boundary of the Tropical Zone
9. The southern boundary of the Tropical Zone is –
the rhumb line from the Port of Santos, Brazil, to the point where the meridian of longitude 40°W
intersects the Tropic of Capricorn; thence the Tropic of Capricorn to the west coast of Africa; from
the east coast of Africa the parallel of latitude 20°S to the west coast of Madagascar, thence the west
and north coasts of Madagascar to longitude 50°E, thence the meridian of longitude 50°E to latitude
10°S, thence the parallel of latitude 10°S to longitude 98°E, thence the rhumb line to Port Darwin,
Australia, thence the coasts of Australia and Wessel Island eastwards to Cape Wessel, thence the
parallel of latitude 11°S to the west side of Cape York; from the east side of Cape York the parallel of
latitude 11°S to longitude 150°W, thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 26°S, longitude 75°W,
thence the rhumb line to the point latitude 32°47’S, longitude 72°W, and thence to the parallel of
latitude 32°47’S to the west coast of South America.
Valparaiso and Santos are to be considered as being on the boundary line of the Tropical and
Summer Zones.
Areas to be included in the Tropical Zone
10. The following areas are to be as included in the Tropical Zone –
(a) the Suez Canal, the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, from Port Said to the meridian of longitude 45
o
E;
Aden and Berbera are to be considered as being on the boundary line of the Tropical Zone and
the Seasonal Tropical Area;
(b) the Persian Gulf to the meridian of longitude 59
o
E; and
(c) the area bounded by the parallel of latitude 22
o
S from the east coast of Australia to the Great
Barrier Reef, thence the Great Barrier Reef to latitude 11
o
S. The northern boundary of the area is
the southern boundary of the Tropical Zone.
SEASONAL TROPICAL AREAS
11. The following are Seasonal Tropical Areas.
(a) In the North Atlantic
An area bounded
on the north by the rhumb line from Cape Catoche, Yucatan, to Cape San Antonio, Cuba, the
north Coast of Cuba to latitude 20
o
N and thence the parallel of latitude 20
o
N to longitude 20
o
W;
on the west by the coast of the American continent;
on the south and east by the northern boundary of the Tropical Zone.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st November to 15th July.
SUMMER: 16th July to 31st October.
7
(b) In the Arabian Sea
An area bounded
on the west by the coast of Africa, the meridian of longitude 45
o
E in the Gulf of Aden, the coast
of South Arabia and the meridian of longitude 59
o
E in the Gulf of Oman;
on the north and east by the coasts of Pakistan and India;
on the south by the northern boundary of the Tropical Zone.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st September to 31st May.
SUMMER: 1st June to 31st August.
(c) In the Bay of Bengal
The Bay of Bengal north of the northern boundary of the Tropical Zone.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st December to 30th April.
SUMMER: 1st May to 30th November.
(d) In the South Indian Ocean
(i) An area bounded
on the north and west by the southern boundary of the Tropical Zone and the east coast of
Madagascar; on the south by the parallel of latitude 20
o
S;
on the east by the rhumb line from the point latitude 20
o
S, longitude 50
o
E, to the point latitude
15
o
S, longitude 51
o
30’E, and thence by the meridian of longitude 51
o
30’E to latitude 10
o
S.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st April to 30th November.
SUMMER: 1st December to 31st March.
(ii) An area bounded
on the north by the southern boundary of the Tropical Zone;
on the east by the coast of Australia;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 15
o
S from longitude 51
o
30’E, to longitude 114
o
E and
thence the meridian of longitude 114
o
E to the coast of Australia;
on the west by the meridian of longitude 51°30’E.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st May to 30th November.
SUMMER: 1st December to 30th April.
8
(e) In the China Sea
An area bounded
on the west and north by the coasts of Vietnam and China from latitude 10
o
N to Hong Kong;
on the east by the rhumb line from Hong Kong to the Port of Sual (Luzon Island) and the west
coasts of the Islands of Luzon, Samar and Leyte to latitude 10
o
N;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 10°N.
Hong Kong and Sual are to be considered as being on the boundary of the Seasonal Tropical
Area and Summer Zone.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 21st January to 30th April.
SUMMER: 1st May to 20th January.
(f) In the North Pacific
(i) An area bounded
on the north by the parallel of latitude 25
o
N;
on the west by the meridian of longitude 160
o
E;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 13
o
N;
on the east by the meridian of longitude 130
o
W.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st April to 31st October.
SUMMER: 1st November to 31st March.
(ii) An area bounded
on the north and east by the west coast of the American continent;
on the west by the meridian of longitude 123
o
W from the coast of the American continent
to latitude 33
o
N and by the rhumb line from the point latitude 33
o
N, longitude 123
o
W to
the point latitude 13
o
N, longitude 105
o
W;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 13
o
N.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st March to 30th June and 1st November to 30th November.
SUMMER: 1st July to 31st October and 1st December to 28th/29th February.
(g) In the South Pacific
(i) The Gulf of Carpentaria south of latitude 11
o
S
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st April to 30th November.
SUMMER : 1st December to 31st March.
9
(ii) An area bounded
on the north and east by the southern boundary of the Tropical Zone;
on the south by the parallel of latitude of 24°S to longitude 154°E, thence by the meridian of
longitude 154°E to the Tropic of Capricorn and thence by the Tropic of Capricorn to
longitude 150
o
W, thence by the meridian of longitude 150
o
W to latitude 20
o
S and thence by
the parallel of latitude 20
o
S to the point where it intersects the southern boundary of the
Tropical Zone;
on the west by the boundaries of the area within the Great Barrier Reef included in the
Tropical Zone and by the east coast of Australia.
Seasonal periods:
TROPICAL: 1st April to 30th November.
SUMMER: 1st December to 31st March.
SUMMER ZONES
12. The remaining sea areas constitute the Summer Zones.
However, for ships of 100 metres or less in length, the area bounded
on the north and west by the east coast of the United States;
on the east by the meridian of longitude 68
o
30’S from the coast of the United States to latitude 40
o
N
and thence by the rhumb line to the point latitude 36
o
N longitude 73
o
W;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 36
o
N;
is a Winter Seasonal Area.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 1st November to 31st March.
SUMMER: 1st April to 31st October.
ENCLOSED SEAS
13. Baltic Sea
This sea bounded by the parallel of latitude of The Skaw in the Skagerrak is included in the Summer
Zones.
However, for ships of 100 metres or less in length, it is a Winter Seasonal Area.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 1st November to 31st March.
SUMMER: 1st April to 31st October.
14. Black Sea
This sea is included in the Summer Zones.
However, for ships of 100 metres or less in length, the area north of latitude 44
o
N is a Winter
Seasonal Area.
10
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 1st December to 28th/29th February.
SUMMER: 1st March to 30th November.
15. Mediterranean
This sea is included in the Summer Zones.
However, for ships of 100 metres or less in length, the area bounded
on the north and west by the coasts of France and Spain and the meridian of longitude 3
o
E from the
coast of Spain to latitude 40
o
N;
on the south by the parallel of latitude 40
o
N from longitude 3
o
E to the west coast of Sardinia;
on the east by the west and north coasts of Sardinia from latitude 40
o
N to latitude 9
o
E to the south
coast of Corsica, hence by the west and north coasts of Corsica to longitude 9
o
E and thence by the
rhumb line to Cape Sicié.
is a Winter Seasonal Area
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 16th December to 15th March.
SUMMER: 16th March to 15th December.
16. Sea of Japan
This sea south of latitude 50
o
N is included in the Summer Zones.
However, for ships of 100 metres or less in length, the area between the parallel of latitude 50
o
N and
the rhumb line from the east coast of Korea at latitude 38
o
N to the west coast of Hokkaido, Japan, at
latitude 43
o
12’N is a Winter Seasonal Area.
Seasonal periods:
WINTER: 1st December to 28th/29th February.
SUMMER: 1st March to 30th November.
11
Regulation 25
SCHEDULE 2
CONDITIONS OF ASSIGNMENT
Interpretation
1. (1) In this Schedule, except where the context otherwise requires –
“breadth (B)” means the maximum breadth of the ship measured amidships to the moulded line
of the frame in the case of a ship having a metal shell, or to the outer surface of the hull in the
case of a ship having a shell of any other material;
“enclosed superstructure” means a superstructure –
(a) which has enclosing bulkheads of efficient construction in which all access openings are
fitted with sills and weathertight doors; and
(b) in which all other openings in sides or ends are fitted with efficient weathertight means of
closing;
but shall not include a bridge or poop fulfilling these requirements unless access to machinery
and other working spaces within the bridge or poop is provided by alternative means which are
available at all times when access openings in the bulkheads of the bridge or poop are closed;
“exposed position” means a position which is either –
(a) exposed to weather and sea; or
(b) within a structure so exposed other than enclosed superstructure;
“forward perpendicular” means the perpendicular taken at the forward end of the ship’s length
(L), coinciding with the foreside of the stem on the waterline on which such length is measured;
and “after perpendicular” means the perpendicular taken at the after end of such length;
“freeing port area (A)” means the sum of the areas of the openings of freeing ports on each side
of the ship for each well;
“height” in relation to a superstructure means the least vertical height measured at side from the
top of the superstructure deck beams to the top of the freeboard deck beams; and the “standard
height” of a superstructure means the height ascertained in accordance with the provisions of
paragraph 9 of Schedule 4;
“Position 1” or “Position 2” means those positions in which structure, openings or fittings are
situated –
(a) in the case of Position 1, upon exposed freeboard and raised quarter decks, and upon
exposed superstructure decks situated forward of a point located a quarter of the ship’s
length from the forward perpendicular; and
(b) in the case of Position 2, upon exposed superstructure decks situated abaft a quarter of the
ship’s length from the forward perpendicular;
“Summer load waterline” means the waterline which corresponds to the Summer load line of
the ship;
12
“superstructure” means a decked structure (including a raised quarter deck) situated on the
freeboard deck which either extends from side to side of the ship or is such that its side plating is
not inboard of the shell plating by more than 4 per cent of the breadth of the ship; and where the
freeboard deck consists of a lower deck as described in subparagraph (b) of the definition of
“freeboard deck”, includes that part of the hull which extends above the freeboard deck;
“superstructure deck” means a deck forming the top of a superstructure;
“Type “A” ship” means a ship which is designed to carry only liquid cargoes in bulk and has the
characteristics set out below –
(a) the cargo tanks of the ship have only small access openings closed by watertight gasketed
covers of steel or equivalent material;
(b) the ship has high integrity of the exposed deck and has a low permeability of loaded cargo
compartments;
(c) (i) in the case of a ship constructed before 8th June 2000, if over 150 metres in length and
designed to have empty compartments when loaded to the Summer load waterline, the
ship shall be capable of remaining afloat after the flooding of any one of these empty
compartments, at an assumed permeability of 0.95 in a condition of equilibrium; if over
225 metres in length its machinery space shall be treated as a floodable compartment,
but with an assumed permeability of 0.85;
(ii) in the case of a ship constructed on or after 8th June 2000, if over 150m in length and a
freeboard of less than required for a type “B” ship has been assigned, when loaded in
accordance with the initial condition of loading before flooding, the ship is capable of
remaining afloat in a satisfactory condition of equilibrium after the flooding of any
compartment or compartments with an assumed permeability of 0.95, consequent
upon the damage assumptions specified in paragraph 5(8) of Part 1 of Schedule 4; in
such a ship the machinery space shall be treated as a floodable compartment, but with
a permeability of 0.85.
(d) the condition of equilibrium referred to in subparagraph (c)(i) is as follows.
(i) the final water line after the flooding is below the top of any ventilator coaming, the
lower edge of any air pipe opening, the upper edge of the sill of any access opening
fitted with a weathertight door, and the lower edge of any other opening through
which progressive flooding may take place;
(ii) the angle of heel due to unsymmetrical flooding does not exceed 15 degrees or, if no
part of the deck is immersed, an angle of heel of up to 17 degrees may be accepted;
(iii) the metacentric height calculated using the constant displacement method has a
positive value in the upright condition after the flooding;
(iv) the ship has adequate residual stability; and
(v) the ship has sufficient stability during intermediate stages of flooding to the
satisfaction of the Assigning Authority;
(e) The condition of equilibrium referred to in subparagraph (c)(ii) shall be regarded as
satisfactory provided the following conditions are fulfilled.
(i) The final waterline after flooding, taking into account sinkage, heel and trim, is below
the lower edge of any opening through which progressive downflooding may take
place. Such openings shall include air pipes, ventilators and openings which are closed
by means of weathertight doors or hatch covers, and may exclude those openings
13
closed by means of manhole covers and flush scuttles, cargo hatch covers of the type
described in subparagraph (a), remotely operated sliding watertight doors, and
sidescuttles of non-opening type. However, in the case of doors separating a main
machinery space from a steering gear compartment, watertight doors may be of a
hinged, quick-acting type kept closed at sea, whilst not in use, provided also that the
lower sill of such doors is above the summer load waterline.
(ii) If pipes, ducts or tunnels are situated within the assumed extent of damage penetration
as defined in paragraph 5(8)(b) of Part 1 Schedule 4, arrangements shall be made so
that progressive flooding cannot thereby extend to compartments other than those
assumed to be floodable in the calculation for each case of damage.
(iii) If no part of the deck is immersed, the angle of heel due to unsymmetrical flooding
does not exceed 17°. If any part of the deck is immersed, the angle of heel due to
unsymmetrical flooding does not exceed 15°.
(iv) The metacentric height in the flooded condition is positive.
(v) When any part of the deck outside the compartment assumed flooded in a particular
case of damage is immersed, or in any case where the margin of stability in the flooded
condition may be considered doubtful, the residual stability is to be investigated by the
Assigning Authority. It may be regarded as sufficient if the righting lever curve has a
minimum range of 20° beyond the position of equilibrium with a maximum righting
lever of at least 0.1m within this range. The area under the righting lever curve within
this range shall not be less than 0.0175m.rad. The Assigning Authority shall give
consideration to the potential hazard presented by protected or unprotected openings
which may become temporarily immersed within the range of residual stability.
(vi) The Assigning Authority is satisfied that the stability is sufficient during the
intermediate stages of flooding.
“Type “B” ship” means a ship other than a Type “A” ship;
“unattended machinery space” means a machinery space which during the normal operation of
the ship at sea is unattended for any period, and “attended machinery space” means a
machinery space other than an unattended machinery space;
“weathertight” in relation to any part of a ship other than a door in a bulkhead means that water
will not penetrate it and so enter the hull of the ship in the worst sea and weather conditions
likely to be encountered by the ship in service; and in relation to a door in a bulkhead it means a
door which –
(a) is constructed of steel or other equivalent material, is permanently and strongly attached to
the bulkhead, and is framed, stiffened and fitted so that the whole structure in which it is set
is of equivalent strength to the unpierced bulkhead;
(b) is closed by means of gaskets, clamping devices or other equivalent means permanently
attached to the bulkhead or to the door itself;
(c) when closed, is weathertight as above defined; and
(d) it can be operated from either side of the bulkhead.
1. (2) In the definition of a “Type “A” ship”, the initial condition of loading before flooding referred to
in paragraph (c )(ii) shall be determined as follows-
(a) the ship is loaded to its summer load waterline on an imaginary even keel;
14
(b) when calculating the vertical centre of gravity, the following principles apply:
(i) homogenous cargo is carried
(ii) all cargo compartments, except those referred to under subparagraph (iii), but
including compartments intended to be partially filled, shall be considered fully
loaded except that in the case of fluid cargoes each compartment shall be treated as
98% full;
(iii) if the ship is intended to operate at its summer load waterline with empty
compartments, such compartments shall be considered empty provided the height of the
centre of gravity so calculated is not less than as calculated under subparagraph (ii);
(iv) 50 % of the individual total capacity of all tanks and spaces fitted to contain
consumable liquids and stores is allowed for. It shall be assumed that for each type of
liquid, at least one transverse pair or a single centreline tank has maximum free
surface, and the tank or combination of tanks to be taken into account shall be those
where the effect of free surfaces is the greatest; in each tank the centre of gravity of the
contents shall be taken at the centre of volume of the tank. The remaining tanks shall
be assumed either completely empty or completely filled, and the distribution of
consumable liquids between these tanks shall be effected so as to obtain the greatest
possible height above the keel for the centre of gravity;
(v) at an angle of heel of not more than 5° in each compartment containing liquids, as
prescribed in subparagraph (ii) except that in the case of compartments containing
consumable fluids, as prescribed in subparagraph (iv), the maximum free surface effect
shall be taken into account. Alternatively, the actual free surface effects may be used,
provided the methods of calculation are acceptable to the Assigning Authority;
(vi) weights shall be calculated on the basis of the following values for specific gravities:
salt water 1.025
fresh water 1.000
oil fuel 0.950
diesel oil 0.900
lubricating oil 0.900
15
PART I – SHIPS IN GENERAL
Structural strength and stability
2. (1) The construction of the ship shall be such that its general structural strength is sufficient for the
freeboards assigned.
(2) The design and construction of the ship shall be such as to ensure that its stability in all probable
loading conditions shall be sufficient for the freeboards assigned, and for this purpose due
consideration shall be given to the intended service of the ship and to the following criteria.
(a) The area under the curve of righting levers (GZ curve) shall not be less than –
(i) 0.055 metre-radians up to an angle of 30 degrees;
(ii) 0.09 metre-radians up to an angle of 40 degrees or the angle at which the lower edge of
any openings in the hull, superstructures or deckhouses which cannot be closed
weathertight, are immersed if that angle is less; and
(iii) 0.03 metre-radians between the angles of heel of 30 degrees and 40 degrees or such
lesser angle as is referred to in subparagraph (ii) above.
(b) The righting lever (GZ) shall be at least 0.20 metres at an angle of heel equal to or greater
than 30 degrees.
(c) The maximum righting lever shall occur at an angle of heel not less than 30 degrees.
(d) The initial transverse metacentric height shall not be less than 0.15 metres. In the case of a
ship carrying a timber deck cargo which complies with subparagraph (a) above by taking
into account the volume of timber deck cargo, the initial transverse metacentric height shall
not be less than 0.05 metres.
(3) To determine whether the ship complies with the requirements of subparagraph (2) the ship
shall, unless otherwise permitted, be subject to an inclining test which shall be carried out in the
presence of a surveyor appointed by the Secretary of State or, for the ships listed in regulation
32(5), a surveyor appointed by the Assigning Authority.
Superstructure end bulkheads
3. Bulkheads at exposed ends of enclosed superstructures shall be of efficient construction. The height
of any sill in an access opening in such a bulkhead shall, except where otherwise stated, be at least
380 millimetres above the deck.
Hatchways: general
4. (1) The provisions of this paragraph and of paragraphs 5 and 6 apply to all hatchways in Position 1
or in Position 2 except where otherwise stated.
(2) Subject to subparagraph (3), the construction and the means for securing the weathertightness of
a hatchway shall –
(a) in the case of a hatchway closed by a portable cover and secured weathertight by tarpaulins
and battening devices, comply with the requirements of paragraph 5; and
(b) in the case of a hatchway closed by a weathertight cover of steel or other equivalent material
fitted with gaskets and clamping devices, comply with the requirements of paragraph 6.
16
(3) Every hatchway located in an exposed position on a deck above a superstructure deck and
leading to a space below shall be of such a construction and be fitted with such means as will
secure the weathertightness of the hatchway, having regard to its position.
Hatchways closed by portable covers and secured weathertight by tarpaulins and battening devices.
Coamings
5. (1) Every hatchway shall have a coaming of substantial construction. The coaming shall be
constructed of mild steel but may be constructed of other material provided that the strength
and stiffness of the coaming are equivalent to those of a coaming of mild steel. The height of the
coaming above the deck shall be at least-
(a) 600 millimetres, if the hatchway is in Position 1;
(b) 450 millimetres, if the hatchway is in Position 2.
Covers
(2) (a) The width of every bearing surface for a hatchway cover shall be at least 65 millimetres.
(b) In the case of a cover made of wood –
(i) the finished thickness of the cover shall be at least 60 millimetres in association with a
span of not more than l.5 metres, and the thickness of covers for larger spans shall be
increased by 4 millimetres for each 100 millimetres above the span of 1.5 metres;
(ii) the ends of the cover shall be protected by galvanised steel bands efficiently secured.
(c) In the case of a cover made of mild steel –
(i) the strength of the cover shall withstand the assumed load given in Table 1, and the
product of the maximum stress thus calculated and the factor 4.25 shall not exceed the
minimum ultimate strength of the material;
TABLE 1
Ship’s Length(L) Assumed Load, per square metre
Hatchway in Position 1 Hatchway in Position 2
24 metres 1 metric ton 0.75 metric ton
100 metres or over 1.75 metric tons 1.30 metric tons
Over 24 metres but
less than 100 metres
to be ascertained by linear interpolation
17
(ii) the cover shall be so designed as to limit the deflection to not more than 0.0028 times
the span under the assumed load in Table 1 appropriate to the hatchway cover.
(d) In the case of a cover made neither of mild steel nor wood the strength and stiffness of the
cover shall be equivalent to those of a cover of mild steel.
Portable beams
(3) (a) Where portable beams for supporting hatchway covers are made of mild steel, their
strength shall be such as to withstand the assumed load given in Table 1, and the product of
the maximum stress thus calculated and the factor 5 shall not exceed the minimum ultimate
strength of the material.
(b) Such beams shall be so designed as to limit the deflection to not more than 0.0022 times the
span under the assumed load in Table 1 appropriate to the beam.
(c) In the case of portable beams not made of mild steel, the strength and stiffness of the beams
shall be equivalent to those of beams of mild steel.
Pontoon covers
(4) (a) Where pontoon covers of mild steel are used in place of portable beams and covers, their
strength shall be such as to withstand the assumed load given in Table 1, and the product of
the maximum stress thus calculated and the factor 5 shall not exceed the minimum ultimate
strength of the material.
(b) Such pontoon covers shall be so designed as to limit the deflection to not more than 0.0022
times the span under the assumed load in Table 1 appropriate to the pontoon cover.
(c) Mild steel plating forming the tops of such covers shall not be less in thickness than 1 per
cent of the spacing of the stiffeners or 6 millimetres, whichever is the greater.
(d) In the case of pontoon covers not made of mild steel, the strength and stiffness of the cover
shall be equivalent to those of a cover of mild steel.
Carriers or sockets
(5) Carriers or sockets for portable beams shall be of substantial construction and provide efficient
means for the fitting and securing of the beams. Where rolling types of beams are used the
arrangements shall ensure that the beams remain properly in position when the hatchway is
closed.
Cleats
(6) Cleats shall be set to fit the taper of the wedges. They shall be at least 65 millimetres wide and
spaced not more than 600 millimetres, centre to centre. The end cleats along each side or end of
the hatchway shall not be more than 150 millimetres from the hatch corners.
Battens and wedges
(7) Battens and wedges shall be efficient for their purpose and in good condition. Wedges shall be of
tough wood or equivalent material cut to a taper of not more than 1 in 6 and shall not be less
than 13 millimetres thick at the toes.
Tarpaulins
(8) At least two layers of tarpaulins shall be provided for every hatchway. They shall be waterproof,
in good condition, and have satisfactory strength and quality.
18
Security of hatchway covers
(9) (a) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (b), steel bars shall be provided for every
hatchway to ensure that each section of hatchway covers can be efficiently and
independently secured after the tarpaulins have been battened down and that hatchway
covers of more than 1.5 metres in length are secured by at least two such bars.
(b) Bars of material other than steel, or means of securing hatchway covers otherwise than by
bars, may be used provided –
(i) in the case of the former the strength and stiffness of the bars used are equivalent to
those of steel bars;
(ii) in either case the degree of security so achieved is not less than that which would be
achieved by the use of steel bars.
Hatchways closed by weathertight covers of steel or equivalent material fitted with gaskets and
clamping devices
Coamings
6. (1) (a) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (b), every hatchway shall have a coaming of
substantial construction the height of which above the deck shall be at least –
(i) 600 millimetres, if the hatchway is in Position 1;
(ii) 450 millimetres, if the hatchway is in Position 2.
(b) A hatchway may have a coaming of less than the height applicable under the provisions of
subparagraph (a), or in exceptional circumstances a coaming may be dispensed with
altogether, provided that –
(i) the safety of the ship will not be impaired in the worst sea or weather conditions likely
to be encountered by the ship in service;
(ii) when any coaming is fitted it shall be of substantial construction.
Weathertight covers
(2) (a) The strength of every cover of mild steel shall be such as to withstand the assumed load
given in Table 1, and the product of the maximum stress thus calculated and the factor 4.25
shall not exceed the minimum ultimate strength of the material. Every such cover shall be so
designed as to limit the deflection under such a load to not more than 0.0028 times the span.
(b) Every such cover made of materials other than mild steel shall have a strength and stiffness
equivalent to that required for a cover of mild steel.
(c) Every cover shall be fitted with efficient means by which it can be secured and made
weathertight.
(d) Mild steel plating forming the top of any cover shall be not less in thickness than one per
cent of the spacing of the stiffeners or 6 millimetres whichever is the greater.
Machinery space openings
7. (1) Every machinery space opening situated in Position 1 or Position 2 shall be efficiently framed
and enclosed by a steel casing of substantial strength, account being taken of the extent, if any, to
which the casing is protected by other structures.
19
(2) Every doorway in a casing referred to in the subparagraph (1) shall be fitted with a steel
watertight door having a sill the height of which shall be at least –
(a) 600 millimetres above the deck, if the opening is in Position 1;
(b) 380 millimetres above the deck, if the opening is in Position 2.
(3) Every opening in such a casing other than a doorway shall be provided with a permanently
attached cover of steel fitted with efficient means by which it can be secured and maintained
weathertight and, except in the case of a cover consisting of a plate secured by bolts, is capable of
being operated from either side of the opening.
(4) Every fiddley, funnel or machinery space ventilator situated in an exposed position on the
freeboard deck or on a superstructure deck shall have a coaming of such a height above the deck
as will provide adequate protection having regard to its position.
Miscellaneous openings in freeboard and superstructure decks
8. (1) Every manhole and flush scuttle in Position 1 or Position 2 shall be provided with a substantial
cover fitted with efficient means to secure and maintain it watertight. Unless secured by closely
spaced bolts, every such cover shall be permanently attached by a chain or equivalent means so
as to be available for immediate use at all times.
(2) Every opening in a deck other than a hatchway, machinery space opening, manhole or flush
scuttle shall –
(a) if situated in the freeboard deck, be protected either by an enclosed superstructure or by a
deckhouse or companionway equivalent in strength and weathertightness to an enclosed
superstructure;
(b) if situated in an exposed position –
(i) in a deck over an enclosed superstructure and giving access to space within that
superstructure; or
(ii) on top of a deckhouse on the freeboard deck and giving access to space below that
deck;
be protected by an efficient deckhouse or companionway fitted with weathertight doors;
(c) if situated in an exposed position in a deck above the deck over an enclosed superstructure
and giving access to space within that superstructure, be protected either in accordance with
the requirements of subparagraph (b) or to such lesser extent as may be adequate having
regard to its position.
(3) Every door in a companionway, deckhouse or enclosed superstructure referred to in
subparagraph (2)(a) or (b)shall have a sill the height of which shall be at least –
(a) 600 millimetres, if the structure is in Position 1;
(b) 380 millimetres, if the structure is in Position 2.
Ventilators
9. (1) (a) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (b) below, every ventilator in Position 1 or
Position 2 leading to spaces below the freeboard deck or below the deck of an enclosed
superstructure shall have a coaming of steel or equivalent material, substantially constructed and
efficiently connected to the deck. The height of such coamings shall be at least –
20
(i) 900 millimetres above the deck, if the ventilator is in Position 1;
(ii) 760 millimetres above the deck, if the ventilator is in Position 2.
(b) Where the coaming for any ventilator referred to in subparagraph (a) above is situated in a
position in which it will be especially exposed to weather and sea the height of the coaming
shall be increased by such an amount as is necessary to provide adequate protection having
regard to its position.
(2) If the coaming of any ventilator referred to in the subparagraph (1) exceeds 900 millimetres in
height above the deck it shall be efficiently supported by stays, brackets or other means.
(3) Every ventilator in Position 1 or Position 2 which passes through a superstructure, other than an
enclosed superstructure, shall have a coaming of steel or equivalent material at the freeboard
deck substantially constructed and efficiently connected to that deck and at least 900 millimetres
in height above that deck.
(4) Subject to subparagraph (5), every ventilator opening in Position 1 or Position 2 shall be
provided with an efficient appliance by which it can be closed and secured weathertight. Every
such closing appliance provided on board a ship of not more than 100 metres in length shall be
permanently attached and, in the case of any other ship, shall either be so attached or be
conveniently stowed near to the ventilator for which it is provided.
(5) (a) A ventilator in Position 1 the coaming of which exceeds 4.5 metres in height above the deck and
a ventilator in Position 2 the coaming of which exceeds 2.3 metres in height above the deck, need
not be fitted with a closing appliance unless the fitting of such an appliance is considered
necessary by the Assigning Authority in order to provide adequate protection.
(b) A ventilator leading to a battery room shall not be fitted with a closing appliance.
Air pipes
10. (1) The exposed parts of any air pipe leading to a ballast or other tank and extending above the
freeboard deck or a superstructure deck shall be of substantial construction.
(2) The exposed opening of any such air pipe shall be fitted with efficient means of closing the
opening weathertight, which shall be permanently attached so as to be ready for immediate use.
(3) Subject to subparagraph (4), the height above the deck of the exposed opening of any such
airpipe shall be –
(a) at least 760 millimetres, if that deck is the freeboard deck;
(b) at least 450 millimetres, if that deck is a superstructure deck or, if the superstructure is of
less than standard height, such height as is necessary to adequately compensate for the
lower height of the superstructure.
(4) The heights given in subparagraph (3) may be reduced if –
(a) the working of the ship would be unreasonably impaired if those heights were adhered to; and
(b) the closing arrangements will ensure that the lower height is adequately compensated for.
Cargo ports and similar openings
11. (1) Cargo ports and similar openings in the ship’s side below the freeboard deck or in the sides or ends
of superstructures which form part of the shell of the ship shall be compatible with the design of the
ship and shall not exceed in number those necessary for the proper working of the ship.
21
(2) Every such cargo port and opening shall be provided with a door or doors so fitted and
designed as to ensure watertightness and structural integrity commensurate with the
surrounding shell plating.
(3) Unless the Assigning Authority permits, the lower edge of any such cargo port or opening shall
not be so situated that it is below a line drawn parallel to the freeboard deck at side having as its
lowest point the upper edge of the uppermost load line.
Scuppers, inlets and discharges
12. (1) Subject to subparagraphs (4) and (9), every discharge led through the shell of a ship either –
(a) from spaces below the freeboard deck; or
(b) from within any enclosed superstructure, or from within any deckhouse on the freeboard
deck which is fitted with weathertight doors;
shall be fitted in accordance with subparagraphs (2) and (3) with the means for preventing water
from passing inboard.
(2) Subject to subparagraph (3), this shall consist of a single automatic non-return valve fitted at the
shell of the ship and having positive means of closure from a position or positions above the
freeboard deck. Such positions shall be readily accessible at all times under service conditions
and shall be provided with an indicator showing whether the valve is open or closed.
(3) (a) If the vertical distance from the Summer load waterline to the inboard end of a discharge
pipe exceeds 0.01(L) two automatic non-return valves having no positive means of closure
may be fitted. One valve shall be situated as close to the ship’s shell as practicable and be
substantially connected to it and the inboard valve shall be so situated that at all times
under service conditions it will be readily accessible for examination.
(b) If the vertical distance referred to in subparagraph (a) above exceeds 0.02(L) the Assigning
Authority may permit a single automatic non-return valve having no positive means of
closure, to be fitted. This valve shall be situated as close to the ship’s shell as practicable and
substantially connected to it.
(4) (a) The controls of any valve in an attended machinery space and serving a main or auxiliary
sea inlet or discharge or bilge injection system shall be so sited as to be readily accessible for
examination at all times under service conditions.
(b) The controls of any valve in an unattended machinery space and serving a sea inlet or
discharge or bilge injection system shall be so sited as to be readily accessible at all times
under service conditions, particular attention being paid in this regard to possible delay in
reaching or operating the controls. In addition, the machinery space in which the valve is
situated shall be equipped with an efficient warning device to give warning at suitable
control positions of any entry of water into the machinery space other than water resulting
from the normal operation of machinery.
(c) Valves referred to in subparagraph (a) and (b) above shall be equipped with an indicator
showing whether the valve is open or closed.
(5) Subject to subparagraph (6) every scupper and discharge pipe originating at any level and
penetrating the shell of the ship either –
(a) more than 450 millimetres below the freeboard deck; or
(b) less than 600 millimetres above the Summer load waterline;
22
shall be equipped with an automatic non-return valve situated as close to the ship’s shell as
practicable and substantially connected thereto.
(6) Subparagraph (5) shall not apply –
(a) where the scupper or discharge pipe is fitted with the means for preventing water from
passing inboard in accordance with the provisions of subparagraphs (1) to (3); or
(b) where the piping of the scupper or discharge pipe is of substantial thickness;
(7) Every scupper leading from a superstructure other than an enclosed superstructure or from a
deckhouse not fitted with weathertight doors, shall be led overboard.
(8) All shell fittings and the valves required by this paragraph shall be of steel, bronze or other
suitable ductile material, and all pipes referred to in this paragraph shall be of steel or equivalent
material.
(9) In ships constructed on or after 8
th
June 2000 scuppers led through the shell from enclosed
superstructures used for the carriage of cargo shall be permitted only where the edge of the
freeboard deck is not immersed when the ship heels 5° either way. In other cases the drainage
shall be led inboard to a suitable space, or spaces, of adequate capacity having a high water level
alarm and provided with suitable arrangements for discharge overboard.
Side scuttles
13. (1) Every side scuttle to a space below the freeboard deck or to a space within an enclosed
superstructure shall be fitted with a hinged inside deadlight so that it can be effectively closed
and secured watertight.
(2) No side scuttle shall be fitted in a position such that its sill will be below a line drawn parallel to
the freeboard deck at side and having its lowest point –
(a) 2.5 per cent of the breadth of the ship above the Summer load waterline (or Summer Timber
load waterline, if assigned); or
(b) 500 millimetres above the Summer load waterline (or Summer Timber load waterline, if
assigned);
whichever is the greater distance.
(3) Every side scuttle, glass and deadlight (if fitted) shall be of substantial construction and be
efficiently fitted.
Freeing ports and arrangements
14. (1) Where bulwarks on the weather portions of the freeboard deck, a raised quarter deck or a
superstructure deck form wells, efficient provision shall be made for rapidly freeing the decks of
water in bulk and for draining them, and in particular the requirements set out in subparagraphs
(2) to (9) shall be complied with.
(2) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraphs (4) and (5), the freeing port area (A) for each
well shall –
(a) if the well is on the freeboard deck or on a raised quarter deck, be not less than the area
ascertained in accordance with subparagraph (3); and
(b) if the well is on a superstructure deck, other than a raised quarter-deck be not less than one
half of the area given by subparagraph (3).
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(3) (a) Subject to subparagraph (c) below, where the length (l) of a bulwark in the well is 20 metres
or less –
(A) = 0.7+ 0.035 (l) (square metres); and
(b) Subject to subparagraph (c) below, where (l) exceeds 20 metres,
(A) = 0.07 (l) (square metres).
The length (l) need in no case be greater than 0.7(L).
(c) If the bulwark is more than 1.2 metres in average height the required area shall be increased
by 0.004 square metres per metre of length of well for each 0.1 metre difference in height. If
the bulwark is less than 0.9 metre in average height, the required area may be decreased by
0.004 square metre per metre of length of well for each 0.1 metre difference in height.
(4) (a) If the deck on which the well is situated has no sheer, the freeing port area shall be the area
ascertained in accordance with subparagraph (3) increased by 50 per cent.
(b) If the deck on which the well is situated has sheer less than standard sheer, the freeing port
area shall be the area ascertained in accordance with subparagraph (3) increased by a
percentage to be obtained by linear interpolation.
(c) If the deck on which the well is situated has sheer, two thirds of the freeing port area shall
be situated in the half of the well which is nearest to the lowest point of the sheer.
(5) The lower edge of every freeing port shall be as near to the deck as practicable.
(6) Every freeing port more than 230 millimetres in depth shall be protected by rails or bars so fixed
that the distance between the lowest rail or bar and the lower edge of the freeing port does not
exceed 230 millimetres.
(7) Every freeing port fitted with a shutter shall have sufficient clearance to prevent jamming of the
shutter, and the shutter hinges shall have pins or bearings of efficient non-corrodible material.
(8) Efficient provision shall be made for freeing water from any superstructure other than an
enclosed superstructure.
(9) Where a ship fitted with a trunk does not comply with the requirements of paragraph
10(2)(b)(vi) of Schedule 4, “Freeboards”, or where continuous or substantially continuous
hatchway side coamings are fitted between detached superstructures the minimum area of the
freeing port openings shall be calculated from the following table:
The area of freeing ports at intermediate breadths shall be obtained by linear interpolation.
BREADTH OF HATCHWAY AREA OF FREEING PORTS
OR TRUNK IN RELATION IN RELATION TO THE
TO THE BREADTH OF TOTAL AREA OF THE
SHIP BULWARKS
40% or less 20%
75% or more 10%
24
Protection of the crew
15. (1) Every deckhouse used for the accommodation of members of the crew shall be of efficient
construction.
(2) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (3), all exposed parts of the freeboard deck and of
every superstructure deck shall be fitted at their perimeter with efficient guard rails or guard
wires and stanchions complying with the requirements of subparagraph (4), or with bulwarks.
In either case this protection shall be at least 1 metre in height from the deck.
(3) The height specified in subparagraph (2) may be reduced at a particular point if –
(a) the normal working of the ship would be unreasonably impeded; and
(b) adequate protection is provided at that point.
(4) Guard rails or guard wires fitted in accordance with subparagraph (2) shall consist of courses of
rails or wires supported by stanchions efficiently secured to the deck. The opening between the
lowest course of the rails or wires and the deck shall not exceed 230 millimetres in height and no
opening above that course of rails or wires shall exceed 380 millimetres in height. Where the ship
has rounded gunwales the stanchions shall be secured at the perimeter of the flat of the deck.
(5) Gangways, underdeck passages and all other means of access used by members of the crew to
pass between their quarters, the machinery space and any other space in the ship in the course of
their necessary work shall be so designed and constructed, and be fitted, where necessary, with
life lines, access ladders, guard rails, guard wires, hand rails or other safety fittings, as to afford
effective protection for the crew.
(6) Deck cargo carried on any ship shall be so stowed that any opening which is in way of the cargo
and which gives access to and from the crew’s quarters, the machinery space and all other parts
used in the necessary work of the ship, can be properly closed and secured against the admission of
water. Effective protection for the crew in the form of guard rails or life lines shall be provided
above the deck cargo if there is no convenient passage on or below the deck of the ship.
(7) The requirements of this paragraph shall not apply in the case of unmanned barges.
25
PART II – SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TYPE “A” SHIPS
Application
16. The requirements of paragraphs 17 to 20 apply only to Type “A” ships.
Machinery casings
17. (1) Subject to subparagraph (2), every casing enclosing a machinery space opening in Position 1 or
Position 2 shall be protected by either –
(a) an enclosed poop or bridge of at least standard height; or
(b) a deckhouse of equal height and equivalent strength and weathertightness.
(2) Subparagraph (1) shall not apply and the casing need not be protected if –
(a) there is no opening in the casing which gives direct access from the freeboard deck to the
machinery space; or
(b) the only opening in the casing has a steel weathertight door and leads to a space or passage
way which is as strongly constructed as the casing and is separated from the stairway to the
machinery space by a second steel weathertight door.
Gangway and access
18. (1) References in this paragraph to a poop or detached bridge apply also to a deckhouse fitted in
lieu of and serving the purpose of a poop or detached bridge.
(2) Access between the poop and the detached bridge shall be by means of either –
(a) a permanent and efficiently constructed gangway of substantial strength. The gangway
shall be at the level of the superstructure deck and have a platform at least 1 metre in width
and of non-slip material. Efficient means of access from gangway level to the deck shall be
provided at each terminal point. The platform shall be fitted on each side throughout its
length with guard rails or guard wires supported by stanchions. Such rails or wires shall
consist of not less than 3 courses, the lowest being not more than 230 millimetres, and the
uppermost being at least 1 metre above the platform, and no intermediate opening being
more than 380 millimetres in height. Stanchions shall be at intervals of not more than 1.5
metres; or
(b) an underdeck passage connecting and providing unobstructed access between those
structures and complying with the following requirements –
(i) the passage and all its fittings shall be oil and gas tight;
(ii) the passage shall be well lighted, and be fitted with efficient gas detection and
ventilation systems;
(iii) it shall be situated immediately below the freeboard deck;
(iv) its distance from the shell plating shall at no point throughout its length be less than
one fifth of the breadth of the ship. Alternatively two underdeck passages may be
provided one to port and one to starboard each of which shall comply with the
requirements of subparagraphs (i),(ii) and (iii) above;
26
(v) means of exit from the passage to the freeboard deck shall be –
(aa) so arranged as to be as near as practicable to the working areas to be used by
the crew;
(bb) in no case be more than 90 metres apart; and
(cc) fitted with efficient means of closing which are capable of quick release and
operable from either side;
(vi) openings in the freeboard deck corresponding to the means of exit referred to in
subparagraph (v) above shall be protected in accordance with the requirements of
paragraph 8(2)(a).
(c) equivalent means of access.
(3) In adverse weather conditions, where the crew in the course of their duties may be required to
go to working areas forward of the detached bridge, or forward of the poop in cases where there
is no detached bridge, access shall be by means of –
(a) a gangway complying with the requirements of subparagraph (2)(a);
(b) an underdeck passage complying with the requirements of subparagraph (2)(b); or
(c) a walkway complying with the following requirements –
(i) be not less than l metre in width and be situated on or as near as practicable to the
centre line of the ship;
(ii) if obstructed by pipes or other fittings of a permanent nature, be provided with
efficient means of passage over such obstruction.
(iii) be fitted on each side and throughout its length with guard rails or guard wires
complying with the requirements in subparagraph (2)(a);
(iv) have openings in these guard rails or guard wires which give access to and from the
freeboard deck to the working areas used by the crew. These openings shall be on alternate
sides of the walkway and be situated not more than 90 metres apart on either side;
(v) if the length of exposed deck to be traversed by the crew exceeds 70 metres, shelters of
substantial construction shall be set in way of the walkway at intervals not exceeding 45
metres, every such shelter being capable of accommodating at least one person and be so
constructed as to afford weather protection on the forward, port and starboard sides.
(4) The requirements of this paragraph shall not apply in the case of unmanned barges.
Hatchway covers
19. The covers of hatchways in exposed positions on the freeboard deck, on a forecastle deck or on the
top of an expansion trunk shall be of steel, of efficient construction, and watertight when secured.
Freeing arrangements
20. (1) All exposed parts of the freeboard deck and superstructure decks shall be fitted at their
perimeter for at least half their length with guard rails or guard wires in lieu of bulwarks or with
other equally effective freeing arrangements. Such guard rails or guard wires shall comply with
the requirements set out in relation to such rails or wires in paragraph 18(2)(a).
27
(2) The upper edge of the sheer strake shall be as low as practicable.
(3) If superstructures of the ship are connected by a trunk, the exposed parts of the freeboard deck
in way of the trunk shall be fitted at their perimeter throughout their length with guard rails or
guard wires complying with the requirements set out in paragraph 18(2)(a).
(4) If the ship is so constructed that notwithstanding the provision of freeing ports and
arrangements it will be particularly subjected under service conditions to the building up of
quantities of water on the freeboard deck efficient breakwaters shall be fitted in suitable
positions on that deck.
28
PART III – SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CERTAIN TYPE “B” SHIPS
Application
21. The requirements of paragraphs 22 to 25 apply only to Type “B” ships assigned a reduced freeboard
under the provisions of paragraph 5(3) of Schedule 4.
Gangway and access
22. The ship shall comply with the requirements of either –
(1) paragraph 18 as if it were a Type “A” ship; or
(2) paragraphs 23 and 24.
23. (1) References in this paragraph to a poop or detached bridge apply also to a deckhouse fitted in
lieu of and serving the purpose of a poop or detached bridge.
(2) Access between the poop and the detached bridge shall be by means of an efficiently constructed
gangway of substantial strength fitted on or near the centre line of the ship. The gangway shall
be at least 1 metre in width and shall be fitted on each side and throughout its length with guard
rails or guard wires complying with the requirements as set out in paragraph 18(2)(a). If the
length of the gangway exceeds 70 metres, shelters complying with the requirements set out in
paragraph 18(3)(c)(v) shall be provided in way of the gangway.
24. (1) In adverse weather conditions, where the crew in the course of their duties may be required to
go to working areas forward of the detached bridge, or forward of the poop in cases where there
is no detached bridge, access shall be by –
(a) the means described in paragraph 18(3);
(b) the means described in paragraph 23(2); or
(c) equivalent means of access.
(2) Where hatchway coamings are 600 millimetres or more in height, two walkways complying with
the following requirements may be provided in lieu of subparagraph (1) –
(a) the walkways shall be efficiently constructed and of satisfactory strength;
(b) the walkways shall each be at least 1 metre in width and be fitted on the freeboard deck
alongside the outboard structure of the hatchway coamings, one to port and the other to
starboard of the hatchways;
(c) on the side outboard of the hatchways each walkway shall be fitted with guard rails or
guard wire complying with the requirements set out in paragraph 18(2)(a).
Freeing arrangements
25. The ship shall comply with the requirements of paragraph 20(4).
29
PART IV – SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO SHIPS ASSIGNED TIMBER
FREEBOARDS
Application and interpretation
26. (1) The requirements of paragraphs 27 to 29 apply only to ships assigned Timber freeboards. The
requirements of paragraph 30 shall apply in respect of timber deck cargo carried by a ship which
is marked with timber load lines and is loaded to a depth greater than that indicated by the load
line which, if timber load lines were not marked, would be appropriate in the circumstances.
(2) In this Part except where the context otherwise requires –
“deck cargo” means cargo carried in any uncovered space on the deck of a ship;
“timber deck cargo” means deck cargo consisting of timber;
“weather deck” means the uppermost complete deck exposed to weather and sea, a deck which
is stepped being taken to consist for this purpose of the lowest line of the deck and the
continuation of that line parallel to the upper part of the deck.
Superstructures
27. (1) The ship shall have a forecastle of not less than the standard height of an enclosed
superstructure and not less in length than 0.07(L).
(2) If the ship is less than 100 metres in length it shall be fitted aft with either –
(a) a poop of not less than standard height; or
(b) a raised quarter deck having either a deck house or a strong steel hood, so that the total
height is not less than the standard height of an enclosed superstructure.
Double bottom tanks
28. Double bottom tanks fitted within the midship half length of the ship shall have satisfactory
watertight longitudinal subdivision.
Bulwarks, guard rails and stanchions
29. The ship shall be fitted with –
(1) permanent bulwarks at least 1 metre in height which are specially stiffened on the upper edge
and supported by strong bulwark stays attached to the deck, and provided with freeing ports
complying with the requirements of paragraph 14(1) to (7); or
(2) efficient guard rails and stanchions at least 1 metre in height, of specially strong construction,
and complying with the requirements of paragraph 15(4).
Stowage
Siting, distribution and stowage of timber deck cargo
30. (1) The cargo shall be distributed and stowed so –
(a) as to avoid excessive loading having regard to the strength of the deck and the supporting
structure of the ship;
30
(b) as to ensure that the ship will retain adequate stability at all stages of the voyage having
regard in particular to –
(i) the vertical distribution of the deck cargo;
(ii) the wind moments which can be expected on the voyage;
(iii) the losses of weight in the ship, including those due to the consumption of fuel and
stores; and
(iv) possible increases of weight of the ship or deck cargo, including those due to the
absorption of water and to icing;
(c) as not to impair the weathertight or watertight integrity of any part of the ship or its fittings
or appliances, and to ensure the proper protection of ventilators and air pipes;
(d) that its height above the deck, or any other part of the ship on which it stands will not
interfere with the navigation or working of the ship;
(e) that it will not interfere with, or obstruct access to, the ship’s steering arrangements,
including emergency steering arrangements;
(f) that it is in accordance with paragraph 15(6).
Securing of deck cargo
(2) Deck cargo shall be so secured as to ensure, as far as practicable, that there will be no
movements of that cargo relative to the ship in the worst sea and weather conditions which may
normally be expected on the voyage; and lashings and all fittings used for their attachment shall
be of adequate strength for that purpose.
Maximum height of timber deck cargo
(3) Timber deck cargo carried by a ship within a Winter seasonal area during the period specified as the
Winter period shall be so stowed that at no point throughout its length does the height of the deck
cargo above the level of the weather deck at side exceed one third of the extreme breadth of the ship.
Access
(4) (a) Where timber deck cargo occupies the whole or substantially the whole of the uncovered space
on the deck of a ship, means of access shall be provided for the crew between their quarters and
the machinery spaces and other parts of the ship used in the working of the ship, as follows.
(b) The means of access shall be provided in the form of a walkway fitted over the timber deck
cargo, and the walkway shall be:
(i) as near as practicable on the centreline of the ship.
(ii) not less than 600mm in width, and
(iii) provided with a lifeline which, where practicable, shall be a wire rope set taut with a
stretching screw.
(c) In addition guard rails or lifelines spaced not more than 350 mm apart vertically shall be
provided on each side of the deck cargo to a height of at least 1 metre above the cargo.
(d) The stanchion supports to all guard rails and lifelines shall be so spaced as to prevent undue
sagging.
31
Uprights
(5) If the nature of the timber is such that uprights are necessary in order to comply with
subparagraphs (6) and (7), uprights shall be fitted which are of sufficient strength for the
purpose. They shall be secured in position by angles or metal sockets of sufficient strength for
the purpose or by equivalent means and shall be so spaced as to provide efficient support taking
into account the nature and length of the timber, so however that the space between any two
uprights fore and aft shall not exceed 3 metres.
Stowage of timber deck cargo in relation to superstructures
(6) (a) Timber deck cargo stowed in any well between superstructures shall be stowed as solidly as
possible so as to extend over the entire available length of the well to a height not less than
the standard height of a superstructure other than a raised quarter deck.
(b) Timber deck cargo stowed in a position having a limiting superstructure at the forward end
but no such superstructure at the after end shall be stowed so as to extend over the entire
available length between the superstructure and the after end of the aftermost hatchway, to
the height and in the manner specified in subparagraph (a) above.
Securing of Timber deck cargo
(7) (a) Timber deck cargo shall be efficiently secured throughout its length by independent overall
lashings spaced not more than 3 metres apart. Eye plates for these lashings shall be
efficiently attached to the sheer strake or to the deck stringer plate at intervals of not more
than 3 metres. The distance from an end bulk head of a superstructure to the first eye plate
shall be not more than 2 metres. Where there is no bulkhead, eye plates and lashings shall
be provided at distances of 0.6 metres and 15 metres from the ends of the timber deck cargo.
(b) Lashings shall be of not less than 19 millimetres close link chain or of flexible wire rope of
equivalent strength, fitted with sliphooks and turnbuckles so positioned as to be accessible
at all times. Wire rope lashings shall have a length of long link chain sufficient to permit the
length of lashings to be regulated.
(c) When timber is in lengths less than 3.6 metres the spacing of the lashings shall be reduced or
suitable provision made to suit the length of timber.
32
PART V – GENERAL
Equivalence
31. The Assigning Authority may, with the approval of the Secretary of State, –
(a) allow any fitting, material, appliance or apparatus to be fitted in a ship, or allow other provisions
to be made in a ship, in the place of any fitting, material, appliance, apparatus or provision
respectively which is required under any of the provisions of the Regulations, if satisfied by trial
or otherwise that it is at least as effective as that so required; or
(b) allow in any exceptional case departure from the requirements of any of the said provisions on
condition that the freeboards to be assigned to the ship are increased to such an extent as to
satisfy the Secretary of State that the safety of the ship and protection afforded to the crew will
be no less effective than would be the case if the ship fully complied with those requirements
and there were no such increase of freeboards.
33
Regulation 27
SCHEDULE 3
RECORD OF PARTICULARS
MERCHANT SHIPPING (LOAD LINE) REGULATIONS 1998
RECORD OF PARTICULARS RELATING TO CONDITIONS OF ASSIGNMENT
In this record, reference to regulations are references to the regulations set out in Annex I to the
Convention of 1966, and reference to paragraphs are references to paragraphs of Schedule 2 (Conditions
of Assignment) of Merchant Shipping Notice 1752 (M)
Name of ship
Port of registry
Nationality
Distinctive number or letters
Shipbuilders
Yard number
Date of Build/conversion
Freeboards assigned as a ship of Type
Classification
Date and place of initial survey
3
4
A plan of suitable size may be attached to this report in preference to the sketches on this page
Disposition and dimensions of superstructures, trunks, deckhouses, machinery casings; extent of bulwarks, guard rails and wood sheathing on exposed
deck, to be inserted in the diagrams and tables following; together with positions of hatchways, gangways, and other means for the protection of the crew;
cargo ports, bow and stern doors, side scuttles, scuppers, ventilators, air pipes, companionways, and other items that would affect the seaworthiness of the
ship.
3
5
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraphs 7 & 8)
DOORWAYS IN SUPERSTRUCTURES, EXPOSED MACHINERY CASINGS AND DECKHOUSES PROTECTING OPENINGS IN FREEBOARD
AND SUPERSTRUCTURE DECKS
(Regulations 12, 17, and 18)
LOCATION REF NO NUMBER AND SIZE OF HEIGHT OF CLOSING APPLIANCES
ON SKETCH OPENINGS SILLS
TYPE AND NUMBER
OR PLAN
MATERIAL OF CLIPS
In forecastle bulkhead
In bridge forward bulkhead
In bridge after bulkhead
In raised quarter deck bulkhead
In poop bulkhead
In exposed machinery casings on freeboard or
raised quarter decks
3
6
DOORWAYS IN SUPERSTRUCTURES, EXPOSED MACHINERY CASINGS AND DECKHOUSES PROTECTING OPENINGS IN FREEBOARD
AND SUPERSTRUCTURE DECKS
(continued)
LOCATION REF NO NUMBER AND SIZE OF HEIGHT OF CLOSING APPLIANCES
ON SKETCH OPENINGS SILLS
TYPE AND NUMBER
OR PLAN
MATERIAL OF CLIPS
In exposed machinery casings on superstructure
decks
In machinery casings within superstructures or
deckhouses on freeboard deck
In deckhouses in Position 1 enclosing openings
leading below freeboard deck
In deckhouses in Position 2 enclosing openings
leading within enclosed superstructures or below
freeboard deck
In exposed pump room casings
3
7
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752 (M), paragraph 5)
HATCHWAYS AT POSITIONS 1 AND 2 CLOSED BY PORTABLE COVERS AND SECURED WEATHERTIGHT BY TARPAULINS AND BATTENING
DEVICES (Regulation 15)
Position and Reference No. on Sketch or Plan
Dimensions of clear opening at top of coaming
Height of coamings above deck
PORTABLE BEAMS Number
Spacing
b
1
x t
f
D x t
w
b
2
x t
f
Bearing surface
Means of securing each beam
Material
PORTABLE
Thickness
COVERS
Direction fitted
Bearing surface
Spacing of cleats
TARPAULINS
No. of layers
Material
Means of securing each section of covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Are wood covers fitted with galvanized end bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
b
2
b
D
1
t
f
t
f
t
w
3
8
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraphs 7 and 8)
HATCHWAYS AT POSITIONS 1 AND 2 CLOSED BY WEATHERTIGHT COVERS OF STEEL (OR OTHER EQUIVALENT MATERIAL) FITTED
WITH GASKETS AND CLAMPING DEVICES (Regulation 16)
Position and reference No.
on Sketch or Plan
Dimensions of clear opening at
top of coaming
Height of coaming above deck
Type of cover or Patent Name
Material
Position and reference No.
on Sketch or Plan
Dimensions of clear opening at
top of coaming
Height of coaming above deck
Type of cover or Patent Name
Material
3
9
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraphs 7 and 8)
MACHINERY SPACE OPENINGS AND MISCELLANEOUS OPENINGS IN FREEBOARD AND SUPERSTRUCTURE DECKS
(Regulations 17 and 18)
Positions and Reference No. on Sketch or Plan
Dimensions
Height of coaming
COVER Material
How attached
Number and spacing of Toggles
Positions and Reference No. on Sketch or Plan
Dimensions
Height of coaming
COVER Material
How attached
Number and spacing of Toggles
Particulars of spurling pipe closing arrangements
4
0
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 9)
VENTILATORS ON FREEBOARD AND SUPERSTRUCTURE DECKS (POSITIONS 1 AND 2)
(Regulation 19)
DECK ON WHICH FITTED NUMBER FITTED COAMING TYPE (STATE CLOSING
PATENT NAME APPLIANCES
DIMENSIONS HEIGHT IF ANY)
4
1
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 10)
AIR PIPES ON FREEBOARD AND SUPERSTRUCTURE DECKS
(Regulation 20)
DECK ON WHICH FITTED NUMBER FITTED COAMING TYPE (STATE CLOSING
PATENT NAME APPLIANCES
DIMENSIONS HEIGHT IF ANY)
4
2
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 11)
CARGO PORTS AND OTHER SIMILAR OPENINGS
(Regulation 21)
POSITION OF PORT DIMENSIONS OF DISTANCE OF LOWER SECURING DEVICES REMARKS
OPENING EDGE FROM
FREEBOARD DECK
4
3
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 12)
SCUPPERS, INLETS AND DISCHARGES
(Regulation 22)
STATE IF NUMBER PIPE FROM VERTICAL DISTANCE ABOVE TOP NUMBER, POSITION
SCUPPER OR OF KEEL TYPE OF
DISCHARGE DIAMETER THICK MATERIAL AND CONTROLS
-NESS DISCHARGE UPPERMOST MATERIAL
VALVE OF
OUTLET INBOARD DISCHARGE
IN HULL END VALVES
NOTE: In Ro-ro ships, indicate how ready accessibility to scupper valves is ensured when vehicle space is filled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S – Scupper MS – Mild Steel SD – Screw down
D – Discharge CS – Cast Steel ANR – Automatic non-return
GM – Gun Metal SD ANR – Screw down automatic non-return
Any other approved material to be designated
4
4
Indicate the vertical distance between the freeboard deck and the lower sill of the side scuttle positioned at the greatest vertical distance below the
freeboard deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 13)
SIDE SCUTTLES
(Regulation 23)
POSITION NUMBER CLEAR GLASS FIXED OR MATERIAL TYPE OF GLASS STANDARDS
FITTED SIZE OPENING AND USED
FRAME DEADLIGHT
THICKNESS AND
TYPE NO
4
5
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraphs 14 and 20)
FREEING PORTS
(Regulation 24)
LENGTH OF HEIGHT OF NUMBER AND SIZE OF FREEING PORTS TOTAL AREA REQUIRED
BULWARK BULWARK EACH SIDE EACH SIDE AREA
EACH SIDE
FREEBOARD DECK AFTER WELL
FORWARD WELL
SUPERSTRUCTURE DECK
State fore and aft position of After Well
each freeing port in relation
to superstructure end bulkheads Forward Well
Particulars of shutters, bars or rails fitted to freeing ports.
Height of lower edge of freeing port above deck.
4
6
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraphs 15, 18, 22, 23 and 24)
PROTECTION OF THE CREW
(Regulations 25 and 26)
State particulars of bulwarks or guardrails
on freeboard and superstructure decks:
State details of lifelines, walkways,
gangways or underdeck passageways
where required to be fitted:
(See Schedule 2 to this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752(M), paragraph 29)
TIMBER DECK CARGO FITTINGS
(Regulation 44)
State particulars of uprights, sockets,
lashings, guardrails and lifelines;
OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES
47
INITIAL SURVEY
The conditions of assignment shown on this form are a record of the arrangements and fittings provided
on the ship and are in accordance with the requirements of the relevant regulations set out in Annex I to
the Convention of 1966 and of this Merchant Shipping Notice 1752 (M).
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(Surveyor’s Signature)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(Date)
SUBSEQUENT PERIODICAL SURVEYS
I have completed the periodical survey and am satisfied that the fittings and appliances are in
accordance with the particulars shown in this record and are in good condition and that approved
stability information and, where applicable, information relating to loading and ballasting of the ship is
on board.
Signature Port of Survey Date of Survey
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Regulation 29
SCHEDULE 4
FREEBOARDS
Interpretation
1. Expressions in this Schedule have the same meanings as those assigned to them in Schedule 2, and –
“block coefficient (C
b
)” means the product of –
where –
ٌ is the volume of the moulded displacement of the ship (excluding bossing) if the ship has a metal
shell, and of displacement to the outer surface of the hull if the ship has a shell of any other material,
displacement being taken in each case at a moulded draught of d
1
; and
d
1
is 85 per cent of the least moulded depth, provided that in no case shall the block coefficient (C
b
)
be taken to be less than 0.68;
“depth for freeboard (D)” means –
(a) except as otherwise stated in subparagraph (b) below, the moulded depth of the ship amidships
plus the thickness of the freeboard deck stringer plate where fitted, plus, if the exposed
freeboard deck is sheathed, the product of –
where –
T is the mean thickness of the exposed sheathing clear of deck openings;
(b) in a ship having a rounded gunwale with a radius greater than 4 per cent of the breadth of the
ship or having topsides of unusual form, the depth calculated in accordance with subparagraph
(a) above, would be the depth for freeboard purposes of a ship having a midship section with
vertical topsides and with the same round of beam and the same area of topside section as that
of the midship section of the actual ship;
“effective length (E)” in relation to a superstructure means the effective length of the superstructure
determined in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 9(3);
“flush deck ship” means a ship which has no superstructure on the freeboard deck;
“length (S)” in relation to a superstructure means the length of the superstructure determined in
accordance with the provisions of paragraph 9(2);
“salt water” means water having a relative density of 1.025;
“Summer draught” means the draught measured from –
(a) in the case of a wood or composite ship, the lower edge of the keel rabbet;
T((L)-(S))
(L)

