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MAY 2-8, 2012
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Scholarships available
Republican Women offer
two scholarships. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Association tackles cleanup
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On April 14, the Stony Brook-
Millstone Watershed Association
launched its Sixth Annual
Stream Cleanup at Baldwins
Creek.
This kick-off marked the first
of four cleanups the association,
which partnered with Friends of
Hopewell Valley Open Space for
the events, will be holding this
month.
The second cleanup was held
on April 21 in Cranbury, Hight-
stown, Millstone, Monroe and
West Windsor. The last two
cleanups are scheduled for April
28 and 29 and will service East
Windsor, Franklin, Hillsborough,
South Brunswick and Princeton.
The association has the
cleanups because of people pol-
lution, which is one of the
biggest contributors to water pol-
lution in its total region of 930
acres, according to its website.
When it rains, storm water car-
ries waste, including excess fertil-
izers, pet and animal waste, trash,
recyclables and more to several
streams, lakes and rivers. This de-
bris is eventually dumped into
the ocean, harming aquatic life
and polluting water. For the April
14 cleanup in Hopewell Township,
local volunteers helped clean 247
pounds of trash from Baldwins
Creek, which flows under Route
31 into the Baldwin Lake and then
into the Stony-Brook Millstone
Creek, hence the reasoning for
the cleanups location.
Because the public values
clean water so much, when you
provide an opportunity like this
to connect with other citizens
that care about the environment,
it really is a success, policy di-
rector for the association Jen-
nifer Coffey said.
Coffey has been working on
stream cleanup since its incep-
tion and takes great pride in the
success of the events each year.
Its a way for us as an associa-
tion to provide an opportunity for
people to connect with their local
environment, she said. Also, its
a way to improve local habitats
and have a positive experience
with local waterways.
Coffey explained how the
cleanup was initially an idea that
blossomed into an actual event. In
the beginning, the association
partnered with the local environ-
mental commission to pursue the
event further.
Jim Waltman, the executive di-
rector for the association, attend-
ed the April 14 cleanup and ex-
plained how the events benefit
and educate residents on protect-
ing and restoring clean water in
the area.
These events are a great way
for us to engage the public to get
out and learn about the organiza-
tion and what were trying to ac-
complish, he said.
The association works with 26
municipalities in Mercer, Mon-
mouth, Middlesex, Somerset and
Hunterdon counties. It strives to
protect and reserve clean water in
those regions, as well as restore
habitats, protect land, and
strengthen environmental laws.
Township
committee
introduces
budget
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
At the Hopewell Township
committee meeting on April
24, the committee introduced
its 2012 municipal budget.
The suggested budget of
$20,089,338 is proposing a 1.5-
cent increase per $100 of as-
sessed value in the municipal
tax rate, according to CFO
Elaine Borges.
One cent of that is based
upon the change of evaluation
in the township and the other
.5-cent is due to increased fed-
eral costs, Mayor Michael
Markulec said. So, while the
overall township budget went
down, we still needed a 1.5-
cent increase to maintain the
services and maintain the
staff that we have today.
Although the municipal tax
rate is increasing by 1.5 cents,
the school tax rate is increas-
ing by five cents from 2011
from $1.35 to $1.41. The
schools expenses account for
59 percent of the 2012 overall
tax.
In other municipal business,
residents will head to the polls
May 8 to vote on the controver-
sial Ewing Lawrence Sewerage
Authority referendum.
Hopewell Township has
been negotiating a sewerage
contract with ELSA to dispose
Special to The Sun
Bloomberg volunteer Jen Ruggles helps the Stony-Brook Millstone Watershed Association cleanup at
Baldwins Creek on April 14 by finding numerous bags of debris, including plastic bottles, shopping bags
and other recyclable items.
please see STATE, page 5 please see CLEANUPS, page 7
History fair set for
May 12 in Titusville
The Spirit of the Jerseys State
History Fair will be held on Sat-
urday, May 12, at Washington
Crossing State Park in Titusville
from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Visitors are invited to bring up
to three of their treasured an-
tiques except jewelry, large fur-
niture items and firearms to be
appraised by members of the As-
sociated Antique Dealers of New
Jersey (AADNJ).
