Thousands of Lucha Libre (Mexican Pro Wrestling) Techniques

Translated into English by K_JKD

Lucha Libre Style

The Mexican wrestlers, and smaller stature than their American counterparts, they rely primarily on the use of keys, key reversals and aerial maneuvers to reduce their opponents, unlike the use of force that characterizes most American fighters. Since heavyweight fighters constitute the majority of the fighters of Mexico, aerial combat and high risk is widespread, and is typical Mexican style using the ropes ( springboard ) to boost their movements. Jumps out of the ring or suicide are among the most famous features of Mexican wrestling, and it is rare for a particular dive bomber a fighter is more famous in his repertoire that the same final movement. Hurricanranas and tilt-a -whirl headscissors takedowns are very easy to find, as indeed are movements originating in Mexico. Keying A variant of Mexican wrestling known as key or keying, which includes the use of complex submissions to force the opponent to surrender and intricate variants pinfall for a quick count the opponent before he can prevent it, often alternating between the two variants. This particular style is more confidence in the effectiveness of the technique of pinning it on the strength of a previous move, and is very common to find long sequences of reversals featuring two fighters trying to catch the other counteracting their keys. This style was popularized by Skayde , although its use dates back to long ago, and has some connection with disciplines such as wrestling, amateur or even mixed martial arts .

Lucha Libra moves can be broken dpwn into 6 different types Arial Movements (sentons, swantons, shooting stars etc.) Keying Submission Movements (Joint Locks, Strangles, etc) Takedown Movements (Throws, Slams, Scoops etc.) Attacking Movements (Strikes, Punches, kicks etc.) Team Technique Movements (3D, Double Drop Kick, etc.)

Air movements of professional wrestling
Many aircraft movements are used in professional wrestling to show the speed and agility of a wrestler. These movements are made up mostly of young fighters who can not make moves that require more strength. There are a variety of aerial moves in wrestling. Several movements are known by different names. Due to the dangerous nature of some of these movements, some companies have banned the use of a series of movements. In 2005, the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) banned the use of the shooting star press and 450 ° splash for fear of injury. However, Jim Ross stated that this prohibition as unknown. The movements are listed in a category as general as possible.

The Undertaker performing his Old School (arm twist ropewalk chop) on Heidenreich .

Arm twist ropewalk chop

The phases of the Arm twist ropewalk chop used by Undertaker against Heidenreich

This movement is grabbing the opponent by the wrist and hand Girandole well, then climb to the top of the turnbuckle , walk the top rope and hit the opponent in the back or neck with your hand or arm. This movement is known in America for use by the wrestler Undertaker , who calls it Old School ("old school"). Other fighters are also known to have added something extra to move. Jinsei Shinzaki uses a variation where you grab your opponent when he is on the outer edge of the ring and his opponent within it, then jumps to the top rope using opponent's wrist to stabilize and once up, walk and jump rope hitting the opponent. Sonjay Dutt also uses a variation in which a dance on the rope before hitting your opponent. Mad Mikey used a variation in which, instead of rising to the top rope, climbing rope just below before hitting your opponent. This variation was called Pre-School ("pre-school").

Axe Handle
Also known as Double Axe Handle, Double Axe Handle Smash or Double Sledge. This movement is jumping from the top of the turnbuckle with both hands clasped over his head to the enemy, hitting him in the head on his chest, pretending to have an ax in his hands. Commonly applied to a fighter who is standing or getting up, being very rare time that is applied to an opponent lying on the canvas.

Crossbody
This movement is used by many wrestlers, usually lighter, and is also called diving crossbody (but so named as crossbody or cross body block). This movement is referred to as the version of a high crossbody , where a wrestler jumps from an elevated position (usually the turnbuckle ) to an opponent, landing horizontally across the opponent's torso, forcing it falls back to the mat and usually terminating in an attempt pinfall .

Reverse crossbody

This term refers to a variation where a fighter, which is in a raised position facing away from the opponent, performs a rotation in the air before falling horizontally across the torso of the opponent. Although the vast majority of the time, this technique is used to attack an opponent in the ring, there are some versions that go over the top rope to attack an opponent outside the ring. In wrestling , this variation is called the Fish, or English, Iron .

Diamond Dust
Named by Masato Tanaka , this movement is a Forward somersault three-quarter facelock cutter / jawbreaker performed by a wrestler from an elevated platform. This movement requires a wrestler in high places (like the second string or sit on the pole) facing the enemy's rear, applying an inverted facelock . From this position the attacking wrestler is driven forwards, flipping, turning the key to a three-quarter facelock . When both fall, the attacking wrestler does sitting, causing the opponent's jaw hit the attacking wrestler's shoulder, or if the attacking wrestler falls back, it sends the opponent's face into the canvas, changing the key to a bulldog . Chris Hero uses a variation where he begins a three-quarter facelock , there is the forward somersault, mantieniendo the key. The move forces the opponent to turn 360 degrees, to fall into a cutter . Layla uses this key, which called The Face Lift

Diving bulldog

Trish Stratus applying a Stratusfaction to Victoria .

This movement is a bulldog performed by a wrestler from an elevated platform. A bulldog is a move where the wrestler applies a head lock on his opponent and leaps forward, falling back to the mat and causing the impact of the opponent's face into the mat. A standard diving bulldog is a wrestler jumping from any high place, using any type of lock to the opponent's head before falling to the canvas. This move was popularized by Rick Steiner , who called Steiner Drop.

Springboard bulldog
This movement is a bulldog applied after springboard (make a trampoline) on the ropes. In some cases the lock to the head is applied before the wrestler jumps on the ropes. Another version of this move is when a wrestler will springboard into the ropes and then applied to the air lock to the head that wears the bulldog. The diva of the WWE Trish Stratus uses this move, so Stratusfaction llamadolo

Diving elbow drop
A diving elbow drop is executed by jumping from a high place with a raised elbow to elbow on landing hit the neck, shoulder or head of an opponent.

Axe handle elbow drop
The wrestler sits on the corner, one leg on each second rope, facing an opponent lying on the canvas. Then the wrestler leaps towards the opponent, lifting your elbows together, they fell down, dropping both elbows together on the chest or shoulder opponent.

Shawn Michaels performing a Diving Elbow Drop.

Corkscrew elbow drop
The wrestler sits on the corner, with the opponent lying face up on the canvas. The wrestler then jumps toward the opponent, while making a 360 degree pan before dropping an elbow up the opponent. This causes the movement is of greater impact than a Diving Elbow Drop normal. This movement can be made from the ground, ie, without getting into the corner.

Diving back elbow drop
This is a rare variation of a diving elbow drop, the wrestler is standing on the corner, facing away from where the opponent extends and raises an elbow and then jump or drop back, falling to elbow in opponent's body part. This movement allows for greater range, but has less precision.

Diving elbow drop somersault
In this technique, the user goes to the top rope, facing inside the ring, and jumps making a frontal gyrus in the air, keeping your elbow up, landing him on the chest of the opponent.

Shooting star elbow drop
The wrestler jumps at an opponent from an elevated position, executing a backflip in the air, landing with a raised elbow, which lands on an opponent's body.

Diving fist drop
A fist drop is a move in which the wrestler drops his fist on the chest or the opponent's head and air version is to perform the same movement but from a raised platform. The attacking wrestler can fall to their knees or side of the torso, but the fist must hit the opponent to be considered a fist drop. Jerry Lawler used this movement as the movement end .

Diving headbutt

Chris Benoit applying a swan-dive diving headbutt to MVP at WrestleMania 23 .

In this technique, the user jumps from an elevated position on the opponent, landing in a header against any part of your body, usually the chest or abdomen. This move was innovated by serendipity by Harley Race , who slipped from the corner and fell on his opponent's head, resulting in not only the diving headbutt, but a particularly dangerous variant in which the jump is performed with the rigid body and free fall, sometimes called a

swan-dive diving headbutt. Race then adapted it as a normal move, and then be copied and popularized by The Dynamite Kid . Race declared that feels remorse for having invented the motion because he feels guilt had back pain and neck who have suffered several wrestlers who use the swan-dive diving headbutt. Then it was revealed that this version does not only affect the spine, but also cause brain damage. El Santo and El Hijo del Santo popularized a variant safer, being called by them I ran to Christ, and that is referred to today simply as a diving headbutt. June Izumida uses a variation where it turns 45 degrees to the side, hiding his arms under his body, which called Meteorite Impact.

Diving hurricanrana
This movement is sometimes referred to as huracanrana Diving. Is to jump from the corner with his legs forward, an opponent who is facing the fighter, landing on the shoulders of the opponent, which allows for an hurricanrana . Lita became famous this movement, which called Litacanrana.

Diving somersault hurricanrana
In this variation, the wrestler after jumping gives a forward somersault in the air before landing on the shoulders of the opponent and then apply a hurricanrana common, transformed into a pinfall . The name of this technique was given by its inventor, Dragon Kid .

Super hurricanrana
In this move the wrestler, taking the opponent sitting or standing on the corner ropes, jump to move his legs on his shoulders and his head bound with them, and throwing his weight back, flip the opponent from his position to make land in the soil. Elix Skipper uses a variation where walking along the upper cueda before applying a normal Frankesteiner an opponent sitting in the corner. Technically it is called ropewalk Skipper frog and called New School in reference to arm twist ropewalk chop , Old School, conducted by The Undertaker . A variation is called StratusFear by Trish Stratus . It consists of making an inverted position (asserting his arms and hands on the mat) to grab the legs of the opponent's neck. The attacking wrestler rolls back its inverted position, in the same way that made it, forcing the opponent to perform a forward somersault, falling back to the canvas.

Inverted super hurricanrana
It is also known for Inverted Frankensteiner or Poison Rana. This movement is a headscissors takedown on an opponent made him who sits on the top turnbuckle. However, unlike a Frankensteiner , the opponent is facing away from the ring, causing it when the attacking wrestler performs the normal maneuver, the opponent performs a backflip, landing with his chest

to the mat, unlike the another movement which was falling back. It can also be carried out of the ring, or with the opponent facing inward and the wrestler behind him. This movement is considered highly dangerous, because the drop is forced and the roll is not easy to do. A failure of any of the fighters involved may end in one of two with his neck falling directly onto the canvas, which risks serious problems such as paralysis or even death.

Diving knee drop
Movement in which a wrestler jumps from a raised platform and hits with one or both knees to the opponent.

Diving knee drop bulldog
In this technique, also called Calf Branding, the user leaves the opponent standing with his back against the corner, go up to it, by standing behind the opponent's neck. Then the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and rests against her knee, giving impetus to the free leg to jump off the corner and push the opponent's head against the floor, using the weight of the attacker. This move was popularized by Hiroyoshi Tenzan and Raven .

Diving leg drop
The Wrestler, situated in an elevated position, jump up a leg to land her with all his weight on a fighter lying on the canvas, usually the neck or face. Kenny Dykstra uses a variation of this movement. At the time of jumping from the raised position, hide one of his legs with one arm tocándosela next to the torso, to release it just before he fell, hitting the opponent with the same leg.

Moonsault leg drop
This variation sees the wrestler doing a moonsault , but instead of falling into a splash position, the rotation continues, using a diving leg drop normal.

Diving leg drop bulldog
This is a variation of an air leg drop bulldog , where the wrestler does a springboard into a string or jumps from a raised platform, dropping a leg on the back of the neck of an opponent, who is kneeling , rising or inlinado looking down. The impact of the fall causes the opponent hits his head against the canvas, which adds pressure exerted by the leg in the opponent's neck. Shannon Moore uses a variation where applies a leg drop bulldog from the corner, with the opponent also located in the corner, causing both are released from the top to the ring. John Cena uses it as a personal or signature move.

Diving leg drop split-legged
The fighter has the opponent lying on the ring, then the fighter goes into the ropes to stretch his leg and drop it on the chest or neck of the opponent. This move was popularized by Christy Hemme on TNA

Somersault leg drop
The wrestler, in an elevated position, jump towards the opponent, doing a forward somersault in the air, making a diving leg drop applied normal to the point of falling. somersault corkscrew leg drop The fighter is in a high place. Then jump to the fighter, giving a forward flip and rotate 360 degrees horizontally at the same time, before falling into a diving leg drop normal. This movement is sometimes done in a senton or splash , because of the complexity of implementing it. Imploding diving somersault leg drop The wrestler leaves the opponent lying on the ring and climbs the top rope, looking out of the ring. Then jump back giving a forward roll, turning 180 degrees to land with his leg over the opponent.

Shooting star leg drop
This movement is performed when a wrestler jumps from a high place forward, doing a back flip in the air, continuing the rotation until you can apply a diving leg drop normal to its opponent. This variation was popularized by Jason Cross , who called Crossfire.

Corkscrew shooting star leg drop
The wrestler applies a shooting star leg drop, but during the back flip, a turn of his body 180 degrees horizontally. The only difference between this variation and the shooting star leg drop is that the wrestler lands in the opposite direction.

Springboard leg drop
This movement is performed when a wrestler located at the outer edge of the ring, use the top rope to springboard inside the ring, falling with his leg. In this variation does not matter if the fighter strikes with his leg the face, neck or neck of the opponent. There is a variation called triple jump leg drop where the fighter runs into a chair, jump on it, jump to the top rope and then applies a leg drop to an opponent who is outside the ring, usually on a table. This movement was created, used and popularized by wrestler Sabu .

Diving shoulder block
The wrestler jumps from an elevated position, sticks his arms to his body and hit the shoulder of an opponent with his own shoulder, causing the opponent to lose balance and fall with the stroke to the canvas.

Diving spear
This movement is technically a diving shoulder block takedown. The wrestler jumps from a raised platform, hit the opponent with his shoulder in the chest, forcing him with the force of impact, falling to technique is mainly used lona.Esta by Edge .

Diving stomp

Little Spike Dudley running a diving double foot stomp on Rodney Mack .

In these techniques, the user jumps from an elevated position to land standing on the opponent's body in a double stomp, dumping body weight.

Diving double foot stomp
The user goes to a high position and jump from it to land with both feet on the opponent's body.

Mushroom stomp
The Wrestler, located on the second or third string, jump on the back of the opponent, who is crouching, standing or leaning looking down. Jumping on the back, push down, forcing the opponent to fall to the mat, but before the opponent falls to the mat, the wrestler is driven in the same opponent's back foot to fall elsewhere in the ring.

The name of this technique (in English Stomp Seta) is in reference to the character of Mario , who makes a similar leap to kill some mushrooms , which are their enemy.

Moonsault double foot stomp
In this variation the wrestler perform a moonsault but instead of falling in place splash , continues the rotation until foot landing on the opponent

Shooting star double foot stomp
In this variation the wrestler perform a shooting star press , continuing the rotation until foot landing on the opponent.

Flying clothesline

Kane fliying applying a clothesline to CM Punk .

In this movement, the user goes to a high position as the top rope, and jump from there on a standing opponent, extending his arm to hit the opponent and throwing him. A version where the clothesline is replaced by a lariat can be seen.

Flying back elbow
In this move the wrestler jumps from an elevated position (usually the top turnbuckle or the second string ) and hits a standing opponent with the back of your elbow.

Flying neckbreaker
This movement is a neckbreaker applied from a raised platform, grabbing the opponent's neck in the air, then fell running technique. The most common variation of this movement is called Flipping Neckbreaker, Blockbuster or Over Castle. This movement is a neckbreaker where the attacking wrestler perform a forward somersault and, while turning, grab the opponent's head, ending in a falling neckbreaker . This move was popularized by Buff Bagwell , who called him Buff Blockbuster.

A variation of the flipping neckbreaker is performed by Shannon Moore , who holds the head of an opponent who is bent over, with its side toward him, using an aerial version of a front flip neckbreaker . This movement calls Mooregasm. CM Punk uses a variation corkscrew Flipping Neckbreaker as the reversal of an Irish whip into the corner. When running or is thrown into the corner, Punk leaps or lands on the second turnbuckle , performing a forward somersault, while performing a 360 degree pan with your body, then grab the opponent's neck performing a Flipping Neckbreaker normal.

Flying spinning heel kick
In this move the wrestler jumps from a high place and hits the opponent with a spinning heel kick in the air.

Flying thrust kick
This movement is performed when a wrestler jumps from an elevated position to hit your opponent with a thrust kick in the air. "Gentleman" Chris Adams invented this movement in the late 80s, calling it as "flying superkick". More recently, this movement has been used by Rob Van Dam , who beats his opponent in the chest (or sometimes in the face). The opponent may be within the ring or at the outer edge thereof.

Moonsault
The moonsault is a movement in which the performer executes a backflip and hits the opponent with the body. The basic monsault is done from the top of an elevated platform to an opponent who is lying on the mat, but there are different variations. This move was innovated by Keiji Mutoh .

Corkscrew moonsault
The user, climbed to the top rope in the corner and looking out of the ring, jumps into a back flip as in a standard moonsault, only turning 360 ° on itself before completing the rotation and land on your opponent.

Springboard moonsault
In this technique, the wrestler jumps on the second or third string of the ring and is driven from it to give a back flip and land on the opponent's stomach. This movement is called Quebrada in Mexico, where that was innovated by Fantasma de la Quebrada .

Missile dropkick
A missile dropkick is a dropkick made from an elevated position, most commonly the third string of the turnbuckle , there is another way in which the wrestler bends his knees before taking the kick in the chest or the face of his opponent.

Iron
Technically called suicide slingshot crossbody , this technique a wrestler grabs the top rope to push on it out of the ring and land on an opponent on the outside, as a form of suicide dive . In Mexican wrestling , this move is called fish, while the term sheet is used in North America . The term sheet also designate an air movement which is made from the turnbuckle against an opponent on the outside. For example, a shooting star press against an opponent standing outside the ring would be called shooting star iron, while a diving crossbody to the same target would be called diving board.

Senton
A senton is similar to a splash . However, instead of impacting stomach, the wrestler lands on his back on the opponent.

630 ° senton
The wrestler performs a senton, spinning 630 ° before falling forward, that is, complete rotation (360 °) followed by a forward somersault (270 °), finally falling back on an opponent lying on the ring. It was popularized by Jack Evans , who used it as his finisher. Corkscrew 630 ° senton The wrestler, facing away from the ring and stood on the top turnbuckle, make a pan of his body 180 degrees in the air, before performing a 630 ° senton standard on an opponent lying on the ring. This movement is performed by Jack Evans .

Corkscrew senton
The attacking wrestler stands at corner of the ring, his back to the opponent and jumps in an arc inside the ring, turning his body 180 degrees horizontally before turning the front and landed on his back on the opponent as a senton bomb Normal .

Moonsault senton

In this technique, the user takes the esquiner looking out of the ring and jumps back, turning his body into the air before landing back on the opponent. This move was innovated in Japan by MIKAMI .

Seated senton
Known in wrestling as La Silla, where a wrestler uses his legs and lower body to throw his opponent, rather than your back. It is performed by jumping from an elevated position or springboarding to the shoulders of a standing opponent, forcing him to crash his opponent to the canvas. It can also be made to an opponent who is lying on the canvas. Basically, you jump to fail "sitting" on the shoulders of an opponent. A variation is called Banzai Drop, is performed by a wrestler who sits on his opponent, then jump on the second corner (facing away from the ring) and then jump over the opponent dropping his back (usually in the chest or stomach opponent). This move is basically a butt drop from an elevated position, which was popularized by Yokozuna . Molly-Go-Round This is a variant of a seated senton, which is known technically as diving somersault senton seated. It is performed when a wrestler jumps from an elevated position, giving a forward somersault before landing on the shoulders of an opponent who is standing. This forces the opponent to crash in the canvas. The name of this movement was given by Molly Holly , who invented the attack. Single leg muscle buster This movement is performed when an attacking wrestler hooks both legs of an opponent folds his arms and head in the opponent's side before standing and lifting the opponent up, so they are upside down with his head resting on the attacking wrestler's shoulder. From this position, the attacking wrestler jumps and falls to the mat, driving the opponent shoulder first to the mat with the opponent's neck impacting both the shoulder and the mat wrestler. This can be seen the wrestler to pick up an opponent who is standing, but bent forward, but often starts with an opponent who sits in an elevated position, usually a top turnbuckle, because it is easier to engage and lift an opponent when he is placed higher than the fighter. The measure also has a neckbreaker variation, which focuses more on the neck of the opponent's attack. This movement originated in the manga Kinnikuman, originally known as Buster Kinniku, with the movement ending with the opponent fell on his neck against the attacking wrestler's shoulder

senton bomb
In this variation of the senton, the wrestler will jump from an elevated position, giving a forward somersault, before falling back on an opponent. This move was innovated by Lanny Poffo .

There is a variant made from the ground, called Standing Somersault Somersault senton or just Senton. This movement was used by Edouard Carpentier , who rarely landed on the enemy's rear. High-angle senton bomb In this variation of the senton bomb , the user goes to the top rope and jump from them flying over the ring and just before landing on the opponent, giving the forward roll to fall on his back, hurrying to finish before tumbling. This movement is considered much more dangerous than regular senton bomb, was pioneered by Great Sasuke in Japan and Super Nova in the United States , being not until years later popularized by Jeff Hardy and MIKAMI . A version springboard especially dangerous in this movement is used by the Japanese fighter Marines Mask II , under the name Marine Bomb. Here the user delay the rotation until almost landing on the opponent vertically. Imploding senton bomb This movement is a variation of a 450 ° splash imploding . It is performed when a wrestler at the top of the post and facing away from the ring, jumps back to apply a senton bomb (facing the corner, in a direction opposite to normal) on an opponent lying on the ring. This movement is also called reverse shooting star press.

Shooting star senton
The wrestler jumps forward from an elevated position and contract your legs against his body, making a full rotation back in flight, before landing back on the opponent. This movement was created and popularized by Yoshitsune in 2005 under the name Shura. Due to its high compliación and risk, is a move rarely used.

Shiranui

Murphy KL applying a Shiranui.

In this movement, technically called springboard backflip three-quarter facelock falling inverted DDT, the user grasps the head of an opponent behind him over his shoulder, runs into the ropes (or any other stepped surface) and jump on them to walk upright upward through the strings to reach the top, the user jumps to raise his body to a vertical position, still holding the opponent, and the rotation continues to fall flat on the ground, dragging the opponent behind him and dropping it on his neck. This move was innovated in Japan by Naomichi Marufuji , who appointed him as Shiranui, and popularized in America by Brian Kendrick under the name of Slice Bread # 2. There is also a version made from the floor .

Splash
In these techniques, also called the press, a wrestler jumps from an elevated position to land with your stomach or chest of the opponent's stomach, generally perpendicular to it. The basic version, called splash diving is when a wrestler jumps from the corner in a straight line to land on his opponent in the manner mentioned above. This variation was innovated by Jimmy "The Superfly" Snuka under the name of Superfly Splash, becoming one of the first and most popular aircraft movements in the history of professional wrestling .

Corkscrew splash
The user goes to a raised position to leap forward, turning 360 degrees on itself, landing on the opponent

450 ° splash
In this technique the wrestler jumps from an elevated position, giving a full front flip to land on your opponent's stomach. This move was innovated by 2 Cold Scorpio in the United States under the name of Scorpio Splash and popularized in Japan by Hayabusa under the name Firebird Splash. This movement is one of the strongest risk aerial techniques used throughout the world. Corkscrew 450 ° splash Innovated by Hayabusa under the name Phoenix Splash, in this movement the fighter rises to an elevated position back to the ring. Then, jump back in an arc in the air and, on reaching the top of the parabola , rotates 180 degrees your body until you are pointing inside the ring again, doing at the time the flip front 450 ° splash to land on his opponent. This technique involves a more complex movement than the original variant of the 450 ° splash due to further rotation and having to jump back to the opponent, but can achieve more camber. Imploding 450 ° splash

The wrestler is standing on an elevated position, looking out of the ring and turning his back on an opponent lying on the floor. At that point the user jumps back, giving both a front somersault to land with your stomach on the opponent. This technique is technically a 450 ° splash facing away, and was popularized by The Blazer .

Corner slingshot splash
The wrestler places the opponent lying face up near the corner of the ring, climbs to the second rope and holds on to the third. From that position, the wrestler jumps as high as possible without letting the top rope, staying horizontal in the air before releasing a downward path and run back and land on the opponent. This technique was popularized by Big Van Vader under the name of Vader Bomb.

Frog splash
In this movement the attacking wrestler jumps from a high place towards the opponent, stretching arms and legs in the air and then collapse them to his chest and back stretch before impact, particularly in a flowing sequence. This technique was innovated and named for Eddie Guerrero . The original version of the movement, which inspired Guerrero is called Stretch out frog splash and was innovated by Art Barr earlier. In this technique, the wrestler jumps from an elevated position, stretching your legs from torso to touch them with arms to stretch and then go down on the opponent. Currently, this version is much less used than Guerrero, and its users include D'Lo Brown and CIMA . In a variant innovated by Hayabusa , called imploding frog splash, the user jumps from the corner with his back before running a frog splash normal.

Shooting star press
In this movement, the user jumps from an elevated position, pressing the knees against his chest to give a back flip, then releasing the knees and extending the body before landing on the opponent. This technique was innovated by Jushin Liger after seeing a similar movement in the manga Fist of the North Star . This technique, along with the 450 ° splash , has become one of the most accomplished aerial moves by agile fighters. Despite having a rotation less complex than the 450 ° splash, the shooting star press is considered more dangerous, because if the fighter fails to give the flip in the air can land on your head on the floor, as happened to Brock Lesnar at WrestleMania XIX . For this and other injuries, the WWE banned the movement officially since October of 2007 , but in 2008 the newcomer Evan Bourne won the lifting of the ban. Corkscrew shooting star press

In this movement, the wrestler jumps forward from an elevated position, giving a back flip to get the knees to his chest while giving a 360 º on its axis, extending later to land on the opponent. This technique is considered high risk and extremely difficult to perform, and is only used some fighters, like Jack Evans , Takuya Sugi or PAC .

Movements of transition
Some movements are not intended to damage, forced to pay or win the match against an opponent. These movements are called transition movements and prefixes are used as a movement, to indicate that condition is met.

