Building  Foundational    Literacy  and  Language  Routines,   Language  and  Literacy  Series,  Part  I  
    Local  District  4   Administrators’  Meeting  

 

April  11,  2012   Dale  Vigil,  Ed.D.,  Superintendent  
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Language  and  Literacy  Series     Building  upon  o  •  instruc5on,  this  ur  prior  work  sin  literacy  and  language   three  month   eries  will  deepen  our  

understanding  and  increase  our  capacity  to  lead  school  site   instruc5onal  conversa5ons.   •  We  will  explore  the  Treasures  program’s  use  of  instruc5onal   rou5nes  in  both  English  Language  Development  and  Literacy.     •  This  judicious  review  will:  
•  •  •  •  Iden5fy  observable  instruc5onal  procedures  in  the  program     Increase  academically  engaged  par5cipa5on  by  more  learners   Build  school-­‐wide  expecta5ons  for  gradual  release     Enable  school  sites  to  calibrate  their  expecta5ons  across   classrooms  
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Series  Descriptions    
•  April  –  Rou5nes  and  Procedures  in  the  Primary  Grades  
•  Building  founda5onal  literacy  and  language  rou5nes  

•  May  –    
•  Part  1  -­‐  Rou5nes  in  Grades  3-­‐6    
•  Applying  the  same  rou5nes  to  more  demanding  content  in  context    

•  Part  2  -­‐  Language  Objec5ves  in  English  Language  Development  
•  Iden5fy  the  dis5nct  purpose  of  the  language  objec5ves  in  the  ELD  program   and  the  SDAIE  lessons  in  the  ELA  program  

•  June  –  Language  Objec5ves  in  our  English  Language  Development  (CONT.)  
•  Observing  for  language  objec5ves  that  are  dis5nct  to  ELD  and  SDAIE  in   our  Treasures  curricula  

•  June  –  Voluntary  Session  –  PuYng  all  the  Parts  Together  for  2012-­‐2013  
•  Alignment  of  our  program  resources     •  Implica5ons  of  the  periodic  assessments   •  SeYng  up  a  strategic  plan  for  language  and  literacy  
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Objectives  for  Today  
•  Rou5nes  and  Procedures  in  the  Primary  Grades  
•  Review  the  first-­‐grade  language  arts  teacher’s  edi5on  and   resources  to  iden5fy  the  systema5c  use  of  rou5nes  and   procedures.   •  Define  the  instruc5onal  sequence  of  the  rou5ne  to  increase   student  independence  and  strategic  applica5on  of  the  rou5nes.   •  Evaluate  the  gradual  evolu5on  of  the  rou5nes  in  accessing  more   complex  content.  

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Integrating  our  Past  Work  

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Instructional  Routines    
•  What  Are  Instruc<onal  Rou<nes?  
•  According  to  the  American  Heritage  Dic5onary  of  the  English   Language  (2000)  rou5nes  are  prescribed,  detailed  courses  of   ac5on  to  be  followed  regularly;  a  standard  procedure;  a  set  of   customary  and  oaen  mechanically  performed  procedures  or   ac5vi5es.  

•  Rou5nes  are  step-­‐by-­‐step  processes  that:  
Begin  and  end  with  a  clear  signal   Follow  the  same  sequence  of  steps  every  5me  used   Are  consistent   Require  minimal  teacher  talk   Are  used  with  a  brisk  pace   Oaen  contain  nonverbal  and  verbal  teacher  signals  indica5ng   a  student  response   •  Slowly  transfer  the  responsibility  of  the  task  to  the  students   •  •  •  •  •  • 

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Instructional  Routines  
Why  Are  Instruc<onal  Rou<nes  Important?  
  Rou5nes  reflect  best  classroom  prac5ces  and  help  students   focus  on  the  new  learning  tasks,  rather  than  learning  a  new   way  to  do  something.    They  are  effec5ve  at  organizing   instruc5on  in  seYng  clear  expecta5ons  for  students.     Rou5nes  help  teachers  scaffold  instruc5on,  minimize   instruc5onal  5me  and  teacher  talk,  maximize  student   par5cipa5on,  and  overall  make  learning  a  new  skill  easier.    
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Start  Smart:  K-­‐6  Objectives  
•  Teach  key  instruc5onal  rou5nes   •  Establish  classroom  procedures   •  Assess  skills   •  Review  previous-­‐grade  skills  (1st  –  6th  grades)  

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Start  Smart:  Kindergarten  
Start  Smart  builds  the  founda5on  for  reading   success   Lessons  are  designed  to  teach  and  reinforce:   •  Phonemic  awareness   •  Listening  comprehension   •  The  alphabet   •  Beginning  reading  concepts      
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Start  Smart:  First  Grade  
•  Start  Smart  lays  the  groundwork  for  literacy   success  in  the  years  to  come   •  Lessons  are  designed  to  teach  and  reinforce:  
•  Phonemic  awareness   •  Listening  comprehension   •  Vocabulary   •  Wri5ng    
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Start  Smart:  Grades  2-­‐6  
•  Start  Smart  con5nues  to  build  on  the   founda5onal  skills  and  rou5nes  introduced  in   grades  K-­‐1   •  Second  grade  begins  the  transi5on  to  upper   grade  rou5nes   •  Grades  3-­‐6  establish  and  con5nue  the  same   rou5nes  but  with  more  complex  content      