Items will be appraised for a fee
of $5 per item. Only cash is ac-
cepted. The appraisal will be held
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The fair will
be held in rain or shine.
For more information, visit
www.aadnj.org.
Wagner takes honors
in track and field
Joan Wagner of Titusville, a
2011 graduate of Hopewell Valley
Central High School, took top five
honors at the All-American Track
and Field Invitational at East
Stroudsburg University on April
21. The Kutztown University
Freshman led the Golden Bears
in the shot put, placing fourth
with a throw of 10.49 meters and
then fourth again in the Ham-
merthrow with a 37.89-meter ef-
fort, claiming top frosh honors for
Kutztown.
Topping it off was a top 10 fin-
ish in the discus, with a throw of
31.03 meters.
Adopt-A-Flag program
is underway
The warm weather is here and
that means Pennington's Main
Street will soon be adorned with
American flags. Penningtons
Parks and Recreation Commis-
sion maintains this patriotic tra-
dition through its Adopt-A-Flag
program.
Help keep the tradition alive by
honoring someone special for
Mother's Day, Memorial Day or
Father's Day. Honorees will re-
ceive a letter of recognition from
the commission.
Flags are $42.
Order forms can be found at
Pennington's Borough Hall or by
emailing penningtonparksan-
drec@gmail.com.
Networking breakfast
on May 8 in Pennington
Please Join the Mercer Region-
al Chamber of Commerce for a
Networking Breakfast on Tues-
day, May 8, at 8 a.m. at the
Hopewell Valley Vineyards locat-
ed at 46 Yard Road in Pennington.
Come learn about the new Uni-
versity Medical Center of Prince-
ton at Plainsboro with speaker
Barry Rabner, CEO of University
Medical Center of Princeton at
Plainsboro.
The cost to attend for members
is $10. For future members, the
cost is $25. To register, visit mer-
cerchamberevents.org and click
on the date of the event, then
click the register now button.
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 2-8, 2012
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Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 2-8, 2012
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
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POLICE REPORT
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On April 14 at 3:28 p.m., Officer
Joseph Maccaquano responded to
a Pennington Hopewell Road ad-
dress on a report of a theft. A wit-
ness told police that on April 9, a
slim man, described as being in
his 40s with white hair, exited a
dark green Volvo sedan and re-
moved a metal sign from the front
lawn of the property. The sign
had the words I Buy Musical In-
struments printed on it. The loss
was estimated at $40.
On April 16 at 2:30 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino stopped a car
along Route 31 for a rear license
plate light violation. Infantino
spoke with the driver, a 30-year-
old man, who was found to have
an active arrest warrant out of
Ewing Township. He was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with mainte-
nance of lamps, failure to pro-
duce credentials and no seatbelt,
which will be heard in municipal
court. He was later released after
posting bail on the outstanding
warrant.
On April 14 at 12:05 p.m., Offi-
cer William Gaskill responded to
the Shop Rite for the report of
criminal mischief on April 14.
Sometime between 2:30 p.m. on
April 13 and 11:30 a.m. on April
14, someone used a lug wrench to
damage a padlock securing a
fence enclosure around a propane
gas tank. No entry was made into
the enclosure.
On April 15 at 1:40 p.m., Officer
Joseph Maccaquano responded to
a Somerset Street address on a re-
port of a burglary. Sometime be-
tween April 3 and April 15, some-
one entered a vacant home and
removed a toilet valued at $100.
Television cable wires were also
ripped out of a wall and a hole
was discovered in the plywood
please see POLICE, page 9
MAY 2-8, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
S
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Village Shoes
Specializing in quality footwear for the entire family since 1976.
1340 Route 206 Skillman, NJ 08558
(609) 683-4411
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May 1st through 12th
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With this ad.
Ad must be presented
at time of purchase.
of the waste from the Hamptons,
a 19-unit residential development
located off of Denow Road in
Pennington.
Last year, the township adopt-
ed an ordinance that would have
supplied an additional 267,000
gallons of sewer capacity to resi-
dents and businesses suffering
from inadequate septic systems
and to meet affordable-housing
requirements.