1 LBd
49
(b) if the form at the lower part of the midship section is of a hollow character, or if thick garboards
are fitted, the point where the line of the flat of the bottom continued inwards cuts the side of the
keel; and
(c) in any other case, the top of the keel;
to the point which, when load lines and marks have been marked on the ship’s side, will correspond
to the centre of the ring of the load line mark;
“Summer Timber draught” means the draught measured from point (a),(b) or (c) described in the
definition of the Summer draught to the point which when Timber load lines have been marked on
the ship’s side will correspond to the upper edge of the Summer Timber load line;
“tabular freeboard” means in the case of a Type “A” ship the freeboard appropriate to the ship’s
length under Freeboard Table A set out in Schedule 4 and, in the case of a Type “B” ship, the
freeboard appropriate to the ship’s length under Freeboard 5 Table B.
Freeboards: general
2. (1) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (2), the freeboards, other than Timber freeboards,
to be assigned to a ship shall be determined in accordance with the provisions of Part I, and
Timber freeboards to be assigned to a ship shall be determined in accordance with Part II.
(2) The freeboards to be assigned to –
(a) sailing ships;
(b) tugs;
(c) ships of wood or of composite construction or of other materials;
(d) ships with constructional features such as to render freeboards determined in accordance
with subparagraph (1) unreasonable or impracticable; and
(e) unmanned barges having on the freeboard deck only small access openings closed by
watertight gasketed covers of steel;
shall be determined in accordance with the provisions of Part III of this Schedule.
50
PART I – FREEBOARDS OTHER THAN TIMBER FREEBOARDS
Determination of freeboards
3. (1) Subject to subparagraph (3), the Summer freeboard shall be determined in accordance with the
provisions of paragraphs 4 to 16.
(2) Subject to subparagraph (3), the Tropical freeboard shall be obtained by deducting from the
Summer freeboard one forty-eighth (1/48th) of the Summer draught of the ship.
(3) The freeboard so obtained in subparagraphs (1) and (2), but omitting any correction made in
paragraph 8 for deck-line, shall be not less than 50 millimetres except in the case of a ship with
hatchways in Position 1 to which paragraph 5 of Schedule 2 applies but which do not have
pontoon covers, in which case it shall be not less than 150 millimetres.
(4) The Winter freeboard shall be obtained by adding to the Summer freeboard one forty-eighth
(1/48th) of the Summer draught of the ship.
(5) The Winter North Atlantic freeboard shall be obtained by adding to the Winter freeboard a
distance of 50 millimetres.
(6) (a) Subject to subparagraph (b) below, the fresh water freeboard shall be obtained by deducting
from the Summer freeboard the quantity –
where –
⌬ is the displacement in salt water in metric tons at the Summer load waterline, and
T represents metric tons per centimetre immersion in salt water at that waterline.
(b) In any case in which the displacement at that waterline cannot be ascertained the deduction
shall be one forty-eighth (1/48th) of the Summer draught of the ship.
Summer freeboard: Type “A” ships
4. The Summer freeboard assigned to a Type “A” ship shall be determined as follows.
(1) There shall first be ascertained the ship’s tabular freeboard from Table A in Schedule 5.
(2 )If the block coefficient (C
b
) of the ship exceeds 0.68 the tabular freeboard shall be multiplied by
the factor
(3) Corrections in accordance with paragraphs 6 to 16 shall be applied to the freeboard obtained in
accordance with subparagraphs (1) and (2).
(4) Subject to paragraph 3(3), the freeboard so corrected shall be the Summer freeboard assigned to
the ship.
( ) .
.
C
b
0 + 68
136

