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Permit-to-Work Procedure Permits-to-work, whilst not specifically mentioned, evolved from the old Factories Act 1961.

These provide a formal safety control system aimed at prevention of accidents, damage to property and damage to products, when forseeably hazardous works are undertaken. The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 placed further duties on employers and the self-employed to provide and maintain plant and systems of work that are, so far as reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health. The permit to work consists of a document which: Details the work to be done; Details the precautions to be taken; States that all foreseeable hazards have been noted; States the control measures to be implemented. Permits to work do not, in themselves, make a job free from risk: they rely upon effective control and coordination in order that hazards are identified and risks are suitably and sufficiently assessed. Requirements of a Permit To Work. The Health and Safety Executive, in their booklet Permit to Work Systems (INDG 98 (rev 3)), identify the following requirements of a Permit to Work System: The permit to work should clearly state: Type of Permit; Permit Number; Job Location; Plant Identification (where applicable); The work to be carried out, and any limitations; Hazard Identification; Necessary Precautions; Protective Equipment; Authorisation; Acceptance; Extension / Shift Handover Procedures; Handback; Cancellation When should a Permit To Work be operated? The Health and Safety Executive recommend that Permits to Work be issued for the following activities: Entry into confined spaces, closed vessels, vats; Work involving demolition of pipelines, or openings of plant containing steam, ammonia, chlorine, hazardous chemicals, vapours, gasses or liquids under pressure; Work on certain electrical systems; Welding and Cutting work (except in workshops);

Work in isolated locations or where access is difficult, or at heights; Work near, or requiring the use of, highly flammable, explosive, toxic substances; Work causing atmospheric pollution; Pressure testing; Fumigation operations using gases; Ionising radiations work; Any of the above works involving contractors.

For University purposes, it is probable that it would be necessary to operate the following specific Permits to Work: Asbestos; Confined Spaces; Excavations; Gas Services; High and Low Voltage Electrical Works; Hot Works; Pressure Systems; Work on Lifts; Working at Height including Suspended Access Equipment (Erection and Use); Restricted / Hazardous Areas*; Any of the above works involving on site contractors. * Restricted Areas / Hazardous areas are defined as: Lift motor rooms; Electrical intake rooms and switch rooms; Plant rooms; Works on unprotected areas of roofs / elevations Works on all Science building roofs which have ventilation stacks; Works on all fragile roofs; Research laboratories; Laboratories handling radioisotopes; Who should Issue Permits-to-Work? Permits-to-Work relate to high-risk activities, and as such the permit issuer requires particular knowledge and experience relevant to the task in order to be considered competent. Competency has never generally been defined in either case or statute law. However, the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations define a person as being competent where that person has sufficient training and experience or knowledge as to enable him or her to assist in securing compliance, on the part of the employer, with the necessary safety legislation and maintenance procedures. For the purposes of the University permit-to-work system, competent persons should be required to have: Valid certificated training, including a satisfactory element of health and safety appreciation, relevant to the works to be undertaken;

Experience of the works to be undertaken; Knowledge of the relevant health and safety legislation to be observed whilst the works are undertaken; Sufficient knowledge / understanding of the University permit-to-work procedures to enable them to dispense their duties; The Estates Manager will have overall responsibility for determining the minimum levels of health and safety training, experience and knowledge required for a person to be considered competent to issue Permits-to-Work. Procedure for the Issue of a Permit-to-work: 1 Pre-Permit Issue Contractor Assessment: Prior to issuing a permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall ensure that: The contractors supervisor has provided a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks inherent within the works; The contractors supervisor has provided a suitable and sufficient method statement for the works to be undertaken; The contractor has provided evidence of competency for all operatives engaged in the works to be undertaken (Copies of training certificates, CITB / CTA training cards etc.). Contractors should, as far a reasonably practicable, submit risk assessments / method statements at least 48 hours before the works to which these relate are undertaken in order to allow the Competent Person to fully assess this information. This also allows sufficient time for deficient risk assessments / method statements to be amended if required. Risk assessments should be as site-specific as possible; the area where the removal is scheduled to take place may have a significant bearing on the risks involved. Examples could be: Work at Heights, works in Confined Spaces (for which a separate permit -to-work would be required), works adjacent to occupied areas etc. When assessing the suitability of the risk assessment, the Competent Person should use their knowledge of both the process and the works area. Generic assessments that do not address the local hazards should not be accepted. If the above conditions are not met, then the Competent Person shall advise the contractor accordingly that the Permit cannot be issued. The onus is on the contractor to fulfil these criteria before the Competent Person proceeds with the issue of the permit-to-work: The Competent Person must never compromise these requirements. Where the Permitted works are to be undertaken by in-house operatives, the relevant supervisor will be responsible for carrying out the necessary risk assessments and writing an accompanying method statement. The relevant Competent person responsible for issuing the permit-to-work should review these documents, as above. 2 Issue of the Permit-to-work: When issuing the permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall ensure that each of the following is completed:

A Permit Number is obtained from the Facilities Administrator. This number must be recorded in the relevant section of the permit. No other Permits are issued which will impact upon the issue of this Permit. Where it is unsafe to issue a Permit due to other works being in progress, then the Permit shall not be issued; The Permit is applicable to the works to be carried out; The Permit records the exact location where the works are to be carried out; The precise periods that the Permit is valid for are recorded; The nature of the works to be carried out are clearly identified; The Company carrying out the works is identified; The contractors supervisor is identified. Once each of the above has been recorded, the Competent Person shall then: Explain the conditions of the permit-to-work, including suspension / cancellation procedures (given below) to the contractors supervisor; Carry out a routine inspection of the works area to ensure that the control measures detailed in the provided risk assessment / method statement are in place. Where the Competent Person will not be able to complete the monitoring /completion process, e.g. due to leave, they should identify a suitably competent designated deputy to carry out these functions. The deputy should be identified on the Permit. Once the Competent Person is satisfied that all control measures are in place; they should sign section 2 of the permit to authorise the works to commence. 3 Acceptance Once the sections relating to the above have been completed, the contractors supervisor should then sign to acknowledge acceptance of the permit. The top copy should be retained by the Competent Person, and the bottom display copy given to the contractors supervisor. The Competent Person shall then be responsible for informing the Facilities Administrator that the permit-to-work has been issued so that details may be recorded in the Permit-to-Work Log Book. 4 Display Copy The Contractor must display their copy of the permit in a prominent position, wherever possible, adjacent to the works area. Contractors should leave the permit in position for the duration of the works, including overnight. Contractor operatives must not take the permit home. If a display copy is lost then the contractors supervisor should notify the relevant Competent Person as soon as possible. If the display permit is lost, removed etc. then a copy of the Competent Persons permit should be taken and provided to the contractors supervisor. This will act as the display copy and must be displayed as before. Closure and Cancellation of the permit, as documented below, should be recorded as below. 5 Monitoring the Permit-to-work: The Competent Person shall be responsible, so far as is reasonably practicable, for monitoring that the operatives are adhering to the provided Method

Statements / Risk Assessments whilst the permit is in operation, and that the Permit is clearly displayed. To achieve this, the Competent Person, or a suitably competent deputy, shall be required to visit the work as frequently as necessary, but at least once per day, to observe the works in progress. 6 Clearance: Permits shall only be valid for the periods stated by the Competent Person. The Competent Person shall ensure that the contractors supervisor is aware of the limitations of the permit, and the closure process. On Permit expiry, or completion of the works (whichever is sooner), the contractors supervisor shall be responsible for: instructing their operatives to stop working and withdraw from the works area; returning the display permit to the originating Competent Person, or designated deputy. signing the relevant section of the display permit indicating whether the works are complete or not, and confirming that all works have ceased and all operatives have withdrawn from the works area. 7 Cancellation: Complete Works Where the supervisor indicates that the Permitted works are complete, the Competent Person shall accompany the Supervisor to the works area to ensure that: Works have ceased; All tools and equipment have been removed; The area has been left in a satisfactory and safe condition. When the Competent Person has confirmed that the above has been satisfied, they shall: Sign the Permit to cancel the permit; Inform the Facilities Administrator that the permit is closed; Forward the completed permit (display copy) to the Facilities Administrator for filing. (a file of completed permits should be kept for at least six months); File their copy of the work permit. This should be kept for at least six months. Incomplete Works: Where the contractors supervisor indicates that the Permitted Works are incomplete, the Competent Person shall accompany the supervisor to the works area to ensure that: Works have ceased; The area has been left in a satisfactory and safe condition (This may or may not mean that all tools etc. have been removed from the works area ~ This will be determined by the security of the area, how soon works will be recommenced etc.) When the Competent Person has confirmed that the above has been satisfied, (s)he shall:

Sign the Permit to acknowledge cancellation; Inform the Facilities Administrator that the Permit has been withdrawn; Forward the completed permit (display copy) to the Facilities Administrator for filing. (a file of completed permits should be kept for at least six months); File their copy of the work permit. This should be kept for at least six months.