This would have been done to
the tune of $4 million. However,
officials said it would also have
cost more than $40,000 to provide
sewers to those whose septics
werent properly functioning.
Many residents were outraged
when they learned of this, de-
spite the townships ultimate
agreement not to tie the reserve
into the areas with failing sep-
tics.
The authorization still called
for 267,000 gallons of additional
capacity, despite the other
changes, and according to some
reports, that represented more
than double the capacity the
township currently needs.
Opponents said bonding for $4
million to pay for capacity that
might never be needed was ab-
surd and as such, circulated a pe-
tition that led to the May 8 refer-
endum.
And, according to reports,
were the ordinance adopted, all
residents would be on the hook
for paying for the capacity even
if their homes werent to be af-
fected by it.
Opponents also fear developers
would want to flock to the town-
ship to build with an inordinate
amount of sewer capacity avail-
able since 267,000 gallons of re-
serve, per day, is well beyond
what is currently needed.
If the ordinance is adopted, the
township would bond for $4 mil-
lion to pay for the capacity.
If its rejected, officials would
likely have to amend original
plans and seek significantly
fewer gallons of reserve.
Polls are open Tuesday, May 8,
from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.
STATE
Continued from page 1
State aid has decreased
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 2-8, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Ed Lynes
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Joe Eisele
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
letters to the editor
in our opinion
T
heres going to be a lot of blus-
ter, posturing and campaigning
done over the next seven
months as President Obama and Mitt
Romney vie for votes.
But, honestly, barring any big news,
the campaign will come down to tradi-
tional battleground states.
New Jersey, unless Gov. Christie is
on the GOP ticket, likely will break for
the president. Hence, dont expect a lot
of campaign stops from either camp
here.
No, the two candidates likely will
spend a lot of time in Florida and
Ohio. Closer to home, maybe we see
the candidates in Pennsylvania, if the
economy is weak and Romney feels
like he has a shot at capturing those
electoral votes.
Still, its good to have a contest that
is at least competitive.
We remember 1984. Thats the year
Ronald Reagan won every state except
Walter Mondales Minnesota.
And 1972, when Richard Nixon won
everything except Washington, D.C.,
and Massachusetts.
Were glad this isnt 1984 or 1972.
The economy might be moving in the
right direction, but its not moving
very quickly.
And there are issues such as health
care that also will divide the elec-
torate. This year, there is no lock on
who will be elected come November.
Which brings us back to the all-or-
nothing electoral college.
Chances are good that, if youre a
Democrat in Mississippi or a Republi-
can in New York, your votes, essential-
ly, will not count.
By all means, people should vote. We
also remember the 2000 presidential
election, Florida and hanging chad.
Indeed a few votes could make a big
difference this year.
But those votes are centralized in a
few, key battleground states.
Thats what the electoral college
gives us. Voters will go to the polls,
but, unlike every other election, some
votes wont matter.
Stage is set for showdown
For all of the talk, presidential race comes down to a few states
Maps dont lie
Will your presidential vote really mat-
ter this year? Maybe, but it appears
now that the election will hinge on a
few key states.
Vote no on sewer bond
ordinance, says writer
Once upon a time, Hopewell Township
had a committee that worked together to
enact legislation desired by the residents,
while following the townships master
plan. Recently, however, it seems members
of the committee are more concerned with
proving they were right instead of doing
what's in the best interest of Hopewell
Township.
I am writing this letter as a private citi-
zen expressing my personal opinion on the
subject. I'm not writing in an official capac-
ity of any board or commission affiliated
with the Township of Hopewell.
First of all, please understand that the
sewer bond ordinance has nothing to do
with affordable housing. Our township had
a viable affordable housing plan long be-
fore the sewer ordinance came about and it
will continue to have a viable affordable
housing plan as long as the committee in-
troduces an ordinance that is consistent
with the will of the residents and with the
goals of the master plan specifically, the
creation and maintenance of open space in
the entire township, and not the encour-
agement of more development in one sec-
tion of the township.