4T
51
Summer freeboard: Type “B” ships
5. The Summer freeboard to be assigned to a Type “B” ship shall be determined as follows.
(1) There shall first be ascertained the ship’s tabular freeboard from Table B in Schedule 4.
(2) (a) If the ship has hatchways in Position 1 the covers of which are either pontoon covers
complying with the requirements of paragraph 5 (4) of Schedule 2 or covers which comply
with paragraph 6(2) of that Schedule, the tabular freeboard may be corrected in accordance
with such of the provisions of subparagraphs (3) to (8) as are applicable to the ship.
(b) If the ship has hatchways in Position 1 the covers of which comply with the requirements of
paragraph 5 of Schedule 2 except those of subparagraph(4) of that paragraph, the tabular
freeboard shall be corrected in accordance with the provisions of subparagraph (9).
(3) The tabular freeboard of a ship to which subparagraph (2)(a) applies and which exceeds 100
metres in length may be reduced by an amount not exceeding the maximum applicable under
subparagraphs (4) and (5) if the Assigning Authority is satisfied that –
(a) the measures for the protection of the crew comply with the requirements of paragraph 15
of Schedule 2;
(b) the freeing arrangements comply with the requirements of paragraph 14 of Schedule 2;
(c) all covers of hatchways in Positions 1 and 2 comply with the requirements of paragraph 6 of
Schedule 2;
(d) in the case of a ship constructed before 8
th
June 2000, when the ship is loaded to the Summer
load waterline it will remain afloat, after the flooding of any single damaged compartment
other than the machinery space at an assumed permeability of 0.95, in the condition of
equilibrium described in subparagraph (6). If the length of the ship exceeds 225 metres the
machinery space shall rank as a floodable compartment for the purposes of this requirement
having for the purpose an assumed permeability of 0.85.
(e) in the case of a ship constructed on or after 8
th
June 2000 which is loaded in accordance with
the initial condition of loading before flooding, the ship will –
(i) be able to withstand the flooding of any compartment or compartments, with an
assumed permeability of 0.95, consequent upon the damage assumptions specified in
paragraph 5(8), and,
(ii) remain afloat in a satisfactory condition of equilibrium, as referred to in subparagraph
(c)(ii) of the definition of a Type “A” ship in paragraph 1(1) of Schedule 2; and if the
ship is over 150 metres in length, the machinery space shall be treated for these
purposes as a floodable compartment, but with a permeability of 0.85.
(4) Subject to subparagraph (5) no reduction of freeboard pursuant to subparagraph (3) shall exceed
60 per cent of the difference between the tabular freeboards under Freeboard Table A and
Freeboard Table B.
(5) The reduction of 60 per cent referred to in subparagraph(4) may be increased to 100 per cent if
the Assigning Authority is satisfied that –
(a) the ship complies with the requirements of paragraphs 17 and 20 of Schedule 2 as if it were
a Type “A” ship and with those of paragraph 22 of that Schedule;
(b) the ship complies with the requirements of subparagraphs (3)(a) to (c);
52
(c) in the case of a ship constructed before 8
th
June 2000, when loaded to the Summer waterline
the ship will remain afloat in the condition of equilibrium described in subparagraph (6)
after the flooding –
(i) of any two compartments adjacent fore and aft, neither of which is the machinery space,
at an assumed permeability of 0.95; and
(ii) in the case of a ship exceeding 225 metres in length, of the machinery space alone, at an
assumed permeability of 0.85; and
(d) in the case of a ship constructed on or after 8
th
June 2000, the ship complies with the
requirements of subparagraph (3)(e); but in relation to the damage assumptions specified in
paragraph 5(8), throughout the length of the ship any one transverse bulkhead will be
assumed to be damaged, such that two adjacent fore and aft compartments shall be flooded
simultaneously, except that such damage will not apply to the boundary bulkheads of a
machinery space.
(6) In the case of a ship constructed before 8
th
June 2000, the condition of equilibrium referred to in
subparagraphs (3) and (5) above is as follows –
(a) the final waterline after flooding is below the top of any ventilator coaming, the lower edge
of any air pipe opening, the upper edge of the sill of any access opening fitted with a
weathertight door, and the lower edge of any other opening through which progressive
flooding may take place;
(b) the angle of heel due to unsymmetrical flooding does not exceed 15°, or if no part of the
deck is immersed the angle of heel does not exceed 17°; and
(c) the metacentric height calculated using the constant displacement method has a positive
value of at least 50 millimetres in the upright condition after flooding; and
(d) the ship has adequate residual stability; and
(e) the ship has sufficient stability during intermediate stages of flooding to the satisfaction of
the Assigning Authority;
(7) In the case of a ship constructed before 8
th
June 2000, the following assumptions shall be made
for the purposes of calculations pursuant to subparagraphs (3)(d) and (5)(c) –
(a) the vertical extent of damage is equal to the depth of the ship at the point of damage,
measured from and including the freeboard deck at side to the underside of the keel;
(b) the transverse penetration of damage is not more than one fifth of the breadth of the ship
(B), this distance being measured inboard from the ship’s side at right angles to the centre
line of the ship at the level of the Summer load waterline. The depth of transverse
penetration damage assumed shall be that which results in the most severe conditions;
(c) except in the case of compartments referred to in subparagraph (5)(c)(i), no transverse
bulkhead is damaged;
(d) the height of the centre of gravity above the base-line is assessed allowing for homogeneous
loading of cargo holds and for 50 per cent of the designed capacity of consumable fluids
and stores.
(8) In the case of a ship constructed on or after 8
th
June 2000, the following assumptions shall be
made for the purposes of the calculations pursuant to subparagraphs (3)(e) and (5)(d) –
53
(a) the vertical extent of damage in all cases is assumed to be from the base line upwards
without limit;
(b) the transverse extent of damage is equal to one fifth of the breadth of the ship (B) or 11.5m,
whichever is the lesser, measured inboard from the side of the ship perpendicularly to the
centreline at the level of the summer load waterline;
(c) if damage of a lesser extent than that specified in subparagraphs (a) and (b) above results in
a more severe condition, such lesser extent shall be assumed;
(d) except where otherwise required by subparagraph (5), the flooding shall be confined to a
single compartment between adjacent transverse bulkheads provided the inner longitudinal
boundary of the compartment is not in a postition within the transverse extent of assumed
damage. Transverse boundary bulkheads of wing tanks which do not extend over the full
breadth of the ship shall be assumed not to be damaged, provided they extend beyond the
transverse extent of assumed damage prescribed in subparagraph (b)above.
If in a transverse bulkhead there are steps or recesses of not more than 3m in length located
within the transverse extent of assumed damage as defined in subparagraph (b), such
transverse bulkhead may be assumed intact and the adjacent compartment may be flooded
singly. If, however, within the transverse extent of assumed damage there is a step or recess
of more than 3m in length in a transverse bulkhead, the two compartments adjacent to this
bulkhead shall be considered as flooded. The step formed by the afterpeak bulkhead and
the afterpeak tank top shall not be regarded as a step for the purpose of this regulation;
(e) where a main transverse bulkhead is located within the transverse extent of assumed
damage and is stepped in way of a double bottom or side tank by more than 3m, the double
bottom or side tanks adjacent to the stepped portion of the main transverse bulkhead shall
be considered as flooded simultaneously. If this side tank has openings, into one or several
holds, such as grain feeding holes, such hold or holds shall be considered as flooded
simultaneously. Similarly in a ship designed for the carriage of liquid cargoes, if a side tank
has openings into adjacent compartments, such adjacent compartments shall be considered
as empty and as being flooded simultaneously. This provision is applicable even where
such openings are fitted with closing appliances, except in the case of sluice valves fitted in
bulkheads between tanks and where the valves are controlled from the deck. Manhole
covers with closely spaced bolts are considered equivalent to the unpierced bulkhead except
in the case of openings in topside tanks common to the holds;
(f) where the flooding of any two adjacent fore and aft compartments is envisaged, main
transverse watertight bulkheads shall be spaced at least 1/3 L
2/3
or 14.5m, whichever is the
lesser, in order to be considered effective. Where transverse bulkheads are spaced at a lesser
distance, one or more of these bulkheads shall be assumed as non-existent in order to
achieve the minimum spacing between bulkheads.
(9) The tabular freeboard of a ship to which subparagraph (2)(b) applies shall be increased by the
amount shown in Table 1 appropriate to the ship’s length –
Freeboards, at intermediate lengths of ship shall be obtained by linear interpolation. The increase
in the case of ships of more than 200 metres in length shall be by an amount which the Secretary
of State determines in each particular case.
(10) (a) This subparagraph applies to every Type “B” ship of not more than 100 metres in length
having enclosed superstructures the total effective length (e) of which does not exceed
35 per cent of the ship’s length (L).
(b) The freeboard calculated in respect of such a ship in accordance with subparagraphs (1), (2)
and (9) shall be increased by the following amount –
( ) ( )
( )
( )
7 5 100 0 35 . . − −
¸
¸