Corkscrew
It is when a fighter takes a 360 degrees from your body in a horizontal manner, when performing other air movement. Clear examples of this type of movement can be corkscrew elbow drop , corkscrew moonsault or corkscrew senton . Another meaning of corkscrew, also called corkscrew somersault or 180 ° corkscrew, is jumping back from the corner looking out of the ring, in which the wrestler turns 180 ° on itself at the height of the turn to make a somersault . This is mostly used in the corkscrew 450 ° splash or corkscrew senton 630 º .

Grounding
The wrestler jumps from a high place to a standing opponent, causing the opponent to fall to his knees with his head between the legs of the attacking wrestler, who lands on his feet. This move is usually used to make later a powerbomb .

Springboard
A springboard is when a wrestler uses any ring rope as a springboard. Many techniques can be performed with this technique as a springboard legdrop , springboard dropkick . Sometimes fighters jump into something and then to the rope or string in two different, what is called double springboard, most notably the springboard moonsault , where the wrestler uses the second rope as a springboard to jump to the top rope, reuse as a springboard moonsault and then apply. Another version of a springboard is called rope run / climb where a fighter is going to "grow" each string, making the springboard after climbing to the third. This variation is used to apply a Tornado DDT , where the wrestler applies a head lock on the front, then run into the ropes and make the rope run, to finish it with the Tornado DDT.

Slingshot

A slingshot involves a wrestler, is which is at the outer edge of the ring, pulls the top rope and takes the impulse to soar over the strings to the ring, without touching them with your legs. Several aircraft movements can be performed after a slingshot.

Shooting star
This move is when a wrestler jumps forward from an elevated position, performing a backflip in midair. Several techniques can be performed after a shooting star, known as the shooting star press , but there are other variations like the shooting star leg drop and elbow drop shooting star .

Skin the cat
This defense is a technique in which when a wrestler is thrown over the ropes of the ring grips the top not to touch the ground, hanging from it, then throws his legs up to do a cartwheel on the rotating rope and fall back standing in the ring. This often precedes some movement as a springboard moonsault. This and other variants of this technique can be found in combat as Battle Royal and Royal Rumble Matches.

Split-legged
The Wrestler, located to the ropes or the third one, and always looking out of the ring, grabs the top rope to propel and download your legs on it, making them bounce on the string and generate momentum for air technique back, usually a moonsault or moonsault corkscrew .

Switches
Ropewalk
The term ropewalk is used to refer to any movement in which the attacking wrestler walks over the top rope before the coup. One of the most famous in the professional wrestling is the Old School of The Undertaker . Jinsei Shinzaki made the first ropewalk in Japan , turning the whole into the ring over the top rope, this movement was called Praying Ropewalk, because while Shinzaki performed it was praying.

Somersault
The term designates a somersault variant of an air movement in which the user jumps describing a 360 degrees forward. This can be found in splashes, leg drops, sentons, and others.

Standing
The term standing is used for any air movement instead of being made from a raised position, it is done at the same height where the opponent.

Super
The term super is placed before a movement is performed initially on the floor of the ring, but in this case is done with the user and his opponent in the last or second rope turnbuckle . For example, if the Samoan drop is carried out from that position renamed super high Samoan drop. Although the term diving is usually used as a synonym is also used to define a technique in which only the user is uploaded to the turnbuckle, the term being elevated in which only the oponenete is elevated. In Japan the term is often used instead of elevated avalanche. The suplex made since the turnbuckle are renamed superplex, and powerbomb are called Superbomb.

Suicide
The term suicide (or suicide) is placed before any move is made from the canvas of the ring to an opponent out of it. The most widely used variant, called a suicide dive, or just stumbled stumbled suicide, is to jump from inside the ring between the second and third string out to hit with his shoulder against a standing opponent and knock him down. There is a variant called suicide somersault senton, ran into money (in Mexico ) or bumped thread (in Japan ) in which the wrestler performs a forward roll to hit back instead of the chest or shoulders. When the break occurs outside the ropes and not between them is called over the top rope suicide. There is also a variant of suicide that is to use the head to ram instead of the shoulder, called suicide headbutt

Keying Submissions of professional wrestling
Submissions of professional wrestling are a variety of physical movements designed to immobilize the opponent and cause pain to induce surrender. Many of these movements are not limited to wrestling, but have a real utility, being used in mixed martial arts or combat sports .

Abdominal stretch

Big Show making an abdominal Stretch to John Cena .

The user, located next to and slightly behind the opponent, put one leg between his and locked his arm under the armpit of the user, by pulling it to hyperextend your abdominal muscles. This technique is quite popular in Japan , where it is known as cobra twist. There is a variant where the user, after catching the opponent in the art, move your body to the ground to support the opponent's shoulders on it and make the pinfall .

Octopus hold
The wrestler places the opponent's side and put one leg between the opponent. Thereafter, the user grasps the arm farthest from the opponent and forcing him to bend over, puts his free leg on the nape of the rival. In that position, the wrestler pulls the arm toward him arrested while downloading your weight on the leg in the opponent's neck to cause pain in many parts of your body. This technique was innovated by Antonio Inoki in the name of Manji-Gatame.

Ankle lock

Kurt Angle doing a "Angle Lock" to Shawn Michaels .

The user grasps an opponent's leg and turn your back on itself, pulling it while holding the ankle and flexes to cause him pain. This technique, used in disciplines of Olympic wrestling was innovated in professional wrestling by Ken Shamrock and popularized by Kurt Angle .

Heel hook
Also called Heel Hold, here the user, facing an opponent lying, grabs his leg and immobilized in hers, ensuring the opponent's foot under his armpit, and from that position, the wrestler twists the opponent's leg, causing pain ligaments of the knee. This technique, used in jiu-jitsu and sambo , is highly dangerous because it can cause injuries. This movement was used by the ex-diva WWE Michelle McCool .

Armbars
Twist his arm.

Cross armbar
The user grasps both arms of one of the rival and stretched over his chest, lying face up on the floor perpendicular to your opponent, then the captured fighter arm around her legs and pulled, stretching the joint hiperexteniendo shoulder and elbow. This move was innovated in Japan by Nobuhiko Takada and recently popularized in America by Alberto del Rio .

Crucifix armbar
In this variant of the cross armbar, the user is placed perpendicular to an opponent on his back and grabs his arm, holding it with yours. Then, without releasing it, the user seizes the arm with the legs and passes behind the opponent's head, holding the other arm of the opponent with them to form something like a crucifix pin . From that position, pull the arm wrestler arrested while driving with the legs to cause pain in the joint of the arm and shoulder. Tiger feint crucifix armbar

Fujiwara armbar
This popular technique innovated by submission Yoshiaki Fujiwara the user to lie face down opponent and looking in his direction, grabs him by the arm and twisted it to place it on the opposite shoulder, similar to a hammerlock , while does, the user can download your weight by lying on the back of the opponent to immobilize him.

headscissors armbar scissored armbar
The user stands next to an opponent lying face down and, grabbing the arm nearest rival, seizes the limb with his legs like a scissors. After that, the fighter uses his arms to grab the opponent's other arm and pull it towards you, causing joint pain. This key is used in jujitsu and judo .

Short-arm scissors
The wrestler leaves the opponent on his back and stood by his side, clutching the arm nearest. Then the user bends his arm grabbed, pass the leg over and folds around him, pulling on the ankle of that leg to compress the opponent's arm. This movement is called a bicep slicer in various combat sports.

Stepover headhold armbar
The user approaches an opponent on his back and grabs one wrist, twisting and pulling the opponent to sit with his back to the user. Then he extends his leg to the opponent's head and imprisons her, kneeling on that leg to put pressure on the neck, after that, you grab an opponent's leg and pulls it closer to the arm seized up, causing pain in various parts of the body. This technique was innovated by Kensuke Sasaki , and later used by Carpenter Ant in Chikara from other existing version .

omoplata
You take one arm of an opponent upside down, stretch, past the nearest leg over it and crosses her legs, causing pain in the shoulder and arm. Is very similar to Kimura , since it is a variant of this.

Bearhug

Chris Masters applying a Bearhug to Shawn Michaels .

The Wrestler closes his arms around the opponent's abdomen and squeezes with all his might in order to strangle her ribcage. Occasionally you can shake your body from side to side in order to generate more pain in rib area and back. It's a very simple implementation technique, but it requires great strength and bulk. This move was popularized by Andre the Giant .

Inverted Bearhug
A fighter is behind the opopnente and puts her arms around his torso to push them, similar to a current Bearhug. This technique is also called waist lock, and is used to start a German suplex .

Bodyscissors
The fighter with their legs around the opponent's torso and cross your ankles, pushing with both legs to compress the abdomen of the opponent with them. This key, leaving your hands free, is often used in combination with others.

Wheelbarrow bodyscissors
The user, with his back to the opponent, dropped face down while lifting your legs to bind them around the torso of the opponent, and make another move from it. This technique is the inverse of a wheelbarrow .

Boston crab
This key submission is that when the user is behind an opponent lying face up hooks his arms with the legs of the other, turns aside and turns putting it upside down, stepping over him. The final position is that the wrestler is found crouched on the back of another, with the opponent's legs from hers to her face. The effect is to pull your legs back makes it rise causing great pain in it. This technique is often preceded by a double leg takedown to make it fall into the correct position and make the Boston crab hold their legs. It may also have several variants.

Elevated Boston crab

Chris Jericho applied the Walls of Jerich on Batista .

In this variation the opponent gets up to bend my legs the other and that the pain in your spine is greater. WWE is known for being the final movement of Chris Jericho , called Walls of Jericho.

Single leg Boston crab
In this technique the wrestler grabs a leg of an opponent lying face up and turn it upside down for using the leg, which is sustained by passing between the legs of the user, who is crouching. This movement is a variant with a single leg Boston crab traditional. Arm single leg Boston crab trap The wrestler grabs a leg of an opponent lying face up and turn it upside down for using the leg, which is sustained by passing between the legs of the user, then the wrestler grabs an opponent's arm with his free and pull, causing pain in your joints. Over the shoulder single leg Boston crab The wrestler grabs a leg of an opponent lying face up and turn it upside down for using the leg, which is sustained by passing between the legs of the user, then the wrestler pulls the leg to pass it over his shoulders and his head , leaving standing or crouched over his opponent to cause pain in the leg and back.

Reverse Boston crab
Also called Crab Chicago , in this technique, the wrestler grabs his back legs of an opponent lying face up before him and turn him going over to put the opponent upside down, resulting in a reversal of the traditional Boston crab in the the user looks to the opponent instead of giving back.

Rope hung Boston crab

In this technique, the user makes a Boston crab with the opponent standing vertically hanging ropes. This move was innovated by Tajiri under the name of Tarantula.

Inverted Boston crab
In this technique the wrestler grabs an opponent's legs face up, stretched vertically and sits on them to cause pain in the knee joints, as well as serving for a pinfall. This technique was used in a one-legged version of Doink the Clown .

Bow and arrow
The user kneels on the back of an opponent upside down, seizes his legs and his head and pull them to arch your body, then, the wrestler is dropped back to lie on your back as you lift your knees, while you release the opponent, so it is stretched over the knees, causing great pain in his back.

Camel Clutch

Yoshihiro Tajiri doing a camel clutch to Rene Bonaparte .

The wrestler sits on the back of his opponent is face down on the canvas, and put both arms behind his opponent's thighs. Then interlace your hands around the opponent's chin and pull back to bring pressure on the head and torso. This key is the creation of Gory Guerrero , and was adopted as the final movement teammate El Santo , who named it The Horse of. The Arab wrestler The Sheik also used as the final movement, and was renamed whom the camel clutch. In his honor, the majority of Arab or Asian fighters tend to use it, as Muhammad Hassan and his apprentice Daivari , The Sultan and Sabu , among others.

Camel clutch sleeper

In this variant, the user to lie face down rival and sitting on his back facing the same direction, with one arm around the opponent's neck and pulls him leaning back, pushing with your other hand on the opponent's neck to increase the pressure.

camel clutch Inverted facelock
In this technique the user to lie face down opponent and sits on his back, facing the same direction. Then, the wrestler pulls the opponent back to arch your back and keeping the opponent's face looking up, imprisoning the opponent's head in his armpit, while grabbing the opponent's arm. You can support a knee in the back of the opponent to increase pressure. This move was innovated by Low Ki under the name Dragon Clutch from a previous version created by Tatsumi Fujinami as Dragon Sleeper, which consisted of a facelock inverted traditional.

Leg hook camel clutch
The user leaves the opponent face down on the floor and place your feet in it on the shoulders of a wrestler. Then he bends his opponent's legs and leans forward to grab with both hands the opponent's chin and pull it back, arching around the opponent's body to produce pain in his back. This variation is more complicated to get the camel clutch normal, but the damage done is greater due to the angle that is bent back of the opponent.

Chickenwing
This popular movement of immobilization, the user grasps an opponent's arm from behind him and bend your elbow, forearm passing behind the opponent's arm, retaining arm. The most common variant of this movement is the double chickenwing, which is performed on both arms of the opponent.

Crossface chickenwing
The user approaches an opponent from behind him and grabs one of his arms, flexing and moving his arm to pin down, then using the other arm, the attacker around the opponent's head and grabs the wrist of the arm used for above the dam, putting pressure on the face and the shoulder joint. This movement, called chickenwing facelock in Japan , was pioneered by Bob Backlund .

Double chickenwing
In this technique, the user is behind the opponent and grabs his arms back and up to flex the elbows, then the wrestler puts her arms behind the opponent's forearms and hands joined in the opponent's neck or neck , causing pain in the shoulder joints. After that, several other techniques can be performed.

Bridging grounded double chickenwing In this movement, you bend your opponent's arms behind his back and passes behind his forearms, holding hands on the neck, then, relying on the opponent, which should be crouching or sitting, the user gives somersault over him and lands on his feet by drawing a bridge with your body, stretching the opponent's joints and causing pain. This move was innovated in Japan by Poison Sawada and Cattle Mutilation, and later popularized by Bryan Danielson in the United States with the same name. Elevated double chickenwing The wrestler bends the opponent's arms behind his back and passes behind his forearms, holding hands on the neck, as in the basic variant, then, you used the dam to lift your opponent above him, pushing the arms captured to produce pain in the joints.

Chinlock
is a movement which the user is behind his opponent with his knee on his back and using his hands to apply pressure to the jaw.

Chris Masters applying a chinlock a U.S. soldier.

Choke
Choke (choke) is defined as any movement which aims to impede the opponent's breathing, usually affecting the neck, chest or both, to cause them to surrender or become unconscious.

Arm-hook sleeper Corner foot choke
The wrestler leaves the opponent sits on the corner of the ring with his head on one of the guards, then the user rests his foot on the opponent's neck and download your weight on it to press it against the shield, eventually strangling the opponent. This movement is usually done for two or

three seconds, and most of that time would result in a disqualification to be being arrested the next rival to the ropes. It is also used to seek disqualification on purpose.

Double choke Gogoplata

Undertaker running a Gogoplata to Edge .

This submission technique is performed when the attacker slid one leg over the opponent's neck and supports the shin of the other against his throat, and a clip created thereby presses, helping hands, in the airways opponent's neck. This movement is related to the triangle choke , but much less used to it because of being too intricate to apply quickly. The Gogoplata was popularized in America by The Undertaker in the name of Hell's Gate.

Guillotine Choke
The user makes the foe before him bend over and put his head under his arm, around his neck with his arm, then dropped the fighter sitting and binds her legs around the torso of the opponent, putting pressure on the throat and chest the opponent at a time. This technique is popular in mixed martial arts , is technically a front facelock bodyscissors , although is often referred to by that name. One version, called inverted guillotine choke, consider the opponent being held in an inverted facelock , instead of a front facelock.

Half Nelson Choke
The user takes a behind the opponent's arm around him like a common Nelson, and make pressure with the help of his other arm, both around the head and arm of the opponent. Was used as a finisher by Tazz , who called him Tazzmission.

One-handed choke
The user grasps with one hand the opponent's neck to strangle her. This technique usually precedes a chokeslam .

Sleeper hold
In this technique the offensive wrestler around the opponent's neck with his arm from behind him, pressing his biceps sides of the neck to depress the respiratory tract and blood of the opponent. Additional pressure can be obtained by pushing with the palm of your hand against the neck of the other elbow.

Straight jacket choke

Jetta Straigth jacket making a camel clutch (right) and a straight jacket double knee backbreaker (left).

The user stands behind the opponent, may be sitting on the back of an opponent upside down or keeping one knee to her, then grabs his arms and crosses over the opponent's chest, pulling them to cause pain in your joints and hinder breathing by pressing your ribcage. This technique can be combined with other techniques such as double knee backbreakers or neckbreakers , although the usual form of submission of the movement is usually similar to camel clutch . Sometimes the term is used straight jacket for any movement in which the opponent's arms are held folded against his chest for added grip. Cutthroat The user grasps the opponent's arm and hold it down while circling around the opponent to stand behind him, holding his arm caught around the neck of the opponent, and pulls it to cause pressure. This movement, also known as single arm straight jacket straight jacket or half, is technically a one-armed version of the straight jacket , and is often used in conjunction with other movements.

Thumb chokehold
In this movement, the user grabs the opponent and plunges his thumb erect on the jugular of its opponent to interrupt blood flow .

This movement is used in kayfabe , due to the high danger associated with its actual use.

Triangle choke
This original technique of judo consists essentially surround the neck with his legs and an arm of the opponent from a leg over one shoulder and the other under the opposite armpit, linking back and pushing them as a bodyscissors , this dam produces tightness in the carotid artery and the chest of the opponent, making breathing and blood flow. There are several variants of this technique which differ in the placement of the opponent, since he may be arrested for the user or her back to him, the latter being called inverted triangle choke variation. Arm triangle choke

CM Punk Anaconda Vice for applying a Mike Knox .

Also called Anaconda Vise , this technique is common in jiu jitsu and judo . The wrestler and his opponent are seated on the fabric facing each other. So you're sitting next to the opponent and using his arm around her neck closer, taking the opponent's wrist and bend the arm up. The user then puts his arm around the hole made by the opponent's bent wrist, closes his hand over his own wrist and pulls the opponent forward, causing pressure in arm and neck. Cross-armed triangle choke In this movement, the user is located to the opponent, grab his arms and crosses them, after that, use your legs to catch the opponent's neck, blocking foot behind the opponent's neck and applying pressure with your legs to push the carotid opponent. This technique was innovated by Masato Yoshino under the name of Byakuya. Koji clutch The wrestler, having left the opponent lying face down and his hand around his neck with his arm and leg lifts, situated on the far leg under the opponent's neck and above while the other weaves his hands behind his opponent's neck , having passed one arm under his leg and another on top. From that position, the wrestler pulls the head through the neck to press his throat against the twin of the user, pressing the neck and obstruct blood flow. This move was innovated by Koji Kanemoto , and is commonly preceded by a reverse STO to put in place to both fighters.

Two-handed chokelift
The wrestler grabs his neck with his hands to strangle the opponent, usually elevating him to place his waist in front of the user's shoulders. This technique is often used before a two-handed chokeslam or chokebomb .

Clawhold
In this submission the opponent grabs the opponent's head and, using primarily the last two phalanges of the fingers, press causing pain in the skull. There are versions of one or two hands, and generally this technique is used by very strong fighters like Giant Gonzalez , The Great Khali and Giant Silva .

Shoulder clawhold
Also called nerve clawhold, this is a variation of the above intended to rival shoulder nerve causing great pain, with usually the same effect as a sleeper hold . A version of this technique in which the user is mounted above the opponent to immobilize him.

Stomach clawhold
Similar to the above, in this technique the user presses the opponent's stomach, causing great pain. This technique creates a great risk, since it is made a stiff can cause rupture of internal blood vessels.

Cloverleaf
The wrestler is at the foot of your opponent, grab his legs and up. The wrestler then bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit. With the same arm that reaches around the ankle and the opening formed by the legs, and locks his hands together. The fighter of the following steps to transitioning technique in a sharpshooter and proceeds to squat back. The key causes great pain in the spine, legs and abdomen. This submission was innovated by Dory Funk Jr. and popularized by Dean Malenko as Texas Cloverleaf.

armlock cloverleaf
An armlock variation of the cloverleaf that is similar to one Boston crab with armlock leg. This seizure begins with a lie supine opponent's face up on the mat. The attacking wrestler then grabs an arm and proceeds to walk over the opponent while still holding the arm, forcing them to dump on your stomach. The wrestler then kneels down on the opponents back, locking the opponent 's arm behind his knee in the process. The wrestler then reaches over and bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit.

With the same arm, the wrestler reaches around the ankle and with the opening formed by the legs, and lock their hands together as in a Cloverleaf. The wrestler then pulls to stretch your legs, back and neck of the opponent while keeping the arm trapped.

Leglock cloverleaf
In this variation of the cloverleaf wrestler, after crossing the opponent's legs in a figure four, blocks the upper leg behind the knee on the leg before putting the arm stretched and turn around. The wrestler then proceeds to stretch by pulling back leg caught in the armpit.

Damascus head leglock
The wrestler wraps his legs around the opponent's head and crosses the opponent's legs, applying pressure on them with your hands. The wrestler next turns 180 degrees and leans back, compressing the spine. This hold applies pressure at the temples, the calves, and compresses the spine.

Reverse cloverleaf
In this movement, the wrestler leaves the opponent on his back and stood over him, looking at his legs, and lifts. The user then crosses them, placing one ankle behind the knee of the other, and turns the opponent to place it upside down, keeping the dam to produce pain in his legs.

Cobra Clutch
It consists of a dam in which the wrestler behind the opponent and grabs him by the arm, passing under him and supporting his palm on his neck, as in a half Nelson . The user then uses his free arm to grab the opponent's arm caught and pull it up to surround the opponent's neck, after that, the wrestler grabs his wrist with the other arm to apply pressure.

Crossface

Benoit Crippler Crossface in applying the MVP .

In this technique the user locks the user's head clasping his hands over his face and pulling him back, staying in the same direction.

Trap Arm crossface
The user does lie face down opponent with his legs and grabs the opponent's arm, pulling the tip, then the wrestler locks his hands on the opponent's face, making you arch your back up and semiincorporarse, causing pain in the joint arm and back. This technique was popularized by the late Chris Benoit in the Crippler Crossface name.

omoplata crossface
The user grasps the arm supported an opponent upside down, looking in his direction, and passes a leg above and one below, then head over and catch both the limb. Then the fighter around the other's head and hands under his chin weaves to pull it and hyperextend the shoulder joint and spine. This technique is used by Daniel Bryan under the name LeBell Lock, in honor of Gene LeBell and also adopted by the independent wrestler Sara Del Rey.

Double underhook
In this technique the fighter makes him lean toward the opponent and puts his head under his arm while the arms immobilized behind her rival and binds them together with yours, passing underneath and pulling them. This technique can be used in conjunction with another or end with a suplex , a DDT and other techniques.

Facelock
Facelock desiga a position where the opponent is trapped by the head through the neck, squeezing his throat with his arms. From there you can do various techniques, such as DDTs , cutters and others.

Front facelock
The user puts his opponent's head, looking before him, under his armpit. This dam is used for the standard DDT and some types of suplex.

Inverted facelock
The wrestler, standing behind the opponent, he pulls back and seizes her neck with the arm, keeping the opponent's face up at all times and his neck at an angle to the body. You can sit back to support the opponent to one knee and pull for pressure.

Three-quarter facelock

The wrestler stands in front of his opponent, facing the same direction, grab the opponent's head and rests on his shoulder. Thereafter, the user can perform several techniques, such as cutters and stunners , among others.

Figure four leglock
When an opponent is on the canvas on his back, the fighter takes a leg and put it under your pelvic area, gives a little twist by taking the other leg, forming a "4" legs of the opponent. The attacker drops sitting and using your legs, use them to push the opponent's foot down, causing you to have a lot of pressure on the knee. This key was created by the deceased member of the WWE Hall of Fame Buddy Rogers , and popularizing the ex-wrestler in the WWE Ric Flair , which uses it as a finishing move. As after him, this move is also used by Batista , Triple H and Shawn Michaels . The Nurse's popular in Mexico, calling it "The Nurse spider."

Hanging figure four leglock
The fighter has the opponent cornered in the ring, then this sits on the turnubuckle, and so that takes the opponent's head with his legs and dropped from the strings, and taking them to stop, causing pain in the rival .

Inverted figure four leglock
Basically it is a counter, then applying the figure four leg lock, if it can turn your opponent's body and reverses the key causing the pain on rival. The wrestler Charly Manson makes a modification of this movement, called El Pozo.

Modified figure four leglock

Michaels applying his Heartbreaker to Jeff Hardy

This variation of the Figure four leglock is that, when an opponent is lying on the ground, the user moves his leg in between those of the rival, as a Sharpshooter. Then take the leg hooked and form a "4" with the other leg, the attacker dropped his foot sit and ride up the opponent forming a pressure on the knee even stronger.

Modified inverted reverse figure four leglock

In this variation the user crosses an opponent's leg over another and kept pressing on his legs crossed, then grabs the other leg and lies face up on the mat, lifting the other leg in the air to cause pain on them and the lower back of the opponent. This technique was invented by Charlie Haas and his late brother Russ , calling Haas of Pain.

Over the shoulder back to belly figure four leglock
In this technique, the user lifts the opponent frontally and places it over his shoulder looking back, then, clutching his head with one arm, the user uses the other to cross your legs and make a figure four leglock with them. This technique was innovated by CIMA under the name of Schwein-Gatame.

Hammerlock
A technique used by the security forces for detention, in this technique, the user takes the opponent's arm and twisted it to put your wrist at the top of his back.

Headlock

Chris Masters made a side headlock on Shawn Michaels .

The user stands next to an opponent and makes bending forward, then the fighter around the head of the other arm and grab his wrist with the other to put pressure on the opponent's skull. This technique, also called side headlock, submission is a basic and often used in the beginning of a fight, usually fighters of great strength. In a variant called wrenching side headlock, you head around the other arm and then lowered to the ground face down, then the wrestler lifts his legs and arm rests exclusively on the dam in order to unburden the Skull rival.

Headscissors
In these techniques, the user connects the legs around the opponent's head in order to get on their shoulders and do a takedown or similar technique.

Electric chair headscissors
The user jumps elevating the legs to be sitting on the shoulders of an opponent on his back, looking both at the same address and remains in that position for several techniques, such as inverted hurricanrana , a victory roll and others. A version of this technique grabbing the opponent's arms was innovated in Mexico as submission by Sun , under the name of Solarina.