The current ordinance guarantees dou-
ble the amount of development in the
southern tier than is required by the af-
fordable housing plan and the needs of the
businesses. If the businesses do not want
the sewers, then there would be even more
new development in the southern tier driv-
en by developers who would want to take
advantage of all that extra capacity.
Furthermore, under the current ordi-
nance, there is no guarantee taxpayers will
be repaid for the costs of the bond. Even
more alarming is that, if no one buys this
capacity, the residents of the southern tier
could be forced to pay for the sewers they
overwhelmingly said no to last year.
As a community, we should vote this
flawed ordinance down and encourage the
committee to develop an ordinance that al-
lows for the users of the sewers to pay, not
the taxpayers, provides capacity only for
what is needed and that does not guarantee
double the amount of development in the
southern tier; and one that advances the
goals of the Townships master plan, and
does not undermine many of the stated
goals as the current ordinance does.
It's time for the Hopewell Township
Committee to embrace what the citizens
are asking for and start working together
again for the good of Hopewell Township.
To save our future, please vote no on
May 8.
Paul A. Kiss
Writer: Sewer bond ordinance
in best interest of community
The opponents of the sewer bond ordi-
nance have argued that the truth matters.
Well here is the truth, and I challenge any-
one to prove me wrong:
When Vanessa Sandom was mayor and I
was deputy mayor, we met with the Ewing
Lawrence Sewer Authority (ELSA) board
and pleaded with them to provide sewer ca-
pacity to the southern tier of Hopewell
Township. We told the ELSA board we
needed the sewers because we had resi-
dents in desperate need of sewers and we
needed sewers to satisfy our affordable
housing obligation.
Then, Sandom and I then meet with the
town councils for both Ewing and
Lawrence and asked them to persuade the
ELSA board to agree to provide sewers to
Hopewell Township.
Then, Sandom and I then requested that
the township administrator and township
attorney work closely with the ELSA staff
and present to the Hopewell Township
Committee a contract for ELSA to provide
please see LETTERS, page 10
MAY 2-8, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
There are four main ways that
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed
Association tries to protect the
environment, Waltman said.
Through land conservation, en-
vironmental advocacy, the sci-
ence and understanding behind
the environment, and environ-
mental education.
The association has taught
nearly 10,000 children environ-
mental education. It holds 400 for-
mal environmental education
programs each year, which teach
children about natural history,
wildlife, clean water, and a vari-
ety of other environmentally
friendly topics.
We hope to inspire the next
generation of environmental
stewardship, Coffey said.
For more information about
the association and its upcoming
cleanups, visit www.thewater
shed.org.
CLEANUPS
Continued from page 1
Cleanups because
of people pollution
The Republican Women of
Mercer County, through its affili-
ation with the National Federa-
tion of Republican Women, seek
nominees for scholarships bene-
fiting young Republican women.
The application deadline is
May 15.
Three annual National
Pathfinder Scholarships of $2,500
each honor former First Lady
Nancy Reagan. College sopho-
mores, juniors and seniors, as well
as students enrolled in masters
programs, are eligible to apply.
Three annual Betty Rendel
Scholarships of $1,000 each will
be awarded to undergraduate stu-
dents majoring in political sci-
ence, government or economics.
Applications for both scholar-
ships are available online at
www.rwomc.org. Applications
must include the completed form,
three letters of recommendation,
an official copy of the applicant's
college transcript, two one-page
typed essays and an optional pho-
tograph.
Submit applications to the Re-
publican Women of Mercer Coun-
ty, P.O. Box 901, Pennington, 08534.
Republican group offers scholarships
WEDNESDAY MAY 2
Home Brewing 101: 7 p.m. at
Hopewell Train Station. Hopewell
resident Brendan Elliot discusses
basics of home brewing, includ-
ing ingredients, process, equip-
ment and educational resources.
Most appropriate for those curi-
ous about home brewing and
novice brewers, although experi-
enced brewers welcome.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the first
Wednesday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp.
org.
THURSDAY MAY 3
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
FRIDAY MAY 4
Open Play Time: All ages. 11 a.m. to
noon at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
time for parents and children to
socialize in the childrens activity
room. Toys and coloring supplies
available.