_
,
L
E
L
54
(11)In the case of a ship with a block coefficient (C
b
) exceeding 0.68, the freeboard calculated in
accordance with subparagraphs (1) to (10) shall be multiplied by the factor –
(12)Corrections in accordance with paragraphs 6 to 16 shall be applied to the freeboard calculated in
accordance with subparagraphs (1) to (11) and, subject to paragraph 3(3), the freeboard so
corrected shall be the Summer freeboard to be assigned to the ship.
( ) .
.
C
b
0 + 68
136
55
Basic freeboard
6. In the following paragraphs “basic freeboard” means the Summer freeboard calculated in
accordance with paragraph 4 or 5, whichever is applicable, but omitting, in the case of a Type “A”
ship, the corrections referred to in paragraph 4(3), or in the case of a Type “B” ship the corrections
referred to in paragraph 5(12).
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) increase (metres) increase (metres) increase
(millimetres) (millimetres) (millimetres)
108
and below
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
50
52
55
57
59
62
64
68
70
73
76
80
84
87
91
95
99
103
108
112
116
121
126
131
136
142
147
153
159
164
170
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
175
181
186
191
196
201
206
210
215
219
224
228
232
236
240
244
247
251
254
258
261
264
267
270
273
275
278
280
283
285
287
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
290
292
294
297
299
301
304
306
308
311
313
315
318
320
322
325
327
329
332
334
336
339
341
343
346
348
350
353
355
357
358
TABLE 1
56
Correction for Depth
7. (1) If the depth for freeboard (D) exceeds , the basic freeboard of the ship shall be
increased by – R millimetres
where R is –
, in the case of a ship less than 120 metres in length; and
250 in the case of a ship of 120 metres or more in length.
(2) If (D) is less than , the basic freeboard of the ship shall be reduced by –
R millimetres
if, but only if, the ship has, subject to subparagraph (3), either –
(a) an enclosed superstructure covering at least 0.6 (L) amidships;
(b) an efficient trunk extending for the ship’s length; or
(c) a combination of enclosed superstructures connected by efficient trunks, being a
combination extending for the ship’s length.
(3) If the height of any such superstructure or trunk in subparagraph (2) is less than standard height
the amount of reduction shall be reduced in the ratio of the actual to the standard height of the
superstructure or trunk.
Correction for position of deck-line
8. (1) Subject to the provisions of subparagraph (2), if the actual depth to the upper edge of the deck-
line is greater or less than the depth for freeboard, the difference if greater shall be added to, or if
less shall be deducted from, the basic freeboard of the ship.
(2) If the position of the deck-line has been fixed in accordance with the provisions of regulation
16(3), the actual depth of the ship shall be taken to the point amidships where the continuation
outwards of the upper surface of the freeboard deck or of any sheathing on that deck intersects
the outer surface of the shell of the ship.
Standard height, length and effective length of superstructures
9. (1) The standard height of a superstructure shall be determined in accordance with Table 2 –
TABLE 2
Standard heights for intermediate lengths of the ship shall be obtained by linear interpolation.
( )
( )
D
L

¸
¸

_
,

15
( ) L
15
( ) L
0 48 .
( )
( )
D
L

¸
¸

_
,

15
( ) L
15
Length of ship Standard Height (metres)
(L) (metres)
of a raised of a superstructure other
quarter deck than a raised quarter deck
30 or less 0.90 1.80
75 1.20 1.80
125 or more 1.80 2.30
57
(2) (a) Subject to subparagraph (b)below, the length of a superstructure (S) shall be the mean
length of the parts of the superstructure which lie within the length of the ship.
(b) In the case of an enclosed superstructure having an end bulkhead which extends in a fair
convex curve beyond its intersection with the superstructure sides, the length of the
superstructure (S) may be taken as its length determined in accordance with subparagraph
(a), but increased by two-thirds of the fore and aft extent of the curvature to a maximum of
one half the breadth of the superstructure at the point of intersection of the curved end of
the superstructure with its side.
(3) (a) In the case of an enclosed superstructure of standard height, the effective length of a
superstructure (E) shall be, subject to subparagraph (c) below, either –
(i) its length; or
(ii) if the superstructure is set in from the sides of the ship, its length modified in the ratio
b/Bs, where –
(aa) “b” is the breadth of the superstructure at the middle of its length; and
(bb) “Bs” is the breadth of the ship at the middle of the length of the superstructure:
where the superstructure is only set in for part of its length, this modification shall be
applied only to that part.
(b) In the case of an enclosed superstructure of less than standard height the effective length of
a superstructure, subject to subparagraphs (a) above and (c) below, shall be its length
reduced in the ratio of the actual height of the superstructure to its standard height.
(c) In the case of an enclosed superstructure consisting of a raised quarter deck the effective
length of a superstructure shall, if the deck is fitted with an intact front bulkhead, be its
length subject to a maximum of 0.6 of the ship’s length and, if not so fitted, be determined
by treating the raised quarter deck as a poop of less than standard height.
(d) A superstructure which is not an enclosed superstructure as defined in paragraph 1 of
Schedule 2 shall have no effective length.
Standard height and effective length of trunks
10. (1) The standard height of a trunk shall be that applicable to a superstructure other than a raised
quarter deck in paragraph 9(1).
(2) The effective length of a trunk shall be determined as follows –
(a) a trunk which is not an efficient trunk as described in subparagraph (b) below shall have no
effective length;
(b) a trunk shall be treated as an efficient trunk provided –
(i) it is at least as strong as a superstructure;
(ii) the hatchways in way of the trunk are in the trunk deck, and the hatchway coamings
and covers comply with the requirements of paragraphs 4 to 6 of Schedule 2, except that
small access openings with watertight covers may be permitted in the freeboard deck;
(iii) the width of the trunk deck stringer provides a satisfactory gangway and sufficient
lateral stiffness;
58
(iv) a permanent working platform fore and aft fitted with guard rails or guard wires
complying with applicable requirements in paragraph 18(2)(a) of Schedule 2 is
provided by the trunk deck, or by detached trunks connected to superstructures by
efficient permanent gangways;
(v) ventilators are protected by the trunk, by watertight covers or by equivalent means;
(vi) open rails or wires are fitted on the weather parts of the freeboard deck in way of the
trunk for at least half their length;
(vii) the machinery casings are protected by the trunk, or by an enclosed superstructure of
at least standard height, or by a deckhouse of the same height, strength and
weathertightness equivalent to such an enclosed superstructure;
(viii) the breadth of the trunk is at least 60 per cent of the breadth of the ship;
(ix) where there is no superstructure the length of the trunk is at least 0.6(L).
(c) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (d) below, the effective length of an efficient
trunk shall be its full length reduced in the ratio of its mean breadth to the breadth of the ship.
(d) If the actual height of an efficient trunk is less than the standard height, its effective length
shall be the length calculated in accordance with subparagraph (c) above reduced in the
ratio of the actual to the standard height of the trunk. In addition, if the ship is a Type “B”
ship and the height of hatchway coamings on the trunk deck is less than that required by
paragraph 5(1) or 6(1) of Schedule 2 a reduction from the actual height of the trunk shall be
made of an amount corresponding to the difference between the actual height and the
required height of the hatchway coamings.
Deduction for effective length of superstructures and trunks
11. (1) Where the sum of the effective lengths of superstructures and trunks of a ship is 1.0(L), the basic
freeboard of the ship shall be reduced by –
350 millimetres if the ship is 24 metres in length (L);
860 millimetres if the ship is 85 metres in length (L);
1070 millimetres if the ship is 122 metres in length or more;
and by amounts obtained by linear interpolation in the case of ships of intermediate length.
(2) Where the sum of the effective lengths of superstructures and trunk is less than 1.0 (L), the basic
freeboard of a ship shall be reduced by a percentage of the figures in subparagraph (1) according
to the total effective length of its superstructures and trunks as follows.
(a) In the case of a Type “A” ship, by a percentage given in Table 3. The percentage in the case
of a ship having superstructures and trunks of an effective length intermediate to those
specified in Table 3 is to be obtained by linear interpolation.
(b) (i) Subject to subparagraphs (ii), (iii) and (iv) below, in the case of a Type “B” ship, by a
percentage given in Table 4. The percentage in the case of a ship having
superstructures and trunks of an effective length intermediate to those specified in
Table 4 is to be obtained by linear interpolation.
(ii) Where the effective length of a bridge covers less than 0.1(L) before and 0.1(L) abaft
amidships the percentages shall be obtained by linear interpolation between the lines
I and II.
59
(iii) Where the effective length of a forecastle is more than 0.4 (L),the percentages shall be
obtained from line II.
(iv) Where the effective length of a forecastle is less than 0.07 (L),the above percentages
shall be reduced by –
where “f” is the effective length of the forecastle.
TABLE 3
PERCENTAGE OF DEDUCTION FOR TYPE “A” SHIPS
TABLE 4
PERCENTAGE OF DEDUCTION FOR TYPE “B” SHIPS
Measurement of Sheer
12. (1) The sheer shall be measured from the deck at side to a line of reference drawn parallel to the
keel through the sheer line at amidships.
(2) In ships designed with a rake of keel, the sheer shall be measured in relation to a line of
reference drawn parallel to the Summer load waterline.
(3) In flush deck ships and in ships with detached superstructures the sheer shall be measured at
the freeboard deck.
(4) In ships with topsides of unusual form in which there is a step or break in the topsides, the sheer
shall be considered in relation to the equivalent depth amidships.
(5) In ships with a superstructure of standard height which extends over the whole length of the
freeboard deck, the sheer shall be measured at the superstructure deck. Where the height of the
superstructure exceeds the standard height the least difference (Z) between the actual and standard
heights shall be added to each end ordinate. Similarly, the intermediate ordinates at distances of
1/6(L) and 1/3(L) from each perpendicular shall be increased by 0.444 (Z) and 0.111 (Z) respectively.
( ) ( )
( )
5
0 07
007
.
.
.
L f
L