The Competent Person shall then be required to issue another Permit for the works to be continued. Note: The original Risk assessments / Method Statements should still be applicable, but the Competent Person must still check to make sure that this is actually the case. Particularly, when dealing with contractors, the identity of the operatives who will be carrying out the works should be confirmed, so that the University can be certain that: Operatives are competent; Operatives are fully conversant with the agreed risk assessments / method statements; Operatives are inducted. Where the method statement is found to be no longer applicable, the contractors supervisor must re-submit new risk assessments / method statements for approval before a new permit can be issued. Where a delay is likely between the issue of expired and new permits, the Competent Person should instruct the operatives to totally withdraw from the works area, remove all tools etc. and ensure that the area is made safe whilst awaiting the issue of a new permit. If a contractor fails to return an expired permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall ensure that all works have ceased and that the area has been left in a safe and satisfactory condition. If the operatives are still working, the Competent Person shall instruct the contractors supervisor to cease works immediately (or as soon as it is safe to do so) and cancel the permit. Where additional permits are required these should be issued in accordance with this section. 8 Out of Hours Working / Works During University Closures: Inevitably, some works requiring a Permit to Work may need to be carried out outside of normal University operating hours raising the problem of monitoring contractor compliance with approved method statements / risk assessments. Where such works are deemed necessary, the Competent Person should complete a formal risk assessment. The Head of Facilities or their nominated deputy shall give written confirmation before the works may proceed.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Asbestos


Introduction All works on Asbestos materials carried out in the university shall be carried out in accordance with the requirements of current legislation, HSE / HSC Approved Codes of Practice, and in particular: The Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002 Approved Code of Practice L27 The Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations 1983 (as amended) Work with Asbestos Insulation, Asbestos Coating and Asbestos Insulation Board All works on, or near, asbestos-bearing materials shall be subject to a Permit-toWork. Near shall be defined as any works that could unintentionally damage adjacent asbestos bearing (or suspected asbestos bearing) materials.

All Permits-to-Work for work involving asbestos shall be issued by the Dutyholder (Asbestos) in accordance with the Universitys procedures. The Universitys policy is that only licensed removal companies shall undertake works involving asbestos removal. Additionally, without prejudice to the previous sentence, the Asbestos Management process, from discovery to eventual removal / treatment shall be undertaken in accordance with the University of Worcester Asbestos Management Plan. In-House Operatives shall never undertake asbestos removal. Permit Duration: Asbestos Permits-to-Work may be issued for a maximum of 5 working days. Where works exceed this period, the Dutyholder (Asbestos) will need to issue subsequent permits to cover the whole project period as per section 7 of this manual. Dutyholder (Asbestos) Responsibilities: Prior to raising a permit-to-work, the Dutyholder (Asbestos) shall: Obtain a copy of the Universitys Management Plan for Asbestos; Ensure that the contractor is competent and licensed if removal works are involved. Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per University procedures. Model Method Statements: Asbestos removal method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the asbestos removal contractor. Asbestos licence details i.e. number and date of expiry. Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates. Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work. Type of work e.g. removal of roof sheets, insulation boarding or lagging. Type and quantity of asbestos and the results of any analysis. Probable duration of work. For work with asbestos insulation or coating, date of notification to HSE and starting date, which must not be changed. The controls to be applied to reduce exposure other than by PPE e.g. controlled wetting method. Details of expected exposures. Details of the steps to be taken to control the release of asbestos to the environment e.g. enclosure arrangements, negative pressure equipment, reassurance monitoring, clearance certificate on completion, etc. Location of decontamination unit. Arrangements for power supply and clean water supply. Details of the equipment, including PPE, to be used for the protection and decontamination of those carrying out the work. Procedures for the removal of waste from the work area and the site. Procedure for disposal of contaminated water. Procedures for dealing with emergencies. Pre-Start Inspection:

Before Asbestos removal can commence, the Authorised Person (Asbestos) shall: Arrange for a University Approved Laboratory to carry out Assurance Testing at the end of the works. (Where contractors propose to arrange this service, they must also use a University Approved Laboratory); Inspect the works area to ensure that the control measures as described in the method statement are in place and fully operative. (Decontamination Units etc.) Monitoring: The Dutyholder (Asbestos) shall be present, when any enclosures are tested for integrity. Only when satisfied that the enclosure is suitable and sufficient, shall the Dutyholder (Asbestos) sign the permit-to-work and allow works to commence. Where works are scheduled to take place over a number of days, in an area that cannot be secured when unattended, then the Dutyholder person shall ensure that the enclosure has a smoke test each day before works are commenced. Completion of Works: Before enclosures are dismantled, the University Approved Laboratory must carry out Assurance Monitoring within the enclosure. The laboratory must provide, in writing, a satisfactory report that fibres encountered are within acceptable limits (<0.01 fibres/ml). The Dutyholder shall then allow the asbestos contractor to clear their working area. When the area is clear of tools, materials etc., to the Dutyholders satisfaction, the Dutyholder Person shall sign off the permit-to-work, and follow the applicable closure procedures.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Confined Spaces


Introduction:

All works within Confined Spaces on University Premises shall be subject to a permit-to work. A confined space means any place, including any chamber, tank, vat, silo, pit, trench, pipe, sewer, flue, well or other similar space in which, by virtue of its enclosed nature, there arises a reasonably foreseeable specified risk. No person whether working for the University, or working on the University campus, shall enter, or be instructed to enter a confined space for any purpose: Unless it is not reasonably practicable to achieve that purpose without such entry; Until they have received a valid permit-to-work. Confined Space Permits-to-Work shall only be issued by a Competent Person. Note: Confined Spaces Permits-to- Work confer a right to enter a confined space; they do not confer a right to carry out works that are subject to other Permits-toWork. e.g. asbestos removal in a confined space would require two Permits-toWork, one to enter the confined space, the other to carry out the asbestos removal. Permit Duration: Confined Spaces Permits-to-Work may be issued for a maximum of 1 working day. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person. Competent Person Duties: Prior to raising a permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall: Ensure that the requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management contractors have been met; Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per University procedures; Ensure that the works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Ensure Permits are closed as per University procedures; Model Method Statements: Confined space work method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the contractor involved; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work; Description of the work to be carried out; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; Details of the plant, equipment and/or substances to be used within the confined space; Details of the possible hazards and any relevant tests of the atmosphere; Details of any ventilation of the confined space that will be undertaken; Arrangements for monitoring the atmosphere within the confined space; Details of the arrangements for access into and egress from the confined space; Details of the PPE to be used for the protection of the persons working within the space. Emergency equipment and procedures including: -

Rescue harness; Lifting tripod or other suitable means to retrieve persons from confined space; Emergency breathing apparatus; First aid kit; An observer and means of communication.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Permit to Dig

Introduction: All grounds disturbance works on the University campus shall be subject to a Permit-to-Dig Permits-to-Dig shall only be issued by a Competent Person. Excavations shall be carried out in accordance with all relevant legislation, but in particular: The Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) regulations 1996 HSG 150 Health and Safety in Construction HSG 185 Health and Safety in Excavations: Be safe and shore HSG 41 Avoiding Danger from Underground Services Permit Duration: Permits-to-Dig may be issued for a maximum of 5 working days and are location specific. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person. Competent Person Duties: The Competent Person shall be required to ensure that: Contractors have sufficient information, where available, regarding known positions of cables and underground services in order to plan the excavation works safely; Contractors have sufficient information, where available, regarding ground conditions and stability of adjacent structures to enable a safe means of excavation to be selected; Where excavations could compromise the stability of adjacent structures that a suitably competent Design Engineer is consulted to review the works to be undertaken; Any other information held by the University which may be relevant to the chosen method of excavation selected by the contractor is made available; Ensure that the requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management of premises contractors have been met; Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per University procedures; Ensure that the works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Ensure Permits are closed as per University procedures. Model Method Statements for Excavation Works: Excavation method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the groundwork contractor; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work;