Hair pull headscissors submission
The user has the opponent on the ground, so that takes your head or hair with her legs to tighten and take pain and even submission.

Indian Deathlock
The user grasps a leg of an opponent and turn your back on it, even gripping, twisting and falling to their knees or sitting. Then grab the opponent's leg caught and placed under the knee of the other, pulling them to secure, immediately afterwards, the user stands up, face to face with the opponent and puts pressure on the leg caught, causing pain in it.

Inverted Indian Deathlock
In this variation the opponent grabs the opponent's leg, while his back, grabs her and spins on the other leg, then pull both legs to turn down the opponent, while the user remains standing. This technique is often combined with a surfboard , offering an ideal position to do so.

Reverse Indian Deathlock
You take on an opponent's leg and twisted his back, turning on her and seizing the other leg of the opponent with one leg of the wrestler. The user then takes a turn to get on the opponent, and finally one for both lying face down, stretching the fighter on the ground to cause pain in the opponent's leg.

Kimura
In this technique, also called keylock, you grab an opponent supports the opponent's arm and flexed at the elbow to pass behind his back, putting one of them below grabbing his wrist and another, from that position, the wrestler pushes the hand holding the wrist by rotating the arm against the joint and causing pain in it, getting a transition between chickenwing and hammerlock . This movement belongs to the realm of martial arts , which was innovated by the judoka Masahiko Kimura . Usually well seen in MMA fights and fighters in the repertoire of professionals with background in that discipline.

Kneebar
In this movement, the user grasps the leg of an opponent on his back and dropped to the ground apresándola with hers, pulling her to hyperextend the knee. This movement is to the leg so the cross armbar arm.

Cross kneelock
The user, after stopping an opponent upside down or on elbows and knees, grabs his leg and captures with his own, dropping and pulling the ankle to stretch the joint and cause pain in it. The fighter can twist the leg to the side to increase efectidivad movement.

Leg spread
The user leaves the opponent yacienco his back and sit in perpendicular to it. Then grab the nearest leg and foot rests in the other, and pull the first leg while pushing the other to separate the legs of the opponent and cause pain in their English.

Neck crank
This original technique of Olympic wrestling, the opponent's neck is bent to its maximum angle, causing pain in the cervical vertebrae. This can be achieved in many ways, the most common application submission and any other supporting rival the nape of the user's knee, when pulled, forcing her neck to bend.

Neckscissors
The user, lying face up on the floor or sitting on the turnbuckle, his legs bound with the opponent's neck and presses them to strangle him.

Full Nelson

Chris Masters applying a Master Lock (Swinging Full Nelson) to Rene Dupree .

The executor of the lock is positioned behind the opponent and passes his arms under the opponent's arms, hands clasped at the neck, causing pain in the joints. It is widely used in professional wrestling for its effectiveness and the difficulty of escape.

Half Nelson
In this variant, only one of the opponent's arms is arrested, while still using the same method. It is also used as a precedent to other survey techniques, such as a power slam , backbreaker or more.

Sharpshooter

Benoit applied the Sharpshooter on Chavo Guerrero .

The user picks up the legs of an opponent on his back and put one of their own among them, crossing them. Then, using a method similar to the Boston crab, the wrestler turn the opponent upside down without releasing it from a leg over him, and kneels down, causing pain in the legs and back. This technique was innovated by Riki Choshu in Japan as Sasori-gatame and popularized by the Canadian wrestler Bret Hart and his niece Natalya .

Reverse sharpshooter
The user makes the same procedure as the sharpshooter normal, however when the user turns it does not completely. That is, a sharpshooter normal user is back to the opponent and this variation the user is seeing in front of the opponent. Was used and innovated by Edge I call Edgecator.

STF
(Short for stepover toehold facelock) In this technique, the user leaves the opponent face down on the floor and grabs his leg, holding his ankle between the calf. Then, the wrestler leans forward on the body of another and interlace your hands under his head, pulling it back and cause pain in the back and legs. This technique was innovated by Lou Thesz , and popularized by Masahiro Chono in Japan and John Cena in the U.S.

Cross-legged STF
The wrestler leaves the opponent upside down and grab your legs, bend your knees and cross, placing one ankle behind the knee of the other. Then grabs the free ankle and places it among the calves of the user to hold it, leaning forward to grab his hands clasping his head under his chin. This technique is used by WWE wrestler William Regal calling her "Regal Stretch" Reverse cross-legged STF The wrestler grabs an opponent's legs face down, bend your knees and cross, placing the ankle of one knee behind the other, then the user turns on itself, turning his back to the opponent and places one of his feet in the triangle created by the opponent's crossed legs. After that, the user places the opponent's free ankle behind the knee the wrestler leans back and back to interlace your hands under the chin of the opponent. This technique was innovated by The Great Muta , which calls Muta Lock.

Standing STF
The user grasps a leg of an opponent from behind him and holds it in hers, then, the wrestler locks his hands under her chin, pulling, and standing two feet. This submission was used by Milano Collection AT and STFashion.

STS
(Stepover toehold sleeper Abbreviation) In this technique, the user leaves the opponent face down on the floor and grabs his leg, holding his ankle between the calf. Then, the wrestler leans forward on the other's body and one arm around the neck of another, pulling his head movement was atrás.Este innovated in Japan by Masahiro Chono .

Surfboard

Daniel Bryan sufboard elevated in deploying a Christian .

The user comes up behind an opponent lying face down on the floor and supports each foot on one of the joints of the opponent's knees, lifting the opponent's feet and holding them behind the knees of the user, then grabs the opponent's arms and dropped by pulling them back and therefore, pulling all the opponent's body, producing arqueándolo and joint pain in his shoulders. After that, you can remain standing, sitting or even lying down, lifting the opponent over him, although providing no supporting shoulders on the mat. Another version is made to a sitting opponent, pulling his arms while holding a knee or foot on his back. This version is called in Mexico Table Marina. This move was innovated by Rito Romero in Mexico as Romero Special and popularized years later by Ray of Jalisco as Tapatia. In Spain the first wrestler to run was Chausson Jesus Emilio Lambán in 1954 in Palma de Mallorca to be known as Inverted or Inverted Surfboard Skate according to the reference made in the book Jesus Chausson-The Battle of Life book prefaced by film director and winner of an Academy Award José Luis Garci .

Lotus hold
In this technique, the user leaves the opponent sits and sits behind him, grabbing his arms and pulling them back. Then raise your legs and pulling them under the opponent's armpits, feet crossed on his neck, pinning his arms with them and causing pain in the shoulder joints. This movement is known as double leg Nelson.

Tonga death grip
The user grasps a pressure point in the opponent's throat and presses, cutting the air supply to the brain. This technique is not considered an air choke because its focus is not respiratoras way, but the arteries of the neck of the opponent. This movement, which is performed on a fictional basis for selling , was innovated by Tonga Fifita .

Wrist lock

William Regal pinning Cody Rhodes with a standing wrist lock.

The wrestler grabs his opponent's hand and turns back, putting pressure on the wrist. Although you can use by itself to cause pain, this technique usually precedes attacks.

Double wrist lock
In this variant, the user grasps the opponent's hands and turns on itself, passing under the arms to twist both wrists.

Stepover headhold wrist lock
The user approaches an opponent on his back and grabs one wrist, twisting it and pulling it to sit the rival in that position, the fighter gets his arm caught between her legs, seizing the opponent's head with one of them . Then, the user kneels on the leg worn over the head of the rival, putting pressure on her, and grabs a leg of it, pulling her arm arrested for causing pain in various parts of the body of the opponent. This technique was invented by Kensuke Sasaki under the name of Strangle Hold Z and years later made famous by Mike Quackenbush and Chikara Special. Also has an inverted version .

Movements of transition
Trap Arm
In this modification, the user grasps an opponent's arm to restrain him.

Collar-and-elbow tie up

This technique is considered a submission put one hand on the opponent's neck and the other holding the opponent's elbow around his own neck. This movement is one of the pillars of wrestling and is used to start many fights, fighters generally large size or weight, as it aims to push the opponent into the corner or a similar place in which they are placed at a disadvantage .

Lady of the Lake
This is a technique used to catch a rival, popular in the 70's. The user lies on his back on the ground and pressed into a ball, leaving an outstretched hand. The opponent, usually confused, grab his hand, when it is used by the fighter to leave his position and, with his hand still clutching the opponent, make an armlock of any kind.

Tree of Woe
This move is to let the opponent hung upside down from the corner looking into the ring. After that, the fighter can perform any attack on him as a running dropkick, running knee strike or similar. Also be accompanied by more attacks using the five seconds the referee for attacks cornered. Therefore, it is usually considered a technique heel .

Professional wrestling Takedowns
Here are explained the movements used in professional wrestling .

Armbreaker
In this move the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm and, usually after an arm drag or similar rammed his knee or shoulder.

Armbar takedown
In this variation of armbreaker the user grasps the right arm or left rival, crossing the attacker's chest before falling, wearing the face of the opponent to the mat and injuring his arm and shoulder of the opponent.

Stepover takedown
The wrestler grabs the opponent's arm and passes a leg over him, then jumps up and gives the user a sharp turn ensuring the arm with the legs to bring back the opponent to the canvas and apply an armbar .

Arm drag
In this movement, the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm and pulling it drops to dislodge the enemy also, often throwing it upon themselves due to the inertia that usually has a rival in the event of being caught in the middle of a race. This technique, which usually requires the collaboration-voluntary or non-rival, is very common in the keying of Mexican style , which is used to reverse an opponent's movement and use his own momentum against him. Usually, this technique tends to be derived in any armbar .

Japanese arm drag
This movement is when the attacker runs towards the opponent in the face. When it is close to grab the opponent's arm with both hands and dropped to rival that of forcing a shift back falling forward over the attacker.

Over the shoulder arm drag
The wrestler grabs the opponent's arm, passes it over his shoulder and pulls him to flip forward on the canvas, in a move straight from the judo .

Springboard arm drag

The attacker grabs the opponent's arm, then runs to the corner and usually does a springboard over the top of the corner. In this move the wrestler the wrestler jumps over, sometimes from the corner.

Arm wringer
A Wringer or Spinning Armw wristlock's when the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm by the wrist / arm and turning to the opponent's head spinning rival for this fall to the canvas. The maneuver is used popularly in the American struggle. Often when a fighter is utilziado comes from an Irish Whip, also investing a hammerlock or counteracting a reverse co elbow or eye rake / poke.

Atomic Drop
The wrestler places the opponent's side, put his head under his arm and lifts it into the air to drop the tailbone on the knee / leg of the user.

Inverted atomic drop
A move where the wrestler puts his head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts and drops it in his "lower abdomen region" or in his crotch at the knee of the attacker. Also this movement is an indirect low blow, is legal because it hits the crotch completely.

Nelson sitout full atomic drop
Best known as a full nelson bomb. in this movement is when the wrestler applies a full nelson to rival. Then it rises in the air and sitting drop, hitting the back of the opponent on the mat.

Back body drop
The wrestler bends forward to crouch against an opponent and grab his legs, then joined again elevating the opponent and releases it so that it falls to the floor behind the wearer's back. This move is usually done by fighters of great strength or size. Back body drop the name is sometimes mistakenly used to refer to the belly to back suplex .

Mountain bomb
In this technique, also called legwhip takeover, the user grasps the leg of a charging opponent and dropped back, flipping the opponent to fall backward to the canvas. This move was innovated by Hiroyoshi Tenzan .

Biel throw

In this technique the wrestler grabs the opponent, either the torso, neck or head, lifts it and throws it so that it falls freely to the ground. This technique is an extremely basic movement and is used by wrestlers to emphasize their strong power, which is spectacular for the public. It is usually seen in fighting squash .

pedigree is so the user gets the opponent's head between his two legs, grabs both arms as torzida and then hits the opponent's face into the mat

Brainbuster
A brainbuster (also called avalanche suplex) is a professional wrestling move in which the opponent's head is taken to hit the canvas. The basic variant, also called vertical suplex brainbuster, is that a wrestler puts his opponent in a front facelock , grab her legs and lifts him up straight in the air, then dropped back the user, making the imprisoned head of another clash against the canvas. Although this movement is sometimes confused with the piledriver , since both are basically the same, the difference is brainbuster piledriver that the opponent's head is always subject to a facelock , which allocates the impact to the skull and prevent the occurrence compression of the neck that causes the piledriver. Therefore, the technical name would be front facelock brainbuster piledriver, but is rarely referred to by that name.

Cradle brainbuster
Also known as a belly to belly brainbuster, the wrestler stands Facing a standing opponent and Then Both wraps arms around the opponent's torso, lifting off the ground Them. The wrestler Then grip shifts Their So They are holding the opponent by Their legs, gripping the opponent behind the knee. The wrestler Then Removes one arm from the opponent's leg and Quickly Applies to front facelock With That arm, lifts the opponent as if They Were using a vertical suplex and lands the opponent on the back of Their head.

Double underhook brainbuster
Popularly called Michinoku Driver (not be confused with the piledriver of the same name ) in this version the user was crouching opponent's arms behind his back and there he hooks up with his. Then pull them to lift to a vertical position, and dropped back to smash the opponent's head against the floor.

Fisherman brainbuster
This popular technique, the wrestler, facing the opponent, put his head under his arm, grabbing a leg to lift it vertically, like a fisherman suplex . In that position, the wrestler drops sitting back to smash the opponent's head against the ground.

Cross-legged fisherman brainbuster

Inverted brainbuster
The user behind the opponent, it does lean toward him and around his neck with his arm, placing it under his armpit, then the fighter uses his free hand to push back and elevate the opponent while letting go, and when the opponent is upright, with your back straight in the air, drops the user to hit his skull sitting on the mat. Scoop brainbuster Known as Northern Lights Bomb on Japan , this move the wrestler makes his opponent bow before him and put his head under his arm, like a brainbuster normal at that time, however, the user gets an arm between the legs of opponent and uses it to lift vertically, before dropping to hit his head sitting on the floor.

Jumping brainbuster
Also called brainbuster brainbuster spike DDT, this variation is different from normal brainbuster the user jumps before the moment of impact, to add power.

Spinning brainbuster
Also known as twisting brainbuster brainbuster or revolution, in this variation the user gets his opponent's head under his arm and lifts it upright, like a brainbuster normal at that time, the fighter takes a sharp turn left horizontal before fall to hit the opponent's head against the floor.

Bulldog

Chris Jericho by applying a one-handed bulldog on Booker T .

Also known as bulldogging facebuster headlock headlock and, in this move the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and jump forward, sitting or kneeling falling and driving the opponent's face to the ground. This movement and its variants may be confused with types facebusters .

Cobra clutch bulldog
This move is to hit the contrary in the face by placing the L-shaped hand and hitting with the fingertips.

Half Nelson Bulldog
Begins as a half nelson normal but then the user who applies for a bulldog uses

One-handed bulldog
It is a movement in which the wrestler grabs momentum and takes with one hand on the back of the opponent's head hitting the canvas.

Reverse bulldog
This user técnia caught with arms the head of an opponent is crouching beside him in a headlock. So instead of falling forward to bring the opponent's face into the ground, the fighter is driven back to sitting down, hitting the opponent's neck against the ground like a mat slam . This technique is called Zig Zag by Dolph Ziggler .

Inverted bulldog double undehook Stading
To make this technique first user starts with a double chickenwing then gives a 180 ° left or right, until, while still gripping the arms of the opponent, this stare the ground and immediately to this the user jumps to impact the opponent's face as a bulldog.

Three-quarter facelock bulldog
A cutter is a movement of professional wrestling , known technically as three-quarter facelock bulldog . In it, the user puts the opponent on his back and grabs his head, resting on the shoulder, then dropped her face lying to drive the opponent to the ground through the hole in the armpit and arm.

This technique was innovated by Johnny Ace under the name Ace Crusher, but was popularized by Diamond Dallas Page and Diamond Cutter, adopting the term cutter it. Although it is sometimes called inverted neckbreaker slam , not really. This movement provided the basis for a variant called three-quarter facelock jawbreaker or stunner , which differs very slightly from the cutter, therefore, all variants have their version cutter stunner.

modified cutter Bearhug

The wrestler takes the opponent in so bearugh , then puts her legs behind her back and the opponent's head in a DDT to fall into so sitout and hit the opponent on his way man cutter. Today is called Voodoo Bomb by Roxxi .

Belly to back suplex cutter
In this variation of the cutter high attacking wrestler applies a belly to back suplex . Then, instead of letting fall back, the attacking wrestler lifts the opponent's legs, making it turn in the air into position parallel to the ring canvas. When the opponent falls, quickly attacking wrestler applies three-quarter facelock bulldog the air, dropping into the position of a cutter normal.

Crucifix cutter
In this version the wrestler lifts the opponent on a crucifix before turning in the air and dropped, using the three-quarter face lock in the air and landing on the position of the cutter normal. Inverted crucifix cutter In a variation of the crucifix cutter, the attacking wrestler applies a reverse crucifix to the opponent, then drop, using the three-quarter facelock in the air and land on the cutter pocisión normal. This version was popularized in America by Tommy Dreamer , who called this movement the TommyHawk.

Elevated cutter
With the opponent placed on an elevated surface, the attacking wrestler applies a three-quarter facelock and then move forward, leaving only the opponents feet on the surface. The wrestler dropped back, forcing the opponent to fall into the usual position of the cutter. In a slight variation the wrestler runs forward and hold the three-quarter facelock, making the speed and force used drive the opponent off the platform while the attacking wrestler drop back in position of a cutter normal. The cutter can be elevated as a movement made in pairs, such as elevated doomsday-style cutter or 3D . Standing somersault cutter In this version the user is at a higher level and looking in opposite directions with his opponent, then do a somersault with a 180 ° (half-corkscrew moonsault) then hooked his arm around the head of his opponent and hits with the position of the cutter normal.

Jumping cutter

Randy Orton applying a RKO (Jumping Cutter) to Shawn Michaels .

This is a variation of a standard cutter, but instead of moving forward and dropped, the wrestler jumps up to the opponent's head, running parallel to the floor of the ring, using a three-quarter facelock opponent in the air then fell in the position of the cutter normal. This move was popularized by Randy Orton who uses this movement in larger and heavier opponents, who sometimes fall at the knees rather than the chest to the mat. Randy Orton RKO christened this movement (Randy Keith Orton Shorthand).

Powerbomb cutter
In this variation of the cutter wrestler lifts the opponent into a powerbomb , but instead of dropping it sends the opponent's legs forward, rotates 180 ° degrees, while the opponent is falling, apply the cutter. There is a slight variation, used by Teddy Hart , in which the wrestler applies a much stronger when lifting the opponent in the powerbomb position, so that instead of placing it on his shoulders, let the opponent continue rotation apply the air to the cutter more violently and quickly. This variation of powerbomb cutter is very difficult to apply properly.

Rolling cutter
Technically called swinging cutter, in this technique, the wrestler stands behind the opponent and pulls him back to arching his back, holding his head under his arm. In that position, the user takes a sudden turn horizontally to the side of the arm used in the dam and, passing under the opponent to get back to his back, dropped back on the ground, causing the opponent is dragged behind him in the rotation and his face falls to the ground through the hole in the armpit of the fighter. This technique was innovated by Super Nova under the name Doctor Spin and is used currently in the WWE for Cody Rhodes under the name of Cross Rhodes. Outward rolling cutter The wrestler stands behind the opponent and pulls him back to arching his back, holding his head under his arm. The user then turns to the opposite side arm used in the dam to pass over the

opponent, before dropping lying to force the opponent and turn your face into the mat shock, used by Carlito perodiacamente This technique is technically a rolling cutter reverse rotation.

Inverted suplex cutter
It is a variation of an Inverted suplex but is modified. Before it hits the opponent the user takes the opponent's head finishing it with a Cutter normal.

Springboard cutter
This variation occurs when the wrestler applies a three-quarter facelock and then runs into the ropes or escalerada surface, and jump or scale to bounce and spin in the air and hold the facelock to achieve fall into the cutter. Springboard backflip cutter A variation is possible springboard cutter, called springboard backflip three-quarter threequarters facelock facelock diving bulldog. This cutter the wrestler applies three-quarter facelock and then runs to the corner, climbing to be vertical in the air, hold the facelock, later turning and falling into the cutter. This movement is similar to Shiranui .

Fireman's cutter
Also known as TKO, appointed by Marc Mero , is a variation of an elevated cutter . The wrestler lifts the opponent in a fireman's carry from which drives the legs of the opponent into a back, leaving only the opponent's neck on one shoulder the attacking wrestler, who applied the threequarter facelock and dropped back in usual position of the cutter. The deceased wrestler Andrew "Test" Martin used a variation of TKO, in which he uses as much force to push the opponent back legs, making applying the three-quarter facelock, Test could turn a bit before dropping to atrás.Este movement is currently used by Alex Riley Argentine cutter In this movement, the wrestler lifts the opponent in an Argentine backbreaker rack and throws the opponent's legs back, rotating in the air to apply the cutter.

Front facelock cutter

Applying a Hardy "Twist of Fate" to Sheamus.

Technically it is called Twist of Fate by Matt Hardy . In this variation, the wrestler first applies a front facelock , then turn 180 degrees (to the side of the hand that applies the facelock) and with his free hand to apply the three-quarter facelock and dropped into regular cutter. There is a variation of this movement stunner . The Twist of Fate was created and popularized by Matt Hardy , as well as being used by all members of Team Xtreme (Matt, Jeff Hardy and Lita ). Matt Hardy also uses a variation where the opponent is sitting on the top turnbuckle and Matt can be up to the canvas in the first, second or third string before applying the movement from that position. This variation is called Super Twist of Fate. Jeff Hardy also used a reverse variation of motion, referred to as Reverse or Extreme Twist of Fate .

Overhead cutter gutwrench
This variation innovated and baptized by Susumu Yokosuka , is performed when the wrestler lifts the opponent in a backbreaker canadian rack , then turn the opponent from one of his shoulders to the position of the cutter. It is common that the fighter does not reach to apply the three-quarter facelock and the movement ends like a facebuster . Chuck Palumbo popularized this movement in the United States calling Full Throttle. This move is very similar to the Crucifix cutter .

Catapult

The wrestler grabs the legs of a fighter Ariba mouth and gets under your exilas. Then he dropped back, making the opponent off the ground by the impact beam and catapulted forward out above the user, usually into the corner. You can also make the opponent's neck located below the first string to cause damage to your throat.

DDT
A DDT is a movement of professional wrestling in which the wrestler falls backward the opponent lifting and carrying his head, (previously tucked under the arm of the user ) to the canvas. This move was invented by accident by Jake "The Snake" Roberts in 1980. Apparently, Roberts was applying a front facelock the opponent when he slipped and fell backward, making movement conclude a facelock facebuster , which was called DDT. They know the meaning of the acronym, to be, and has been speculated as Drop Dead Twice, Demonic Death Trap, Death Drop Technique and Damien's Dinner Time (in honor of the Snake Roberts). When it was asked to Roberts, he responded with a famous "The End". The abbreviation itself is taken from the pesticide DDT , and Roberts found that the DVD Pick Your Poison DVD . In fact, some people believe it was named for the harmful effects that pesticides have on the nervous system as well as (in kayfabe ) the movement. Argentine DDT The user lifts the opponent on his back on his shoulders, then an arm around his head and pull it down while pushing her back with the other to flip the opponent and turning over himself, put his head under his arm and left sitting down. This movement is sometimes confused with the inverted Death Valley driver Double underhook DDT It puts the opponent's head as in any DDT, but here are two hands grab the opponent and placed in their own back, then just go to atrás.Este movement is common in the wrestler Drew McIntyre and Mick Foley Elevated DDT In this version the wrestler places the opponent on an elevated position before realizing, as the ropes or turnbuckle, then grabs her head, tucking it under his arm, and dropped back, causing the force of impact is greater due to the angle of the opponent. Super DDT In this variant, both the user and the opponent are in a position before the wrestler apply a rival DDT.

