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Scott Clink LIS 5143 Class Final Gov. Publications Adriana Edwards- Johnson Pop-culture reference: (Book) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. Topic: Government publication and sources for those dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Haddon, Mark, The Curios Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (New York: Vintage Books, 2003)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. “Autism Spectrum Disorders Fact Sheet” Dept. of Health and Human Services. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/actearly/autism.html (accessed December 6, 2007) A website put out by the CDC to bring awareness to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The website explains what ASD is and it lists some of the symptoms. It also provides developmental milestones that most children develop by specific ages. This site also provides facts regarding Developmental Screening, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Cerebral Palsy, Vision loss, Intellectual disability, Hearing Loss and ADHD. The site also provides a list of resources, professional healthcare information, childcare resources and a list of partners.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Autism information center,” Dept. of Health and Human Services. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/states/ (accessed December 6, 2007) This website provides information to two networks that are recognized by the CDC in sixteen states. Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM) goal is to “provide comparable, population-based estimates of the prevalence rates of autism and related disorders in different sites over time.” While the second network Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) is currently working on a national study: “Child Development and Autism – a five-year, multi-site collaborative study to help identify factors that may put children at risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs)”. This website also provide news and highlights regarding autism.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Media Relations Link “CDC Releases New Data on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) from multiple communities in the United States,” Dept. of Health and Human Services. http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/2007/r070208.htm (accessed December 6, 2007) This website discusses the information regarding studies to determine the actual number of children who suffer from autism. The research is designed to show reliable numbers of those who suffer from this behavioral syndrome. “The studies also looked at when

Clink 3 parents and others first noted signs of developmental concerns in their children.” Hope is that this research will lead to better early detection for those who have ASD.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Science Ambassador. “Science Ambassador Lesson Plans,” Dept. of Health and Human Services. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/ambassador_pgm/lessonplans_autism.htm (accessed December 6, 2007) This website provides middle school and high school lesson plans for educators who teach Biology and/or Life Science. These lesson plans are designed to help evaluate, identify signs, expose them to current scientific research and literature.

Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Vaccine Safety. “Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccine and Autism Fact Sheet,” Dept. of Health and Human Services. http://www.cdc.gov/od/science/iso/concerns/mmr_autism_factsheet.htm (accessed December 6, 2007) This website provide information concerning the controversy the MMR and the onset of autism in children. This site provides information in regards to how the study came about and highlights information in which “10 out of 13 authors in the 1998 study retracted the studies interpretations.” This website also provide more information addressing autism and other organizations which address concerns facing autism.

Clink 4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “ New Jersey Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Project.” http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/states/NJ-ADDM.pdf (accessed December 7, 2007) This website identifies what Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) does and more specifically discusses the New Jersey Monitoring location and what its specific guidelines are towards research, programs, studies being conducted, and laws and statutes concerning those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Autism Information Center. “Congressional Activities” http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/federal/congressionalactivities.htm (accessed December 7, 2007) This website provides nine congressional activities regarding autism. It also provide quick links to other sources in the area of research and monitoring, and provides news and highlights that parents might find beneficial for themselves and their children who are dealing with autism.

Dunlap, Glen. Teaching Students with Autism, Reston, VA: ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education (1999) This government document discusses teaching methods when dealing with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This digest goes over seven steps in which an instructor can use to help encourage and motivate learning. Since children with ASD

Clink 5 have communication and motivational issues how to encourage and manage those issues are discussed along with instructional formats, positive behavioral support and age span considerations.

Dunlap, Glen and Mary-Kay Bunton-Pierce. Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Reston, VA: ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education (1999) This government document recognizes autism, not as an illness or a disease, but as a behavioral syndrome. Many different forms of Autism are noted providing definition to those specific behavioral syndromes. Behavioral descriptions regarding autism are discussed: “verbal and nonverbal communication, social relatedness, and leisure and play activities.” Diagnosis and evaluation, prevalence, approaches to intervention and educational support are highlighted in this article.

NIHCHD. Rett syndrome. Rockville, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2001) This booklet describes the symptoms of Rett syndrome, which falls into the category of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Rett syndrome affects infant girls starting from 6 to18 months. This booklet explains what happens to girls, as they grow older, the cause of Rett syndrome and answers the question is there any cure.

Clink 6 NIHCHD. Practical Oral Care for People With Autism. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (2006) This booklet is designed to provide information to help caregivers and parents manage dental care for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. It provides steps, which will help the caregivers and parents, in introducing an autistic individual to proper oral care. A few of the steps: bring the autistic patient to the office so they can become comfortable in the new environment, introduce the patient to the doctor, show the patient the chair in which they will be sitting and the tools that will be used on them.