Total effective length of superstructure and trunks
0 0.1(L) 0.2(L) 0.3(L) 0.4(L) 0.5(L) 0.6(L) 0.7(L) 0.8(L) 0.9(L) 1.0(L)
0 7 14 21 31 41 52 63 75.3 87.7 100
Percentage of
deduction for
all types of
superstructure
and trunks
Total effective length of superstructure and trunks
Line 0 0.1(L) 0.2(L) 0.3(L) 0.4(L) 0.5(L) 0.6(L) 0.7(L) 0.8(L) 0.9(L) 1.0
I 0 5 10 15 23.5 32 46 63 75.3 87.7 100
II 0 6.3 12.7 19 27.5 36 46 63 75.3 87.7 100
Ships with
forecastle
and
without
detached
bridge
Ships with
forecastle
and
detached
bridge
60
(6) Where the deck of an enclosed superstructure has at least the same sheer as the exposed
freeboard deck, the sheer of the enclosed portion of the freeboard deck shall not be taken into
account.
(7) Where an enclosed poop or forecastle is either –
(a) of standard height with greater sheer than that of the freeboard deck; or
(b) is of more than standard height;
an addition to the sheer of the freeboard deck shall be made calculated in accordance with
paragraph 14(4).
Standard sheer profile
13. The ordinates of the standard sheer profile are given in Table 5 –
TABLE 5
Measurement of variation front standard sheer profile
14. (1) Where the sheer profile differs from the standard sheer profile, the four ordinates of each profile
in the forward or after halves of the ship shall be multiplied by the appropriate factors given in
paragraph 13. The difference between the sums of the respective products and those of the
standard divided by 8 shall be the deficiency or excess of sheer in the forward or after half. The
arithmetical mean of the excess or deficiency in the forward and after halves shall be the excess
or deficiency of sheer.
(2) Where the after half of the sheer profile is greater than the standard sheer profile and the
forward half is less than the standard sheer profile, no credit shall be allowed for the part in
excess, and deficiency only shall be measured.
(3) Where the forward half of the sheer profile exceeds the standard sheer profile, and the after half
of the sheer profile is not less than 75 per cent of the standard sheer profile, credit shall be
allowed for the part in excess. Where the after half of the sheer profile is less than 50 per cent of
the standard sheer profile, no credit shall be given for the excess of sheer forward. Where the
sheer in the after half is between 50 per cent and 75 per cent of the standard sheer profile,
intermediate allowances may be granted for excess sheer forward.
(4) Where sheer credit is given for a poop or forecastle the following formula shall be used –
( )
s
L y
L
· ⋅
3
'
Station Ordinate Factor
(in millimetres)
After perpendicular (A.P.) 25.0((L) /3 + 10) 1
After half 1/6(L) from A.P. 11.1((L) /3 + 10) 3
1/3(L) from A.P. 2 .8((L) /3 + 10) 3
Amidships 0 1
Forward half Amidships 0 1
1/3(L) from F.P. 5.6((L) /3 + 10) 3
1/6(L) from F.P. 22.2((L) /3 + 10) 3
Forward perpendicular (F.P.) 50.0((L) /3 + 10) 1
61
where –
s = sheer credit, to be deducted from the deficiency or added to the excess of sheer;
y = difference between actual and standard height of superstructure at the after or forward
perpendicular; and
L’= mean enclosed length of poop or forecastle up to a maximum length of 0.5 (L).
This formula provides a curve in the form of a parabola tangential to the actual sheer curve
at the freeboard deck and intersecting the end ordinate at a point below the superstructure
deck at a distance equal to the standard height of the poop or forecastle. The superstructure
deck shall not be less than standard height above this curve at any point. This curve shall be
used in determining the sheer profile for the forward and the after halves of the ship.
Correction for Variations from standard sheer profile
15. (1) The correction for sheer shall be the deficiency or excess of sheer determined in accordance with
paragraph 14 multiplied by –
(2) In the case of a ship with sheer less than the standard sheer profile, the correction for deficiency
of sheer determined in accordance with subparagraph (1) shall be added to the basic freeboard
of the ship.
(3) Subject to subparagraph (4),in the case of a ship having an excess of sheer –
(a) if an enclosed superstructure covers 0.1(L) before and 0.1(L) abaft amidships, the correction
for excess of sheer determined in accordance with subparagraph (1) shall be deducted from
the basic freeboard of the ship;
(b) if no enclosed superstructure covers amidships, no deductions shall be made from the basic
freeboard of the ship;
(c) if an enclosed superstructure covers less than 0.1(L) before and 0.1(L) abaft amidships, the
correction for excess of sheer determined in accordance with subparagraph (1) shall be
modified in the ratio of the amount of 0.2(L) amidship which is covered by the
superstructure, to 0.2(L).
(4) The maximum deduction for excess sheer shall be at the rate of 125 millimetres per 100 metres of
length (L).
Correction for minimum bow height
16. (1) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraphs (2) and (3), where the bow height determined in
accordance with subparagraph (4) is less than the minimum bow height determined in
accordance with subparagraph (5), the freeboard determined for the ship shall be increased by
an amount equal to the difference between the bow height and the minimum bow height.
(2) Where an existing ship to which subparagraph (1) applies has been so constructed or modified
as to comply with all the requirements of Schedule 2 applicable to a new ship of her type and is
to be assigned freeboards determined in accordance with this Schedule, and/or –
(a) the forecastle is less than 0.07(L);
( )
0 75
2
. −
S
L
62
(b) the sheer extends for less than 15 per cent of the ship’s length (L) measured from the
forward perpendicular;
The freeboard shall be increased by such amount as the Assigning Authority may determine in
each particular case.
(3) In the case of a ship to which subparagraph (1) applies, being a ship which is constructed to
meet exceptional operational requirements, the correction to be made in accordance with
subparagraphs (1) and (2) may be reduced or waived if the Secretary of State is satisfied that the
safety of the ship will not be impaired in consequence of the worst sea and weather conditions
likely to be encountered by the ship in service.
(4) The bow height of a ship is the vertical distance at the forward perpendicular between the
Summer load waterline at the designed trim and the top of the exposed deck at side.
(a) Where the bow height is obtained by including sheer, the sheer shall extend for no less than
15 per cent of length (L) measured from the forward perpendicular.
(b) Where the bow height is obtained by including the height of a superstructure, such
superstructure shall –
(i) extend from the stem to a point not less than 0.07 of the ship’s length (L) measured
from the forward perpendicular;
(ii) if length (L) is 100 metres or less, be an enclosed superstructure; and
(iii) if length (L) exceeds 100 metres in length, be fitted with satisfactory closing appliances.
(5) The minimum bow height in millimetres shall be –
where (L) is less than 250 metres; and
where (L) is 250 metres or more;
C
b
shall not be taken as less than 0.68.
7000
136
0 68
.
. C +
¸
¸

_
,

b
( )
( )
56 1
500
136
0 68
L
L
C

¸
¸

_
,

+
¸
¸

_
,

.
.
b
63
PART II – TIMBER FREEBOARDS
Summer Timber freeboard
17. The Summer Timber freeboard is the freeboard determined in accordance with the provisions of
paragraphs 5(1),(2)(a),(10) and (11) and corrected in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 6 to 15,
except that the percentages in Table 6 shall be substituted for those given in Table 4 of paragraph 11(2).
TABLE 6
PERCENTAGE OF DEDUCTION FOR TYPE “B” SHIPS
Percentages at intermediate lengths superstructures shall be obtained by linear interpolation.
Other Timber freeboards
18. (1) The Winter Timber freeboard shall be obtained by adding to the Summer Timber freeboard one
thirty-sixth (1/36th) of the Summer Timber draught.
(2) The Winter North Atlantic Timber freeboard shall be the same as the Winter North Atlantic
freeboard assigned.
(3) The Tropical Timber freeboard shall be obtained by deducting from the Summer Timber
freeboard one forty-eighth (1/48th) of the Summer Timber draught.
(4) (a) The Fresh Water Timber freeboard shall, subject to subparagraph (b), obtained by deducting
from the Summer Timber freeboard the quantity –
millimetres
where –
⌬ is the displacement in salt water in tonnes at the waterline which will when load lines
have been marked on the ship’s side correspond to the Summer Timber load line; and
T represents tonnes per centimetre immersion in salt water at that waterline.
(b) Where the displacement at that waterline cannot be ascertained, the deduction shall be one
forty-eighth (1/48th) of the Summer Timber draught of the ship.

4T
Total effective length of superstructure
0 0.1(L) 0.2(L) 0.3(L) 0.4(L) 0.5(L) 0.6(L) 0.7(L) 0.8(L) 0.9(L 1.0(L)
20 31 42 53 64 70 76 82 88 94 100
Percentage of
deduction for
all types of
superstructure
64
PART III – SAILING SHIPS AND OTHER SHIPS
Sailing ships and tugs
19. The freeboards to be assigned to sailing ships and tugs shall be freeboards determined in accordance
with the provisions of Part I of this Schedule increased by such amounts as the Secretary of State
may direct in each particular case.
Ships of wood and other ships
20. The freeboards to be assigned to ships of wood or of composite construction or of other materials, or
to ships with constructional features such as to render freeboards calculated in accordance with Part
I of this Schedule unreasonable or impracticable shall be determined by the Assigning Authority in
each particular case.
Unmanned barges
21. The freeboards to be assigned to unmanned barges having on the freeboard deck only small access
openings closed by watertight gasketed covers of steel shall be freeboards determined in accordance
with the provisions of Part I of this Schedule omitting paragraphs 5 and 16. Such freeboards may be
reduced by such amounts not exceeding 25 per cent as the Secretary of State may direct in each
particular case.
65
Schedule 4
SCHEDULE 5
FREEBOARD TABLES
1. The following is the Freeboard Table referred to in paragraph 4 of Schedule 4:–
TABLE A
FREEBOARD TABLE TYPE “A” SHIPS
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
6l
62
63
200
208
217
225
233
242
250
258
267
275
283
292
300
308
316
325
334
344
354
364
374
385
396
408
420
432
443
455
467
478
490
503
516
530
544
559
573
587
600
613
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
626
639
653
666
680
693
706
720
733
746
760
773
786
800
814
828
841
855
869
883
897
911
926
940
955
969
984
999
1014
1029
1044
1059
1074
1089
1105
1120
1135
1151
1166
1181
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
1196
1212
1228
1244
1260
1276
1293
1309
1326
1342
1359
1376
1392
1409
1426
1442
1459
1476
1494
1511
1528
1546
1563
1580
1598
1615
1632
1650
1667
1684
1702
1719
1736
1753
1770
1787
1803
1820
1837
1853
66
TABLE A (continued)
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
1870
1886
1903
1919
1935
1952
1968
1984
2000
2016
2032
2048
2064
2080
2096
2111
2126
2141
2155
2169
2184
2198
2212
2226
2240
2254
2268
2281
2294
2307
2320
2332
2345
2357
2369
2381
2393
2405
2416
2428
2440
2451
2463
2474
2486
2497
2508
2519
2530
2541
2552
2562
2572
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
2582
2592
2602
2612
2622
2632
2641
2650
2659
2669
2678
2687
2696
2705
2714
2723
2732
2741
2749
2758
2767
2775
2784
2792
2801
2809
2817
2825
2833
2841
2849
2857
2865
2872
2880
2888
2895
2903
2910
2918
2925
2932
2939
2946
2953
2959
2966
2973
2979
2986
2993
3000
3006
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
3012
3018
3024
3030
3036
3042
3048
3054
3060
3066
3072
3078
3084
3089
3095
3101
3106
3112
3117
3123
3128
3133
3138
3143
3148
3153
3158
3163
3167
3172
3176
3181
3185
3189
3194
3198
3202
3207
3211
3215
3220
3224
3228
3233
3237
3241
3246
3250
3254
3258
3262
3266
3270
67
TABLE A (continued)
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
3274
3278
3281
3285
3288
3292
3295
3298
3302
3305
3308
3312
3315
3318
3322
3325
3328
3331
3334
3337
3339
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
3342
3345
3347
3350
3353
3355
3358
3361
3363
3366
3368
3371
3373
3375
3378
3380
3382
3385
3387
3389
3392
3394
3396
3399
3401
3403
3406
3408
3410
3412
3414
3416
3418
3420
3422
3423
3425
3427
3428
3430
3432
3433
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
Freeboards at intermediate lengths of ship shall be obtained by linear interpolation.
Freeboards, in mm, at length of ship less than 24 metres shall be –
See also paragraph 3 of Schedule 4.
( )
50
150
24
+

1
1
1
L
68
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
5l
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
200
208
217
225
233
242
250
258
267
275
283
292
300
308
316
325
334
344
354
364
374
385
396
408
420
432
443
455
467
478
490
503
516
530
544
559
573
587
601
615
629
644
659
674
689
705
721
738
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
754
769
784
800
816
833
850
868
887
905
923
942
960
978
996
1015
1034
1054
1075
1096
1116
1135
1154
1172
1190
1209
1229
1250
1271
1293
1315
1337
1359
1380
1401
1421
1440
1459
1479
1500
1521
1543
1565
1587
1609
1630
1651
1671
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
1690
1709
1729
1750
1771
1793
1815
1837
1859
1880
1901
1921
1940
1959
1979
2000
2021
2043
2065
2087
2109
2130
2131
2171
2190
2209
2229
2250
2271
2293
2315
2334
2354
2375
2396
2418
2440
2460
2480
2500
2520
2540
2560
2580
2600
2620
2640
2660
2. The following is Freeboard Table B referred to in paragraph 5 of Schedule 4:–
TABLE B
FREEBOARD TABLE FOR TYPE “B” SHIPS
69
TABLE B (continued)
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
2680
2698
2716
2735
2754
2774
2795
2815
2835
2855
2875
2895
2915
2933
2952
2970
2988
3007
3025
3044
3062
3080
3098
3116
3134
3151
3167
3185
3202
3219
3235
3249
3264
3280
3296
3313
3330
3347
3363
3380
3397
3413
3430
3445
3460
3475
3490
3505
3520
3537
3554
3570
3586
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
3601
3615
3630
3645
3660
3675
3690
3705
3720
3735
3750
3765
3780
3795
3808
3821
3835
3849
3864
3880
3893
3906
3920
3934
3949
3965
3978
3992
4005
4018
4032
4045
4058
4072
4085
4098
4112
4125
4139
4152
4165
4177
4189
4201
4214
4227
4240
4252
4264
4276
4289
4302
4315
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
4327
4339
4350
4362
4373
4385
4397
4408
4420
4432
4443
4455
4467
4478
4490
4502
4513
4525
4537
4548
4560
4572
4583
4595
4607
4618
4630
4642
4654
4665
4676
4686
4695
4704
4714
4725
4736
4748
4757
4768
4779
4790
4801
4812
4823
4834
4844
4855
4866
4878
4890
4899
4909
70
Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard Length of ship Freeboard
(metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres) (metres) (millimetres)
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
4920
4931
4943
4955
4965
4975
4985
4995
5005
5015
5025
5035
5045
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
5055
5065
5075
5086
5087
5108
5119
5130
5140
5l50
5160
5170
5180
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
5190
5200
5210
5220
5230
5240
5250
5260
5268
5276
5285
5294
5303
TABLE B (continued)
Freeboards at intermediate lengths of ship shall be obtained by linear interpolation.
Freeboards, in mm, at length of ship less than 24 metres shall be –
See also paragraphs 3 and 17 of Schedule 4.
( )
50
150
24
+