Diving DDT In this technique, the fighter rises to an elevated position, as the turnbuckle, and then jump towards the opponent with the aim of arresting him fall on his head under his arm and twisting path down to hit the opponent's face into the mat . This technique has a springboard version. Falling DDT The attacker puts the opponent's head under his arm and dropped face down to take her to the ground. This variant is essentially a DDT falling forward instead of sitting. Flip-over DDT Also known as Samurai Driver Frankensteiner DDT, DDT in the user jumps elevating the legs to pass them on the shoulders of the opponent and be sitting on them, looking the other way. Then, the wrestler jumps back again zafándose position, grabbing the opponent's head under his arm and leading her to the mat falling granted. This technique can be used to counter a powerbomb . Float-over DDT In this technique, also called spinning headlock DDT, the user is located behind the opponent and puts his arm under the armpit nearest rival, then the user forces the opponent to squat and jump spinning 180 degrees on the back of the opponent, landing in front him to put the opponent's head under the other user's arm and dropped to sit and hit the opponent's head against the canvas. Flowing DDT In this variant, the user gets the opponent's head under his arm and slides head-on before sitting down, giving a more vertical angle to the impact of the opponent's head against the canvas. Fireman's Carry DDT Also described as a Fireman's Carry Implant DDT in this movement the attacker puts the opponent in a position of Fireman's Carry (across the opponent's body above his shoulders), then rises above it to the opponent, turning and then take the opponent in a front facelock and so bring the head of the opponent to the canvas. Fisherman DDT After applying a front facelock , the attacker takes an opponent's leg, leaving him up in a vertical position and then be dropped back and let the opponent fall of the face or head to the canvas. Hair Flip Snap DDT

This is a DDT, was use not only by the exdiva WWE Maryse and was used as a finisher. It consists of taking your opponent with the left arm and pull the canvas but seconds before applying a hair moving up and down. Implant DDT Implant DDT refers to the variation of DDT when brought face the first opponent to the canvas. as a "faceplant" and not their heads. The most common variation is the lifting DDT. A common variation Underhook Double DDT is the variation "Implant". Another variation of the Implant DDT is when the attacker takes the opponent's head in a Headlock, but instantly dropping them holy to fall face first opponent. Jumping DDT In this variation, the user gets the opponent's head under his arm and jumps as high as possible, sometimes resting a few seconds on the opponent's shoulder, before declining again to the floor to sit down and impact the other's head against the canvas. This technique is used by Mickie James . Legsweep DDT Also known as Russian Legsweep DDT. In this version of DDT, the attacker applies a front facelock and runs a kind of legsweep from one of his legs by a rival, to drop and strike first opponent's face. Lifting DDT The user gets the opponent's head under his arm, abdomen grabs him and pulls him to lift at an angle. Then let go while sitting dropped to smash the opponent's head against suelo.Esta technique is used by Alex Riley and final movement, and is also used by former professional wrestler Edge as calling it the Edgecution personal movement.
Lifting DDT Spinning

Over the shoulder DDT The attacker takes the opponent over his shoulder like a powerslam, but by dropping twists his body holding the opponent's head and ending in a Modified DDT 'or a Modified dacebuster. Running DDT The attacker comes running towards an opponent who is bent over, and applies a front facelock before you head to the mat opoente, dropping. In another variation pushing the opponent with his free arm, executing a spike DDT version of this movement. This movement is used by The Undertaker

DDT scissored In this movement will grab the opponent's head and put one leg in one of the opponent's arms to be dropped after making the opponent's head falls to the canvas. Snap DDT This is a standard DDT, varying the aggressor is driven by its rear leg. The DDT was mostly known for Lita . Spike DDT This variation of DDT is now like a brainbuster with a Lifting DDT. The attacker usually grabs the opponent's head, then lifts the opponent (at least) in a vertical position and then drop the opponent's head impacting the mat. This tecninca was better used by Edge, calling Edgecution. Sunset flip DDT The user makes the opponent lean forward and put his head under his arm, then the wrestler jumps along the back of the opponent, making him sit up and fall back as the user rotates headup sitting down, dragging the opponent to flip and smash his head vertically against the canvas. Tornado DDT Also called a spinning DDT, this technique wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm, usually from an elevated position, jumps forward and swings around the opponent drawing him to the ground to stop hitting your head against the floor. Springboard tornado DDT Also called Rope DDT run is that the user is on the same level as the opponent, but having caught climbing on the ropes running for a DDT. Trent Barretta innovated this technique in the WWE calling Barretta DDT. . Inverted DDT Also called a reverse DDT, in this move the wrestler approaches the opponent's back and pulls him back, sticking his head under the armpit of the user, then it drops back to lead his neck to the ground. This technique was popularized by Sting under the name of Scorpion Death Drop. Reverse tornado DDT The attacker applies an Inverted facelock from an elevated position (eg sitting on top of the corner to a standing opponent on the mat, or from the side of the ring to a standing opponent on

the ground). Then letting the opponent turns before falling. Using the jump point, the attacker falls and drops the opponent's neck on the mat. Springboard backflip three-quarter facelock falling inverted DDT In this technique, innovated by Naomichi Marufuji as Shiranui, the user grasps the head of an opponent behind him over his shoulder and, without letting go, he runs into the ropes (or any other stepped surface) and jump on them to walk upright in upward, reaching the top, the user jumps to raise his body to a vertical position, still holding the opponent, and the rotation continues to fall flat on the ground, dragging the opponent behind him and he fell on his neck. Standing backflip three-quarter facelock falling inverted DDT Innovated by Last Dragon as Asai DDT and also called standing Shiranui, in this movement the user stands with his back to the opponent and grabs his head, resting on his shoulder, then the wrestler jumps giving high back flip and hold the opponent , ending at a landing on their knees or stomach to bring the opponent's neck to the ground. Swinging inverted DDT In this technique, the wrestler puts his opponent's character's head under his arm, placed face to face. Then, the user turns on itself rotating his arm to reverse the move to grab prey and under the armpit the head's up rival tilted back. With this position, the wrestler is dropped to impact seated opponent's neck against the ground and jumps lugo

Electric chair drop
The user puts the opponent sitting on his shoulders facing the same direction as him and grabbing his legs dropped back to make it hit the ground.

Facebreaker
Double knee facebreaker

Jericho applying a Codebreacker (Double knee facebreaker) to Batista .

This motion is applied when the fighters are face to face. One of the fighters takes the opponent's head with both arms flopping back with your knees hitting the opponent's face. This movement is used by wrestler Chris Jericho , and he called Codebreaker.

Facebreaker DDT
The user gets the opponent's head under his arm and dropped back like a DDT, with the difference that here lies the knee to his face to impact against tanbien it can be done from the strings and from the corner of February 3 or a rope

Facebreaker knee smash
The wrestler, in front of your opponent, grab his head and pulls it down as you lift one knee to make it hit the opponent's face. It is often used against an opponent charging down the user.

Inverted stomp facebreaker
The attacker grabs the opponent's wrists and arms extended to the maximum in a standing wristlock. Then bend the opponent does and supports his boot to his face, then dropped sitting or lying down so that the impact is transmitted up her leg to the face of rival. This Movement is currently used by Gail Kim in TNA .

Shoulder facebreaker
Also called a hangman's facebreaker in this movement supports the opponent wrestler on the ropes and turns, keeping one knee raised to intercept her face with her.

Facebuster
A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is a movement of professional wrestling in which the attacking wrestler leads the rival's face into the mat without using any type of headlock or facelock, as would be done in a DDT or a bulldog. Many inverted slams are commonly referred to as facebusters. A standard facebuster, usually called jumping facebuster, is that the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and falls to the ground taking it to him.

Argentine facebuster
The wrestler places the opponent in an Argentine backbreaker rack , ie face up on the shoulders of the wrestler as he grabs a leg and an arm, then the user is dropped to the side with the opponent still caught and hits the other's face against the canvas. This movement is sometimes confused with the inverted Death Valley driver . Argentine drop

In this movement, also called inverted Samoan drop, the user loads the opponent on his back on his shoulders while holding one leg and one arm, then the wrestler is dropped back to hit the front of the opponent's body against the canvas.

Back to back release facebuster
The user lifts the opponent in a Gory special , that is, raised back to back while fighting him in custody by the arms, then drop and grab your legs for the opponent to fall forward while the user sits down to add strength to impact. This technique was innovated by Chavo Guerrero , who called Gory Bomb.

Reverse powerbomb
Also called Alley Oop, this assistance the user bend the opponent and puts his head between his legs. So grab your belly with your arms and put him up to sit on his shoulders looking the other way. At that time, the wrestler pushes the opponent back to him to fall back towards the ground impact.

Reverse STO
In this move a wrestler is next to the destinoente opongiro looking in opposite direction around the opponent's neck with one arm and dropped back, sometimes interfering with your leg between the other to make him fall (being called leg hook reverse STO). This movement is known as complete shot due to the stable of Japanese fighters called Complete Players , where the wrestler Gedo used it as a finishing move. Arm triangle facebuster In this variation the wrestler subjected to the opponent to a standing arm triangle choke and using that dam, drops forward to smash the opponent's face into the ground. Leaping reverse STO The user, the opponent's side and looking in the opposite direction, raising the legs to jump up to catch the opponent's neck with one arm and cause it, when landing the attacker, the opponent is dragged to the ground so that his face clash against him . Lifting reverse STO The user surrounds the opponent's neck with one arm and lifted him, like a lifting side slam and then be dropped back and driving his face into the mat. Swinging reverse STO The user next to the opponent and looking the other way, it captures the neck with one arm and it does lean toward the ground, bending his back, then the user turns on itself to fall back on the

ground wearing the face of rival against him. The implementation of this technique is very similar to the rolling cutter .

Diving facebuster
The user grasps the opponent's head and go to the turnbuckle . Then, while releasing the opponent, the wrestler jumps from the ropes to hit the ground dragging the opponent's head so that his face from hitting the floor. This technique has a performance very similar to diving bulldog , and also has a version springboard .

Double underhook facebuster

The wrestler Triple H applied a "Pedigree" (Double underhook facebuster) wrestler John Cena .

The fighter makes bending the opponent before him, puts the opponent's head between her legs and arms bound with his opponent on the opponent's back, making a double underhook. Then the wrestler jumps and falls on his knees to hit the opponent's face against the floor. This technique is called Pedigree by Triple H . This movement has many variations in its final process, being able to lift the opponent (lifting) and fall sitting, kneeling and others. An aerial version exists, and was popularized in the past by CM Punk , calling Pepsi Plunge. The WWE diva, Kharma uses this move as finisher, calling Implant Buster. The Ex-Diva Michelle McCool used this technique calling it Wings of Love. Christopher Daniels uses a variation in which lift before allowing the opponent to fall heads ground gives a 90 degree turn, this technique is called Angel's Wings. Double chickenwing facebuster The wrestler stands behind the opponent, facing in same direction, then this mode takes the opponent double chickenwing then rises to drop impacting face into the mat. Jazz use this technique calling her Bitch Clamp. Inverted double underhook facebuster To make this technique first user starts with a double chickenwing then gives a 180 ° left or right, until, while still gripping the arms of the opponent, this stare the ground and immediately

to this the user is left fall forward causing the face of the opponent strikes the ground. Christian used this technique and called Killswitch. Candice Michelle used this technique under the name of CandyWrapper.

Fireman's carry facebuster
Popularly known as F-5 , in this movement the wrestler takes the opponent on his shoulders. Then raises his arm on the side of your body that supports the legs of the opponent and lifts that part rotating forward over his head so that the opponent's point back with his stomach on the wearer's shoulder and dropped it lying to hit the floor the other's face. A version of this forward movement can be performed.

Russian legsweep Forward
The user, located side by side with the opponent and looking in his direction, grab his neck with one arm while using his leg to block, like a Russian legsweep . However, instead of letting fall back, you fall headlong forward to drive the opponent's face to the ground.

Full Nelson facebuster
The user puts the opponent in a full Nelson , that is, from his arms under the opponent's, united in their back, and joining hands in his neck, then dropped forward, hitting his face against the fabric. Full Nelson legsweep facebuster In this variation of the former wrestler, after putting the opponent in the full Nelson, is separated from the rival, still apresándole with the key, put one leg between the opponent to prevent them falling slow, and let it fall forward to smash his face into the mat. In another variation the wrestler enters a leg between the opponent still behind him and thus making the legsweep from behind before realizing it.

Head stomp
The user does lie face down his opponent and pulling the upper body back, usually with a surfboard , then the wrestler rests his foot on the neck of the opponent and download your weight on it by releasing the dam to drive the face the opponent to the mat.

Inverted chokeslam facebuster
In this technique, the user approaches an opponent from behind and grabs his neck with one hand. Then you lift it using your other hand to pull the bottom of your body to him and drops the opponent flat on the ground.

Inverted hip toss

The user stands shoulder to shoulder with each opponent and looking in one direction. Then, the wrestler puts his arm around the armpit of the other and pulls him to flip and land on the mat face.

Inverted powerslam
This type of techniques is inverted versions powerslams , ie, variants in which the wrestler is positioned face down to hit him. Belly to back inverted mat slam In this technique the user bend the opponent and puts his head between his legs. After that, clutching his abdomen, the wrestler lifts the opponent to a vertical position upside down and, keeping the subject, his arms immobilized using their legs. Then the user is allowed to fall forward to bring the opponent's face into the mat. The former WWE diva Michelle McCool used this technique as his finisher, calling it "Faith Breaker" and is currently used by the TNA wrestler AJ Styles, calling her "Styles Clash" Inverted falling powerslam In this version of the above, the wrestler behind the opponent, enter one arm between his legs and one on one shoulder and lifts them up to place it perpendicular to your chest, facing outward, then the user is dropped face down to smash his face and chest of the opponent to the ground, as a facebuster. Inverted front powerslam Also known as Dominator and more technically as inverted powerbomb, this technique the user hits the opponent's head between her legs and around your abdomen to lift the arms pulling it. Then he raises his back over one shoulder, similar to an overhead backbreaker rack gutwrench and can perform this technique before completing the move. At this point, the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and pulls it down, making the rival face pointing to the ground in this position, the user drops and smashes the opponent head on the ground. Inverted front powerslam sitout Also known as emerald flowsion inverted in this move the wrestler lifts the opponent on his back on his shoulder similar to that of an overhead backbreaker rack gutwrench. In this position the attacking wrestler sits and simultaneously flips the opponent forwards and down, knocking him flat on the ground next to the user.

Mat facebuster
Kneeling facebuster

The user makes the foe before him bending, then the wrestler, putting the opponent's head between her legs or just holding it, he falls to his knees to bring his face into the mat. Spinning kneeling facebuster The user approaches an opponent on his back or side to him and grabs his head, then the wrestler grabbed the opponent runs and jumps describing a 180 degrees before landing on his knees taking the opponent's face into the mat. This movement is also called charging facebuster spinning 180 degrees, and is widely used by female fighters. sitout facebuster In this technique the wrestler takes the opponent's head, usually bent, then the user is sitting drop to hit the ground the opponent's face. This technique was innovated by X-Pac under the name XFactor.

Push up facebuster
The user, lying face down, bound his legs with the head of the rival, also upside down and behind him, and makes a bend , causing the other's face from hitting the canvas. This movement is usually done in succession.

Side facebuster
In this technique the user stands shoulder to shoulder with the opponent, looking both at the same address, at which point, grab the opponent's torso and lifts, dropping granted to smash the chest and face the opponent to the mat .

Wheelbarrow facebuster
In this technique, the user grasps around the waist to a standing opponent facing away and up, through the legs of the opponent by pushing your hips back and down so that the other's face strikes the ground at granted to the user be dropped. Electric chair facebuster The user lifts the opponent sitting on his shoulders facing the same direction, then the wrestler pulls the opponent forward (usually grabbing and pulling his arms) and then lowered face down, placing her legs on either side of the opponent's hips. Feint backdrop wheelbarrow facebuster The wrestler puts his head under the arm of an opponent on his back and grabs his waist to lift it, then release the prey and grab his legs, extending on both sides of her hips before downloading the opponent face-first into the ground.

Double chickenwing wheelbarrow facebuster In this technique, the user stands behind the opponent and grabs his arms, flexing his back and his passing underneath to immobilize it. Then, the wrestler lifts the opponent of the dam and allowed to fall forward, hitting the opponent's face against piso.La diva WWE Beth Phoenix uses this technique as calling it Glam Slam finisher Full Nelson wheelbarrow facebuster In this variation the user puts the other in a full Nelson before switching legs the other to her hips and dropped like a wheelbarrow sntado facebuster ordinary. This technique should not be confused with the full Nelson facebuster.

Fireman's Carry

John Cena made an Attitude Adjustment to Kurt Angle .

Death Valley driver
The wrestler lifts the opponent and places it across his shoulders. Then the user is dropped to the side of the head of the match for it and some of its impact back on the floor. This movement is very popular in Japan, where it is known as Death Valley bomb. Inverted Death Valley driver Also called Death Valley driver or Argentine Burning Hammer , this technique the user lifts the opponent on his back on his shoulders. Then pull down the fighter's head as he pushes his opponent to flip back and turning over himself, his neck and back hit the mat. This movement is sometimes Confused with the Argentine facebuster or Argentine DDT , because its performance is very similar.

Fireman's carry takeover
The user lifts his opponent and loads across his shoulders. Then with one arm around opponent's neck and pulls him down as he pushes his abdomen up to the other to lift the opponent and

falling over the wearer's shoulder to the mat. This technique is called Attitude Adjustment by John Cena .

Inverted fireman's carry takeover
The user lifts his opponent in a fireman's carry inverted . Then push the opponent of his head to fall to the canvas.

Fireman's carry drop
The user lifts his opponent, sometimes while he runs to him, and places it across his shoulders. Then the attacking wrestler is dropped back to deal a blow to the victim. This movement, popularly called Samoan drop, is, as its name suggests, a signature move in fighters accustomed Samoans .

Fireman's carry double knee Gutbuster
The user lifts the opponent on his shoulders, then this throws while it falls down with knees up for the opponent to impact on them.

Flapjack
A flapjack, also known as pancake slam, is that a wrestler lifts his opponent in the legs and dropped back to face the rival game against the canvas.

Giant Swing
The wrestler grabs the legs of a fighter on his back on the mat and puts them under his armpits, like a catapult, but then the attacking wrestler begins to rotate on itself to lift the opponent off the canvas and then release it again drop and hold your legs or make it crash into an object of the ring.

Guillotine drop
The user gets the opponent's head under his armpit and grabs his legs to put them on both sides of the hips of the fighter. Thereafter, the user lifts the opponent and drops sitting, impacting the sacrum and lower vertebrae of the opponent to the floor.

Gorilla press
In this type of technique the user lifts the opponent over your head with your arms fully extended. This movement is often used as a show of force, and sometimes includes shaking the opponent is held while before dropping it, for emphasis.

Gorilla press drop
The wrestler lifts his opponent over his head with your arms fully extended to later drop, either in front or behind him horizontally. The opponent is no longer in free fall landing, but often face hit the ground, in addition, this movement can be seen in Battle Royals and elimination bouts in which it is necessary to launch the opponent outside the ring.

Gorilla press slam
In this type of powerslam the wrestler lifts his opponent above the shoulders, similar to the previous one. Then an arm wrestler drops to tilt the opponent and falling on a bed.

Gutbuster
In this technique, the user lifts the opponent and makes it fall so that the abdomen of the opponent from hitting the knee or the shoulder of the attacker.

Double knee Gutbuster
The user jumps to a rival in front of him and lift both knees to hit them against his stomach, then the attacker is left sitting or lying down dragging the opponent to make landing force ls impactra knee-chest of the opponent. This technique is very similar to double knee facebreaker or double knee backbreaker .

Elevated Gutbuster
In this type of Gutbuster, the user lifts the opponent with some movement of transition before dropping it on the knee. Fireman's carry Gutbuster The user lifts the opponent on his shoulders and dropping it onto the air, raising one or both knees the user so that the opponent lands on them with your abdomen. Gorilla press Gutbuster In this technique the wrestler lifts the opponent over your head with your arms fully extended upward before dropping to one knee.

Gutbuster drop
The user, putting an arm between the opponent's legs and another on his shoulder, lifts up the opponent and places with your stomach on the shoulder of the fighter. Then it drops sitting or kneeling, hold the opponent, so that the impact is transmitted to the shoulder and stomach of the opponent is pushed against him.

Rib breaker
Also called Gutbuster pendulum, this technique the user gets an arm between the opponent's legs and another on the shoulder and the dam used to lift and place it perpendicular to your chest, then the wrestler drops the opponent so that it lands with her breast against the wrestler's knee.

headscissors takedown
In these techniques the fighter uses his legs to lasso the neck of the opponent by way of submission and download its weight to bring down the opponent with his back to the canvas and can be in various ways. The opponent may be sitting or standing more often, and can be done from an elevated position. A version popular in the Mexican wrestling is called hurricanrana. The main difference between this and the headscissors takedown is that the hurricanrana begins with the user seated on the shoulders of the opposing faces away, while the other variant is hanging breast to the chest of the user's head.

Hurricanrana
In this technique, also called huracanrana, the user jumps in front of the opponent by raising the legs to pass them on his shoulders and head and neck bound with them; then caught holding the opponent, the user shifts his weight to make a turn back being behind the opponent and forcing him to do a somersault landing front to back, with the user on his chest in a position to pinfall or straight up. This move was innovated in Mexico by Hurricane Ramirez and popularized in America by Scott Steiner as Frankensteiner. Another popular variation provides the user jumps to bind the opponent's head with his legs and, turning sideways instead of vertically, flip the opponent and free falling to the canvas, while the user lands upside down or walk away from it . Inverted hurricanrana In this variant, the user stands sitting on the shoulders of the opponent, facing the same direction, and suddenly dropped back grabbing the other's head with his legs to give a back flip and crash head against the canvas. This move is highly dangerous, since a bad position can land directly the opponent's head vertically and cause neck injuries.

Tilt-a-whirl headscissors takedown
In this technique, the user runs into an opponent with his back to him. Then, the wrestler grabs the opponent's shoulder and, leaning on it, throws his legs to his head to match up with them, letting go of the shoulder and giving a pendulum swing to drag your opponent and suddenly releasing it, send it to the ground in a takedown due to momentum. In a complex variant, the user

runs several of these rotations before the end of the movement. There are variants in which the headscissors takedown is replaced by another technique. This is a very popular move very agile fighters, especially in Mexico , where it is known as scissors or tie. Because it is a technique that usually requires the cooperation of the opponent, is considered within the storyline as a sequence of reversals in which both fighters try to use the tilt-a-whirl in their favor until the attacker gains the advantage and makes the movement.

Iconoclasm
In this movement, the user stands with his back to the opponent and a slightly lower level than him, either crouching under the opponent, or when he is sitting on the turnbuckle . Thereafter, the user lifts his arms back and grab the opponent's head for sharply lower them forward and hold the opponent, making front somersault and land back on the canvas.

Inverted leg drop facelock
This technique, also called inverted leg drop bulldog, is that the user makes the foe bow back and places his leg over the opponent's chest. Then the fighter is dropped, either sitting, kneeling or in other positions, to unload the burden on the opponent and make your neck and back impact against the ground.

Irish whip

Gene Snitsky Irish whip to making a Brian Kendrick .

Also called the hammer throw in the basic and elementary movement in wrestling the wrestler grabs the opponent's wrist with both hands and rotates on its axis to drag behind him in order to release it, completed the rotation, and push it against the strings to make it bounce or an obstacle to impact against him. Sometimes the user sitting down because of the momentum.

Jawbreaker
This technique refers to a movement in which the jaw of the opponent is struck using the shoulder or head.

sitout jawbreaker
The user, facing the opponent, bends down and puts his own head under the opponent's chin. He then dropped his jaw to hit sitting on impact.

Shoulder jawbreaker
Also called reverse stunner in this technique, the wrestler, facing the opponent, supports the other's head on his shoulder and dropped to the ground to spread the impact across his shoulder against the opponent's jaw.

jawbreaker Three-quarter facelock
In this move the wrestler, back to the rival, supports the other's head on his shoulder from behind and, holding his head gripping, sitting is dropped so that the impact of the fall is transmitted by the shoulder to the jaw of the opponent. This technique was innovated by Mikey Whipwreck and popularized by Steve Austin , being popularly known as the stunner. This movement is widely used in various battles of comedy and parodies of wrestling because the wrestlers first to receive a stunner used to do a selling too bulky, which eventually ran out subtracting credibility.

Monkey flip
The wrestler, usually after leaving his opponent in the corner or against the ropes, his hands bound behind the opponent's neck and jumps keeping the legs bent against the chest for them to contact the opponent's torso, keeping him hanging . Then, the user shifts his weight to fall back, taking the opponent consigio, and suddenly stretched legs to catapult the opponent over his head to make him fall back to the canvas. This movement is a variation of tomoe nage of judo .

Muscle buster

Samoa Joe muscle buster to making a Christian Cage .

In this technique the wrestler puts his opponent's head under his armpit, while before him, and raises it on his shoulders so that the opponent's body faces down with his neck bent and resting on the wrestler's shoulder. Then this, grabbing his legs, dropped back to shock the opponent's shoulder to the mat and his head between the shoulder and impacting the ground. A version of this air movement in which the opponent is up to the turnbuckle, because it is easier to locate when the opponent is on a raised surface. There is also a variant neckbreaker .

Neckbreaker
A neckbreaker is a movement of professional wrestling for the opponent's neck. A very common type of this technique may be impacting the back of the neck of the opponent on a user's body part, like the shoulder or knee. Another version is to rotate the opponent's neck, following him into a headlock facelock or to take him to the canvas in a manner similar to a powerslam . This movement has many variations, usually referred to cutter as an inverted neckbreaker, but it really is. Some variciones, such as whiplash, can sometimes be mistaken for types of rolling cutter.

Argentine neckbreaker
The user lifts the opponent, putting his head under his arm and holding onto his leg, face up on his shoulders, in a position of Argentine backbeaker rack. Then release the leg and pushes the other's body behind him, grabbing his neck and falling into a falling neckbreaker .

Arm trap neckbreaker

The user grasps the opponent's arm and moves to a position of back to back, so that the opponent's arm surround your own head, in a cutthroat . At that point the wrestler is dropped, pulling the other's arm and dragging it to his neck falling to the canvas. A variation on straight jacket there, being called cross-arm neckbreaker or straight jacket neckbreaker, being performed in the same way, but grabbing both arms of the opponent and entrecruzándolos.

Corkscrew neckbeaker
In this technique the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and turns on itself, causing the opponent runs continue moving and falling to the canvas on his head. Corkscrew neckbreaker The term is sometimes used to designate a somersault neckbreaker, though not the same. Somersault neckbreaker In this technique, also called frontflip neckbreaker, the user grasps the opponent's head and jump forward, keeping the dam, the jump momentum causes the fighter to swing vertically on the opponent before falling back to the canvas, leading opponent's neck behind. This technique is sometimes a quick fix to a vertical suplex .

Cradle neckbreaker
In this variant of the muscle buster , the user lifts his opponent and supports it with the neck bent over his shoulder, holding her legs to keep him in this position. Then, the wrestler is dropped sitting or kneeling to the shock is transmitted to the opponent's neck across the shoulder. This move is basically a shoulder neckbreaker with all the opponent above the shoulder, which makes your weight add extra strength to the technique. This move was innovated by Kid Kash under the name of Bankruptcy. Today is a very little used because of its highly dangerous, because, since the user has to perform the full force of the movement, failure or excess it can cause serious injury to the cervical vertebrae of the victim .

Diving neckbreaker
In this variation, also called flying neckbreaker, the user jumps from an elevated position and while it is in the air grab the opponent's neck and he collapsed with him on different types of neckbreakers. Generally performed a version called flipping neckbreaker or Blockbuster, where the movement is finished in a falling neckbreaker . Super neckbreaker In this variation, the wrestler performs any type of neckbreaker his opponent while both are uploaded to the corner.

Elevated neckbreaker
In this movement the user makes any type of neckbreaker an opponent located in an elevated position, as the strings of bead.

Fireman's carry neckbreaker
The user lifts the opponent and supports across his shoulders. Then, pull down the head of the opponent while pushing the legs up to flip, like a fireman's carry takeover , at this point, the wrestler spins around and grabs the opponent's head from behind before dropping to back to crashing his head against the floor through the hole under the arm, like a neckbreaker slam . In a variant called fireman's carry neckbreaker knee, the user leaves the opponent down with his neck placed on the wrestler's knee instead of the ground. This variation requires a slightly different implementation.