Description of the works to be carried out; Confirmation that the site has been visited and due account taken of surrounding conditions, access, etc.; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; Details of PPE; The sequence of operations detailing method of dealing with specific hazards; Details of methods of locating and avoiding any existing underground services, whether or not their presence is known; Nature of the soil and moisture conditions. Dimensions of the excavation; Method of excavation; Proximity of services or structures; Duration of work; Details of the precautions to be taken to prevent collapse of the sides of the excavation e.g. battering or support. If support is proposed this should include details of the system to be used; Details of access/egress to and from the bottom of the excavation plus any crossings over the excavation; Details of any fencing around the open excavation; Details of plant and equipment to be used together with confirmation that all necessary records will be provided on site; Method of storing and dispensing fuel oil including precautions to prevent pollution of groundwater; Quantity of any fuel to be stored on site and method of storage; If any road works are involved, the name of the supervisor trained in accordance with the New Roads and Street Works Act 1991. Note: -An additional method statement will be required for any work involving entry into confined spaces e.g. sewer connections. This checklist is intended to aid the production and approval of method statements. It is not an exhaustive list of every possible issue that may need to be addressed for any given task.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Gas Services


Introduction: All works defined under the Gas Services (Installation and Use) Regulations 1984 shall be carried out under a Permit-to-work (Gas Services). The only exceptions will be for works on domestic gas boilers and any emergency works required to prevent or control an emergency. Excepted works will only be undertaken by an approved emergency maintenance contractor according to previously agreed method statements. The Gas Services (Installation and Use) Regulations 1984 requires every employer: Where they require any work in relation to a gas fitting to be carried out at any place of work under their control, to take reasonable steps to ensure that the person undertaking that work is registered with the Council for Registered Gas Installers (CORGI); All operatives carrying out work in relation to any gas fitting or gas storage vessel must be competent to do so. The level of training required is given in the Approved Code of Practice 20 Standards of training in safe gas installation. To ensure that any gas appliance or installation pipe work installed at any place of work under their control is maintained in a safe condition so as to prevent risk of injury to any person. The Gas Services (Installation and Use) Regulations Definitions: Gas fittings: gas pipe work, valves, regulators and meters, and fittings, apparatus and appliances designed for use by consumers of gas for heating, lighting, cooking or other purposes for which gas can be used, ventilation grilles and basement extract systems, but it does not mean: Any part of a service pipe; Any part of a distribution main or other pipe upstream of the service pipe; A gas storage vessel; A gas cylinder or cartridge designed to be disposed of when empty. A Service pipe: a pipe for supplying gas to premises from a distribution main. A Flue: a passage for conveying the products of combustion from a gas appliance to the external air and includes any part of the passage in a gas appliance duct that serves the purpose of a flue. A Gas appliance: an appliance designed for use by a consumer of gas for heating, lighting, cooking or other purposes for which gas can be used, but does

not include a portable or mobile appliance supplied with gas from a cylinder, or the cylinder, pipes and other fittings used for supplying gas to that appliance. Gas Installation pipework is defined as any pipework for conveying gas for a particular consumer and any associated valve or other gas fitting but it does not mean: A service pipe; A pipe comprised within a gas appliance; Any valve attached to a storage container or cylinder; Service pipe work; Any part of a primary meter installation. Work in relation to a gas fitting includes any of the following activities: Installing the fitting; Maintaining, servicing, permanently adjusting, repairing, altering or renewing the fitting or purging it of air or gas; Where the fitting is not readily movable, changing its position; and Removing the fitting.

Permit Duration: Permits-to-Work (Gas Services) may be issued for a maximum of 5 working days and are location specific. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person. Competent Person Duties: The Competent Persons shall be required to ensure that: The requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management of premises contractors have been met; Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per University procedures; The works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Permits are closed as per the general permit-to-work Procedures Model Method Statements for Works on Gas Services: Method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the contractor involved; Contractors C.O.R.G.I. Registration details, and Operatives training certificates; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work; Description of the work to be carried out, including type of system / components; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; Each step required to safely isolate the work on gas fittings and how the system shall be locked off; Each step required to safely purge any gas from the gas fittings;

The steps to be taken to avoid the risk of explosion and in particular all gas testing that is required; All personal safety equipment that is required; The action to be taken to segregate the work area and post warning notices; Actions to be taken in emergency situations; Any inspection, examination, testing and purging required on completion.