1
1
1
L
71
Regulation 32
SCHEDULE 6
STABILITY
PART I – INFORMATION AS TO STABILITY
The information relating to the stability of a ship to be provided for the master shall include the
particulars specified below.
1. The ship’s name, official number, port of registry, gross and register tonnages, principal dimensions,
displacement, deadweight and draught to the Summer load line.
2. A profile view and, if necessary, plan views of the ship drawn to scale showing all compartments, tanks,
storerooms and crew and passenger accommodation spaces, with their position relative to mid-ship.
3. (1) The capacity and the longitudinal and vertical centre of gravity of every compartment available
for the carriage of cargo, fuel, stores, feedwater, domestic or water ballast.
(2) In the case of a vehicle ferry, the vertical centre of gravity of compartments designated for the
carriage of vehicles shall be based on the estimated centres of gravity of the vehicles and not on
the volumetric centres of the compartments.
4. (1) The estimated total weight and the longitudinal and vertical centre of gravity of each such total
weight of –
(a) the passengers and their effects; and
(b) the crew and their effects.
(2) In estimating such centres of gravity, passengers and crew shall be assumed to be distributed
about the ship in the spaces they will normally occupy, including the highest decks to which
either or both have access.
5. (1) The estimated weight and the disposition and centre of gravity of the maximum amount of deck
cargo which the ship may reasonably be expected to carry on an exposed deck.
(2) In the case of deck cargo, the arrival condition shall include the weight of water likely to be
absorbed by the cargo. (For timber deck cargo the weight of water absorbed shall be taken as
15 per cent of the weight when loaded.)
6. A diagram or scale showing –
(a) the load line mark and load lines with particulars of the corresponding freeboards; and
(b) the displacement, tonnes per centimetre immersion, and deadweight corresponding to a
range of mean draughts extending between the waterline representing the deepest load line
and the waterline of the ship in light condition.
7. (1) A diagram or tabular statement showing the hydrostatic particulars of the ship, including the
heights of the transverse metacentre and the values of the moment to change trim one centimetre.
These particulars shall be provided for a range of mean draughts extending at least between the
waterline representing the deepest load line and the waterline of the ship in light condition.
(2) Where a tabular statement is used to comply with subparagraph (1), the intervals between such
draughts shall be sufficiently close to permit accurate interpolation.
(3) In the case of ships having raked keels, the same datum for the heights of centres of buoyancy
and metacentres shall be used as for the centres of gravity referred to in paragraphs 3, 4 and 5.
72
8. The effect on stability of free surface in each tank in the ship in which liquids may be carried,
including an example to show how the metacentric height is to be corrected.
9. (1) A diagram or table showing cross curves of stability, covering the range of draughts referred to
in paragraph 7(1).
(2) The information shall indicate the height of the assumed axis from which the righting levers are
measured and the trim which has been assumed.
(3) In the case of ships having raked keels and where a datum other than the top of keel has been
used, the position of the assumed axis shall be clearly defined.
(4) Subject to subparagraph (5), only enclosed superstructures and efficient trunks as defined in
paragraph 10 of Schedule 4 shall be taken into account in deriving such curves.
(5) The following structures may be taken into account in deriving such curves if the Secretary of
State is satisfied that their location, integrity and means of closure will contribute to the ship’s
stability –
(a) superstructures located above the superstructure deck;
(b) deckhouses on or above the freeboard deck whether wholly or in part only;
(c) hatchway structures on or above the freeboard deck.
(6) Subject to the approval of the Secretary of State in the case of a ship carrying timber deck cargo,
the volume of the timber deck cargo, or a part thereof, may be taken into account in deriving a
supplementary curve of stability appropriate to the ship when carrying such cargo.
(7) An example shall be included to show how a curve of righting levers (GZ) may be obtained from
the cross curves of stability.
(8) In the case of a vehicle ferry or a similar ship having bow doors, ship-side doors or stern doors
where the buoyancy of a superstructure is taken into account in the calculation of stability
information, and the cross curves of stability are based upon the assumption that such doors are
secured weathertight, there shall be a specific warning that such doors must be secured
weathertight before the ship proceeds to sea.
10. (1) The diagram and statements referred to in subparagraph (2) shall be provided separately for
each of the following conditions of the ship –
(a) light condition. If the ship has permanent ballast, such diagram and statements shall be
provided for the ship in light condition both with and without such ballast;
(b) ballast condition both on departure and on arrival. It is to be assumed that on arrival oil fuel,
fresh water, consumable stores and the like are reduced to 10 per cent of their capacity;
(c) condition on departure and on arrival when loaded to the Summer load line with cargo filling all
spaces available for cargo. Cargo shall be taken to be homogeneous except where this is clearly
inappropriate, for example, in cargo spaces which are intended to be used exclusively for
the carriage of vehicles or of containers;
(d) service loaded conditions both on departure and on arrival.
(2) (a) A profile diagram of the ship drawn to a suitable small scale showing the disposition of all
components of the deadweight.
(b) A statement showing the lightweight, the disposition and the total weights of all
components of the deadweight, the displacement, the corresponding positions of the centre
of gravity, the metacentre and also the metacentric height (GM).
73
(c) A diagram showing the curve of righting levers (GZ). Where credit is given for the
buoyancy of a timber deck cargo the curve of righting levers (GZ) must be drawn both with
and without this credit.
(d) A statement showing the elements of stability in the condition compared to the crieria laid
down in Schedule 2 paragraph 2(2).
(3) The metacentric height (GM) and the curve of righting levers (GZ) shall be corrected for liquid
free surface.
(4) Where there is a significant amount of trim in any of the conditions referred to in subparagraph
(1) the metacentric height and the curve of righting levers (GZ) may be required to be
determined from the trimmed waterline.
(5) If in the view of the Assigning Authority the stability characteristics in either or both of the
conditions referred to in subparagraph (1)(c) are not satisfactory, such conditions shall be
marked accordingly and an appropriate warning to the master shall be inserted.
11. A statement of instructions on appropriate procedures to maintain adequate stability in each case
where special procedures are applied such as partial or complete filling of spaces designated for
cargo, fuel, fresh water or other purposes.
12. The report on the inclining test and of the calculation derived from it to obtain information of the
light condition of the ship.
PART II – SHIPS IN RELATION TO WHICH THE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OR THE ASSIGNING
AUTHORITY’S APPROVAL OF THE STABILITY INFORMATION IS REQUIRED
13. The ships referred to in regulation 32(3), (4)(a) and (5)(a) of the Regulations are as follows:
(a) an oil tanker over 100 metres in length;
(b) a bulk carrier, or an ore carrier, over 150 metres in length;
(c) a single deck bulk carrier over 100 metres in length but not exceeding 150 metres in length;
(d) a single deck dry cargo ship over 100 metres in length;
(e) a purpose built container ship over 125 metres in length;
(f) a column stabilised mobile offshore drilling unit; or
(g) a column stabilised mobile offshore support unit.
14. In paragraph 13 –
“mobile offshore drilling unit” means a ship capable of engaging in drilling operations for the
exploration or exploitation of resources beneath the sea bed such as liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons,
sulphur or salt;
“mobile offshore support unit” means a ship used in connection with the offshore petroleum
industry to provide ancillary services such as accommodation, cranes or repair facilities; and
“column stabilised” means constructed with the main deck of the unit connected to its underwater
hull or footings by columns or caissons.
74
Regulation 13
SCHEDULE 7
NOTICE OF LOAD LINES TO BE POSTED UP BEFORE SAILING
1. In this Schedule
“freeboard” means the distance measured vertically downwards amidships from the upper edge of
the deck-line marked on the side of the ship to the surface of the water;
Availability of Standard Form
2. Copies of the “Draught of Water and Freeboard” Notice, FRE 13, an example of which is attached,
are available from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency Marine Offices.
75
DRAUGHT OF WATER AND FREEBOARD
NOTICE
SHIP .............................................. PORT OF REGISTRY .................................................... GROSS TONNAGE .............................................
(1) Summer freeboard ............................................... millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(2) Winter freeboard .................................................. millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(3) Tropical freeboard ............................................... millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(4) Winter North Atlantic freeboard ....................... millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(5) Allowance for fresh water for all freeboards other than Timber freeboards ................................................................... millimetres
(6) Timber Summer freeboard ................................. millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(7) Timber Winter freeboard .................................... millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(8) Timber Tropical freeboard ................................. millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(9) Timber Winter North Atlantic freeboard ......... millimetres corresponding to a mean draught of ...................... millimetres
(10) Allowance for fresh water for Timber freeboards ................................................................................................................. millimetres
Notes
1. The particulars to be given above of freeboards and allowances for fresh water to be taken from the load line certificate
currently in force in respect of the ship.
2. All freeboards given on the load line certificate must be stated.
3. The mean draught to be given above is the mean of the draughts which would be shown on the scales of measurement on the
stem and on the stern post of the ship if it were so loaded that the upper edge of the load line on each side of the ship
appropriate to the particular freeboard were on the surface of the water.
4. Where the draught is shown on the scales of measurement on the stem and on the stern post of the ship in feet the mean
draught must be given in millimetres.
PARTICULARS OF LOADING
Notes
1. The actual mean freeboard (Column 6) is the mean of the freeboards on each side of the ship at the time when the ship is
loaded and ready to leave.
2. If the actual mean freeboard is less than the appropriate minimum saltwater freeboard as shown on the load line certificate
there must be entered in Column 7 the corrected freeboard arrived at after making any allowances for density of water,
rubbish to be discharged overboard and fuel, water and stores to be consumed on any stretch of river or inland water, being
allowances duly entered in the ship’s official log-book.
3. If the actual mean freeboard is greater than the appropriate salt water freeboard, Column 7 need not be filled in.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
ACTUAL MEAN FREEBOARD SIGNATURE OF MASTER
DRAUGHT AND AN OFFICER
DATE PLACE
FORWARD AFT MEAN ACTUAL CORRECTED MASTER AN OFFICER
(See notes (See note 3)
1&2)
76
UNITED KINGDOM
LOAD LINE CERTIFICATE
Issued under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998 as amended
under the authority of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
by [official designation of the assigning authority]
Name of Ship
Length (L) as defined by regulation 2 of the Merchant
Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998 as amended
Gross Tonnage
Distinctive Number or Letters
(T)
Freeboard assigned as : Type of ship
(S)
(W)
(WNA)
Freeboard from deck line Load line
Allowance for Fresh Water for all freeboards :
The upper edge of the deck line from which these freeboards are measured is
Date of initial or renewal survey
Port of Registry
Winter North Atlantic mm.
Tropical
Summer
Winter
mm.
mm.
mm.
mm. above (S)
mm. below (S)
mm. below (S)
Upper edge of line through centre of ring
mm.
PARTICULARS OF SHIP
Note: Freeboards and Load Lines which are not applicable need not be entered on the certificate.
This certificate is valid until subject to annual surveys in
accordance with those Regulations
Issued at on
An authorised official issuing the certificate
Signed
Name
THIS IS TO CERTIFY
that this ship has been surveyed and the freeboards and load lines shown above have been assigned in accordance with the Merchant Shipping
(Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended.
Regulations 9, 12 and 14
SCHEDULE 8
UNITED KINGDOM LOAD LINE CERTIFICATES
FORMERLY FRE2 1/4 MSF 2001/REV 0500
77
This is to certify
that at an annual survey required by Regulation 8(1)(c) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations
1998 as amended this ship was found to comply with the relevant requirements of those Regulations.
Place Date
Siganture of an authorised official
Place Date
Name
Name
CONDITIONS:
Place
Place
Date
Date
Name
Name
Name of Ship
Siganture of an authorised official
Signature of an authorised official
Signature of an authorised official
Notes
1. When a ship departs from a port situated on a river or inland water, deeper loading shall be permitted
corresponding to the weight of fuel and all other materials required for consumption between the point of
departure and the sea.
2. When a ship is in fresh water of unit density, the appropriate load line may be submerged by the amount of
the fresh water allowance shown above. Where the density is other than unity, an allowance shall be made
proportional to the difference between 1.025 and the actual density.

3. This certificate must be kept framed and posted up in some conspicuous place on board the ship, so long as it
remains in force and the ship is in use.
ENDORSEMENT OF ANNUAL SURVEY
2/4
78
Name of Ship
THIS IS TO CERTIFY
that at an annual survey in accordance with Regulation 10(8)(c) of Merchant Shipping (Load Line)
Regulations 1998, as amended , the ship was found to comply with the relevant requirements of those
Regulations
Place Date
Signature of an authorised official
Place
Date
Name
Name
Annual survey in accordance with Regulation 10(8)(c)
Endorsement to extend the certificate if valid for less than 5 years where Regulation 10 (3) applies
The Ship complies with the relevant requirements of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended, and this certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10 (3) of those Regulations, be
accepted as valid until
Signature of an authorised official
Place Date
Name
Endorsement where the renewal survey has been completed and Regulation 10 (4) applies
The Ship complies with the relevant requirements of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended, and this certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10 (4) of those Regulations, be
accepted as valid until
Signature of an authorised official
3/4
79
Name of Ship
Place Date
Name
Endorsement to extend the validity of the certificate until reaching the port of survey or for a period
of grace where Regulation 10 (5) or 10(6) applies
This certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10(5)/10(6) * of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line)
Regulations, as amended, be accepted as valid until
Signature of an authorised official
Place Date
Name
Endorsement for advancement of anniversary date where Regulation 10 (8) (a) applies
In accordance with Regulation 10 (8) (a) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended, the new anniversary date is
Signature of an authorised official
In accordance with Regulation 10( 8) (a) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as
amended, the new anniversary date is
Place Date
Name
Signature of an authorised official
* Delete as appropriate
4/4
80
FORMERLY FRE4 1/4 MSF 2003/REV 0500
That the above-mentioned ship is exempt under Regulation 5(2) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended,
from the following provisions of those Regulations:-
UNITED KINGDOM LOAD LINE
EXEMPTION CERTIFICATE
Issued under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended
under the authority of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, an Executive Agency of the Department of the
Environment, Transport and the Regions
PARTICULARS OF SHIP
Name of Ship
Port of Registry
Distinctive Number or Letters
THIS IS TO CERTIFY
Date of initial or renewal survey
This certificate is valid until subject, where appropriate,
to annual surveys in accordance with the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended.
Issued at on
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment,Transport and the Regions
Name
Length (L) in metres as defined by Regulation 2 of the
Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as amended.
SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS
Gross
Tonnage
81
Place Date
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment,Transport and the Regions
Signed
This is to certify
That at an annual survey required under Regulation 8(1)(c) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line)
Regulations 1998 as amended, this ship continues to comply with the conditions under which the
exemption was granted.
Name
Place Date
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment,Transport and the Regions
Signed
Name
Place Date
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment,Transport and the Regions
Signed
Name
Place Date
An authorised official of theDepartment of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
Signed
Name
CONDITIONS (Continued):
Name of Ship
ENDORSEMENT FOR ANNUAL SURVEYS
2/4
82
Name of Ship
This is to certify
that at an annual survey in accordance with Regulation 10(8)(c) of Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations
1998, as amended, the ship was found to comply with the relevant requirements of those Regulations
Place Date
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
Place
Date
Name
Name
Annual survey in accordance with Regulation 10(8)(c)
Endorsement to extend the certificate if valid for less than 5 years where Regulation 10 (3) applies
The Ship complies with the relevant requirements of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended, and this certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10 (3) of those Regulations, be accepted
as valid until
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
Place Date
Name
Endorsement where the renewal survey has been completed and Regulation 10 (4) applies
The Ship complies with the relevant requirements of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998,
as amended, and this certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10 (4) of those Regulations, be accepted
as valid until
An authorised official of theDepartment of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
3/4
83
Name of Ship
Place Date
Name
Endorsement to extend the validity of the certificate until reaching the port of survey or for a
period of grace where Regulation 10 (5) or 10(6) applies
This certificate shall, in accordance with Regulation 10(5)/10(6) * of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line)
Regulations, as amended, be accepted as valid until
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
Place Date
Name
Endorsement for advancement of anniversary date where Regulation 10 (8) (a) applies
In accordance with Regulation 10 (8) (a) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as
amended, the new anniversary date is
An authorised official of the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
In accordance with Regulation 10 (8) (a) of the Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998, as
amended, the new anniversary date is
Place Date
Name
An authorised official of theDepartment of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
* delete as appropriate
4/4
84
REVISED CODE EFFECTIVE FROM 1 JUNE 2001












Each time you sign on a new crew agreement you are
agreeing to observe the Code of Conduct for the Merchant
Navy. This Code has been agreed between the National
Union of Marine, Aviation and Shipping Transport Officers
(NUMAST), the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport
Workers (RMT) and the Chamber of Shipping (CoS) and
approved by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

The Code is printed in this leaflet. Please read it carefully. Any
questions you may have should be referred to your supervisor
or head of department, or to an official of your union.

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR THE MERCHANT NAVY

1. Seafaring is a civilian occupation which places upon
those who go to sea demands not found in industry ashore.
Seafarers are called upon to spend not only their working
hours but their leisure hours too in the confined environment of
a ship and with the same individuals for company. It might be
said that they are more susceptible to the stresses and strains
of everyday life than their fellows ashore. In this environment
the need for discipline and behaviour assumed a particular
importance. However, disciplinary procedures should not be
viewed primarily as a means of imposing sanctions. They are
designed to emphasise and encourage improvements in
individual conduct.

2. The most effective form of discipline is self-discipline,
which in turn springs from a responsible attitude to the job,
whatever it may be, and concern for the efficient operation
of the ship and for the comfort and convenience of fellow
crew members. Failures of self-discipline which occur will
have to be dealt with by reference to an imposed framework
of discipline or Code of Conduct. This document sets out
such a Code, containing the basic rules of reasonable
behaviour expected of all Officers and Ratings. It has been
drawn up by the organisations representing the seafarers and
the employers and approved by the Secretary of State for
transport. Observance of it will make seafaring a better and
more rewarding job for all those involved and will help to
secure the safety of everybody aboard. Rules drawn up by
shipping companies and Masters’ Standing Orders relating to
conduct should not conflict with this Code.

3. Orders must be given and obeyed if a ship is to operate
safely and efficiently. Co-operation cannot be imposed but
will normally be readily forthcoming if it is immediately
apparent to the recipient of an order that the request is a
reasonable one or, if it is not so apparent, if a reasonable
2
request for an explanation of the necessity of the order is
acceded to. At the same time wilful or repeated refusal to
comply with reasonable orders or other anti-social behaviour
must be expected to have certain consequences.

4. An important factor in securing co-operation, which
cannot be too strongly stressed, is good communications. This
applies both to communications between a company’ s
shore-based administration and the ship and to
communications within the ship itself. If all concerned are
kept as fully informed as possible about the company’ s
policies and objectives and can be made to feel that they
have a personal stake in the successful outcome of the
voyage upon which they are engaged, co-operation and
harmony will be much more readily assured than by a ‘ theirs is
not to reason why’ attitude.

Conduct in Emergencies

5. In any emergency or other situation in which the safety
of the ship or of any person on board her, whether crew or
passengers, is at stake the Master, Officers and Petty Officers
are entitled to look for immediate and unquestioning
obedience of orders. There can be no exception to this rule.
Failure to comply will be treated as among the most serious of
breaches of this Code and will be liable to lead the offender’ s
dismissal from the ship (at the first opportunity) and his
Company. It may also warrant prosecution under the
provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts.

Conduct in Situations other than Emergencies

6. Emergencies are fortunately rare and this document is
primarily concerned with the day-to-day situation on board.
It should be borne in mind, however, that certain acts of
misconduct (e.g. absence from place of duty or heavy
drinking) could have the effect of causing a state of
3
emergency. The following paragraph sets out some broad
general rules for everyday conduct.

7. a) PUNCTUALITY is very important both for the efficient
operation of the ship and to avoid putting extra work on
shipmates. This is true of joining the vessel at the time
appointed, returning from shore leave, reporting for
watch-keeping duty and all other work. Absence at the
time of sailing, in particular, may seriously delay the ship
or even prevent her sailing until a replacement is found.

b) DRUGS. The unlawful possession or distribution of
drugs by any person on board ship renders him liable to
dismissal as well as possible legal proceedings either in
the UK or overseas. It should be borne in mind that, in
some countries, certain drugs offences carry a sentence
of capital punishment.

c) DRINKING. There should be ship’ s rules about
bringing intoxication liquor on board and they should be
understood and strictly observed. Where facilities for
drinking on board are provided, they should not be
abused. Bar rules should be strictly adhered to.

d) BRINGING UNAUTHORISED PERSONS ON BOARD. The
ship’ s rules or port authority’ s restrictions on bringing
unauthorised persons on board must be strictly observed.

e) OFFENSIVE WEAPONS. These must not be brought
on board.

f) SMOKING IN PROHIBITED AREAS is dangerous on any
ship but particularly on tankers, liquid gas carriers and
vessels carrying explosive or inflammable materials. The
ship’ s rules controlling smoking and the use of naked
lights or unapproved electric torches must be
scrupulously obeyed.
4

g) DUTIES. Every member of the crew should carry out
his duties efficiently to the best of his ability. He is entitled
to be informed clearly what his duties are and to whom
he is responsible for carrying them out. If he is in doubt
he should ask. Within the scope of his duties, reasonable
commands and instructions must be obeyed.

h) TREATMENT OF ACCOMMODATION. For the duration
of the voyage the ship is not only the seafarer’ s place of
work but also his home. Accommodation and other
facilities, whether provided for his personal use of to be
shared with others, should therefore be treated with
respect.

i) BEHAVIOUR TOWARDS OTHERS. Anti-social
behaviour can cause a seafarer to become a nuisance
to others on board and in extreme circumstances can
hazard the ship and the crew. This can include not only
excessive drinking but also such behaviour as causing
excessive noise, abusive language, sexual harassment,
aggressive attitudes and offensive personal habits. The
fact that some need to sleep whilst others are awake
should also be borne in mind.

Dealing with Breaches of the Code

8. It is necessary to have a procedure for dealing with
breaches of this Code of Conduct backed by appropriate
sanctions. These may range, according to the seriousness of
the breach, from informal warnings for the most minor
breaches, through various grades of formal warning including
reprimands, to dismissal from the ship. Seafarers are subject to
the general law of the United Kingdom and for certain
offences, prejudicial to the safety of the ship or those on
board, there remains a liability to prosecution in the Courts
under Section 58 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995.
5

9. The following acts of misconduct, if proved to the
reasonable satisfaction of the Master to have been
committed, are those for which dismissal from the ship either
immediately or at the end of the voyage will, according to
the circumstances of the case, be considered appropriate
apart from any legal action which may be called for:

i) assault;
ii) wilful damage to ship or any property on board;
iii) theft or possession of stolen property;
iv) possession of offensive weapons;
v) persistent or wilful failure to perform duty;
vi) unlawful possession or distribution of drugs;
vii) conduct endangering the ship or persons on board;
viii) combination with others at sea to impede the progress
of the voyage or navigation of the ship;
ix) disobedience of orders relating to safety of the ship or
any person on board;
x) to be asleep on duty or fail to remain on duty, if such
conduct would prejudice the safety of the ship or any
person on board;
xi) incapacity through the influence of drink or drugs to
carry out duty to the prejudice of the safety of the ship or
of any person on board;
xii) to smoke, use a naked light or an unapproved electric
torch in any part of a ship carrying dangerous cargo or
stores where smoking or the use of naked lights or
unapproved torches is prohibited;
xiii) intimidation, coercion and/ or interference with the work
of other employees;
xiv) behaviour which seriously detracts from the safe and/ or
efficient working of the ship;
xv) conduct of a sexual nature, or other conduct based on
sex affecting the dignity of women and men at work
which is unwanted, unreasonable and offensive to the
recipient;
6
xvi) behaviour which seriously detracts from the social well-
being of any other person on board;
xvii) causing or permitting unauthorised persons to be on
board the ship whilst it is at sea;
xviii) repeated commission of breaches of a lesser degree
listed in Paragraph 11 after warnings have been given in
accordance with the procedures in Paragraph 10.