Inverted facelock neckbreaker
The user stands behind the opponent and pulls him back, holding his head with his arm, then the wrestler drops the opponent on his knee, causing it to collide with the opponent's neck.

Knee neckbreaker
In this movement, the wrestler grabs his opponent's head (several positions) and pulled, causing the back of the neck of the opponent falls on the raised knee of the user.

neckbreaker slam
Also known as falling neckbreaker, this move the wrestler is up and back to back with his opponent, then lift one arm and grabs the opponent's head or neck in a three-quarter facelock inverted , dropping back to hit the back of the head and back of the opponent to the ground. This movement is often used to counter another move of your opponent .. In a variation called jumping neckbreaker, the user jumps maintaining the head of the other subject and falls impactándola against it, in the same way as above, but with more force and angle.

Overdrive
The user makes the opponent crouch before him, supports his leg on his neck and grabs the arm closest to him. Then push the trapped arm so that the fighter turn on itself with the leg still on his neck, and immediately the fighter is dropped forward so that your knee hits the ground and the opponent's neck, under her, receives impact. Today is called K2 by Kelly Kelly . Reverse overdrive

In this variation of the prior art the user to bend the opponent he supports the knee on his neck and grabs the arm farthest from him. Then pull the trapped arm and dropped back, making the knee strikes the neck of another. Spinning overdrive Also called Modified overdrive. In this technique the wrestler uses the same technique that the overdrive just in time to let him hit the canvas, this gives a 180 ° to drop the head against the canvas. MVP Playmaker use this technique calling it. Randy Orton the use calling it O-Zone.

Shoulder neckbreaker
Also called neckbreaker drop, falling neckbreaker sitout neckbreaker or, in this technique, the wrestler grabs his opponent's head and supports the back of his neck over his shoulder, being located back to back. Then, keeping the dam, the user is sitting drops for the impact of falling to the ground is transmitted by the shoulder to the neck of the opponent. This technique is called a hangman's neckbreaker when applied to an opponent lying on the ropes. Gory neckbreaker It is usually called Widow's Peak . In this move the wrestler places the opponent's head between his two legs, then it is doing him up on his back, puts his head on his shoulder and then sits down so that the opponent drops his head with his shoulder estrellandosela fighter.

Swinging neckbreaker
The attacking wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm, putting his own next to it, and using the other arm grabs the wrist of the opponent farther. Then, with the opponent seized, the user takes a turn on the opposite side arm caught and make both fall backward to the ground, turning abruptly other's throats and making hit his head on the floor through the hole in the armpit user. Many people confuse it with a Reverse Rolling Cutter .

Piledriver
A piledriver (called jack in the Mexican wrestling ) is a movement of professional wrestling that aims to drive the opponent's head down. The most common are piledriver belly piledriver to back to belly and belly piledriver, but more intricate variations. The piledriver is generally considered a highly dangerous maneuver fight due to neck compression resulting from head hit the ground vertically, some variants of the piledriver as the brainbuster , avoid this effect, but more intricate variations are likely to develop greater impact. If there is a slight slip of the force used or accident, movement can cause serious injuries and even paralysis, as happened to Steve Austin in a match against Owen Hart . In a well executed piledriver head really does not land on the ground or in any case, it does at an angle or back.

The piledriver is banned in the World Wrestling Entertainment , where only Undertaker and Kane are authorized to do so. This leads to immediate disqualification motion in Mexico and elsewhere.

Argentine piledriver
The user lifts the opponent in a position to Argentine backbreaker rack , ie face up on the shoulders of the wrestler as he grabs a leg and an arm, then push the opponent back and sat down, hitting the opponent's head against the floor.

Backflip piledriver
The user approaches an opponent from behind and captures your torso with your legs, similar to a bodyscissors . Then the user moves his weight to roll backward until she suddenly upside down, leading behind the opponent to his neck strikes the ground in one fluid motion. An aerial version of this technique was innovated by Manami Toyota under the name Victory Star Drop. Due to the high danger of this movement is not very common to see.

belly to back piledriver
In this basic version of the piledriver, the user bend the opponent before him and put his head between his legs, then lifting the opponent's waist, dropped his head to drive to the ground.

Back to belly piledriver
The wrestler is facing the opponent and puts his head between his legs. Then he gets up, holding the opponent to hangs over the wearer's back with the head pointing to the floor as he grabs his legs, and immediately dropped, either kneeling or sitting, to hit his head on the floor. A variation of this technique is called sunset driver, and is that the user puts the opponent's legs under his armpits as he stands in a position back to belly. Then the user falls to his knees, finishing equal. Over the shoulder belly piledriver back to

CIMA performing "Schwein" in Jack Evans .

In this movement, also known as Kryptonite Krunch and Schwein , the wrestler lifts his opponent and places it over his shoulder to the head of the fighter hangs over his back pointing down, holding it generally taking a leg with one arm and head another. Then the opponent sitting down and hits the other's head against the floor. A popular variation of this movement is that the opponent is taken diagonally, leaning on his shoulder and pointing to the opposite hip. This movement is called Air Raid Crash .

Cradle piledriver
This is a variation of the standard piledriver in which the wrestler grabs his opponent's leg with his arm. The most common variant is similar to a Texas piledriver: the user bend the opponent towards him and put his head between the legs of the wrestler that grab your belly and lifts it, then, the user picks an opponent's leg with both arms (or knit their hands behind one) and dropped to his knees sitting or driving his head into the ground. This movement was pioneered by Karl Gotch under the name Gotch-Style Piledriver. This variation can be seen in other types of piledriver, such as the belly to belly piledriver. In this technique resulting from the user lifts the opponent and stands vertically on the front of your abdomen, arms held. Then let go, and grabs one of his legs with his arms while falling on his knees to drive the opponent's head down.

Cross-arm piledriver
The user makes the opponent to bend his abdomen and crosses the opponent's arms between his legs (one double pumphandle ) before lifting it to a vertical position and dropped like a piledriver normal.

Diving piledriver
In this technique, the user performs a jumping piledriver from the second or third string. Such techniques are considered very dangerous high, as the impact of the opponent's head gets very high.

Double underhook piledriver
In this move the wrestler bends their opponent forward to catch his head with his legs. and his arms behind his back. The user then lifts the opponent using this dam until it upright facing the same direction as the wrestler that is dropped on their knees or sitting to hit the opponent's head against the canvas. The knees variant of this movement is known as Tiger Driver '98. Back to back double underhook piledriver Known as Vertebreaker or Kudo Driver , this movement is executed from a position in which the opponent is standing behind the fighter and he hooked his arms with those of the rival. Then the user rotates his body until the opponent is facing towards the ground and back contact of the fighter. This is lifted, allowing the opponent, whose arms are engaged, points toward the ground, and then dropped to crash head sitting on the other to the ground. Another way to obtain the position is closer to a standing opponent from behind, hooking his arms, lean forward and stand up under it then, placing the opponent backwards. This movement is the most dangerous among the variants of the piledriver as the safety of the victim depends only on the attachment of the attacking wrestler's arms to prevent serious neck injury, and this failure could prove fatal. Because of this, the technique was banned in the WWE in April 2003.

Front facelock piledriver
Main article: brainbuster .

Jumping piledriver
Also known as spike piledriver piledriver or stuff, this is a Texas piledriver when the opponent jumps. This can be applied to many types of piledriver as belly to belly or others.

Package piledriver
The user makes bending the opponent before it, stick your head between your legs and arms around the opponent's legs to raise the thigh with the body and so compact to rival. Then lifts the opponent and drops sitting to hit the opponent's head against the floor.

belly to belly piledriver Pumphandle
In this variation the wrestler locks his opponent when he is getting bent arm between his legs closer and farther below the shoulder of the user, then use this dam, known as pumphandle , to lift the opponent on a user's shoulder with the head pointing down before dropping to a reverse piledriver normal.

Punch piledriver

In a piledriver punch a fighter executes any piledriver, but using his fist to further promote the opponent's head against the canvas.

Belly to belly piledriver
Also known as reverse piledriver, in this variation the wrestler grabs his opponent and lifts him up by turning 180 °, holding stomach to stomach with the opponent's head pointing down, from that position, the user is dropped (usually sitting) to crash opponent's head against the floor. This movement is one of the most ariesgados Piledrivers because it is one of the few variants in which the skull of hits in a real opponent to the floor. Also, the strength of the blow depends on the force applied by the user, so an excess of it can cause injury. Kneeling belly to belly piledriver

Applying a Tombstone Piledriver Undertaker (Kneeling belly to belly piledriver) to Edge .

In this variation, the wrestler grabs the opponent and holds her waist before it upside down, dropping to his knees. The result is a movement in which the head hits the floor apparently or canvas. This move was innovated by Andre the Giant and popularized years later by The Undertaker and his brother Kane as Tombstone Piledriver. Over the shoulder belly to belly piledriver The wrestler lifts the opponent and supports over one shoulder, clutching his torso with his arms to point to the floor between the legs of the user, then it drops the skull sitting to hit the opponent to the ground.

Scoop side piledriver
In front of his rival, the wrestler puts his arm between his legs and another on the shoulder to reach both your back. Then lifts the opponent and turn it until your head is facing down and the user moves his left arm around the shoulder from up around the abdomen, and in this position is dropped to hit the opponent's head against the canvas.

arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on the shoulder, reached by turning until your head is pointed toward the ground, still clutching the grips of arms from that position, the wrestler is dropped (usually sitting), driving back the opponent on the canvas. This scoop slam , but differs from it in that this variation accounts for impact on the neck, neck and head of the rival. A version of this movement sitting is called Michinoku Driver II .

This technique, hugely popular with fighters, has lots of variants, which are called driver. Choke driver The user grasps the opponent's neck with both hands, lifted him and broken his body before throwing it down so it lands on his neck. This movement, which requires a user or a tremendously strong opponent very light, has its origin in the high , which is called kubinage. Electric chair driver You rise to the opponent and puts him sitting on his shoulders facing the same direction. The user then pulls the opponent to make it lean forward and stay with her head pointing to the ground from that position, the wrestler is dropped to hit the neck and nape of the opponent to the floor. Fisherman driver The user gets the opponent's head under his armpit and passes an opponent's arm over his head. Then use the free arm to grab the opponent's leg and lift it, like a fisherman brainbuster, but to reach a high position, the fighter. loose head rival, still clutching his leg, to flip and falling headfirst to the ground for the user. Half Nelson driver The user places the opponent's side, facing her, and grabs his arm, holding it against her back and passing the one below to support the hand against his neck, as in a half Nelson . The wrestler then puts an arm between the legs of the opponent and pulls both dams to lift and, turning to his head pointing towards the ground, drop it in that position against the floor. Samoan driver The user lifts the opponent across his shoulders in position fireman's carry . Then the wrestler pulls the opponent's head while pushing his legs to flip and rotate to place the opponent at his chest, dropped to sit back and hit the opponent's neck against the floor between the legs of the user. Wheelbarrow driver In this technique, the wrestler, being behind the opponent, grab his legs and lifts them, then swings the opponent forward to let him hang upside down from the dam and its head is located between the legs of the user. This is dropped, either sitting or kneeling, to smash the neck and the neck of the opponent to the ground.

Spike piledriver
Spike piledriver is a term used to refer to jumping piledriver, aided piledriver or belly to belly reevrse kneeling piledriver.

Sunset flip piledriver
Also known as Canadian Destroyer , in this movement the user places the opponent with his head bent between his legs so similar to a powerbomb , then jump on the enemy's rear allowing up to, falling on his back and rolling to sitting, take the other's neck against the ground. A variation double underhook of this movement there by catching the opponent's arms before performing a variant innovated by Teddy Hart . In executing this movement is the illusion that the victim seeks to raise the attacker into a back body drop and reverse it in the piledriver, which was the storyline requires the action of both the attacker and the victim so , a coordination failure can be fatal to both. Although ostensibly fictional nature, there are variants used in a real way out of wrestling, while not very common to see.

Vertical suplex piledriver
The wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm and passes the opponent's arm over his head, then used his free arm to lift the opponent's abdomen to keep up straight in the air, as in a vertical suplex . Then the fighter turns 180 ° to the opponent to drop in a position to belly piledriver kneeling belly .

Powerbomb
A powerbomb is a move in professional wrestling in which the opponent is crouching with his head between the wrestler's legs and abdomen with this around your arms to lift up to sit on the user's shoulders facing away from him, and hit her back or neck into the mat. A pinning can be achieved in this position. The powerbombs are used in competitive mixed martial arts to undo a triangle choke another fighter.

Argentine powerbomb
The wrestler lifts his opponent and puts it face up on his shoulders, as in an Argentine backbreaker rack , grab an arm and a leg and, with a twist, throws the opponent's head away from him, knocking the opponent on the mat . Sitout A version of this movement.

Chokebomb

Also known as choke driver, this movement is a transition and chokeslam powerbomb. Is that the wrestler takes the opponent's neck with both hands and lifts him in suspense. In this position, the user draws the opponent's body to stop it to prevent impact with the legs, and drops, kneeling or sitting, to hit the back of the opponent against the mat causing pain in the back and head. In an attempt resulting position pinfall can be performed.

Crucifix powerbomb

Mikael Judas making a crucufix powerbomb.

The user makes the foe bow down before him and grabs his stomach with his arms to lift him turning it over to support your back on a fighter's shoulder, then he grabs the opponent's armpits and stretch your arms straight up, keeping the opponent high on it with his legs hanging out the back of the user. From that position, the wrestler is dropped forward to hit the top of the back of the opponent against the mat. This movement is known in Japan as Takano Otoshi due to the popular wrestler there, George Takano . crucifix powerbomb sitout Popularly known Splash Mountain powerbomb this is similar to above but leaves the user is cer seated while the opponent hits the ground. This also provides a position of pinning . Throwing crucifix powerbomb Known as the Border Toss , in this variant of the crucifix powerbomb, the user, lifting the opponent, the head-launching catapult arms forward so that the opponent falls away to the ground.

Double underhook powerbomb
After putting the opponent's head between the user's legs and arms entwine their style double underhook, the wrestler up to the other until the other's back touches his chest and leans back to let the opponent and turn your back pointing to the ground, and drops to the mat hitting this. There is also a sitout version of this movement, also known as Tiger Bomb.

Elevated powerbomb

This movement is similar to an ordinary powerbomb. In it, the user gets the opponent's head between her legs and grabs her abdomen to sit on his shoulders. But at this point the user vertically extending his arms to lift his opponent standing on his shoulders, and just throwing it against the fabric. This type of powerbomb requires a lot of strength to be used, but can also be used to reverse an elevated mounted punches an opponent in the corner sliding arms under it to lift it.

Falling powerbomb
In this embodiment of the powerbomb, when the opponent is on the shoulders of the opponent, it is dropped forward landing on her knees and chest, to add power to beat the opponent to the ground. This technique was used by Kane

Fireman's carry powerbomb
The user lifts the opponent across his shoulders and, turning, before it drops it on the canvas. This technique is used by Sasaki Mammoth Mammoth under the name Driver.

Goose bomb
The user gets the opponent's head between your legs, grab your abdomen rise and sit him up on his shoulders. Then, still holding his legs, he dropped forward so that the opponent upside down penda to the attacker, who drops to his knees to smash the skull of the opponent to the ground. This technique, innovated by Lou Thesz , was created by accident when Thesz attempting a piledriver . In fact, this technique completes the other's head landing upright on the mat and no fastening, so it is dangerous and very little used, due to the risk of neck injuries.

gutwrench powerbomb
The user makes the foe bow down before him and with one arm around the opponent's abdomen. After this, rotating up on one shoulder and dropped to smash your opponent against suelo.Este movement is used by Jack Swagger .

Leg trap powerbomb
In this movement, the user bends down to the opponent and grabs his leg, then, is incorporated to lift and still holding it, stretching his arm to lift the opponent on the shoulder, dropped forward. This technique requires more effort than the standard powerbomb, but it can achieve greater impact.

Multiple powerbombs
In this variation of the fighter powerbomb performed on the opponent but without being released after impact. Then you pull back to lift it over his shoulders and hit it again, this can be done repeatedly.

One shoulder powerbomb
The user makes bending the opponent before him putting his head between his legs, grab your tummy and lifts it to place it on one shoulder. Then from that position, perform any type of powerbomb, such as falling, sitout or others. This technique was innovated by Atsushi Onita under the name Thunder Fire Powerbomb.

Package reverse powerbomb
In this variant of the reverse powerbomb , known as Phoenix-Plex and Steenalizer , the user gets the opponent's head bent between his legs, around your torso with arms and turning it over to sit up on his shoulders, looking away from the wrestler attacker. Then, the user grasps the opponent's head and pulls it back to tilt it down facing the wearer's back, shrinking the opponent into a ball. In that position, the fighter is allowed to fall backward, releasing the opponent to the ground so that impacts on his back and his neck bent.

Pumphandle powerbomb
Double pumphandle powerbomb The user makes the opponent to bend over and grab his arms, putting them between the legs of the opponent to immobilize him. Then, the wrestler pulls them up, holding their legs at the knee joint to flip the opponent head on, then lift it to place it upside down with his back against the chest of the user in a stable position. The attacker continues to throw the opponent to sit on the shoulders and behind it, hit it on the floor flopping.

Rope aided powerbomb
This technique is used as a counter: when the user grasps the opponent's legs, face up on the canvas, and he grabs the ropes, the attacking wrestler pull your legs to lift your opponent up to his shoulders and dropping . sitout powerbomb Corner When the opponent is uploaded to turbuckle looking out of the ring, usually mounted punches using an elevated point of a corner or slingshot splash or similar, and the opponent is below it, then gets up and grabs the opponent's legs, placing them on their shoulders, and dropped into a sitting powerbomb sitout. You can then make an attempt to pin.

Scoop powerbomb
The attacking wrestler puts his arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on the shoulder to get both to lift the opponent back and perpendicular to the user's chest. Then it rises over the opponent and grabs a leg to place it over your shoulder and set the opponent on both classical position powerbomb., Then let fall sitting, kneeling and with more variations.

sitout powerbomb
In this embodiment of the powerbomb, when the opponent is on the shoulders of the opponent, the sitting is dropped to add power to beat the opponent to the ground.

Slingshot powerbomb
The user lifts the opponent into a powerbomb normal, but then dropped without releasing an opponent on the ropes and taking advantage of the rebound, turns and drops.

Spinebomb
In this variant, the traditional powerbomb is transicionada with a spinebuster .

Spinning powerbomb
In this variation the wrestler lifts the opponent into a powerbomb normal. When the opponent is already sitting on the shoulders of the user, it starts to spin to make you dizzy before falling into the ring.

Spin-out powerbomb
Known as Blue Thunder Bomb and more technically as belly suplex powerbomb to back, in this technique the user puts his head under an opponent's arm back to him and lifts him over his shoulder. Then turns the opponent 180 ° gripping one leg and let go to impact against the canvas.

Standing powerbomb
In this type of powerbomb your opponent is thrown to the ground while the opponent is standing. It is also known as release release powerbomb powerbomb and standing. Sheer drop release powerbomb Popularly known as Jackknife Powerbomb , this modified version of the powerbomb standing wrestler takes a jackknife when hitting the back of the opponent to the ground by grabbing their legs continue to fall and arch your back.

Straight jacket powerbomb
Also known as cobra clutch powerbomb, in this movement the user makes bending the opponent before him and grabs his arms, crossing them on his chest, then raise it by pulling them to flip and support sitting on his shoulders facing away and then hit it against dropping the floor.

Sunset flip powerbomb

In this technique, the user bend the opponent before he spends his legs and behind the opponent's armpits. Then, the user jumps forward describing a somersault to his legs, hook acting in armpit on the other, they do join and, continuing the rotation, hit his back against the floor when the user lands on a sitting, having made the turn. This move was innovated by Yoshiyuki Saito under the name of Yoshi Tonic.

Superbomb
The attacking wrestler forces the opponent to ascend to the second or third string, while he is standing on the third looking into the ring. The user makes bending the opponent, putting his head between his legs and hugging your abdomen to lift it over her shoulders while jumping forward to fall to the canvas (which may be in a position sitout, falling or otherwise), making the opponent's back hits the floor. In another variation, the opponent is sitting on the top rope. The attacking wrestler scale up the rope and stood standing over him, making him bend down to put your head between your legs to lift it over her shoulders embracing the abdomen of another, as in a regular powerbomb. Then the user jumps back to back or turning 180 degrees to hit the back of the opponent to the ground. This version can be performed in settings Falling or Sit-Out.

Turnbukle powerbomb
The user makes an opponent crouch and stick your head between your legs to lift it around your abdomen with your arms and sit on his shoulders, like a powerbomb normal after this, is situated near the corner of the ring and the body descatga opponent against the turnbuckle to cause a major blow on his back.

Vertical suplex powerbomb
The user lifts the opponent up straight in the air as a vertical suplex and pushes the top of his body to finish the move in a sitout powerbomb . This move was innovated by Kenta Kobash

Powerslam
A powerslam is a bodyslam of professional wrestling in which the wrestler performing the technique falls down on his opponent. The term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam or scoop powerslam.

Clawhold slam
The user grasps the opponent's head with one hand and pushes her to make him fall back to the canvas and, pressing her arm to mantain his neck and shoulders in the neck, make the pinfall. This technique is usually done after a clawhold .

Cobra clutch slam
In this technique the user places the opponent in a cobra clutch, that is, putting one arm applying a half Nelson and using the other to raise the arm seized up the opponent's face. Then he rises in the air in the neck, jumps back and falls to the ground, either sitting or kneeling, to hit the opponent on the canvas.

Double leg slam
Also known as flapjack spinebuster, or waterwheel slam spinebuster slam, this type of powerslam transitioned into spinebuster is that the attacking wrestler puts his head between the legs of the opponent and gets up grabbing the opponent's legs, which is lifted in the air and rehead on down to hit her back. This technique is popularly done by turning before launching the opponent, and was innovated by Hardcore Holly , who calls Alabama Slam.

Fallaway slam
Also known as Last Call . The fighter, while he is standing in front of the opponent, put an arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on his shoulder, lifts it and places it parallel to the ground on the user's chest. The attacker then sat down while raising the arms to throw the opponent over his head against the canvas. This powerslam bridging mode can be used, or in a succession of transicionarlo slams fallaya hold the opponent.

Falling powerslam
Also known as reverse fallaway slam, this technique is performed while facing the opponent, the fighter enters an arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on the shoulder to reach back and lift both the rival perpendicular to the wearer's body, that is dropped forward to hit the opponent on the floor. Pumphandle falling powerslam Also known as pumphandle drop, this technique makes the opponent bending his opponent and gets one of the opponent's arms between his legs, grabbing the opponent's arm lejando. Then, the attacker lifts the opponent and keep it perpendicular to the torso rather than support him on the shoulder, as is normal for a pumphandle slam , immediately afterwards, the attacker drops to collide head on the opponent to the mat.

Fireman's carry slam
The wrestler lifts the opponent across his shoulders in setting fireman's carry , grab your right leg and then push it up, placing his shoulder in the abdomen of another fighter, and allowed to fall forward, knocking the opponent on his back in a front powerslam . Rolling fireman's carry slam

In this technique, also known as reverse Samoan drop or rolling Samoan drop , the user loads the opponent across his shoulders, so fireman's carry, then dropped turning to front on the ground to the enemy's rear hits the floor and can end with a pinfall . Swinging leg hook fireman's carry slam The user makes bending the opponent and puts his head and shoulders below it, while holding one leg. Then rotates on itself to the rival side, pulling the leg taken, to flip the opponent and falling backwards, hit the back of the opponent to the ground. This movement is sometimes considered a neckbreaker , because the neck and the opponent's neck is the area of greatest impact.

Front powerslam
This is the most common powerslam, and is often referred to as simply powerslam. In this movement the attacking wrestler puts his arm between the opponent's legs and another on one shoulder reaching with both her back and lifts the opponent over his shoulder. From this position the user is allowed to fall forward to strike the opponent on the canvas. Some fighters are before the technique, and is called running powerslam. Pumphandle slam The fighter makes bending the opponent from behind him, grabs his opponent's left arm with his right arm and puts it between her legs to immobilize it while you grab the right with his left arm and puts it under the armpit of the user, leaving the opponent with his back resting on the wrestler's chest perpendicular. The user then picks it up and turned to support your stomach against the wearer's shoulder, and then perform various powerslam, the most frequent front slam. Other variations are sidewalk slam or slam fallaway . sitout front powerslam Invented by Mitsuharu Misawa under the name Emerald Flowsion in this movement the user lifts the opponent over his shoulder to support him as a front powerslam . The wrestler then puts his arm around the neck on that side and the other opponent's torso, and drops sitting on the mat to crash the top of the enemy's rear.

Full Nelson slam
In this move the wrestler puts his opponent in a full Nelson and uses that position to lift. In air, the user removes one arm of the dam (so it becomes a half-Nelson) to help the opponent to fall to the canvas. In another variation, known as double chickenwing slam, the user applies a double chickenwing the opponent to make him fall dropping his arms. Half Nelson Slam

The opponent gets an arm under the opponent with the palm of his hand on his neck in a half Nelson for lifting and turning it falls forward, hitting his opponent to the ground.

Gorilla press slam
In this movement, also known as military press slam, the wrestler lifts his opponent with the arms fully extended above the head (in a posture used in weight lifting ) and lower arm to tilt the opponent to that position and, walking around, drop back down.

Mat slam
In this variation the wrestler takes the mat against opponent's neck in a technique that does not include facelocks or headlocks. If these are used, then the movement becomes considered a DDT (when the wrestler falls backwards) or bulldog. Some neckbreakers also impact the nape of the other on the floor, but these variations the fighter and his opponent must be contacted back to back. A standard mat slam is to grab the opponent's head or hair and throw it back to hit the ground in the area of the neck and upper back. Double underhook mat slam The wrestler faces head on the opponent s, bound his arms with his and rotates 180 ° so that the opponent falls on his back with his head on the back or under an arm wrestler. Then it is dropped to drive the nape of the opponent to the ground. sitout rear mat slam The wrestler grabs from behind the head of his opponent, either by the hair or the top of the head. Then the user jumps back and sat down, taking the opponent's head to the floor between her legs. There is a variation on the scale the turnbuckles wrestler performs a backflip on a rival chases him and ends up taking the position the rear mat slam sitout ordinary. Sleeper slam In this movement, the user surrounds the opponent's neck with his arm from behind him and made a quick move to throw back to the canvas. In a variant called spinning sleeper slam, the user approaches an opponent from the front and, passing under his arm around his neck jumps his to fall sitting, dragging the opponent, make him fall to the floor back in the rotation.