SATURDAY MAY 5
Shredding & Electronic Event Day:
9 a.m. to 1p.m. at Public Works
Building, 203 Washington Cross-
ing Pennington Road, Titusville.
Residents only. ID required. No
businesses. Ten boxes maximum.
No cardboard accepted. For more
information call 537-0250.
SUNDAY MAY 6
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY MAY 7
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY MAY 8
Hopewell Valley Chapter Breakfast
Networking: 8 a.m. until 9:30
a.m. at Hopewell Valley Vine-
yards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington.
The featured speaker will be Bar-
ry Rabner, CEO of University Med-
ical Center of Princeton at Plains-
boro. The cost for members is
$10, and $25 for future members.
For more information, call (609)
689-9960, ext. 14.
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
This group welcomes knitters of
all levels. Join for a cozy evening
of stitching and conversation.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 2-8, 2012
20% OFF
Household Specials
Excludes Tableclothes & Sheets
Exp. 6/16/12.
25% OFF
Alterations & Repairs
Not valid with other offers.
Exp. 6/16/12.
24% OFF
Any Dry Cleaning Order
6 pieces or more
Excludes Shirts. Exp. 6/16/12.
Theyre back!
SPRING SPECIALS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises Suedes and Leathers Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
5/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
5/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/12.
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Bring in your
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for pIanting!
(reg. $22.95-26.95)
MAY 2-8, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
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POLICE REPORT
flooring in the living room sec-
tion of the home.
On April 13 at 12:11 p.m., Offi-
cer Sara Erwin responded to the
Shop Rite on a report of a theft.
Sometime between 10:30 a.m. and
11:10 a.m., someone removed a
wallet from a customers purse
while she was shopping. The loss
was estimated at $227.
On April 15 at 1:30 p.m., Officer
Joseph Maccaquano responded to
the Carter Road Associates prop-
erty (formerly Lucent) on a crimi-
nal mischief report. Sometime
between April 13 and April 15,
someone removed the straps that
were securing an empty 40,000-
pound fuel tank to a tractor-trail-
er, causing it to fall to the ground.
On April 15 at 9:32 a.m., Officer
Joseph Maccaquano responded to
a Bayberry Road on a theft report.
Sometime between April 13 and
April 15, someone is believed to
have removed approximately 150
gallons of diesel fuel from a
tank.
A small wooded area next to
the tank also showed signs of a
brush fire. The value of the stolen
fuel was estimated at $585.
On April 16 at 9:45 p.m., Officer
Mandy Grey responded to Route
518 for the report of a two-car
motor vehicle crash.
Police say a 23-year-old man,
driving a 2005 GMC Envoy, at-
tempted to make a right turn on
to Route 518 eastbound from Aunt
Molly Road when he mistakenly
entered the westbound lane of
Route 518. His car struck a west-
bound car, a 2008 Honda
Odyssey, driven by a 44-year-old
woman.
The collision caused both cars
to leave the roadway where they
both went through a fence and
came to rest against two separate
trees. The woman and a juvenile
passenger were extricated from
their car by the Hopewell Fire De-
partment and were transported to
an area hospital by the Hopewell
First Aid Squad.
The woman and the juvenile
were later released after being
treated for complaints of back
pain.
The man wasnt injured, but re-
ceived a summons for careless
driving, which will be heard in
municipal court.
On April 14 at 11:57 a.m., Offi-
cer Sara Erwin responded to the
Pennington Quilt Works for the
report of shoplifting. A 62-year-
old woman was observed leaving
the store without paying for $820
worth of quilting materials that
she had placed in her purse. She
was detained by an employee
until Erwin placed her under ar-
rest.
She was charged with shoplift-
ing and was later released.
This case will be forwarded to
the Mercer County Prosecutors
Office for review.
POLICE
Continued from page 4
sewer capacity to Hopewell Town-
ship, which they did.
Suffice it to say, afterward, San-
dom and I spent a lot of time and
effort to get ELSA to provide
sewer capacity to Hopewell Town-
ship. It was a very, very concerted
effort.
But when a hard-negotiated
ELSA sewer contract was pre-
sented to the Hopewell Township
Committee for approval, Sandom
voted no.