10. Breaches of a lesser degree of seriousness may be dealt
with by:

a) informal warning administered at an appropriate
level lower than that of the Master;
b) formal warning by the Head of Department which
will be suitably recorded;
c) formal warnings by the Master recorded in the ship’ s
official logbook;
d) written reprimands administered by the Master and
recorded in the ship’ s official logbook.

When a formal warning is given the seafarer should be
advised of the likely consequences of further breaches of the
Code.

11. Breaches of the Code, if proved to the reasonable
satisfaction of the Master, Officer or Petty Officer to have
been committed, for which the procedure in Paragraph 10 is
considered appropriate, are:

a) offences of the kind described at Paragraph 9,
which are not considered to justify dismissal in the
particular circumstances of the case;
b) minor acts of negligence, neglect of duty,
disobedience and assault;
c) unsatisfactory work performance;
d) poor time keeping;
e) stopping work before the authorised time;
7
f) failure to report to work without satisfactory reason;
g) absence from place of duty or from the ship without
leave;
h) offensive or disorderly behaviour.

NOTE: Whilst Paragraph 11 has been made as
comprehensive as possible, it is recognised that some
companies may wish to propose additions related to their
particular trading patterns. Proposals for such additions
should be submitted, after agreement with the organisations
representing the seafarers concerned, to the Maritime and
Coastguard Agency for approval.

Procedures for dealing with breaches of the Code

12. a) A seafarer who is alleged to have breached the
Code will be seen in the first instance by a Petty Officer
or Officer designated by the Master. If the Petty Officer
or Officer is satisfied that no further action is called for or
that the breach, although proved, calls for no more than
an informal warning of the kind referred to at Paragraph
10(a) above, he will proceed accordingly and the
matter will thereafter be regarded as closed.

b) If the offence is of a more serious nature or is a
repetition of a similar minor offence, a formal warning will
be given and the fact suitably recorded. Alternatively,
the case may be referred to the Master; any offence
falling under Paragraph 9 must be referred to him.

c) The Master will deal with cases referred to him with
the minimum of delay. He will inform the seafarer of the
alleged breach giving him the opportunity to say
whether he admits it, to call any witnesses and to
question them on their evidence and to make any
statement he wishes in answer to the alleged breach
8
including any comments on the evidence produced
against him.

d) After a careful and thorough investigation and
having considered all the evidence the Master will orally
inform the seafarer whether or not he finds that the
seafarer committed the alleged breach.

e) If he finds that the seafarer did commit the alleged
breach, he will impose a penalty which he considers to
be reasonable in all the circumstances, taking into
account the seafarer’ s record on the ship and any other
relevant factors. He may announce:
i) that he is giving a warning;
ii) that he is giving a written reprimand;
iii) that the seafarer will be dismissed from the ship. If
the Master decides that the continued presence of the
offender on board would be detrimental to the efficient
and safe running of the ship or to the maintenance of
harmonious personal relations on board, he may arrange
for dismissal to take place at the next port of call for
repatriation to the United Kingdom.

f) The Master will enter details of the breach and the
action taken in the official log.

g) The seafarer shall be given a copy of all entries
made in the logbook relating to his breach of this Code
and shall acknowledge receipt.

h) The seafarer shall be given a copy of any report
made to the company which directly relates to the
incident for which the seafarer is subject to disciplinary
action.

i) A seafarer shall have the right to be accompanied
by a friend, who may advise him and speak on his
9
behalf, whenever an alleged breach of this Code is
being considered against him.

Dismissals

13. In the event of dismissal from the ship, the shipping
company or employer of the seafarer will convene a hearing
ashore to review the circumstances of the seafarer’ s dismissal
and decide whether dismissal should be confirmed or, in the
case of a permanent employee, to decide whether the
contract of employment should be terminated. If so
requested by the seafarer an official of the appropriate
seafarers’ union or a fellow employee will be invited to be
present at the hearing which should normally take place
within 5 working days of dismissal from the ship in the UK, or
within 5 working days of arrival in the UK if dismissed abroad.

14. The seafarer will be advised in writing of the outcome of
the hearing . Where dismissal is confirmed or the seafarer’ s
contract is terminated he will be advised of the time-limits
within which any appeal against the dismissal should be
lodged. (Normally within 14 days.) Any such appeal will
normally be to a higher level of authority within the company.

15. The procedures outlined in paragraphs 13 and 14 may
be amended in accordance with local circumstances should
this be agreed to by the company and the relevant seafarer’ s
union.

16. Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be read as
negating any seafarer’ s right to bring an unfair dismissal claim
before an Industrial Tribunal as provided in the Employment
Rights Act 1996.
10
- 1 -
Marine Guidance Note



MGN 395 (M+F)


Radio Log Book: Merchant Shipping & Fishing
Vessels.


Notice to all Owners, Masters, Officers and Skippers of Fishing Vessels.

This notice replaces MGN 288 (M+F)


PLEASE NOTE:-
Where this document provides guidance on the law it should not be regarded as definitive.
The way the law applies to any particular case can vary according to circumstances - for
example, from vessel to vessel and you should consider seeking independent legal advice if
you are unsure of your own legal position.

Summary

This notice advises on the need for the GMDSS Log Book and the Simplified F/V GMDSS
Log Book to comply with either Part II of the Merchant Shipping (Radio Installation)
Regulations 1998, or Part III of the Merchant Shipping (Radio)(Fishing Vessel) Regulations
1999.

• For Vessels complying with Part II of the Merchant Shipping (Radio Installation)
Regulation 1998 a GMDSS Radio Log Book is required.
• For Vessels complying with Part III of the Merchant Shipping (Radio)(Fishing Vessels)
Regulations a Simplified F/V GMDSS Radio Log Book is required.
• Introduction of the new publication that includes the GMDSS Radio Log and the
Simplified F/V GMDSS Radio Log.


1. Introduction:

1.1 This notice concerns vessels complying with Part II of the Merchant Shipping (Radio
Installations) Regulations 1998, and Part III of the Merchant Shipping (Radio) (Fishing
Vessels) Regulations 1999. It is a requirement under Regulation 20(1) of the Radio
Installation Regulations 1998 that a Log of matters specified in Schedule 3 of the
Regulations must be maintained and be available for Inspection. It is a requirement under
Regulation 19(1) for UNITED KINGDOM DIRECTIVE FISHING VESSELS, and under
direction 25(1) for UNITED KINGDOM NON-DIRECTIVE FISHING VESSELS of the Radio
Fishing Vessels Regulations 1999, that a Radio Log of matters specified in Schedule 3 of
the Regulations must be maintained and be available for inspection. The matters specified,
to include the time that they happened, are:

- 2 -
(a) a summary of communications relating to distress, urgency and safety traffic and the time
such communications occurred;
(b) a record of important incidents connected with radio service and the time such incidents
occurred; and
(c) where appropriate, the position of the ship at least once a day.
(d) a summary of communications relating to distress traffic in which the fishing vessel has
participated, and the times at which such communications occurred, shall be recorded in
the Simplified FV Radio Log as the communications occur.

2. Publication Details:

2.1 The Maritime and Coastguard Agency have updated the Radio Log Book (GMDSS), and
Simplified FV GMDSS Radio Log Book.
2.2 These publications have been incorporated into a single document with a “delete as
appropriate” and “complete as required” system. The one document can be used as either
publication.
2.3 The new publication is called:

GMDSS Radio Log Book incorporating the Simplified F/V GMDSS Log Book:

This replaces GMDSS Radio Log Book 2000 edition (ISBN 978 0115522406) and
Simplified FV GMDSS Radio Log Book (ISBN 978 0115522499).
Copies of the previous documents are no longer available.

2.4 Printed copies of the new style Radio Log Book (ISBN 978 0115530265) are available
from:
The Stationery Office Publications Centre,
PO Box 29,
Norwich,
NR3 1GN.

Telephone (Orders): 0870 600 5533;
Email (orders): books.orders@tso.co.uk

2.5 Copies can be ordered from The Stationery Offices bookshops, its accredited agents or
from any reputable book seller.

2.6 The Logs include instructions for completion to meet the legal requirements and details of
the periodic checks of equipment. Because the Logs must be maintained in duplicate they
are produced on carbon paper.

2.7 The carbon copy of Section C must be detached and carefully fastened together in the
correct order to form the record of the operation of the radio installation. They should be
finally disposed of in the manner directed by the operating company or the shipowner. The
Master/Skipper must then dispose of the Log in the same manner and in accordance with
the requirements of the ships official Log Book.

2.8 An example of a typical day’s log is attached.
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More Information

Navigation Safety Branch
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Bay 2/2
Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
SO15 1EG

Tel : +44 (0) 23 8032 9356
Fax : +44 (0) 23 8032 9204
e-mail: navigation.safety@mcga.gov.uk

General Inquiries: infoline@mcga.gov.uk

MCA Website Address: www.mcga.gov.uk

File Ref: MNA 134/006/005

Published: May 2009
Please note that all addresses and
telephone numbers are correct at time of publishing