Moonsault slam
The user, while he and his opponent in the corner, grab the opponent and jumps backward in an arc, turning his body to land flat on the ground while his opponent, drawn by him, hits the canvas on his back. This technique is essentially a superplex with the user following the jump, and can find many variations of this technique combined with some kind of suplex .

Standing moonsault side slam In this movement, popularly called C-4 , the wrestler stands shoulder to shoulder with the opponent and around his chest with his arm, then, lifting it by a procedure similar to the exploder suplex , the user jumps flipping 180 ° your body back being behind the opponent to his back from hitting the canvas.

Olympic slam
Also known as the Angle Slam , in this move the wrestler is next to the opponent and grabs one wrist, putting his head under his arm and holding her leg caught closer. Then lifts the opponent's hand on his shoulders, and at the same time rotated 90 ° and falls on his back, making the opponent crashing to the ground. This move can be made ahead of the opponent.

Scoop powerslam

Mr. Kennedy applying a scoop slam to Hardcore Holly .

The attacker entered an arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on the shoulder, reaching back with both, and the rise making it rotate 180 degrees until your head is pointed toward the ground at a slightly oblique, then the user releases the grab handles leaning forward arms to drop back to the opponent to the canvas. This technique is extremely popular, and is used by almost every fighter. Snap scoop powerslam In this variation of the former wrestler, side loading an opponent against him, put his arm between his legs and another on the shoulder and up, dropping from the front to take him into the mat in one fluid motion. This movement uses the opponent's own momentum, which adds more power, so it is not rare to see it used as a finishing move.

Side slam
The wrestler is side to side and slightly behind the victim, facing the same direction, and surrounds the opponent's torso with the arm closest to him and placed the other under the legs of the opponent. Then the fighter him up with both dams and falls into a sitting position to hit the back of the opponent to the ground. The name "sidewalk slam" is sometimes incorrectly used to designat a one-armed , side spinning or swinging side slam . Until now occupied by Dwayne Johnson as Rock Bottom

Sidewalk slam
The wrestler takes the opponent in the back facing the same direction and then hit it against the canvas. This movement is seen in Kane , The Big Show and Kevin Nash . Belly to back suplex side slam Also called a belly to back suplex lift twisted and dropped Into a side slam or just elevated side slam. In this technique the wrestler behind the opponent, places his head under an opponent's armpit and perched on his shoulder, pushing it up and transitioning technology into a side slam by dropping the opponent on the ground. One-armed side slam This motion similar to a STO is that the attacking wrestler grabs the opponent when he is charging at him with one arm under the opponent and falls to his knees, all in one fluid motion. A standing version of this movement is possible. Swinging side slam Also known as wind-up slam, the movement is that the arm wrestler entered between the legs of the opponent and the other on the shoulder to reach both back. Then raise it to the horizontal to the ground, and starts spinning in circles while swinging the lower body of the opponent to put an arm around the opponent's chest, and falls forward striking his back against the canvas. Variations of this movement can be as long as the wrestler lifts the opponent over his shoulder and launched from that position, while in another variation the wrestler hang the opponent off your shoulders and pull your legs until the victim falls to the ground. Spinning side slam Also called slam scrapbuster in this movement the attacking wrestler is on one side of the opponent facing away, and surrounds the opponent's chest with one arm under his. The user lifts the opponent while rotating 180 degrees in the opposite direction (backward) and then falls on his chest hitting the back of another on the floor.

In another version of this movement, carrying on an opponent against the user, it uses the opponent's own momentum to turn it back, sometimes causing the fighter around the user rotates almost 360 ° before falling to the mat. Ura-nage This technique is also known as sambo suplex or side suplex. The wrestler places the opponent's side, one arm around her abdomen and passes the other between her legs to lift, from that position, the user lifts the opponent and drops sitting back while throwing the opponent over his head , over onto his back to the mat next to him. The name "ura-nage" (or "uranage") is often used incorrectly to refer to a side slam normal, and although the name actually comes from a movement of judo , this is actually more like a Saito suplex than a "ura-nage" of professional wrestling . Vertical suplex side slam In this variation of elevated side slam, also called vertical suplex lift dropped Into a side slam , wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm and passes the opponent's arm over his head, then used his free arm to lift the opponent's abdomen to keep up straight in the air, as in a vertical suplex . Then the fighter repositions his arm, and when the victim begins to drop is placed in a position of side slam . Tilt-a-whirl slam The wrestler grabs laterally the abdomen of a fighter who goes by his side, similar to a sidewalk slam , but it keeps turning up to place it with your stomach on the shoulder farthest from the user, then it pulls its head and push your legs while sitting down on a sidewalk slam as normal.

Vertical suplex powerslam
Known as Jackhammer or Power-Plex , the wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm and passes the opponent's arm over his head, then used his free arm to lift the opponent's abdomen to keep up straight in the air, as in a vertical suplex standard. When the opponent begins to fall as the attacking wrestler turns to fall face down on the chest of the opponent in a position pinfall . This move was innovated in Japan by Jaguar Yokota .

Shin breaker
The wrestler grabs his opponent's leg and bend the joint to expose the shin, while releasing it, then the user pushes the calf against his opponent's knee, dropping sitting or kneeling.

Shoulderbreaker

The user gets an arm between the legs of his rival and another on the shoulder, then raise it, rotating it to hold it upside down. In that position, the user kneels on the floor, raising the other so that one of the shoulders of the opponent crash into it.

Inverted shoulderbreaker
In this technique, the user lifts the opponent (by various methods) and keeps your back supported on the wearer's shoulder. Then, the wrestler kneels down and lowers the opponent to his chest to his shoulder collision with his knee raised.

Snake Eyes
The user lifts the opponent and puts him on his stomach with his shoulder facing the same direction as the wrestler., This runs into a corner and release the opponent with his face located on the turnbuckle pole, causing collision with it.

Snapmare
The wrestler grabs an opponent's head behind him, kneels, and then pulls the opponent forward, flipping it over his shoulder to the mat. Flying mare is called when the wrestler pulls the opponent to throw hair. These two versions were widely used by The Fabulous Moolah and Mae Young .

Spinebuster

Batista spinebuster to using an Edge .

The user sits in front of his opponent and grabs the waist, legs or underarms, using this dam, which rises in the air and dropped, usually forward or sitting back to hit the opponent to the ground , falling between the legs of the opponent.

Side slam spinebuster
The attacker with one arm around the neck of an opponent in front of him and lifts him up, then grabs the opponent's leg and moved the dam at the waist to download to your opponent on the canvas as an ordinary spinebuster.

Spinning spinebuster
In this variation the user, after grabbing the opponent's waist and lifted, rotated 180 ° before dropping away in front for the spinebuster normal. This variation was innovated by Arn Anderson , and is used by Kurrgan and Triple H .

Spinning crucifix toss
The user gets the opponent's head between her legs, grab your belly and lifts him to sit on his shoulders, making him fall on his back to grab his arms and raised them mentenerlo, similar to a crucifix powerbomb. Then the fighter begins to turn to stun the opponent, and concludes dropping to fall freely.

Spinning headlock elbow drop
The wrestler takes the opponent's head while standing with his back and putting it under your armpit on your back and bending the opponent's body to the ground, turns and supporting the elbow of the free arm on your stomach, is dropped on it to hit it on the floor. This move was innovated by Kaz Hayashi under the name of Final Cut.

Suplex
A suplex is an offensive move used in professional wrestling. The term suplex also used to refer to vertical suplex In Olympic wrestling there is a movement called Suplay, a term of wrestling . This is probably the origin of the word "suplex" because the struggle is much older amateur to the professional but is usually pronounced like "sue-plex", suggesting that designate the same movement. It is believed that the origin of the word "suplex" comes from the French "souplesse" (flexibility).

Fisherman suplex
Also called cradle suplex, this popular technique wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm and his arm under the opponent. Then grab an opponent's leg, usually the knee, with his free arm up pushing your belly or chest and rise vertically into the air before dropping back to land the opponent on the canvas. This move is basically a vertical suplex holding the opponent's leg, and this allows to apply some submissions after landing or lead to a bridging pin. Swinging fisherman suplex Also known as Golden Gate Swing , this technique wrestler puts his opponent's head under his arm and his under the of the other, then grabs the opponent's leg and turn your body sideways to the opponent back down to the canvas. This movement is sometimes confused with the swinging leg hook fireman's carry slam , because of the similarity between them.

Rolling release suplex
This suplex starts when the attacker applies a front facelock the opponent and taking the opponent's arm over his shoulder, then lifts it into a vertical position, the face lock is released when the attacker falls down when the user turns dropping of back to the rival.

Slingshot suplex
Start with a vertical suplex lift, close to the strings, the user then makes him fall into the ropes and bouncing back and finishing with regular suplex. This technique is used and renewed by Beth Phoenix .

Snap suplex
In this popular version of the user, which is charged against an opponent in the opposite direction, it captures the head, keeping the other's arm on his, and leverages the momentum of the opponent to make him swing and hit it way back up on canvas, all in one fluid motion. In fact, this technique is only a vertical suplex fighting back.

superplex
The superplex, abbreviated super suplex is an Air version of the suplex, most commonly the vertical suplex , innovated by Dynamite Kid . This varainte, the wrestler is up to the second rope with the opponent, supported by the third, seizing his head under his arm and holding the opponent's arm over the neck of the user. Then lift it upright, before dropping back from the post to land the opponent on the ground. There is a variation where the opponent is hit on a table, either inside or outside the ring.

Front Suplex
Not to be confused with the Inverted Suplex Slam, is that the user lifts the opponent (as you would in a Suplex) but dropped face down on the canvas falling down the seated user. This attack was popularized the ex-Diva WWE Michelle McCool .

Suplex Slam
This is a variation of a vertical suplex lift, then the user walks around with everything and the opponent, applying a powerslam variation so this would be a slam Vertical Lift. This move was popularized by Bill Goldberg Jackhammer calling you. Doctor Bomb This is another lift Vertical Suplex, but the user before throwing the opponent drops it between your legs, you sit down as a BW & Thunder Bomb, from Jack Swagger . This sitout Suplex Slam was popularized by Hardcore Holly .

Inverted suplex slam The attacker takes the opponent in a front facelock and passing the opponent's arm over his shoulder. Then lift the opponent vertically, dropping stomach and his face hit the opponent on the ground. inverted suplex slam sitout The attacker applies a front facelock the opponent and the opponent puts his arm over his shoulder. The attacker lifts his opponent into a vertical position, and the attacker sitting down, hitting the opponent's face into the mat. This movement is known as Gutbuster Drop or Inverted Falcon Arrow. In another variation, the attacker loose the opponent to fall letting his head fall first.

Vertical suplex

Big Show by applying a vertical suplex on JBL . The user, facing the opponent, put the other's head under his arm and put his own under the opponent. Then, usually pushing her legs, belly or the like, raises the opponent using the dam paar vertically lift it up straight in the air, then the user is dropped back to land the opponent on the mat. This is the most common variation suplex. Delayed vertical suplex This variation, called suplex flag in Mexico , is that the user lifts the opponent into a vertical suplex ordinary, but on reaching the vertical position the opponent is held there for several seconds before completing the maneuver. This technique is often used by very strong opponents to give the illusion of power. Falcon Arow

This variation of Vertical Suplex is also known as rotation suplex, twisting suplex and Rotary suplex. It is when the opponent stands in an upright position, but the attacker turns and turns the opponent's body to finish flopping back and golepando the opponent in the back and neck. this key affects the back and in a few occasions the column is broken.

Underhook suplex
You take on the opponent, puts his head between his legs and holding both arms. When thus, with double strap secures it, I get up and move your body to one side, dropping the opponent on the canvas on his back.

Belly to back
Belly to back suplex
Also called back suplex or wrongly back body drop in Japan , this technique wrestler puts his head under the arm of an opponent with his back to him, then grabs her waist and lifts him over his shoulder to be dropped back and do hitting the opponent's back against lona.Esta technique can lead to a bridging pin easily, something called Greek Bridge in Mexico. DROP BACK TO CONFUSE WITH DRIVER (BDD) BDD is similar but the punishment falls on the shoulder blades or neck

Muscle Buster
Also referred to as a leg lift back suplex or leg lift backdrop. It is applied as a back suplex, only the attacker grabs your arm or the back of the opponent. With his free arm, grab one of the opponent's knees or legs, lifting it and letting it fall Bridging leg hook belly to back suplex The attacker begins next to the opponent, and put behind a standing opponent. The attacker then places his head under the opponent's arm, and grabs his back. Then with his free arm grabs one of the opponent's legs, forcing the opponent to be in a position right angle. Finally up to rival dropping neck and shoulders on the mat, making an arc simultaneously taking it to a position of Pin Fall. This movement is used by William Regal and Regal-Plex and his pupil Bryan Danielson Daniel Bryan in WWE. Spinning leg hook belly to back suplex The attacker is behind the opponent and puts his head under the opponent's arm. Then with one arm and grabs the back with the other leg of the opponent. By lifting the attacker gives a 180 º dropping the opponent back.

Cobra Clutch suplex
The attacker takes the opponent in a position to Hold Cobra Clutch. They proceed to lift the opponent and letting it fall back, taking the head to the canvas.

Crossface chickenwing suplex
The attacker is behind the opponent. Grab one of the arms of a rival Chickenwing his other arm and grabs the opponent's head. Then lifts the opponent onto his back leaving him in the ring.

Double suplex chickenwing
The user, who is behind the opponent, grabs the opponent's arms and leans against his back, passing beneath his armpits. Then he stands on his head using the dam and dropped back to hit the neck and upper back of the opponent on the canvas, sometimes ending with a bridging pin. This technique was innovated by Alfonso Dantes and popularized by Tiger Mask original, Satoru Sayama , under the name of Tiger Suplex. but can also be rejected by a roll-up

Full Nelson suplex
In this variant, the user stands behind the opponent and pulls her arms to pass under and join his hands on the neck of another, in a full Nelson, then, the fighter uses this dam to lift the opponent over him and dropped back to hit the neck and upper back of the opponent to the ground. This move was innovated by Tatsumi Fujinami Dragon Suplex and as later popularized by Last Dragon . Half Nelson suplex A variation of German suplex where the attacker is behind the opponent, facing the same direction ahcia. The attacker puts his arm under one of the opponent, grabbing the opponent's neck with his hand, forcing air left in the opponent's arm (position of Half Nelson). The attacker grabs his arm free the back of the opponent, then picks him up and drops the opponent on the mat neck and shoulders.

gutwrench suplex
The fighter makes bending the opponent before him and around his waist with his arms. Then, the user lifts the opponent of the dam and turns to one side, letting the opponent to fall backward to the ground. A variant of this move was innovated by the Olympic wrestler Alexander Karelin as Karlelin Lift.

German suplex

Known technically as a belly to back suplex waist-lock, this popular technique, the user is located behind the opponent around his waist with his arms and raises until at least one third of the back of the opponent is above the head of user, then it drops back to throw the enemy back and your neck, shoulders and upper back against the canvas impact. This suplex can be derived in a position of pinfall , widely used as a finishing move called bridging German suplex and it is made up body arching one's back to not contact the ground while holding the opponent against him, based on the canvas after the impact. Another variant called German release suplex is that the wrestler releases the opponent before it crashes to fall so ground clearance. Similar to many variants of suplex, German suplex on can be derived in another German suplex side by turning the user's body, still holding the waist of the opponent after hitting to return to the prone position and stand up. This move was innovated by Lou Thesz and named by German Suplex Karl Gotch .

Wheelbarrow suplex
In this technique, the user approaches the opponent, who has his back to him and grab his legs, lifting them up to the top of the back were above the head of the attacker, then the wrestler drop back, as in the German suplex , so that the neck, shoulders and upper back of the opponent from hitting the ground.

Sleeper suplex
The user approaches an opponent on his back and around his neck with one arm, like a sleeper hold, then, lifting arm used in the dam, falling backwards idea back of the opponent hitting the ground. This type of movement can VERCON other prey, rather than the sleeper hold.

Straight jacket suplex

Belly to belly
Belly to belly suplex
The wrestler grabs the opponent's abdomen, facing front, up and gives a sharp turn with the body to the side and slightly upward to land the opponent on his back. A variant called overhead belly to belly suplex is that the opponent is launched in an upright position after being caught by the opponent and can be used against a charging opponent in the opposite direction. They were also used by Randy Orton and Michelle Mccool

Capture suplex

The user is in front of opponent grabs his leg and put up this on his shoulder and grabs the other arm oponenete neck. Then he rises to fall. This move was popularized by Tazz as Tazz Capture.

Choke suplex
The wrestler grabs his opponent's throat similar to the position of chokeslam . Then he stands up, turns it up into a vertical position and drops it back over the user, as in a ura-nage . There are different variations of this technique. The Undertaker almost killed by one of these.

Exploder suplex

Shelton Benjamin by applying a T-Bone Suplex on Carlito . Also known as T-Bone Suplex , this technique the fighter around the neck of an opponent in front of him with one arm, like a side slam , then grabs the opponent's leg and uses both dams to lift above the user and fall back, causing the opponent lands on his back. In a variation called blizzard suplex your opponent is thrown horizontally. This may include a bridging pin. Also, in another variant, the user can transition the suplex in a scoop powerslam pin while the user. Norhtern lights suplex The user puts his head under his arm wrestler's enemy in front of him, closing his arms around his abdomen and lifts it above the head to make it land on his back. This version supports a position bridging pin .

Saito suplex

This technique is a Belly to Back suplex in which the user lifts the oponene and dropped backwards hitting the opponent's neck against the move was innovated suelo.Este by Mr. Saito.

Legsweep
In this type of technique, the fighter uses his leg to jam the opponent or to hit one, he fell to the canvas.

Double leg takedown
A tackle where the intention is to force the opponent to fall to the canvas tackleandolo its torso or legs. In this movement the legs grab the opponent with his arms and closing them, and uses this position to throw the opponent

Dragon screw legwhip
In this technique, the user grasps the leg of an opponent in front of him and turned to one side, causing the opponent to fall to the ground. Innovated by Tatsumi Fujinami .

Drop toehold
The wrestler, placed against an opponent charging at him, dropped on the ground located one foot in front of the opponent's ankle and the other behind the calf and in this way, the opponent stumbles and falls flat on the ground with all its momentum . Sometimes, this movement is used to smash the opponent into a chair or an unlawful object, or even to prepare for a submission .

Half Nelson legsweep
The atacnte is located behind the opponent. Then put your arm under the opponent's arm placing your hand on the opponent's neck, forcing so that the arm is in the air (Half Nelson). The wrestler then uses his other arm to pull the opponent's arm from behind the head. Then put your leg behind the opponent's falling backwards forcing the opponent to fall backward.

Russian legsweep
Also known as Russian side legsweep. A move where the wrestler is next to the rival in the same direction, putting his hand behind the opponent's head, and grabbing the opponent's leg with the attacker falls backwards causing the opponent to hit back . There is also a variation where the attacker jumps before running, leaping like the reverse bulldog, known as the Jumping Russian legsweep. Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep

The attacker is on the same side and in the same direction of the opponent, then takes a threequarter position facelock, then puts her leg behind the opponent's, then quickly fall back on the canvas (with opponent's weight on him) and causing damage in the neck.

STO
(Short for Space Tornado Ogawa ) Member, next to the opponent and looking the other way, around your neck with one arm and grabs the opponent, put one leg between hers to bring it down and let it fall forward to impact opponent's back against the floor. This technique has many variations, and is sometimes confused with the uranage , although not the same. Sometimes this technique is called legsweep side slam. This movement is commonly known in judo as "osoto Otoshi" ("large outer drop"). STO Chokehold This variation of the STO the wrestler applies a one handed choke and then sweep the opponent's leg with his leg. Clawhold STO In this technique the wrestler grabs his opponent's head with one hand, put one leg between hers and push with your arm to make him fall back. Lifting STO This movement is a STO where the wrestler lifts the opponent first and then perform a leg sweep and throw it to the canvas.

Movements of transition
Double underhook
In this technique immobilizes the wrestler's arms behind her rival and binds them together with yours, passing underneath and pulling them. This usually precedes a survey, but can also be used as a movement of submission .

Crucifix
The user, located in front of the opponent, it does bend over to him and grabs his stomach with his arms to lift turning it over, like a gutwrench, then the user drops it over his back until he hooks up with his arms the opponent's armpits and lifts it from there and can make a pinfall , a powerbomb and other techniques. Inverted crucifix

Electric chair
This position is located the opponent sitting on the shoulders of the user looking at the same address with your legs in front of the shoulders of the wrestler that usually grab to immobilize it.

Fireman's Carry
In this position, lifting the user loads perpendicular to the opponent on his shoulders.

Gorilla press
Used by warriors of great strength,

gutwrench
In this technique the fighter makes the opponent to bend it and stick your head under the armpit of the user, with his arms around the abdomen of another and uses it to lift her back on her shoulder. This retention is often used to powerbombs , suplexes , backbreaker rack and the like.

Inverted
This modification is that the opponent is trapped behind the front instead of the techniques in which this is done. Although the term reverse is used often as a synonym, more usually refers to the investment is in the launch of the technique (if any), as in a reverse powerbomb or reverse STO, or position of the attacking wrestler.

Pumphandle
The fighter makes bending the opponent from behind him, grabs his opponent's left arm with his right arm and puts it between her legs to immobilize it while you grab the right with his left arm and puts it under the armpit of the user, leaving the opponent with his back resting on the wrestler's chest perpendicular. From this position, the user can lift the opponent and perform various types of techniques. Pumphandle The term can also refer to any movement in which an opponent's arm is passed between her legs. A variant called pumphandle double, double arm or cross-arm pumphandle is that the fighter makes bending the opponent and, after grabbing her arms, gets between your legs to lift them out from behind and pulling them, what would be a pumphandle using both arms of the opponent. Wrist Clutch In this technique, also called one-handed pumpandle, the user grasps the opponent's arm and passes it between his legs before making another move.

Tilt-a-whirl

The wrestler, with his back to a charging opponent, stretch arms to the side and grabs the opponent's torso as he walks past him, elevating him up for another technique, as a slam or a backbreaker. There is an inverse of this movement, called tilt-a-whirl headscissors, in which the wrestler receiving the technique is useful to perform another move.

Scoop
In this type of technique, the user gets an arm between the legs of the opponent and the other on the opponent's shoulder farthest from that arm. Then use this dam to rotate to one side and lift the opponent, and make another technique, which is usually a powerslam or an inverted DDT .

sitout
When a wrestler is sitting down when applying any key such as facebuster or a neckbreaker .

Wheelbarrow
In this movement the attacker grabs from behind the legs of an opponent facing away and located on both sides of the wearer's waist, then throw it back in a wheelbarrow suplex or forward in a wheelbarrow facebuster. This movement can also be found in reverse, that is, being used by the sufferer technique for another, being called bodyscissors wheelbarrow .

Professional Wrestling Attacks
Attacks of professional wrestling consist of a wide range of movements or ways of hitting the opponent. In the fictional nature of wrestling, some shock (such as punches and other equally basic) modify its trajectory to hit on a cushioned, no harm, but many others are totally real, and are used in other combat sports .

Back elbow
In this attack the fighter is standing with your back pointing at an opponent running and lifting a side causing the crash opponent against him.

Bell clap
Is to hit with both palms on the ears of the opponent, causing great pain in your ears and distort its balance. This move is very dangerous, as excessive force when applied can cause rupture of the eardrums the rival and ruin your hearing permanently. This technique is called Telefone in various disciplines of capoeira , which is illegal.

Body press
In this subtype of techniques is used primarily the chest or torso to hit the opponent with it.

Big Splash

Akebono making a big splash at Commander An Jo .

Also called body press, vertical or running splash splash, this technique the user skips an opponent lying on the ground, landing on his chest or stomach downloading the opponent's whole weight on it to press it against the canvas. This attack is part of the repertoire of mainly very large or heavy fighters, as Viscera , Mark Henry , Akebono , Ryota Hama and Andre the Giant , to name a few. There are aerial versions of this movement used by fighters more agile and light, which develops more impact force, but also are easier to dodge, because they take longer to get over the ground.

Corner avalanche body
The user leaves the opponent relied on the corner of the ring and, standing at a distance to get a running start, run towards the opponent and hits him to crush between your body and the corner. This movement requires a great size, so that is universally used for large fighters. Although it is a movement that develops great pressure, it is very accurate and sufficient that the opponent apart from the corner to make it the user who takes the hit.

Crossbody
Also known as a cross body block, this movement is that the fighter strikes his opponent in the face with the body horizontal in the air, forming an X with the bodies, before the heavier or carry the most momentum (which is generally, the user, when running or jumping) pulls down the other into the mat, usually finishing it in an attempt to pinfall . There are air variations of this technique.

Full body block
The wrestler, usually running, strikes his opponent head-on around the torso, especially the chest or abdomen, usually knocking. This technique, extremely basic, requires large part of the user.

Lou Thesz press
This technique, invented by Lou Thesz , is that the user jumps forward on a standing opponent and attacks with his legs apart on his torso, which makes sitting down on the opponent's chest with his knees on the sides for a position pinfall . It is sometimes accompanied by multiple punches, this being a widely used version of Stone Cold Steve Austin and Randy Orton .

Bronco buster
The fighter leaves his opponent on the mat conttra sitting in the ring post, the user is running toward him, jump head-on with the legs to fall open with your buttocks on the opponent's chest and begins to bounce on him jumping pelvic impacts Site holding onto the top rope or the second. This technique is more ignominious than painful, and often comic or sexual connotations.

Chops
Chop is a blow with his hand out over the opponent, but not if you use chop with his fist. There are different versions.

Backhand chop
Is to hit the chest or face the opponent with the back of the hand.

Cross chop
The user crosses his arms to his chest and charge at the foe to beat them.

Open-handed chop
This is a blow with his open hand on, usually the opponent's chest. It usually download the force on the bottom of the palm to concentrate.

Brain chop
The wrestler delivers a blow with the heel of his hand open on a very commonly used in karate .