She was the only no vote.
She then went door to door and
asked residents to sign a petition
for a referendum to repeal the
sewer bond ordinance.
But, nothing had changed.
The same residents in the
southern tier, when Sandom was
mayor, are still in desperate need
for those sewers. The affordable
housing obligation in the south-
ern tier that existed when San-
dom was mayor still exists.
The only thing that changed is
that Sandom was no longer
mayor. She was no longer in
charge. A change in someones
political fortunes should not lead
to a change in their position on
what is in the best interest of our
community.
Please vote yes on the May 8
referendum on the ELSA sewer
bond ordinance. Please do what is
the best interest of our communi-
ty, even if others will not.
John Murphy
Vote no on May 8
for no new taxes
The vote on the referendum
about the ELSA sewer bond ordi-
nance, slated for May 8, is about
all taxpayers in Hopewell Town-
ship paying for a service that is
strictly the obligation of users
sewer capacity.
The majority of the township
committee voted for $4.1 million
of sewering for commercial users
and affordable housing south of
the Pennington Circle (not resi-
dences), twice as much as needed.
However, those who want the
bond ordinance referendum to
pass are putting forward scare
stories of builders remedies,
which would allow more housing
than what the zoning would allow.
They argue that state-mandat-
ed Hopewell Townships afford-
able housing plan will immediate-
ly be out of compliance if the or-
dinance is rejected on May 8. A
developer will then sue the town-
ship and use the builders reme-
dy to construct up to 3,500 new
homes.
Is this the truth?
The fact of the matter is the
states methodology used to deter-
mine how many affordable hous-
ing units should be built in each
town has been challenged and is
before the New Jersey Supreme
Court.
In fact, the townships most re-
cently submitted affordable hous-
ing plan, which employed the
state methodology, cannot even be
approved until the challenge is re-
solved. It will be many months, if
not a year or two, before the court
rules on this issue and the town-
ship knows with any level of cer-
tainty how many affordable units
will be required in the township.
In light of this fact, a developer
cannot successfully prevail with
the builders remedy that sewer
bond supporters are fearfully ad-
vocating.
Builders will not be construct-
ing subdivisions in your back-
yard if you vote no on the refer-
endum.
Opponents of the bond ordi-
nance, of which I am one, argue
that approximately 500 new
homes could be built on devel-
opable lots in the southern tier of
the township if the bond ordi-
nance passes (if you vote yes on
May 8).
How did I arrive at that num-
ber?
Go to the township website at
www.hopewelltwp.org and go to
ELSA Sewer Proposal and click
Final ELSA Proposal 11-19-11.
Compare slides two with three.
This shows you a map of the
areas that originally were pro-
posed for required sewers (slide
two) with a map of areas that are
not now required by the ordi-
nance to connect to the sewers
due to the high connection cost
(slide three).
When the committee agreed to
not require those neighborhoods
to tie into the sewers, it essential-
ly created a surplus of twice
the sewerage capacity needed
enough to build about 500 new
homes.
Now, if you were a developer,
and you noticed that desirable
southern Hopewell Township had
a surplus sewerage capacity with-
out a designated use for that ca-
pacity, what would you do? One
can rest assured that this surplus
capacity is on their radar screens
at this very moment.
So, the main reason to vote
no on May 8 is so that your
taxes dont go up on May 9 be-
cause this bond ordinance re-
quires taxpayers in the township
to pay $4.1 million for far more ca-
pacity than any planned users
will pay for.
And secondarily, vote no so
developers dont rush in to grab
that allotted excess capacity for
500 or so new homes. For more in-
formation on the ELSA bond or-
dinance referendum, see our web-
site at www.elsareferendum.org.
Please vote no on May 8 for
no new taxes.
Robert Kecskes, chairman
Citizens For Tax Choice
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 2-8, 2012
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letters to the editor
LETTERS
Continued from page 6
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
Statewide Domestic
Violence Hotline
(800) 572-7233
PSA
Send us your
Hopewell news
Have a news tip?
Want to send us a press
release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at (856) 427-0934.
Call the editor at (609) 751-
0245.
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MAY 2-8, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
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