© Crown Copyright 2009

Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas

Printed on material containing minimum 75% post-consumer waste pape
Accident Reporting and Investigation
Notice to all Owners, Masters, Skippers, Officers and Crews of Merchant Ships, Fishing Vessels,
Pleasure Vessels, Harbour Authorities, and UK Inland Waterway Authorities.
This Notice supersedes Notice No. MGN.115 (M+F)
MARINE GUIDANCE NOTE
Summary
This note is to inform all seafarers and vessel owners of the requirements of the new Merchant
Shipping (Accident Reporting and Investigation) Regulations 2005.
Key Points
• A new, broader, definition of the people and organisations given a duty to report accidents and
serious injuries is included.
• Inclusion of a definition of a MAIB ‘preliminary examination’. The stages and process of a
MAIB investigation are clearly outlined. The Chief Inspector now decides whether, following a
preliminary examination, further investigation leading to a published report is appropriate.
• Aregulation regarding the disclosure of records is included, and clarification that MAIB has to keep
in confidence statements and declarations from interested parties is given.
• A regulation has been included which specifies that reports are not to be used in judicial
proceedings for purposes of litigation or blame, unless a Court orders otherwise.
• The powers of inspectors to exclude any person (except a professional legal adviser solely
representing the interviewee) from an interview, if they have substantial reason to believe that the
presence of that person would hamper the investigation, are outlined.
• A regulation has been put in place enabling the inspector to ensure that a ship, crew and evidence
involved in an accident remain accessible to inspectors until the process of collecting or preserving
all evidence has been completed.
• A closed-loop recommendations system has been introduced. It requires those addressed in MAIB
recommendations to respond to those recommendations. The Chief Inspector will publish the status
of implementation of recommendations annually.
MGN 289 (M+F)
1
2
Introduction
1. The Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) is responsible for the investigation of all types
of marine accidents, both to vessels and to those on board. The MAIB is an independent branch
within the Department for Transport (DfT) and is separate from the Maritime and Coastguard
Agency (MCA). The MAIB’s head, the Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, reports directly to the
Secretary of State on accident investigation. He and his professional staff, who are drawn from the
nautical, fishing, marine engineering, and naval architecture disciplines, are appointed by the
Secretary of State under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995. An administrative staff
deals with records, data analysis and publications, policy matters, and provides general support.
2. The MAIB’s sole objective in investigating an accident under the Regulations is the prevention of
future accidents by establishing its causes and circumstances; it is not the purpose to apportion
liability, nor, except so far as is necessary to achieve the objective, to apportion blame. The MAIB
is not an enforcement or prosecuting agency.
3. Procedures are governed mainly by the Merchant Shipping Act 1995, and by Regulations. The
Merchant Shipping (Accident Reporting and Investigation) Regulations 2005 (SI No 881 of 2005),
which replace the Accident Reporting and Investigation Regulations of 1999, come into force
on 18th April 2005. They define the accidents to which they apply, set out the purpose of
investigation, and make provisions for the ordering and conduct of investigations.
4. The Regulations apply generally to all ships, including fishing vessels and (except for reporting
exemptions listed at Annex A) to pleasure vessels. These vessels are covered by the Regulations
whether at sea or in a port. The Regulations also set out requirements for reporting accidents,
major injuries, and serious injuries. They do not cover formal investigations or other public
inquiries, the rules for which are set out elsewhere.
5. The Regulations are also separate from and in addition to reporting requirements in the
Merchant Shipping (Reporting Requirements for Ships Carrying Dangerous or Polluting Goods)
Regulations 1995 and the Merchant Shipping (Vessel Tr a ffic Monitoring and Reporting
Requirements) Regulations 2004. Further details of those regulations can be found in Merchant
Shipping Notice 1784.
6. The Regulations also allow for the investigation of “hazardous incidents” – broadly any
unspecified events which might have led to an accident – though they do not require such
incidents to be reported.
7. Annex B, (2) and (3) reproduce the definitions of major and serious types of injury. Reports of
minor incidents that posed no danger are not required. Nor are reports required of injuries to
shore-based workers in a United Kingdom port or shipyard; such injuries should be reported by
the employer to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), as should reports of other accidents
occurring in a United Kingdom shipyard.
Reporting
8. Accidents (see definition at Annex B) must be reported by the quickest means available and
should contain the information noted in Annex C section 3(1).
9. When an accident occurs, the Master or senior surviving officer must send a report to the Chief
Inspector as soon as is practicable following the accident.
10. When an accident occurs, the owner must send a report to the Chief Inspector as soon as is
practicable following the accident unless the owner has ascertained that the report has already
been made by the Master or senior surviving officer.
11. Persons named in (9 and 10) above must, so far as is reasonably practicable, ensure that the
circumstances of every accident are examined. A single report giving the findings of such an
examination, stating any measures taken or proposed to prevent a recurrence, must be provided
to the Chief Inspector as soon as is practicable, irrespective of any investigation that may be
conducted by the MAIB.
12. Persons named in (9 and 10) above must also, so far as is reasonably practicable, ensure that the
circumstances of every serious injury (see definition at Annex B) are examined. A single report
giving the findings of such an examination, stating any measures taken or proposed to prevent a
recurrence, must be provided to the Chief Inspector within 14 days of the injury occurring.
13. In addition, the following persons must report any accident of which they are aware to the Chief
Inspector, by the quickest means available: the MCA if the accident was in United Kingdom
waters; Harbour Authorities; and Inland Waterway Authorities within the United Kingdom.
14. Reports should be sent by the quickest means available, including telephone, facsimile, telex or
e-mail to the MAIB.
15. The reporting requirements apply to merchant ships, fishing vessels, and vessels in
commercial use for sport or pleasure.
16. The reporting requirements also apply to hired recreational craft, together with boats of less
than 8m in length in commercial use in harbours or on inland waterways, where the accident
involves explosion, fire, death, major injury, capsize of a power-driven craft or boat, or
pollution causing serious harm to the environment.
17. The MAIB Incident Report Form (IRF) can be used to provide an initial report of any accident; it
can also be used for serious injuries. It can be found on the MAIB website or obtained directly
from the MAIB. Annex C section 3(2) contains advice on the information that is needed.
18. The MAIB welcomes the voluntary reporting of accidents to or on pleasure craft used only for
recreation purposes and not for commercial gain, but there is no statutory requirement for this.
19. These Regulations are not intended to replace the requirements of the Port Marine Safety Code.
20. Accidents involving divers whilst diving are not covered by the Regulations, and should not be
reported to MAIB. Any such incident should be reported to the British Sub Aqua Club (BSAC).
21. Accidents on board ships in ports, with the exception of those involving stevedores or
shore-based workers, are covered by the Regulations and must be reported. Incidents involving
shore-based workers should be reported to the Health and Safety Executive.
22. Although there is no requirement to report hazardous incidents, the MAIB strongly urges any
person to do so voluntarily, since useful lessons can always be learned. Examples are “near-
misses”, including failure of procedures in shipboard operations, material defects, fatigue, and
human failures. The critical question in deciding whether or not to report an incident is whether
it had the potential to lead to an accident. These reports should also be sent using an IRF, or if
preferred, in narrative form. Many incidents occur which do not cause injury or damage, but have
the potential to be hazardous or to have serious consequences.
23. When making reports, whether on an IRF or in narrative, the content of the descriptive text is
particularly important. Lessons can be learned from the positive as well as negative aspects.
Details of actions taken to minimise the effects of the accident or, in the case of a hazardous
incident, to prevent it developing into an accident, are particularly helpful. A description of
actions taken or recommendations made to prevent a recurrence are also of value. Much is gained
from the information provided by those most closely involved in the event at the time it occurred.
3
24. Annex C, paragraphs (1) and (2) include a summary of reporting procedures, and details of the
MAIB’s address and contact numbers.
Investigations
25. An accident or serious injury may be investigated by the MAIB if it involves a United Kingdom
ship anywhere in the world, or (with few exceptions), any other ship in UK waters, or if the
Branch agrees to a request to undertake an investigation on behalf of another flag state.
Hazardous incidents may also be investigated.
26. In some cases, the vessel’s own investigation will be sufficient, but the MAIB may seek further
details if necessary.
27. Before deciding whether to carry out any form of investigation, the Chief Inspector may seek to
obtain such information as he considers necessary concerning the accident, and any remedial
action taken. Any person mentioned in (9, 10 and 13) above, or any other person holding such
information shall provide it to the Chief Inspector to the best of their ability and knowledge.
28. If the Chief Inspector decides that an investigation will be carried out, it will be undertaken by
inspector(s) at a time and place, and in such a manner, as appears appropriate to achieve the sole
objective of the MAIB.
29. Following a decision to investigate, the Chief Inspector will notify the master and/or owners
within 28 days. Public notice that an investigation has started may be given in such manner as
the Chief Inspector thinks fit.
30. The initial part of an investigation seeks to establish the causes and circumstances of an accident,
with a view to deciding whether any further investigation is warranted, and is called a
‘preliminary examination’. When a preliminary examination is complete, the Chief Inspector will
decide whether it is appropriate to conduct further investigation leading to a published report.
31. Where an inspector is appointed to carry out an investigation, his powers are extensive, and are
set out in detail in Sections 259 and 267 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995. Subject to these
powers, the Inspector has wide discretion as to how he carries out his investigation. If possible,
much of it will take place on board the vessel involved. He may wish to visit the owners or ship
managers. He may also prohibit, pending investigation, access to or interference with anything
involved in an accident.
32. In particular, those persons mentioned in (9 and 10) above should ensure that all charts, log books,
voyage data and other records, electronic and magnetic recording and video tapes and all
documents which might reasonably be considered pertinent to a reportable accident are kept
intact. No alterations should be made to recordings or entries, and any equipment associated or
involved in an accident should remain undisturbed until:
(a) notification is received from the Chief Inspector that no investigation is to take place or that
the investigation has been completed; or
(b) unless advised otherwise, 28 days after receipt by the Chief Inspector of a report referred to
in (17) above; or
(c) the Chief Inspector or an inspector carrying out the investigation indicates that they are no
longer required.
33. Persons mentioned in (13) are not specifically required to retain documents. The current safety
provisions under ISPS are sufficient to cover any documents or evidence, such as VTS monitoring
data, that these parties may hold.
34. The Chief Inspector may, if he considers it reasonably necessary for the collection or preservation
of evidence, require that any persons mentioned in (9 and 10) ensure that a ship is accessible
4
within United Kingdom waters if there are serious grounds for concern that the ship, crew, or
evidence will be inaccessible to MAIB should the vessel leave UK waters. The ship must remain
accessible until the process of collecting or preserving evidence has been completed.
35. If this power were to be used, the MAIB would be likely to request written assurance that access
to the ship, crew, and any evidence would be granted at the nearest port, and that the evidence
would not be disturbed during the voyage. If this written assurance were not granted, then the
Chief Inspector could use his discretion in applying the power described above. Should a ship be
required to remain in a UK port, then the ship could be moved to a suitable anchorage to ensure
that the availability of berths is not affected.
36. If this power were ever used, then the MAIB will not unreasonably require a ship to remain in UK
waters any longer than is necessary. Evidence will be collected or preserved as quickly as possible
and with the minimum amount of delay to the ship.
37. The Inspector can require any person who may be able to help the investigation to attend an
interview, answer questions, and sign a declaration of the truth of their answers.
38. A solicitor or other professional legal adviser acting solely on behalf of the person being
interviewed may not be excluded from an interview. Any other person allowed or nominated to
be present at an interview by an interviewee, may be excluded from being present by the
inspector. To use this power, both the inspector and the Chief Inspector must have substantial
reason to believe that the presence of the nominee would hamper the investigation.
39. If this power was used, the interviewee can then nominate another person to be present. At the
request of the person being interviewed, the interview would be suspended until the second
nominee was present.
40. The Secretary of State may also require the Chief Inspector to expand the scope of an investigation
into the further consequences of an accident, including salvage and pollution aspects; or the
conduct of search and rescue operations. The investigation into the further consequences could be
completely separate and distinct from the investigation into the initial accident.
Disclosure of Records
41. Unless a Court determines otherwise, the names, addresses and any other details of anyone who
has given evidence to an inspector shall not be disclosed.
42. Some documents or records shall not be made available for purposes other than the investigation
unless a Court determines otherwise. These include any declarations taken by an inspector or
supplied to him during the course of his investigation; any notes or voice recordings of any
interviews; medical or confidential information regarding persons involved in an accident or
hazardous incident; and any report made under (17), copies of a draft report, or a report which is
not the final report of the investigation. But a person who has given evidence to the MAIB may
disclose his own declaration, if he so wishes.
43. If any part of a report is based on information obtained pursuant to an inspector's powers under
sections 259 and 267(8) of the Act, the report shall be inadmissible in any judicial proceedings,
with the exception of an inquest or Fatal Accident Inquiry, unless a Court determines otherwise.
44. In England, Wales or Northern Ireland ‘Court’ means the High Court, or in the case of Scotland,
the Court of Session.
45. Independent technical analysis commissioned by the Chief Inspector, and opinions expressed in
that analysis of information, may be made available if the Chief Inspector considers it appropriate
to do so. Copies of information (“raw data”) obtained from voyage data recorders or from other
recording systems, including voice recordings, video recordings and other electronic or magnetic
5
recordings and any transcripts made from such information or recordings, may be provided at the
discretion of the Chief Inspector to the police or other official authorities. This does not include
recordings of interviews.
MAIB Reports of Investigations
46. The Chief Inspector may, at his discretion and to promulgate any lessons learned, publish
collective short reports of accidents that have not been the subject of a full investigation and
published report.
47. Reports of full investigations will be made publicly available in the shortest time possible, and in
such a manner as the Chief Inspector sees fit. The report shall set out conclusions relating to the
facts of the accident, or where the facts cannot be clearly established, analysis and professional
judgement to determine the probable facts; and recommendations for future safety.
48. All reports of full investigations are published on the MAIB website, [www.maib.gov.uk]. Hard
copies are also widely distributed and can be supplied to anyone upon request.
49. Provision is made for any person likely to be affected by a report to see the draft and to comment
on the facts and analysis therein, before it is finalised and made publicly available. The Chief
Inspector will consider representations relating to the facts and analysis contained in the report
that may be made to him by or on behalf of the persons served with such notice.
Recommendations
50. Recommendations can be made as a result of one or more investigations, whether completed or
not, by the Chief Inspector. If a preliminary examination has been conducted they will be in the
form of a letter from the Chief Inspector. If an investigation has been conducted, the
recommendation(s) would be included in the final report. Recommendations are addressed to
those considered best fitted to implement them.
51. Any person to whom a recommendation is addressed, should take the recommendation into
consideration. They should also send full details of any measures that are being or will be taken
to implement the recommendation and, if appropriate, the timetable for securing implementation.
Notice should be given to the Chief Inspector if at any time this information is rendered inaccurate
by a change of circumstances.
52. Any person to whom a recommendation is addressed should, after taking the recommendation
into consideration, provide a full explanation to the Chief Inspector as to why the
recommendation is not going to be implemented, if that is the case.
53. The Chief Inspector shall, annually or at such intervals as he sees fit, make information received
in response to recommendations publicly available and shall inform the Secretary of State. If a
person has failed to comply with a recommendation addressed to him, he will be allowed a
further opportunity to make representations before the information is published.
Penalties
54. The Regulations lay down penalties for breaches of the requirements. These offences include a
failure to report an accident or serious injury; not providing information as required; falsely
claiming to have additional information or new evidence, and a failure to preserve evidence. In
addition, penalties for obstructing an Inspector or otherwise impeding his investigation are laid
down in Section 260 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995.
6
Further Information
Marine Accident Investigation Branch
Carlton House
Carlton Place
Southampton
Hampshire SO15 2DZ
Tel: 023 8039 5500
Fax: 023 8023 2459
Telex: 477917 MAIB SOG
24 Hr Reporting Line: 023 8023 2527
E-Mail: maib@dft.gsi.gov.uk
Website: www.maib.gov.uk
Published: 04/2005
© Crown Copyright 2005
MAIB is a part of the Department for Transport
Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas
ISO 9001:2000
FS 34835
7
ANNEX A
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
1. Accidents involving or occurring on board -
(a) any United Kingdom ship,
must be reported to the MAIB under the Regulations.
2. Accidents involving or occurring on board -
(a) a pleasure vessel
(b) a recreational craft hired on a bareboat basis
(c) any other craft or boat, other than one carrying passengers, which is in commercial use in a
harbour or on an inland waterway and is less than 8m in length
do not need to be reported to the MAIB, unless the accident involves
i. explosion
ii. fire
iii. death
iv. major injury
v. capsize of a power-driven craft or boat, or
vi. pollution causing significant harm to the environment
3. Accidents involving or occurring on board -
(a) Any ship within the jurisdiction of a harbour master or Queen's harbour master appointed,
or required to be appointed
(b) Any ship carrying passengers to or from a port in the United Kingdom
must be reported to the MAIB under the Regulations.
4. Accidents involving shore-based workers while a ship is in port or in a shipyard within the
United Kingdom should be reported by the person's employer to the Health and Safety Executive.
No report to the MAIB is required.
5. Accidents involving divers whilst diving are not covered by the Regulations. Any such incident
should be reported to the British Sub Aqua Club. No report to the MAIB is required.
8
ANNEX B
ACCIDENTS AND MAJOR & SERIOUS INJURIES
1. Accident means any occurrence on board a ship or involving a ship whereby -
(a) there is loss of life or major injury to any person on board, or any person is lost or falls
overboard from, the ship or one of its ship's boats;
(b) a ship -
(i) causes any loss of life, major injury or material damage;
(ii) is lost or presumed to be lost;
(iii) is abandoned;
(iv) is materially damaged by fire, explosion, weather or other cause;
(v) grounds;
(vi) is in collision;
(vii) is disabled; or
(viii) causes significant harm to the environment.
(c) any of the following occur -
(i) a collapse or bursting of any pressure vessel, pipeline or valve;
(ii) a collapse or failure of any lifting equipment, access equipment, hatch-cover, staging or
boatswain’s chair or any associated load-bearing parts;
(iii) a collapse of cargo, unintended movement of cargo or ballast sufficient to cause a list,
or loss of cargo overboard;
(iv) a snagging of fishing gear which results in the vessel heeling to a dangerous angle;
(v) a contact by a person with loose asbestos fibre except when full protective clothing is
worn; or
(vi) an escape of any harmful substance or agent,
if the occurrence, taking into account its circumstances, might have been liable to cause
serious injury or to cause damage to the health of any person.
The terms “disabled” and “grounds” are separately defined.
2. Major injury means -
(a) any fracture, other than to a finger, thumb or toe;
(b) any loss of a limb or part of a limb;
(c) dislocation of the shoulder, hip, knee or spine;
(d) loss of sight, whether temporary or permanent;
(e) penetrating injury to the eye; or
(f) any other injury –
(i) leading to hypothermia or to unconsciousness, or
(ii) requiring resuscitation, or
(iii) requiring admittance to a hospital or other medical facility as an inpatient for more than
24 hours.
3. Serious injury means any injury, other than a major injury, to a person employed or carried in a
ship which occurs on board or during access which results in incapacity for more than three
consecutive days excluding the day of the accident or as a result of which the person concerned
is put ashore and the ship sails without that person, unless the incapacity is known or advised to
be of three consecutive days or less, excluding the day of the accident.
9
ANNEX C
REPORTING PROCEDURES
1. Summary (Regulation 5)
INCIDENT INITIAL REQUIREMENT FOLLOW-UP PROCEDURE
Accident The master or senior surviving An additional report must be sent
(includes Major Injury) officer (being either the senior to the MAIB using the quickest
surviving officer in the deck means available.
department or if there is no senior
surviving officer in the deck
department, the senior surviving
engineer officer), and the ship's
owner are responsible for sending
a report to the Chief Inspector by
the quickest means available.
In addition, the following shall
report any accident/serious injury
of which they are aware:
(i) the appropriate harbour
authority in respect of an
accident within or adjacent to
its harbour limits;
(ii) the appropriate authority
having responsibility for the
particular waters concerned in
respect of an accident on any
inland waterways in the
United Kingdom,
(iii) The Maritime and Coastguard
Agency in respect of an accident
within United Kingdom waters.
On board examination by ship's
safety officer, if carried.
Serious Injury No requirement Areport outlining the
circumstances of the serious injury
On board examination of the to be sent to the Chief Inspector
circumstances of the serious within 14 days of the incident.
injury required.
Hazardous Incident No requirement It is strongly recommended that a
(non-specified) report (IRF or narrative) is sent to
the MAIB.
* By ship’s safety officer, if one is carried.
10
2. The MAIB’s address is:
First Floor
Carlton House
Carlton Place
Southampton SO15 2DZ
United Kingdom
Telephone: (Office hours) 023 - 80 - 395500 (UK) + 44 - 23 - 80 - 395500 (Outside UK)
Telephone: (24 hours) 023 - 80 - 232527 (UK) + 44 - 23 - 80 - 232527 (Outside UK)
Fax: 023 - 80 - 232459 (UK) + 44 - 23 - 80 - 232459 (Outside UK)
Telex: 477917 MAIB SO G
E-mail: maib@dft.gsi.gov.uk
Internet: http://www.maib.gov.uk
3. Information needed in Reports
(1) Initial reports of accidents should include as much of the following as possible:
(a) name of vessel and IMO, official or fishing vessel number;
(b) name and address of owners;
(c) name of the master, skipper or person in charge;
(d) date and time of the accident;
(e) where from and where bound;
(f) latitude and longitude or geographical position in which the accident occurred;
(g) part of ship where accident occurred if on board;
(h) weather conditions;
(i) name and port of registry of any other ship involved;
(j) number of people killed or injured together with their names, addresses and gender;
(k) brief details of the accident, including sequence of events leading to the accident, extent
of damage and whether accident caused pollution or hazard to navigation.
(l) If the vessel is fitted with a voyage data recorder, the make and model of the recorder.
(2) Follow-up accident reports and initial reports of serious injuries should include the above
information as well as the conclusions of any on-board examination covering the cause, how
a future similar incident might be avoided, and what action has been taken or recommended.
The MAIB’s Incident Reporting Form (IRF) provides a convenient format for reports but
plain narrative giving the above information may be used if the form is not available. As full
an account as possible should be given whether or not the form is used; the list of items
above is not intended to be limiting and any matter should be included which will help to
make the circumstances clear or to show how similar incidents may be prevented. Sketches,
plans and photographs of the damaged areas, taken both before and after the event, are often
helpful and may be attached to the report.
(3) The reports in (2) should be signed by the master, skipper or the owner’s representative, and
by the ship’s safety officer if one is carried.
4. IRF’s are available on the MAIB’s website - www.maib.gov.uk
11
SHIPS’ MEDICAL STORES
Application of the Merchant Shipping and Fishing
Vessels (Medical Stores) Regulations 1995
(SI 1995/1802) and the Merchant Shipping and Fishing
Vessels (Medical Stores) (Amendment) Regulations
1996 (SI 1996/2821)
Notice to Shipowners, Agents, Masters, Skippers of Fishing Vessels and all Seafarers.
This Notice supersedes Merchant Shipping Notice MSN 1726 (M+F) and should be read in conjunction
with the above mentioned Regulations, and MSN 1776 (M) and MGN 257 (M).
MERCHANT SHIPPING NOTICE
Summary
This Notice sets out the minimum requirements for medical stores for UK ships under the above
Regulations. Basic statutory requirements (deriving from EC directive 92/29/EEC) remain as in the
previous Notice (MSN 1726) but where appropriate the recommended treatments and specific
medicines have been updated. It covers:
• The definitions of categories of vessel for the purposes of the Regulations
• Medical stores required and recommended additional equipment………………………….. Annex 1
• Additional requirements for passenger vessels - Doctor’s Bag ………………………….. Annex 2
• First aid kits ………………………….. Annex 3
• Advice on medicines to be carried on ships (including ferries)
transporting dangerous substances …………………………. Annex 4
• Medical guides to be carried and Radio Medical Advice …………………………. Annex 5
• Precautions against malaria …………………………. Annex 6
• Guide to use of medicines ………………………….. Annex 7
• Specimen requisition form for obtaining controlled drugs …………………………. Annex 8
• Completion of the controlled drugs register …………………………. Annex 9
MSN 1768 (M+F)
1
MSN-1768 28/8/03 2:13 am Page 1
1.0 REGULATIONS
1.1 The United Kingdom implemented the
requirements of Council Directive 92/29/EEC,
which sets out the minimum standards for
ships’ medical stores, by introducing the
Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessel
(Medical Stores) Regulations 1995, as amended
by the Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessel
(Medical Stores) (Amendment) Regulations
1996 (referred to as the Regulations). This
Notice provides details of the required
medical stores.
2.0 VESSEL CATEGORIES
2.1 The categories of vessels and the consequent
requirements for medical stores and
equipment areas are set out in the Directive.
The vessel categories are :
Category A Seagoing or sea-fishing vessels with
no limitation on length of trips.
Category B Seagoing or sea-fishing vessels
making trips of less than 150 nautical
miles from the nearest port with
adequate medical equipment. This
category is extended to seagoing or
sea-fishing vessels which make trips
of less than 175 nautical miles from
the nearest port that has adequate
medical equipment and which remain
continuously within range of
helicopter rescue services.
Category C Harbour vessels, boats and craft
staying very close to shore or with no
cabin accommodation other than a
wheelhouse. Lifeboats and life-rafts
are also required to carry Category
C stores.
The UK interprets the phrase "very close to shore"
as meaning that a vessel operating more than 60
nautical miles out to sea would not be operating
very close to shore. Notwithstanding this
interpretation, it is for owners and skippers, for the
purpose of complying with the Regulations, to
assess whether, in respect of voyages in which the
vessel goes less than 60 nautical miles out to sea, the
vessel is "very close to shore".
2.2 The following vessels are excluded from the
requirements of this Notice:
• inland navigational vessels, defined in the
Regulations as those vessels plying on waters
of Categories A to C as defined in Merchant
Shipping Notice MSN 1776 (M).
• warships
• pleasure boats used for non-commercial
purposes and not manned by professional
crews, defined in the Regulations as follows:
any vessel which at the time it is being used is:
(a) (i) in the case of a vessel wholly owned by an
individual or individuals, used only for the
sport or pleasure of the owner or the
immediate family or friends of the owner;
or
(ii) in the case of a vessel owned by a body
corporate, the persons on the vessel are
employees or officers of the body corporate,
or their immediate family or friends; and
(b) (i) on a voyage or excursion which is one for
which the owner does not receive any
money for or in connection with operating
the vessel or carrying any person, other
than as a contribution to the direct expenses
of the operation of the vessel incurred
during the voyage or excursion; or
(ii) wholly or partly owned by or on behalf of a
members’ club formed for the purpose of
sport or pleasure of members of that club or
their immediate family; and for the use of
which any charges levied are paid into club
funds and applied for the general use of the
club; and
(iii)in the case of any vessels referred to in
paragraph (i) or (ii) above, no other
payments are made by or on behalf of users
of the vessel, other than by the owner.
• tugs operating in harbour areas, - as defined
in the Regulations "tug" means a vessel
constructed solely for the purpose of, and
normally used for providing external motive
power to, floating objects or vessels.
2
MSN-1768 28/8/03 2:13 am Page 2
3.0 MEDICAL STORES REQUIREMENTS
3.1 The requirements and recommended stores are
set out in the attached schedules.
Annex 1 Requirements for Categories A, B
& C vessels and recommended
additional equipment
Annex 2 Additional requirements for
passenger ships – Doctor’s Bag
Annex 3 First Aid Kits
Annex 4 Requirements for ships carrying
dangerous cargoes
3.2 Achecklist of all the medicines and equipment
required by this MSN should be kept on board
and reviewed annually.
4.0 MEDICINES FOR SHIPS CARRYING
DANGEROUS CARGOES
4.1 Ships, including ferries, carrying dangerous
cargoes or their residues, should comply with
the International Maritime Dangerous Cargoes
(IMDG) Code and the guidance in the
IMO/WHO/ILO Medical First Aid Guide
for use in accidents involving Dangerous
Goods (MFAG) 1994 and any subsequent
amendments, and the guidance in Annex 4.
5.0 CARRIAGE OF DEFIBRILLATORS
5.1 There is no statutory requirement under
international or national legislation for ships to
carry defibrillators. It is accordingly a matter
for individual operators to decide whether or
not to include a defibrillator with the medical
stores or doctor’s bag. If a defibrillator is
carried, MCA recommends that systems are
in place to ensure regular maintenance of
the equipment (in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions), and adequate
training for the first aiders, including regular
refresher training (at least every 6 months).
Training should also particularly cover care
of the patient after defibrillation, bearing in
mind that immediate hospitalisation may not
be possible.
6.0 MEDICAL GUIDES AND RADIO MEDICAL
ADVICE
6.1 The Ship Captain’s Medical Guide should be
referred to for help with diagnosis. This Notice
should be kept with the current edition of the
Guide. Radio medical advice should be sought
as appropriate (See Annex 5).
7.0 SHIPS’ DOCTORS
7.1 Under the Merchant Shipping (Ships’ Doctors)
Regulations 1995 all UK registered ships which
carry more than 100 persons on board, and
which are engaged on an international voyage
of more than three days, or on a voyage which
is more than one and a half days from port with
adequate medical equipment, are required to
carry a qualified medical practitioner.
8.0 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE OWNER,
EMPLOYER AND THE MASTER
8.1 Responsibility of the owner
The owner of the vessel is responsible for the
cost of any medicine and medical equipment,
including the periodic replacements in order to
keep stocks of any required medicines in date
and immediately useable.
8.2 Responsibility of the seafarer’s employer
Section 45 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995
specifies, among other things, that if a person,
while employed in a UK ship receives any
surgical or medical treatment or such dental
or optical treatment (including repair or
replacement of any appliance) outside the UK,
that cannot be postponed without impairing
the seafarer’s efficiency, the reasonable
expenses of this treatment shall be paid by
the employer(s).
3
MSN-1768 28/8/03 2:13 am Page 3
8.3 Responsibility of the Master
Where a United Kingdom ship does not carry a
doctor among the seafarers employed in it,
Section 53 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995
holds the Master responsible for ensuring that
any necessary medical attention given on
board ship is given either by him, or under his
supervision, by a person appointed by him for
that purpose. The Master is also responsible
for the management of the medical supplies
and ensuring that they are maintained in
good condition.
8.4 IMMUNISATION ARRANGEMENTS
8.4 Ship operators, employers and the Master all
have a duty of care to protect the health and
safety of workers, so far as reasonably
practicable. This responsibility includes taking
steps to minimise the risk of infection and
ensuring appropriate preventative measures
such as immunisation are taken. General
guidance on precautions against malaria can be
found in Annex 6 and specific guidance on
immunisation and anti-malaria medication
(prophylaxis) is given in Marine Guidance
Note MGN 257 (M)
9.0 FURTHER INFORMATION
9.1 Further information on the contents of this
Notice may be obtained from any MCAMarine
Office or the Seafarer Health and Safety Branch
at the address below :
Seafarer Health and Safety Branch
Maritime & Coastguard Agency
2/09 Spring Place
105 Commercial Road
Southampton
SO15 1EG
www.mcga.gov.uk
Tel: 023 80329249
Fax: 023 80329251
Email : seafarer_h&s@mcga.gov.uk
MS 016/022/0140
August 2003
© Crown Copyright 2003
4
The MCA is an executive agency
of the Department for Transport Safer Lives, Safer Ships, Cleaner Seas
MSN-1768 28/8/03 2:13 am Page 4
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