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  Start  Smart:    What  does  it  look   like  in  Kindergarten?  
•  Three  weeks  (Unit  1)   •  Establish  classroom  management  rou5nes   •  Learn  the  why  and  how  of  the  instruc5onal   rou5nes        
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  Start  Smart:    What  does  it  look   like  in  First  Grade?  
•  Three  weeks  (prior  to  Unit  1)   •  Establish  and  focus  on  instruc5onal  rou5nes   •  Emphasis  is  on  learning  to  read    

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Start  Smart  for  First  Grade  
•  Iden5fy  a  rou5ne  
•  Where  is  the  rou5ne  described?    First  lesson,  Instruc5onal   Rou5ne  Handbook,  marginalia...  

•  Cite  lessons  in  the  Teacher’s  Edi5on   •  Define  the  rou5ne  
•  •  •  •  •  What’s  the  purpose?   What’s  the  syntax?   What’s  the  outcome?   How  does  it  change  over  5me?   What  misconcep5ons  might  teachers  have  about  the  rou5ne?  
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Start  Smart  for  First  Grade  
•  Iden5fy  a  rou5ne:  Interac+ve  wri+ng   •  Where  is  the  rou5ne  described?  Rou+ne  descrip+on:   Unit  1  TE  page  S83   •  Cite  lessons  in  the  Teacher’s  Edi5on   •  Start  Smart  lessons:  S23,  S29,  S53,  S59,  S83,  S89   •  Unit  1  lessons:11B,  39B,  65B,  83B,  111B,  137C  

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Start  Smart  for  First  Grade  
•  Define  the  rou<ne   •  What’s  the  purpose?  “…powerful  way  for  the  teacher  to  model   the  wri+ng  process  and  give  prac+ce  with  phonics  and  spelling   skills.    It  engages  children  by  encouraging  their  par+cipa+on.”   •  What’s  the  syntax?   •  Brainstorm  ideas  around  a  prompt  and  chart  a  list   •  Reread  the  list  with  the  students   •  Collabora+vely  with  the  students,  write  one  or  more  sentences   sharing  the  pen  with  the  students  as  appropriate.   •  What’s  the  outcome?    Students  will  be  able  to  create  sentences   around  a  prompt  and  write  it  with  guidance.    With  further   prac+ce,  they  can  write  a  sentence  independently.  

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Start  Smart  for  First  Grade  
•  How  does  it  change  over  5me?   •  Over  +me,  students  write  more  of  the  sentence(s).    This   is  more  of  a  collabora+ve  prac+ce  before  students  go  to   do  independent  prac+ce  in  the  Write  About  It  sec+on   (see  Unit  1  lessons)   •  What  misconcep5ons  might  teachers  have  about  the   rou5ne?   •  Teachers  may  take  the  rou+ne  literally  and  ask  every   student  to  share  the  pen  while  wri+ng  their  own   sentences.    The  rou+ne  may  stay  the  same  over  +me   with  students  only  wri+ng  a  few  leTers  or  words  of  one   sentence.  

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Start  Smart  for  First  Grade  
•  Iden5fy  a  rou5ne  
•  Where  is  the  rou5ne  described?    First  lesson,  Instruc5onal   Rou5ne  Handbook,  marginalia...  

•  Cite  lessons  in  the  Teacher’s  Edi5on   •  Define  the  rou5ne  
•  •  •  •  •  What’s  the  purpose?   What’s  the  syntax?   What’s  the  outcome?   How  does  it  change  over  5me?   What  misconcep5ons  might  teachers  have  about  the  rou5ne?  
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Dig-­‐in  Protocol  
•  Choose  a  partner.    You  and  your  partner  will  analyze  the  same   instruc5onal  rou5ne  and  write  a  synopsis  of  the  rou5ne.   •  When  the  three  pairs  at  your  table  are  done,  each  pair  will   explain  their  rou5ne  to  the  rest  of  the  table.   •  When  your  table  is  done,  you  will  exchange  your  rou5ne   synopses  with  a  table  that  did  different  rou5nes.   •  Each  pair  reviews  one  of  the  new  rou5nes.   •  Each  pair  shares  with  the  table  the  new  rou5ne.  

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ReOlection  
•  Reflec5ng  on  today’s  process  how  has  your   understanding  of  Start  Smart  deepened?   •  Why  is  this  process  of  iden5fica5on,  defini5on,   and  evalua5on  of  rou5nes  important  to  ensuring   student  success  in  all  content  areas?  

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