NIHCHD. “Autism Facts” National Institute of Health. http://webharvest.gov/peth04/20041113101022/http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publicati ons/pubs/autism/facts/index.htm (accessed December 6, 2007) A federal record now managed by the National Archives and Records Administration. This website was produced by the National Institute of Health. This site provides facts regarding autism, discusses what autism is, who is affected and how many people have this behavioral syndrome. It discusses the current knowledge regarding vaccinations, provides symptoms and conditions for this disorder. What signals and conditions to look in a child’s behavior and when should a doctor evaluate the child for diagnosis.

United States Congress. House Committee on Government Reforms. Autism : present challenges, future needs--why the increased rates? : hearing before the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One hundred and sixth

Clink 7 Congress, second session, April 6, 2000. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2001) A congressional hearing discusses the increased rate of autism in the United States and the lack of medical assistance being provided to those whose children are affected by this behavioral syndrome. The Center of Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) both testified before congress regarding the “ongoing research and future needs.” The theory that vaccinations maybe one of the possible causes for autism is discussed but studies suggest there is no correlation between autism and childhood immunizations.

United States Congress. House Committee on Government Reforms. The status of research into vaccine safety and autism: hearing before the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, second session, June 19, 2002. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2002) This document discusses the lack of funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This document discusses better funding, 120 million to the NIH and 8 million to the CDC, for research into vaccine safety. Autism Spectrum Disorder is discussed, as an epidemic stating 1 in 250 children will be diagnosed with some form of ASD.

United States Congress. 107th Congress Hearing Second Session. The Autism Epidemic--Is The NIH And CDC Response Adequate? Hearing before the

Clink 8 committee on Government Reform House of Representatives, Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2002) A congressional hearing where Autism is considered as an epidemic. The definition for this epidemic “a condition is considered epidemic when it occurs suddenly in numbers that are clearly higher than normal” is noted in the hearing. This hearing discusses the increased numbers regarding autism, the fact that more boy than girls are affected by this behavioral syndrome, its first diagnosis 60 years ago, a steady increase in autism being diagnosed across the globe, the discussion of funding for research and testimonies from families who have to deal with an autistic child.

United States Congress. House Committee on Government Reform. Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness. Truth revealed: new scientific discoveries regarding mercury in medicine and autism: hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness of the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, second session, September 8, 2004. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2004) This report discusses the use of mercury in children’s vaccines. “The mercury derivative thimerosal” is used in the production of many child vaccines. Pharmaceutical companies have the ability to produce over the counter items as well as vaccines that do not contain thimerosal. The diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccines, the flu vaccine and hepatitis B vaccines still contain the mercury derivative. The report further discusses testing done on mice regarding the use of thimerosal and the risks associated with neurodevelopment disorders.

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United States Congress. House Committee on Government Reform. Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness. The future challenges of autism: a survey of the ongoing initiatives in the federal government to address the epidemic: hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness of the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, first session, November 20, 2003. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2004) This government document discusses the explosive increase of Autism in California and across the country. Education is considered tantamount in improving the quality of life for children who suffer from Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The cost of funding research, training and education is approximately 10 billion dollars and approximately 400 billion by 2013. Funding initiatives for non-governmental agency and treatment centers as ways to help improve therapies for those suffering with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

United States Congress. House Committee on Government Reform. Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness. Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Update of Federal Government Initiatives and Revolutionary New Treatment of Neurodevelopmental Diseases. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2004) A congressional hearing discusses the removal of mercury from children’s vaccinations and that children with autism have high doses of mercury in their system. Doctors testify towards new therapies that have proven beneficial in helping those who suffer with

Clink 10 autism. Chelation therapy and Hyperbaric therapy are mentioned as ways to remove the heavy metal, mercury, from the human body. Educational needs and costs are discussed along with educational training for educators specializing with children suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

United States Congress. Government Accountability Office. Special education children with autism: report to the Chairman and Ranking Minority Member, Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness, Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives. Washington, DC: Government Accountability Office (2005) This report and power point presentation to the GAO establishes the number of children who are diagnosed with autism, how many are being served by “Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).” The data was collected by the Department of Education and analyzed by the “Special Education Expenditure Project (SEEP).” Collected data from 2001 up to 2004 was done in “accordance with government accounting standards.”

United States Congress. 109th Congress. An Act to Amend the Public Health Service Act to Combat Autism through Research, Screening, Intervention, and Education. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office (2006) Public law 109 – 416 was an act “to amend the Public Health Service Act to combat autism through research, screening, intervention and education.” This law is designed to provide research and surveillance for those who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Clink 11 It also establishes assistance with early detection, intervention and provides autism education. This law establishes an autism coordinating committee in which the Secretary of Health assigns other correlating government agencies the responsibility to develop, monitor, recommend and to report annually strategic plans and budgetary requirements to congress.