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On the basis of the Laws of Chess, which was adopted at the 75th FIDE Congress at Calvia

(Mallorca), October 2004, coming into force on 1 July 2005.

POLYGON
Kosintsev I.G.

(19.11.2008)

PREFACE

Polygon is a board abstract strategy for 2 players as result of an inevitable evolution of the dead
classical chess to more perfect and complex game. The size of the board was increased up to
12x12 squares and a set of pieces - up to 12 types similar to card games. It’s clear that more
pieces mean more combinatory abilities.

Same process went to the creation of Canadian checker.

In agree with principals of honor and justice are removed the notion of check, checkmate,
stalemate, drawn. This is very important for beginner and stimulates an attention of player.

BASIC RULES OF PLAY

Article 1: The nature and objectives of the game of Polygon

1.1. The game of Polygon is played between two opponents who move their pieces alternately on
a square board called a `Polygon`. The player with the red pieces commences the game. A player
is said to `have the move`, when move of his opponent has been ’made’.

1.2. The objective of each player is to capture the king of his opponent. The player who achieves
this goal has won the game. The opponent whose king has been captured has lost the game.

Article 2: The initial position of the pieces on the Polygon

2.1. The board is composed of an 12x12 grid of 144 equal squares alternately light and dark.

The board is placed between the players in such a way that the near corner square to the right of
the player is light.
r

l

n

m

d

t

g

k

b

p

v

f
F V P B K G T D M N L R

2.2. At the beginning of the game one player has 24 red-colored pieces (the `red` pieces); the
other has 24 black-colored pieces (the `black` pieces):

These pieces of two colors (red and black) are as follows:

1. A soldier (12 red and 12 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 1.

2. A corporal (4 red and 4 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 2.

3. A specialist (4 red and 4 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 3.

4. A sergeant (2 red and 2 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 4.

5. An adjutant (2 red and 2 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 5.

6. A lieutenant (2 red and 2 black pieces), indicated by the symbol 6.

7. A captain, indicated by the symbol 7.

8. A major, indicated by the symbol 8.

9. A colonel, indicated by the symbol 9.

10. A general, indicated by the symbol 10.
11. A marshal, indicated by the symbol 11.

12. A king, indicated by the symbol 12.

Symbols 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 can be any different pictures (pictograms): with out a sign –
red color, with the sign “-” – black color.

2.3 The initial position of the pieces on the chessboard is as follows:

r -9 -8 -7 -6 -10 -11 -12 -10 -6 -7 -8 -9

l -3 -3 -2 -2 -4 -5 -5 -4 -2 -2 -3 -3

n -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

m

d

t

g

k

b

p 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

v 3 3 2 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 3 3

f 9 8 7 6 10 12 11 10 6 7 8 9
F V P B K G T D M N L R

2.4. The twelve vertical columns of squares (F,V,P,B,K,L,M,N,L,R) are called `files`. The twelve
horizontal rows of squares (f,v,p,b,k,g,,t,d,m,n,,l,r)are called ranks`. A straight line of squares
of the same color, touching corner to corner, is called a `diagonal`.
Article 3: The moves of the pieces

3.1. It is not permitted to move a piece to a square occupied by a piece of the same color. If a
piece moves to a square occupied by a piece of the opponent the latter is captured and removed
from the chessboard as part of the same move. A piece is said to attack a piece of the opponent if
the piece could make a capture on that square according to Articles 3.2 to 3.12. The king is said
to be `in check` if it is attacked by one or more of the pieces of the opponent.

3.2. There are two different ways of moving the soldier:

a) The soldier may move to any adjoining square (X).
b) The soldier may move to the unoccupied second square (*) along the file or the rank on
which it stands (“March”).

*

X X X

* X O X *

X X X

*

When a soldier reaches the rank furthest from its starting position it must be exchanged as part of
the same move for a new general of the same color. This exchange of a soldier for general is
called `promotion` and the effect of the new piece is immediate.
3.3. The specialist may move to first, second and third square (X) along a diagonal on which it
stands.

X X

X X

X X

O

X X

X X

X X

3.4. The corporal may move to first, second and third square (X) along the file or the rank on
which it stands.

X

X

X

X X X O X X X

X

X

X
3.5. The sergeant may move to one of the twenty four squares (X) nearest to that on which it
stands, not far then two square along the file or the rank.

X X X X X

X X X X X

X X O X X

X X X X X

X X X X X

3.6. The adjutant may move to first, second and third square (X) along the file, the rank or a
diagonal on which it stands.

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X O X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X
3.7. The lieutenant, captain may move to any square (X) along a diagonal on which it stands.