Kesagiri chop
The user uses the back of the hands similar to the backhand chop to hit the opponent diagonally. This attack is named after the pit diagonal used in iaido .

Mongolian chop
In this variation, the wrestler download the song of the hand diagonally downward from one side of the neck of the opponent, usually using both hands.

Clothesline

Shelton Benjamin doing a clothesline to Lance Cade .

Giant Silva making a corner clothesline to HG .

(Rack or Tie) The user extends his arm horizontally and hits his opponent with him in the neck or chest to bring him down. running is usually used to increase the shock, being called running clothesline. This technique is used by most of the fighters, and is usually performed several times in one battle. This technique is sometimes confused with the lariat , since both are essentially the same movement.

Cactus clothesline
A clothesline innovated by Cactus Jack . Is that, when a wrestler is in leaning on the ropes and he comes running towards him with outstretched arm and hit him down to the ring, after giving himself after him. This technique is also called suicide outside clothesline.

Corner clothesline
The user leaves the opponent leaning against the corner of the ring and runs to him to beat him at arm's length.

Discus clothesline
The fighter turns 360 ° and then hit the opponent with a powerful clothesline.

Flying clohtesline
In this movement, the user goes to a high position as the top rope, and jump from there on a standing opponent, extending his arm to hit the opponent and throwing him. A version where the clothesline is replaced by a lariat can be seen.

Short-arm clothesline
Also known as short-range or short clothesline clothesline, this variation is when an attacker takes the opponent's arm, urging him to it and applying a clothesline . It can also be used after applying a wrech arm or wrist lock before pushing to the attacker.

Three-point stance clothesline
In this move the wrestler is in a position three-point stance (crouching with a fist on the floor and the other free hand, used in football), and out of this pose in a race to the opponent, it is necessary to run a clothesline . This technique was innovated by Jim Duggan .

Lariat

(Tie) The wrestler beats his opponent with his arm extended in the chest or neck to bring him down, moving the arm before and after impact of a sequence of pumping to increase the force of the blow. This attack was pioneered by Stan Hansen , and is used in Japan in place of the clothesline , more common in the United States . Leg lariat In this movement, the user skips extending the leg back so that his hamstring knock the opponent's neck and make him fall. This attack is basically the same as a calf kick .

Double ax handle
The user interlace your hands and move arms in a pendulum to strike a blow with the side of the hand against the abdomen, back or face the opponent, sometimes while the wrestler pretends to have an ax or a hammer in his hands. This movement was pioneered by Ivan Putski , who called Polish Hammer. There is an air variant of the technique.

Drops
In these techniques the user is dropped on the opponent down with a body part to hit her.

Butt drop
This technique uses the buttocks and the weight to crush the other. This movement is the same as a seated senton .

Chop Drop
The wrestler is dropped to the ground hitting the side of the hand to the head or chest of the opponent.

Elbow drop
In this technique, used by most of the fighters, a user is located next to an opponent lying on the mat and dropped next to him or about him with an elbow raised to do with him landing on his chest, back or face the opponent. This attack is very basic and is used by most of the fighters, especially heavy weight or size. Discus elbow drop The user stands next to an opponent lying and gives a 180 ° on itself before landing on his elbow. This technique is popularly called Powerdrive Elbow .

Fist Drop

Consists of dropping the fist (usually after jumping) over a fallen opponent by hitting any part of the opponent's body. A famous example is the Five Knuckle Shuffle wrestler John Cena , making it accompanied by ridicule.

Forearm drop
Is to make a lock on a limb, often the arm, then throw the opponent to the ground with that part covered, preventing the protection of the enemy with his arm.

Handispring elbow drop
The fighter has the opponent in any corner of the ring, then this is in the corner opposite to give two turns of 180 degrees and land on his back and hitting the opponent with his elbow. It is most used by the female division.

Headbutt drop
The wrestler is dropped to the horizontal body to strike a blow with his head on, usually the abdomen. It is rarely used due to whiplash produces the user, similar to air version .

Knee Drop
You squat jumps on the opponent's head and hits him lying with his knee. Used by Ric Flair . Knee drop bulldog In this technique the user releases cer one knee with his weight on the neck of the opponent to push her face into the ground.

Leg drop

Hulk Hogan Atomic Leg Drop applying a (Running jumping leg drop) to Vince McMahon .

Widely used, is to be dropped on an opponent's body part (neck, neck, chest or otherwise) to land on him in the leg. There are versions running, jumping, diving and more. This technique is used by many fighters. Discus leg drop The user, after stopping the opponent on the ground, jump on it by turning on itself to fall with his leg over the opponent by looking in the opposite direction he jumped. Double leg drop In this variation the wrestler's leg drop jumps in front of a fallen opponent and board both legs in the air to land on him with both. Guillotine leg drop

Undertaker about to perform a guillotine leg drop to Edge .

In this variant, the opponent is left lying in the ring with his head outside, under the ropes, and meanwhile, the wrestler is outside of them on the floor, and jump straight leg to fall over the neck of opponent, like a guillotine . This technique was popularized by The Undertaker . Leg drop bulldog In this technique, the wrestler performs a leg drop on the neck of another, thereby driving the opponent's face into the ground, in a form of bulldog . Somersault leg drop The wrestler, after leaving the opponent on his back, jumps forward to giving a somersault fall back sitting on the floor venting his leg against the opponent.

Elbow smash
The user hits the opponent with his elbow.

Facewash

With a rival sitting in the corner, the user proceeds to support the side of his boot in the face of the opponent and moves back and forth leg to brush it against him. This movement, almost universally used by heels in derision over its rivals, this attack is usually preceded by another designed to harm the opponent cornered him down to sit and perform the technique.

Forearm club
The user to bend forward and raises his arm to download your forearm against the opponent's back, often sending him to the canvas. This movement is usually used for large fighters.

Forearm smash
Is that the wrestler beats his opponent with the forearm in the face with some momentum.

Flying forearm smash
When the attacker runs towards the opponent (usually after bouncing on the strings) jumps, connecting the forearm blow in the face of the rival.

Sliding forearm smash
The user, after leaving the opponent seated, runs the ropes to bounce off them, and taking momentum, runs to the opponent dropping halfway to slide across the floor against him hitting his fist against his face. This attack was innovated by Masato Tanaka as D Sliding.

Headbutt
(Heading) consists of a skull hitting the opponent's body part, either the head or chest. This movement is usually done by grasping the opponent's head and pulling it to hit itself, directing attack to a region of the opponent's head to cause more pain than the impact itself.

Battering ram
The wrestler, having cornered the opponent left, runs to him and stamped her head against his chest.

Diving headbutt
In this technique, the user jumps from an elevated position on the opponent, landing in a header against any part of your body, usually the chest or abdomen. This move was innovated by serendipity by Harley Race , who slipped from the corner and fell on his opponent's head, resulting in not only the diving headbutt, but a particularly dangerous variant in which the jump is performed with the rigid body and free fall, sometimes called a

swan-dive diving headbutt. Race then adapted it as a normal move, and then be copied and popularized by The Dynamite Kid . Race declared that feels remorse for having invented the motion because he feels guilt had back pain and neck who have suffered several wrestlers who use the swan-dive diving headbutt. Then it was revealed that this version does not only affect the spine, but also cause brain damage. El Santo and El Hijo del Santo popularized a variant safer, being called by them I ran to Christ, and that is referred to today simply as a diving headbutt. June Izumida uses a variation where it turns 45 degrees to the side, hiding his arms under his body, which called Meteorite Impact.

Trappings headbutts
The wrestler, facing the opponent, grab his arms and stops, then starts downloading your head against the sternum of the rival.

Giant headbutt
This technique is a header that takes much momentum, as the attacker, without moving from his position, arch your back backwards moderately and strongly throws his head forward to hit the head or chest of his opponent with it. As a fairly avoidable, sometimes using an "Irish whip" to preclude almost entirely from its eludición and generate a greater impact on the rival. This technique has been used by wrestlers like Undertaker , Andre the Giant , Kane and others.

Hip attack
In this technique, the fighter gains momentum against the opponent (which is usually tucked away in the corner of the ring) and when he gets into position turns to hit against him using the hips. This technique is widely used by fighters of origin Samoan .

Kick
A kick is an attack with the foot, knee or leg, hitting anywhere on the body of the opponent.

Backflip kick
In this technique, the user stands with his back to the opponent and jumps back giving a somersault to hit one or both legs, before landing upside down on their hands. This technique is popularly called Pele Kick for its resemblance to the Chilean former footballer Pele .

Corner kick backflip
In this movement the user leaves the opponent relied on the corner, then the wrestler runs towards it and download a front kick on his torso, using the momentum to walk upright for the opponent to jump and perform a backward rotation, landing foot . This technique is usually used for lighter fighters to show their agility.

Big boot
The user, who is standing and facing an opponent, usually when this burden to him, and lift your leg to the height of the face, stomach, or chest to bring the sole opponent to any of them and collides against it, the momentum of the opponent. This technique is very popular as a counter, and is commonly seen in large numbers of fighters, mostly in the high stature or weight. In a variant called running big boot, the user runs to the rival to increase the force of impact.

Big Kick
The user, who is standing and facing an opponent, usually when this comes running towards him, and lift one leg to the height of the jaw to bring the soles before her and the opponent's jaw and brutally clash against it, taking advantage of the speed of the opponent. Sometimes it knocks the opponent. It is commonly seen in large numbers of fighters, mostly in large size. Is similar to the Yakuza Kick, the difference is that the Yakuza Kick, the user runs before lifting his leg to the jaw.

Bicycle Kick
The user jumps to rival keeping one leg raised before it, then downward as you lift the other in a pedaling motion, and download a hit with the sole on the face of rival.

Dragon whip
In this technique counterattack, the wrestler throws a kick at his opponent, who grips with the intention of destabilizing the user pulling his leg. However, when the opponent loose after pushing, the fighter turns on itself and another kick strikes with the same leg, using the money to increase strength.

Dropkick

Jeff Hardy doing a dropkick on Umaga .

Dropkick is a popular flying kick at the attacker, located at the opponent, jumps keeping both legs together and extended before it as high as possible, so that the body is found right in the air horizontally, striking the opponent with the soles of both feet, before landing back on the floor.

This technique is widely used in disciplines of martial arts and in professional wrestling , and has some variations.

Backflip dropkick
In this technique, the user jumps keeping both legs together and extended before it as high as possible, so that the body is found right in the air horizontally, striking the opponent with the soles of both feet, at which point, the user uses the momentum to rebound against the opponent and describes a backward rotation and turning his body standing or landing face down. This variant is more difficult than normal.

Baseball Slide
The attacker runs towards the opponent and, falling halfway down, it slides across the floor to him with his feet to hit the opponent's legs to bring it down or if the opponent is crouching, his face or chest. In professional wrestling , this technique is often used from within the ring to attack a user outside the ring, slipping under the ropes to exit the ring floor with your feet and hit a nearby opponent.

Front dropkick
The user jumps keeping both legs together and extended before it as high as possible, so that the body is found right in the air horizontally, striking the opponent with the soles of both feet, in doing so, turns on itself to fall stomach rather than your back. This technique is usually accidental, as the fighter can take to turn and face down when you used the necessary momentum.

Missile dropkick
In this version, used primarily in professional wrestling, is a higher version of the standard dropkick. In it, the user goes to a high position as the third string ring pole, and jump against a standing opponent close to hitting him with both feet before falling to the ground. Corner-to-corner missile dropkick In this movement, pioneered by Rob Van Dam , the user goes to the top rope of the ring and, having left the opponent lying in the corner next to his, he jumps, flying over the entire width of the ring (usually 6 meters) to land in place, stamping his feet and all the force of momentum to the opponent. This technique requires a large force of jumping, so it is very rarely seen in wrestlers. Dropkick Ropewalk

In this technique, the user goes to the top rope and runs for her keeping his balance, then jump into a standard dropkick against an opponent who is found near the ropes or the corner. Springboard dropkick The user, located outside the ropes and clinging to the top, jump pushing with the legs to keep their feet on the rope, dropping his hands and standing on it, from that position, the wrestler jumps forward , raising the legs to strike an opponent with both feet close.

Single leg dropkick
In this variation, the wrestler jumps to it by raising the leg to hit the opponent with it, falling back later. This movement is often mistaken for an arched big boot .

Somersault dropkick
The user runs to the opponent and jumps giving a somersault in the air, hitting the opponent with both feet after rotation.

Standing dropkick
The user jumps keeping both legs together and extended before it as high as possible, so that the body is found right in the air horizontally, striking the opponent with the soles of both feet after this, the user returns to land on their feet instead of falling back on the ground. This movement is hard to do, so it is not very common to see it.

Tiger feint dropkick
The wrestler jumps between the second and third string of the ring and grabs them to hold on, using the momentum to swing 180 degrees around them, to get to this point, the user is driven to the ropes to extend your body horizontal and raise both legs to hit the soles of both feet to an opponent near the ropes.

Football kick
Also called Soccer Kick, consists of kicking the opponent, who is sitting on the mat, vertically backwards, hitting the area of the spine, the spine and the back of the head.

Heel kick
In this technique, the user uses the heel strike the opponent, usually in a rotational movement. Spin Kick

The user stands before the opponent and turn to one side while lifting the leg, his back thanks to the turn, hitting with the heel in the abdomen, chest or face. This move is basically a floor version of the spinning heel kick . Spinning heel kick

Hardcore Holly performing a spinning heel kick in Mr. Kennedy .

It is a counter technique in which the wrestler is thrown back by turning his body sideways to lift their legs and intercept them over an enemy that would previously charge against him, striking with one or both heels in the stomach or opponent's legs.

High Kick
In this movement, the attacker lifts the leg to its maximum height and hits her side so the temple or the neck of the opponent. Enzuigiri

Chris Jericho applying a enzuigiri on Randy Orton .

The user jumps to his opponent remained horizontal in the air and supports the leg in the opponent's stomach, then the user, even with the leg in contact with the opponent, lift the other and hits the opponent's neck, before falling back to the canvas. A variant of this technique is called leg-feed enzuigiri, and is that when the opponent grabs the attacker's leg after he attempted to kick it, hitting the user jumps to the other before falling to the ground. Innovated by Antonio Inoki , the term enzui is the Japanese word for " brain stem "while giri means" cut ", detailing and the target of the attack. The word is often used to refer to any attack in which the user makes two kick the opponent without removing the first leg. Gamengiri In the other variant, the user jumps raising one leg extended to contact the opponent's neck or temples with it, landing on the floor upside down after it. Agile fighters can do a cartwheel front instead of falling face down.

Legsweep
(Tripping or sweeping) In this attack, you use your leg to strike a blow to the inside of the opponent's leg and thus make it fall. You can also take advantage of the opponent's movement for it. In this type of technique, the fighter uses his leg to jam the opponent or to hit one, he fell to the canvas.

Dragon screw legwhip
In this technique, the user grasps the leg of an opponent in front of him and turned to one side, causing the opponent to fall to the ground. Innovated by Tatsumi Fujinami .

Half Nelson legsweep
The atacnte is located behind the opponent. Then put your arm under the opponent's arm placing your hand on the opponent's neck, forcing so that the arm is in the air (Half Nelson). The wrestler then uses his other arm to pull the opponent's arm from behind the head. Then put your leg behind the opponent's falling backwards forcing the opponent to fall backward.

Russian legsweep
Also known as Russian side legsweep. A move where the wrestler is next to the rival in the same direction, putting his hand behind the opponent's head, and grabbing the opponent's leg with the attacker falls backwards causing the opponent to hit back . There is also a variation where the attacker jumps before running, leaping like the reverse bulldog, known as the Jumping Russian legsweep. Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep

The attacker is on the same side and in the same direction of the opponent, then takes a threequarter position facelock, then puts her leg behind the opponent's, then quickly fall back on the canvas (with opponent's weight on him) and causing damage in the neck.

Mule kick
The user, positioned behind the opponent, bends down and lifts a leg, hitting the opponent with it. A two-legged version is possible, sometimes with the fighter head-rolling along the ground to return to the standing position.

Overhead Kick
The user lies on her back with the opponent located near his head, at which point, the wrestler lifts his leg (or both) above him back and arches up to hit her opponent. Sometimes it takes the opponent to bend over to hit the opponent and closer.

Shoot kick
In this kick, the user downloads his leg against any part of the body hitting the opponent with the shin. Sometimes, the fighter uses shin for maximum impact.

Punt kick
In this movement, the user stands in front of an opponent usually crouching, sitting or standing and holding a kick strikes the right foot with respect to the leg to strike with the instep, similar to a yellow football . This kick is used by the fighter of the WWE Randy Orton , having as a result concussions ( kayfabe ) to whom it applies.

Roundhouse kick
A type of kick that is the attacker spins his leg in a semicircular motion, striking with the front foot or calf. This technique is very popular in many martial arts, and has numerous variations. Fighters like Yoshihiro Tajiri , Trish Stratus and Yoshi Tatsu use it as a finisher Jumping corkscrew roundhouse kick Also known as 540 Kick, is a technique used in fighting styles based on kicks, such as capoeira , karate , savate and others. Is to skip giving a 360 degree horizontal rotation in the air to strike a roundhouse kick with all the momentum of rotation, being directed generally at the head of the rival. This technique is very difficult to practice, but a large impact force.

Tiger feint kick

Rey Mysterio applying a 619 (Tiger feint kick) on Eddie Guerrero .

The wrestler jumps between the second and third string of the ring holding them to hold, and use the momentum to swing 180 degrees horizontally around the ropes and strike a kick double the opponent, which should be found leaning against the ropes or near them. This technique originated in a fake suicide dive called tiger feint that was innovated in the mid1980 by Tiger Mask in Japan and exported to Mexico for fighters like Super Astro , Oro among others, which was to make the turn on the ropes when the opponent saw a jump coming towards him. It was not until decades later when the tiger feint kick would be used by fighters like Extreme Tiger and No Face in Mexico under the name of The Pendulum, as well as Rey Mysterio in the United States under the name 619, the latter in honor of the prefix phone San Diego . It is a technique that requires great skill, being performed only by individuals very agile. The tiger feint kick is extremely popular in Japan , where it is used by many fighters.

Rolling wheel kick
In this technique, also called Koppou Rolling Kick, the fighter takes a turn to the opponent side, kicking it to take advantage of the rotation.

Scissors kick
In this technique, also called bicycle kick ax, the user leaves his opponent crouching and running toward him, jump before elevating the legs, moving them into a sequence of pedaling before downloading them vertically, downward on the opponent's neck. Booker T calls him King Special. Alicia Fox called Watch You Face.

Superkick

Michaels applying his "Sweet Chin Music" Chris Jericho .

In this attack the wrestler, placed sideways against the opponent, suddenly stretched his leg in external sense to strike up a kick in the face of bias against rivals, usually bend their bodies in the reverse direction to facilitate movement. This kick was popularized by Chris Adams and later by Shawn Michaels , in this case under the name of Sweet Chin Music.

Savate kick
An amateur version of the superkick based on savate , differing from it in that are hit to keep the leg completely straight. This move is used mostly by fighters Samoans .

Stomp
(Stomp) is stepping on the opponent when dropped on it by downloading the leg. This attack is often used by heels , because it involves an offensive rather opportunistic or "dirty".

Knee strike
Attack where the wrestler uses his knee to hit the target. The idea of striking with the knees defensively is popular in British wrestling.

Fireman's carry knee strike
In this technique the user lifts the opponent and keeps resting on his shoulders after that, the attacker loose the opponent so that it falls from the front, lifting one knee to the face of the impact against her rival. This move was innovated in Japan by KENTA in 2004 under the name Go 2 Sleep, and was popularized in America by CM Punk .

High knee

It is an attack where the opponent is ahead, then jump up to the knee or give usually on one side of the head or face. This movement has been associated with Harley Race , referring it as a Harley Race-style high knee.

Shining wizard
This technique is that, when the opponent is with one knee on the floor, the attacker runs to him and step on the raised knee to download your other leg against the opponent's head, striking with the knee or calf. Innovated by the legend of puroresu Keiji Mutoh in 2001, this technique has several variants in which the shock is replaced with the knee by a dropkick or a big boot , using the same principle of stepping on the opponent's knee, something called technically step-up.

Leapfrog body guillotine
The opponent is left trapped between the second and third string or resting on them. Then, the wrestler runs and bouncing off the ropes opposite comes to him and jump elevating the legs as much as possible to pass over the opponent with his butt hitting the neck or back the other against the ropes below.

Neck snap
The attacking wrestler leaves the opponent sitting, standing behind him. The user then runs to the opponent and giving a somersault jump (front or side) on him while grabbing his head and pulls the sheet between her legs, hiperextendiendo neck muscles and hips.

Punch

Giant Silva with a punch hitting Bono-chan .

( LP ) consists of a single blow with his closed fist at a rival body part, usually the face. Influenced by boxing , this attack is called right-handed or left handed punch punch if done with the right hand or left, respectively.

Heart punch
The wrestler lifts the opponent's left arm over your head, sometimes bent back behind her neck and then gives a strong punch to the sternum. It is based on pressure points to achieve impact on a nerve that connects with the opponent's heart to stop momentarily, knocking him unconscious. Most of the time in which this technique is used often done sell .

Mounted punches
The user is on the opponent and download multiple punches on him. This is usually done on the corner, mounted punches being called elevated, or elsewhere.

Spinning backfist
In this technique, the user raises his arm to him and rotates 360 ° on itself, hitting the opponent with his knuckles in the sequence of rotation. This movement is more striking than effective, since the rotation causes the user to turn away other for a moment and that dodge or counterattack allowed, this weakness can be reduced with increased speed.

Slap
(Slap) In this attack, the user hits the opponent's face with his open palm.

Double slap
The wrestler lifts his palms and entrechoca when the opponent's head is between them. When this attack is intended for the ears is called bell clap and was previously used by "Santino Marella".

Palm Strike
In this attack the wrestler uses the palm in a straight forward motion to deliver a solid hit. There are two-handed versions.

Senton
This is a type of technique, also called a backsplash senton splash or reverse, the user jumps on an opponent lying and he lands on his back.

Cannonball senton

In this technique the user, after leaving the opponent in the corner, runs to him and giving a somersault jump rolling on the floor with his head on back to hit the target. This technique is usually used by very agile fighters.

Seated senton
In this variation, technically a butt drop, drops the user sitting on the opponent. It is the fastest way to counter a sunset flip .

Shoulder block

Edge applying a spear to Mr. Kennedy .

In this technique, the user (whether running towards the opponent or vice versa) hits the opponent with his shoulder to bring him down. This movement is often used by wrestlers or medium-size to lure opponents, both by way of attack and defense.

Chop Block
In this technique, the user runs to an opponent on his back and coming with him, bends down and hits his shoulder against the back of one or both legs of the opponent, in order to weaken to a submission or to bend bring down the opponent.

Spear
Also known as horizontal shoulder block takedown, it runs up to where the opponent hitting the opponent's stomach with his shoulder in the horizontal direction, bringing the torso parallel to the ground at all times. In a variant called spear double leg, the user pulls the leg itself when it hits the opponent with it to maximize impact, used by former professional wrestlers Bill Goldberg and Edge.

Turnbuckle thrust

The user cornering the opponent by the turnbuckle and crouches before him, placing his shoulder against the opponent's stomach, after it is launched forward, often in succession, to hit the opponent with his shoulder.

Standing 450 ° splash
The user runs into an opponent on his back and jump head-spinning in the air , giving a complete turn, and land on your opponent's stomach.

Standing corkscrew 450 ° splash
In this movement from the previous, the user stands with his back foot to an opponent lying. Then jump back to an arc, on reaching the highest point of it, laterally rotate the body 180 and be facing the opponent, then performing a somersault on the front for aterrzar rival. This movement, which has an aerial version is extremely difficult and only a few fighters like Jack Evans or Kota Ibushi , have it in their repertoires.

Standing moonsault
The wrestler, being up and turning his back on an opponent lying, jump in an arc down by turning his body to fall on his opponent's stomach.

Standing corkscrew moonsault
This is a variant of the standing moonsault in which the wrestler, standing with his back to the opponent, jumps back describiando an arc as it rotates 360 degrees on itself until it fell to his stomach on the opponent. This move is very rarely seen, and is often used for extremely agile fighters like Jack Evans , Kota Ibushi or PAC .

Standing shooting star press
In this technique the wrestler standing over fallen opponent, jumps on him with knees to chest to rotate the body back in midair and fall to finish his stomach on the body of his opponent.

Standing corkscrew shooting star press
The wrestler stands against an opponent lying and jumps with knees to his chest to rotate 360 degrees laterally in flight before rotating the body backwards and landing on the opponent's end.

Stink Face
In this technique infamous, you rub your butt against the face of opponent when he is sitting in the corner of the ring. This move was innovated by Rikishi

Reverse stink face
The wrestler, having left his opponent sitting in the corner, he proceeds to rub her crotch against the opponent's face as a joke. Such techniques are often used by wrestlers like Hard Gay or Danshoku Dino .

Turnbuckle smash
The user approaches the opponent into the corner, grab his neck and pushes his head with his hand against the turnbuckle , usually in succession. This technique is widely used.

Uppercut
The uppercut is a blow used in boxing that usually aims at the opponent's chin. It, along with the hook (hook) one of the most powerful. In professional wrestling is popularly known as European Uppercut.

Throat thrust
Also called open-handed uppercut, in this attack the user holds the palm open and the tip hits the opponent's jaw in an upward or front. Another version, also widely used, is to hit with the same hand position in rival's throat, creating the illusion of attacking the windpipe of the opponent, that was popularized by Santino Marella under the name The Cobra. A similar variant was innovated by the late Umaga using only the thumb , being called Samoan Spike.

Weapon attack

Undertaker beating Brock Lesnar with a chair.

In this attack the user hits or attacks the opponent with a weapon. Since this involves the disqualification is usually done when the referee is not looking in fighting hardcore or in other situations.

Chair shot

You take a chair and beat her opponent, hitting with respalado anywhere in the opponent's body, usually in the head or abdomen. In another version, the wrestler grabs the chair and lowered vertically to nail the edge at one end of the opponent, usually when you intend to weaken or injure the member.

One man con-chair-to
In this variation of the staff -to-chair with the attacker places the victim's head on a chair and hits from the top with another, entrillándola between them.