X X

X X

X X

X X

O

X X

X X

X X

X X

3.8. The major, colonel may move to any square (X) along the file or the rank on which it stands.

X

X

X

X

X X X X O X X X X

X

X

X

X
3.9. The general, marshal may move to any square (X) along the file, the rank or a diagonal on
which it stands.

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X X O X X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

3.10. When making these moves the soldier, specialist, corporal, adjutant, lieutenant, major or
general cannot move (X) over any intervening pieces (Z) but the sergeant, captain, colonel,
marshal may move (M) over one intervening piece (Z).

Z X

Z Z X

Z X X

X X X

Z Z O Z M M M

X X X

Z X Z

M Z M

M M M
3.11. There are two different ways of moving the king, by:

a) The king may move to any adjoining square (X).

X X X

X O X

X X X

b) The king may move to the unoccupied second square (*) along the file or the rank on
which it stands only over one intervening piece (S) of the same color on the first square
(“Jumping”).

*

S

* S O S *

S

*
Article 4: The completion of the game

4.1. The game is won by the player who has captured the king of the opponent. This
immediately ends the game.

4.2. The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately
ends the game.

4.3. The game is won by the player with the black pieces when on game board only two
pieces (kings) remain and neither player can capture the king of the opponent with next move.
The game is said to end in a `primitive position`. This immediately ends the game.

4.4. The game is won by the player with the black pieces if any identical position has
appeared on the game board at least three times.

4.5. The game is won by the player with the black pieces if each player has made at least the
last 30 consecutive moves without any capture.

Article 5: Coordinate Polygon notation

Algebraic notation is the most widely used method for recording the moves of a board game.
One of its variants, "long algebraic notation", is the official standard which must be used in all
recognized international competition involving human players.
Every move N is signed by two formulas for two players with the red and black pieces:
Piece (number) - get piece square (file, rank) – put piece square (file, rank).

Here is an example of the simple game in that notation:

1. 1 TpTk -1 TnTd
2. 5 TvNk -5 TlNd
3. 1 TkTt -1 TdTt
4. 11 TfTr
1-0
The final position:

r -9 -8 -7 -6 -10 -11 11 -10 -6 -7 -8 -9

l -3 -3 -2 -2 -4 -5 -4 -2 -2 -3 -3

n -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

m

d -5

t -1

g

k 5

b

p 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

v 3 3 2 2 4 5 4 2 2 3 3

f 9 8 7 6 10 12 10 6 7 8 9
F V P B K G T D M N L R

Coordinate notation is similar to algebraic notation except that no abbreviation or symbol is used
to show which piece is moving. It can do this without ambiguity because it always includes the
square from which the piece moves as well as its destination. It has proved hard for humans to
write and read, but is used internally by some chess-related computer software

Positions are usually signed, using the list of formulas for every piece, and shown as diagrams
(images).

Article 6: The Polygon qualification system

Polygon Association (PA) is an international organization that connects all Polygon players
around the world and acts as the governing body of international chess competition.

The unique personal number of player define own qualification (strength) of player which
depend directly from results of official (rating) games. The less number mean the greater
strength. Champion has the number one.

A more subtle issue is related to pairing.

1. Challenger always plays by red pieces, acceptor by black.
2. Any player can challenge another player only one class higher or same class.

3. If and only if the player with low number loses a game, players exchange own personal
numbers.

4. If a player don’t play N weeks (repose) own number are increased on 2 power N-1 every week
with adequate reduces numbers other players.

5. One player has not the right to play more then twelve official (rating) games with one
opponent successive.

All players are divided on fourteen classes as can you see at next table. The number of players at
one class K is basis B in power K, where B can be 2,3,4,5 and so on. B is 4 for our case and can
increase with growing number of registered players. Nobody can be a member of two classes at
once.

Class of player Title Numbers of players Quantity of players
Champion God 1 1
1 King 2-5 4
2 Marshal 6-21 16
3 General 22-85 64
4 Colonel 86-341 256
5 Major 342-1365 1024
6 Captain 1366-5461 4096
7 Lieutenant 5462-21845 16384
8 Adjutant 21846-87381 65536
9 Sergeant 87382-349525 262144
10 Specialist 349526-1398101 1048576
11 Corporal 1398102-5592405 4194304
12 Soldier 5592406-22369621 16777216
Beginner 22369622 and so on other

This game is recommended for study at school as part of mathematics. That will increase
inevitably the intellectual level of a society.

External links:

1. FIDE Laws of Chess.
http://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=124&view=article

2. FIDE.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIDE

3. Elo rating system.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elo_rating_system