Movements of transition

Rob Van Dam performing a rolling thunder.

Backflip
In this movement, the wrestler jumps back giving a somersault in the air to land on their feet again, while you make any kind of technique in the meantime or later. One type of avoidance can occur with this movement when Benoit runs to avoid an opponent's kick toward your face or to the back of your legs. In sum, the bacflip often used by fighters Mexico and Japan to demonstrate its agility.

Bridge
The user bends his back backwards, arching to rest your hands on the floor, thus avoiding a frontal blow imminent. Optionally, the user can perform a quick kip-up after the escape to return quickly to the upright position, or use the arched position to use some kind of kick to surprise the opponent.

This technique is also called Matrix dodging evasion due to its similarity to the movements made by Neo in Matrix . This move was innovated by Trish Stratus , and is used mainly for agile fighters, especially in Japan .

Discus
In this variation the opponent rotates 360 ° on its axis before launching an attack.

Feint
In this variant, the user simulates performing a technique that does not perform then, using the time to surprise the opponent and use another movement caught unaware. It may also involve the user runs a deliberate technique lentitid to dodge the opponent, leaving him vulnerable to another attack.

Handspring
In this variation, the wrestler jumps on the ropes remained upright on the floor on your hands, using the forward momentum to make your legs bounce off the ropes and use the rebound to land back on their feet and make an attack, as a back elbow or similar Another variation is to do away from the ropes, landing on hands, somersault forward and fall from standing for another handspring or a technique. A succession of these movements is often used to avoid losing momentum to fall with your hands, being especially used by Takuya Sugi .

Handstand
The wrestler places his hands on the floor and throws his legs up for some kind of attack with them, from that position. This is seen in disciplines such as capoeira .

Pendulum
The wrestler grabs the ropes, usually from outside, and uses them to oscillate as a pendulum between them and build momentum for an attack. This is usually done usually in the corner of the ring.

Rolling Thunder
Innovated by Rob Van Dam , this technique wrestler head-wheel on the ground in one or more full rotations to move against an opponent and make any kind of attack. This technique is often used to surprise the opponent and impede their ability to predict the attack after rotation, and to give spectacular movement.

Rope aided

In this variant, the user grabs the ropes for a technique that requires you off balance. In another variation, called turnbuckle mounted, the wrestler performs a technique while he is sitting up or clinging to the protective ring.

Somersault
In this variant, the user jumps giving a forward somersault off the ground to land up and do another technique.

Attacks Illegal
The illegal attack are those that are not allowed in combat, some are hit in the crotch, pinching and / or hit in the eye, used against the opponent objects such as chairs, tables and stairs unless the rules of combat permit.

Asian mist
In this technique the wrestler spit in the face of rival colored liquid to blind him with it, usually when the referee is not looking. This technique originated in Japan , where he was called dokugiri poisonous fog ? ) by its creator, The Great Kabuki . After that, it was exported by wrestlers like The Great Muta , Tajiri , Kiyoshi and some more. The fighters perform this technique using a small capsule of latex or plastic , which is stored in the laundry until used. When it is focused by the cameras, the fighter enters the capsule mouth, biting his teeth to release the liquid in the mouth, and spit on the opponent at the right time. In other versions, the wrestler does not attempt to hide the liquid, bringing it in bottles, cans and other containers, usually when your gimmick allows. The liquid consists of water dyed with food coloring or Kool-Aid . The mixture can be almost any color, but the most common is green. According to their color, every liquid has a different effect, within the fiction.
    

Red: This liquid is used to create the illusion of burning the opponent. Yellow: its function is to paralyze the opponent. Blue: knocks the opponent. Purple: disorient the opponent. Black: its effect is to blind the opponent for weeks, causing damage to the eyeballs. This variant is very rarely used.

In addition to these versions, you can use other liquids such as blood (fake), beer or water simple. In fighting hardcore can be found made with alcohol, flammable liquids or style authentic fire-eaters , though not common, due to the high risk involved.

Biting

In this technique, the user bites the foe. This movement is often used by fighters with a gimmick of connotations wild or the like, as George Steele , who popularized the technique.

Eye Poke
In this technique, usually performed by heels , the user puts his finger in the eye of rival to blind him momentarily and gain advantage over him. This movement is also called thumb to the eye.

Eye Rake
You scratch the eyelids of his rival to blind him momentarily. This technique, as well as its previous version, is used by heels to gain momentary advantage against the opponent.

Fireball
In this technique, the user employs a hidden cigarette lighter to ignite a fast-burning object, like a sheet of cellulose nitrate , and throws the opponent's face to distract him. This technique carries a high risk of burns, so it is little used, but its use can still be seen in hardcore fighting and others. This high-risk attack was innovated The Sheik .

Fish hook
The user bends the index in the form of hook and uses it to pull the opponent hooking of the mouth or nose. A variation of this technique was made famous by Austin Aries .

Hangman
In this variation the wrestler, in different ways, driving the opponent's throat against one of the ropes to cut your breathing and cause pain in the neck. This variant is common to see a catapult .

Hair pull
Hair is to pull the opponent. This is done often among female fighters, as Mae Young and The Fabulous Moolah .

Low blow
A direct attack on the opponent's crotch to gain advantage over him. This type of attack involves the disqualification, but may be performed when the referee is not looking or when the fighting permits, and is commonly used by heels and fighters of comedy. Although the most common method is a quick kick, other versions can be punched, punches and knee drops . The inverted atomic drop and other techniques also target the opponent's crotch, but are not considered disqualifying.

Testicular claw In this variant of the above, the user grabs the crotch of the opponent and the press, causing a huge pain in it. This technique is often used to seek disqualification.

Movements professional wrestling team
This section covers the professional wrestling moves which are used by two or more people in team matches.

Movements assisted
This type of motion is usually a fighter doing some kind of technique to the opponent while his partner helps in some way, such as lifting the opponent, serving to support or any other fighter.

Aided backbreaker
In this technique, a wrestler lifts the opponent in any type of technical and discharges it back on the knees of his companion.

Aided brainbuster
In this move a wrestler help another to lift the foe into a double vertical suplex to be dropped in the position of brainbuster typical.

Dropkick Aided
The wrestler stands in front of his companion and crouches before him, then grabs the leg and joins suddenly throwing back, while the wrestler thrown open legs to go over the heads of your partner and make a dropkick to an opponent, the momentum and greater angle given for the help. When a fighter is knocked against two opponents, this technique is called single person aided double dropkick.

Aided Gutbuster
The wrestler lifts the opponent and discharges it frontally on the knees of his companion.

Aided neckbreaker
Any movement is aided by another person for a neckbreaker, to turn the opponent and this impacts heavily on the canvas. Another version of Aided Neckbreaker known as an elevated neckbreaker is when a tag team member attacker leaves the opponent in an elevated position and the other runs a neckbreaker. Aided whiplash This is a whiplash normal, but when the opponent is caught in the air. Assisted Gory Neckbreaker

A wrestler puts his opponent in a position of gory neckbreaker, the other wrestler takes the opponent's arms, forcing the opponent to press his neck. Then both fighters come to sit or kneel down completing the neckbreaker. Aided wheelbarrow facebuster A wheelbarrow facebuster can be many variations combiando facbusters and DDT. When a wrestler puts the opponent in a wheelbarrow position facebuster the other applies a front facelock and ready to do a DDT, while the other sat dropped, hitting the opponent's face on the canvas, ending the wheelbarrow facebuster

Aided piledriver
A wrestler takes the opponent and lifts it into a belly to belly position piledriver keeping up. The other climbs the ring post and jump on it, falling on the shoulders of his partner so that their knees and the opponent's head is driven to the ground. This technique was invented by Brothers of Destruction .

Aided powerbomb
In this technique a user lifts the opponent into a belly to back suplex and discharges on the shoulders of a teammate for a powerbomb . Other variant of this técnca is a wrestler lifts the opponent into a powerbomb and your partner helps the opponent to fall, with a mat slam and other techniques. There are other variants in which a wrestler takes the opponent into a powerbomb and his partner made an attack on rival raised, either from land or jumping off the turnbuckle. Aided Superbomb A wrestler sits on the second string cornerback, or at any rate in the third. His teammate puts his head under the opponent's arm, raise it so similar to a belly to back suplex and holds it against the first wrestler lifting the lower back to lift his opponent's legs, which are used by the wrestler lift the opponent sitting and sit on his shoulders, and released by the second fighter. Then get up and jump in a Superbomb, either sitting or kneeling on the floor to hit the ring to the opponent.

Aided splash
In this technique a fighter jumps on his partner who is prepared to advance it as a jumping surface putting your back, arms, legs or shoulders while both are in the center of the ring and lying next to an opponent, then the on the other wrestler jumps and lands on the opponent's stomach or chest of his. This movement can be seen in most variants of splash , and shooting star press , 450 ° splash , moonsault and others, on the other hand, can also be made sentons , drops and other techniques.

Another variant of this movement is that a fighter makes a throwing technique your partner to throw the opponent and finish him landing on the manner previously explained. Elevated splash In this technique, also called aided diving splash, a wrestler (usually the largest and strongest of the team) is on the corner of the ring while the other gets on the turnbuckle of the same corner, then stand up to the shoulders of the first fighter and jumps from a diving splash them or frog splash against a fallen opponent. This movement is more powerful than an ordinary splash because it increases the height and reach with the help. In another variation, the first wrestler climbs the second rope and from there helps your partner to jump from his shoulders. This variant was used by Rosey & The Hurricane , who called him Superhero Splash. This technique offers other variants jump, as crossbody , senton , moonsault and others. Aided suicide dive In this variant of the previous one fighter is placed next to the cuerds and his partner jumps on him to be thrown out of the ring and land on an opponent that there is feasibly a form of suicide dive .

Aided wheelbarrow facebuster Poetry in motion

Hardy Boyz performing a poetry in motion on Billy Gunn .

Also called corner attack aided in this technique a fighter leaves the opponent in the corner and make any kind of attack against him after it was placed in front of opponent and placed on elbows and knees. Then your partner rushes to him and jumps on his back for use as a trampoline and another attack the opponent.

Combinations of movements

In this type of movement of equipment, a fighter makes a move while the other partner performs the same opponent.

Combination of arm twist and diving attack
A wrestler grabs the opponent's arm and twisted to lock, then, fellow jumps from the turnbuckle using an air raid on the imprisoned arm to weaken it. The air strikes are generally more common diving elbow drops and the like.

Combination of backbreaker rack and diving attack
A wrestler grabs an opponent and keeps up on his shoulders in a backbreaker rack and can be on the shoulder or the knee, then his partner takes the ring post and jump over him, landing on the opponent in some kind of air technique. An elaborate version of this movement is used by Jack Evans & Roderick Strong , who call it Ode to the Bulldogs.

Combination of backbreaker rack neckbreaker Combination of camel clutch and dropkick Combining big leg drop and splash
Combination of diving and diving leg drop splash In this technique, a fighter gets on a cornerback and fellow goes up top farthest from him, having left the opponent lying face up in the middle of the ring. Then both simultaneously jump on him, landing the first with his leg over the opponent's chest and the second with his belly on the opponent. This technique was called Falling Fate by Hardy Boyz . In another variant, innovated by Nova & Chris Chetti and called Tidal Wave, both fighters jump from the same corner clutching the shoulders to loosen up just before impact and fall with one leg and another with its abdomen.

Combination of electric chair and diving attack

Team 3D making a Dudleyville Device.

In this technique a wrestler lifts the opponent sitting on his shoulders facing the same direction. His teammate jumps from the turnbuckle and hits the opponent raised with any kind of air attack, dropping the shoulders of his companion at the same time as the first wrestler drops back, increasing the power of the blow. This technique was invented by Legion of Doom , who used a version of flying clothesline and called Doomsday Device. Recently, Team 3D innovated a version called Dudleyville Device in which the wrestler holding the opponent is dropped back into a electric chair drop , rather than relying solely on the blow dealt by her partner.

Combination of drop toehold and attack
In this technique, a fighter stumble and fall flat on the opponent with a drop toehold while your partner makes an attack on him, which is usually an elbow drop , leg drop or headbutt drop .

Combinations of cutter
Combination of flapjack and cutter A wrestler grabs an opponent's legs in front, lifting it above him, and meanwhile, your partner grabs the opponent's head, placing it over his shoulder and looking in his direction. Then both fighters are dropped, causing the second cutter to make a more powerful opponent by lifting comes from your partner. This technique was innovated by the now called Team 3D , the 3D flame. Combination of Gory special and cutter Combination of wheelbarrow facebuster and cutter

Combination of facebuster and neck snap
In this technique, a fighter makes an opponent a technique that makes you fall face down, like a facebuster or inverted suplex , then runs to his partner while the opponent gets up and hits a neck snap at him.

Combination of Fireman's carry takeover and diving attack
A wrestler lifts an opponent on his shoulders, while his partner climbs the top rope and jump into some kind of air attack against the opponent's neck, which is sent down flipping it back on the ground. A popular version lamada Air Raid by Motor City Machine Guns ( Alex Shelley & Chris Sabin ) provides for the opponent to be turned on wrestler jumping knee when he landed.

Combination of pinfall and attack
In this type of technique, a fighter makes an attack against his opponent to knock it down and thus make it easier for your partner use some sort of pinned on him. Currents are usually combinations lariats or dropkicks with various roll-ups . Combination of front facelock and roll-up A fighter does bend his opponent and puts his head under his arm to hold him while his companion dropped behind him and grabs his leg, at which point, the fighter sits up suddenly to fall back to the opponent while the first release the prey.

Combination of kick and suplex
In this combo, a fighter download any type of kick (eg, a drop kick ) against an opponent while his partner stands behind him for a suplex variant back of the momentum given by the kick of the first.

Combinations neckbreaker
Combination of belly to back suplex and neckbreaker A wrestler puts his head under his arm an opponent on his back and lifts him over his shoulders. Then his partner grabs the opponent's head and simultaneously held both fighters are dropped to the ground, applying the second a neckbreaker to rival. Several variants of neckbreaker can be used in this technique. Merge and powerbomb neckbreaker One Of The Two Companions Makes a powerbomb while the other makes it a Neckebreaker In The Air Combination of Superbomb and neckbreaker

A fighter does bend the opponent between your legs, grab your belly and lifts him up to sit on the shoulders. Then drops forward while a teammate grabs the opponent's head as it falls and takes him to the ground as neckbreaker . Combination of Russian legsweep and neckbreaker Combination of Samoan neckbreaker drop and In this move a wrestler takes the opponent and lifts him into a fireman's carry position. Your partner goes to the turnbuckle and jumps, grabbing the opponent's head sustained for a diving neckbreaker as the first wrestler falls backwards into a samoan drop. In another variation the second wrestler jumps off the post but it makes Combination of twist of fate and swanton bomb In this movement, used by Hardy boyz, a fighter takes a twist of fate or twist of fate the opponent while the other, it takes a swanton bomb at the opponent while on the canvas. This movement is called Extreme and is very effective combination

Combination of diving powerbomb and attack
A wrestler lifts his opponent on his shoulders in a powerbomb and holds it in place while another of his team, which previously had ascended the turnbuckle, jump from it carrying out an air strike on the opponent, which is pushed by the first fighter to the ground so that the force of impact is twofold. There are many different versions of this technique, since the air strike can be a diving crossbody , hurricanrana diving , diving bulldog , diving double knee drop , flying clothesline and many others.

Combination of double knee backbreaker and powerbomb
A fighter (the strongest of the tag team) grabs his opponent and applies a powerbomb by uploading it to your shoulders. Then his companion in front of him, jump to grab the opponent's shoulders and knees placing his back. Then the first wrestler falls (in several types: falling, sitout ...) to hit his opponent to the ground when the second is still hanging, so that it applies a double knee backbreaker increased the rival power.

Combination powerbomb and springboard backflip three-quarter facelock falling inverted DDT
A wrestler grabs an opponent's abdomen and crouched before him up on his shoulders. Then his partner, behind the first fighter, grab from behind and over his shoulder the opponent's head up; done this, and still holding the opponent either, the second runs to the ropes to walk upright and propel them to tilt vertically, while the first fall deka the opponent to fall comapñero impacting your opponent's neck against the floor.

This technique was innovated by Paul London & Brian Kendrick and currently used by Motor City Machine Guns ( Alex Shelley & Chris Sabin ) under the name Made in Detroit.

Combination of lariat and running chop block
In this technique one of the wrestlers apply a running lariat to a standing opponent and the other applies a running chop block all at once.

Combination of spinning superkick and legsweep Combination of Bearhug and attack
Combination of Bearhug and diving crossbody Combination of Bearhug and high kick Combination of seated senton Bearhug and Combination of Bearhug, superkick and jackknife pin Combination of Bearhug and diving leg drop A fighter around the abdomen of the opponent with his arms and pressed them in a Bearhug and meanwhile, your partner takes the turnbuckle . Then the first fighter is separated from the rival, still holding her waist with his arms so that the opponent's upper body rests on the floor, altiempo the second wrestler jumps on a diving leg drop. Combination of Bearhug and lariat Also known as the Hart Attack, this technique a fighter up to the other in a Bearhug and fellow running and jumping rope from the pole to his opponent's chest arm above the head of the first fighter to drop the opponent to completion technique in a spinebuster.

Combinations of DDT
Combination of flapjack and DDT A wrestler stands before the opponent and grab your legs to lift it back over his shoulder. Meanwhile, the second wrestler grabs the opponent's head and falls back into a DDT . This technique was used by the former team MNM ( Joey Mercury & Johnny Nitro ) under the name of Snapshot. Combination of wheelbarrow facebuster and DDT A fighter, the strongest of the group comes up behind your opponent and grab your legs to lift. Then his partner, face to face with the opponent, surrounding his head with one arm, while the

first sat down by lowering the opponent, the other makes it mimics, performing a DDT increased power. Combination of belly to back suplex and inverted DDT A wrestler takes the opponent by putting his head under his arm and lifting it over one shoulder, his partner, behind him, takes the opponent's head and tilts backward on the shoulder of the first to fall into an inverted DDT.

Combinations of diving leg drop
Combination of double leg hold and diving leg drop A wrestler grabs an opponent's legs on his back, sometimes after a double leg takedown slam or double leg, then his partner, jumped on the ring post, jumping on a diving guillotine leg drop , hitting the opponent's neck elevation with leg. Sometimes the technique is transicionada in a catapult or catapult backbreaker .

Combination of wheelbarrow hold diving leg drop bulldog and
A wrestler grabs an opponent's legs upside down to avoid the possibility of moving the site. Then another wrestler, jumped on the turnbuckle, jumping on a diving leg drop against the neck of the opponent arrested for crashing his head against the floor.

Low blow diving headbutt
While an opponent holds and keeps open the legs of a fighter lying, sometimes applying a wishbone , another takes the turnbuckle and jumps to fall into a diving headbutt with his head hitting the opponent's crotch. This technique was popularized by Team 3D under the name Wassup?.

Low blow diving leg drop Combination of reverse STO and jumping enzuigiri
In this technique a fighter takes a reverse STO an opponent while your partner makes a enzuigiri on the opponent's neck, he fell face down on the strength of both techniques.

Combination of Russian legsweep and clothesline Combination sidewalk slam and attack
In this technique, a wrestler is placed next to an opponent, facing in the same direction, grabs the legs and torso up perpendicular to the user's body, keeping it in that position. Then sit dropped to impact the back of the opponent to the ground while the second wrestler applies any kind of

attack against the opponent's head exposed. These attacks can consist of inverted DDT , spinning headlock elbow drop , diving leg drop and diving elbow drop , a version innovated by the team of Tyson Tomko & Snitsky .

Combination of catapult and slingshot attack Combination of catapult and slingshot clothesline Combination of slingshot catapult and missile dropkick Combination of slingshot catapult and diving bulldog Combination of STO and big boot
A wrestler stands next to an opponent facing away, with one arm around his neck and moves one leg between hers. Then another fighter from your computer runs and hits the opponent with a big boot to do the first fall in a STO .

Combination of STO and German suplex Combination of STO and Russian legsweep Combination suplex and superkick
A wrestler grabs the opponent at a back-to-belly. Meanwhile, a second wrestler applies the opponent a superkick on the chin and the first building on the momentum of the attack, the opponent applied a bridging German suplex.

Combination of vertical suplex and diving crossbody
A fighter rises to one in a vertical suplex and holding it in the air. Then your partner gets on the top rope and jumps on a diving crossbody against the enemy while you loose the first wrestler to fall back just as the second to hit against him to make him fall more momentum. This technique has variants with other forms of jumping, such as diving elbow smash and others.

Movements double
Con-chair-to
Two fighters, equipped with individual seats, hit the opponent for two different angles with them, often clashing his head between them. A one-man version also exists. They used The Edge And Christian

Double arm drag
Two wrestlers placed against an opponent charging, each grab an arm of the opponent and, lifting for them, dropped back, caused the opponent's own momentum to flip him run on his own and makes it fall back to the canvas, in a motion similar to a suplex .

Double arm trap neckbreaker Double back elbow
Both fighters, with the opponent charging towards them, raise the elbows simultaneously giving back to the match for it in its own momentum, crash against them and be shot down.

Double bulldog
Double jumping cutter This movement was used by
Rated RKO (Edge & Randy Orton)

Double chokeslam
Two wrestlers placed at the opponent, grab his neck with one arm and lift him to drop back to the canvas, in one embodiment of chokeslam . Single person double chokeslam In this variation, a wrestler applies simultaneous chokeslams two opponents, taken one with each hand. This variation is commonly applied by wrestlers like Kane , The Undertaker and The Big Show lightweight fighters. Stereo chokeslam Also called simultaneous chokeslams is when two wrestlers chokeslams applied to two different opponents at the same time. This variation is commonly applied by members of the team called the Brothers of Destruction . Triple chokeslam Another variation, used by the team of Kane and Big Show , is the triple chokeslam, where both wrestlers apply a Double chokeslam an opponent with his free hand while applying a chokeslam another opponent, all simultaneously.

Double clothesline

A team of two are taken from the shoulders, linking arms, and use this position for a clothesline the opponent, sometimes with ropes to make him fall from the ring.

Double DDT
Two fighters are inclined to an opponent in front of them, usually after a double side kick or side kick, put his head under his left arm wrestler on the right and vice versa, and are dropped for a DDT. Double inverted DDT In this version of the former wrestler is placed face up and fall into an inverted DDT. It was called Slop Drop by The Godwinns . Double lifting DDT This is a version similar to the first in which the fighters up to the other before sitting down. It was used by The Brood , who called Impaler DDT. Double springboard backflip three-quarter falling reverse DDT facelock

Double diving moonsault side slam
This technique, also called Spanish Fly, is to run two separate moonsaults side slam on either side of the opponent.

Double drop toehold Double elbow drop
Two fighters, standing on either side of a fallen opponent, hold hands and forearms together, sitting on the elbows falling on the opponent.

Double electric chair drop
Both fighters are placed laterally a team facing the same direction, up to an opponent and sit on the shoulders of two users, looking in the same direction. Then the two fighters are dropped back to hit the back of the opponent against the mat.

Double enzuigiri Double fireman's carry
In this position a team fighters are placed back to back foot to lift the opponent then across his shoulders, and perform from there different techniques

Double flapjack
The wrestlers grab each leg of a fighter at the forefront of them and dropped back to the opponent head-on crash on the floor.

Double hip toss
In this technique two fighters are located on both sides of an opponent, facing the same direction as him, and each slide one arm under the arm nearest rival. Then the attackers up in unison to the opponent's arms and tumble to fall back on the ground. There is a variant called catching hip toss in which the opponent is not sent directly to the ground, but is held subject to transition between the movement in any other technical equipment.

Double Irish whip

Rene Bonaparte & Lance Cade by performing a double Irish whip to Magnum TOKYO .

Each wrestler grabs an opponent's arm and rotate on their own, dropping for the opponent to bounce off the ropes and can receive another attack.

Double mat slam Double Snapmare
Both fighters are located on both sides of the opponent, slightly developed about him. So grab the opponent's head and rest on your shoulders between the two, pulling him to flip forward and falling back or sitting.

Double Spear
The wrestlers, before the opponent frontally located, run towards him and, in keeping with the torso parallel to the floor and shoulder to shoulder, they charge an opponent in the abdomen with the shoulder to bring him down.

Double STO

Both fighters are located on both sides of the opponent, facing away from him, then, around your neck with your arms while everyone gets a leg between hers to unbalance and, immediately afterwards, drop to the ground to hit your back.

Double submission
Is that two fighters made two keys instead of submission to an opponent. As the referee only takes a few seconds of time for both team members are both inside the ring, sometimes one of the two performed their technique from outside the ropes.

Double kick
Double big boot Two wrestlers stand with one leg and beat the soles face of a rival, while he was loading or running them, running a version called double big boot. Double dropkick

HG & Alan Kuroki doing a double dropkick on Giant Silva .

The fighters made paths dropkicks to a single opponent. This air movement has a version called double missile dropkick, in which users jump from the turnbuckle, sometimes a continuous drop leg or a headbutt Double superkick In this technique two fighters made paths superkicks a single opponent, and can be designed to the same body part (eg, face) or not. A variant, called Total Elimination of The Eliminators , is that both fighters being executed simultaneously superkicks one on each side of the rival, entrillando his head between the two kicks.

Double suplex
Double vertical suplex

Two wrestlers are placed side by side and facing the opponent and lift in a vertical suplex between them, leaving car crash back to the opponent to the ground. This technique is often used against an opponent that a single fighter in the team could not get up. belly to back suplex Double Both fighters are positioned behind the opponent and put their heads in each other's arms, grab him and lift between them, after that, dropped to hit the opponent sitting on the mat.

Other
Sky slam lift
This technique is for each wrestler grabs a leg and an arm of the opponent to lift them and, reaching its highest point, throw it back to the ground. There is a variant used in teams of many members in which the opponent is up among several, increasing the strength of the technique.

Leapfrog body guillotine
A wrestler grabs the opponent's legs and supports over the top rope with his neck or chest located on it, then his partner rests on their shoulders and jump from them to sit down on the opponent, causing the weight to boost rival against the rope.

Wishbone
This popular technique is that two fighters pull both legs of a fallen opponent in the opposite direction, causing pain in the joints and groin.

Translated 2012

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