Inspection at Permit Closure: The Competent Person shall, in addition to the standard Permit closure duties, ensure that the Contractors Supervisor provides a handover certificate at the completion of works stating what has been carried out and the condition / serviceability of the system.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Hot Works


Introduction: Hot work is defined as works that involves temperatures that could give rise to risks of fire and ignition of flammable substances and combustible materials, and includes work which involves the use of naked flames or generation of sparks, smoke or fumes. The following works shall be subject to a permit-to-work (Hot Works) on the University campus: Brazing and soldering; Bitumen boilers; Electric arc welding; Gas welding or cutting; Hot air welding; Disk cutting in confined spaces and areas where there is a high risk of fire or explosion. Permit Duration: Permits-to-Work (Hot Work) may be issued for a maximum of 1 working day, with works ceasing at least 1 hour before the end of the working day. These permits are location specific. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person.

Competent Persons Duties: The Competent Persons (Hot Works) shall be required to ensure that: The requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management of premises contractors have been met; A permit-to-work is issued as per the procedures in this manual; The works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Permits are closed as per the procedures in this manual. Pre-Start Inspection: Before signing the permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall inspect the working area for the following control measures (where applicable): Cutting and welding equipment is in good repair; All gas hoses are securely clipped; Welding / Cutting equipment is fitted with regulators and flashback arrestors; Area is adequately ventilated; Gas cylinders are secured in a vertical position on a trolley. Precautions within 10m of works (where practicable): Floors swept clean of combustibles; Combustible floors have been damped down or covered with sand or fireresistive sheeting; Explosive atmosphere in area has been eliminated; Flammable liquids have been removed, or if removal is impracticable, protected with fire-resistive tarpaulins or metal shields; All wall and floor openings are covered; Fire-resistive tarpaulins are suspended below work. Works on Walls or ceilings: Construction is non-combustible and without combustible covering or insulation; Combustibles have been removed from other side of the wall Work on enclosed equipment: A permit-to-work (Confined Spaces) has been issued by a suitably Competent Person. Works on Roofs: (Bitumen boilers, lead heaters etc.) Gas cylinders are sited at least 3m from burner; If sited on roof, heat insulating base provided. Fire watch: The Competent Person shall also ensure that the following general controls are in place: Suitable and sufficient fire extinguishers are readily available; Operatives are trained in the use of fire extinguishers; Adjacent smoke heads are covered to prevent false alarms;

Security & Reception are advised if it is deemed necessary to take the local alarm system off of automatic 999 call out All fire doors are closed; Arrangements are in place to make sure that the hot works area is not left unattended, for example during tea breaks, lunch etc.; Operatives are aware of actions in case of emergency, 5566 calls etc; No other persons are working in the area that might be endangered by the hot works Arrangements are in place to carry out a check of the area at least 1 hour after the hot works have ceased; Security are advised that the alarm should be put back on automatic 999 call out at cessation of the works.

Method statements: Hot works covers a multitude of operations. In general, the Competent Person shall ensure that the control measures listed above are accounted for, where applicable, within the contractors method statement. The following elements will however be common to the majority of method statements: Name and address of the contractor involved; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work; Description of the work to be carried out, including type of system / components; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; The steps to be taken to avoid the risk of explosion and in particular all gas testing that is required; All personal safety equipment that is required; The action to be taken to segregate the work area and post warning notices; Actions to be taken in emergency situations.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Electrical Services


Introduction: The following works carried out on electrical equipment located on the Universitys Premises shall be subject to a permit-to-work: Switching off any isolater, switch fuse, distribution board, or mains circuit board that may affect the Universitys information technology systems or the safety of anyone on the Universitys premises; Test on live electrical apparatus;

Test on electrical distribution systems that need the installed safety systems/barriers defeated or removed; Work on electrical distribution systems that expose personnel to shock hazards; Work on remote and automatically controlled low voltage switch-gear; Isolation of electrical equipment to make it safe unless carried out by a competent person holding a valid Authorisation Certificate; Test on any earthing system whilst the supply is still live. The only exception will be emergency works undertaken by an approved contractor in order to avert, or remedy, a major incident. A sketch plan should be included on the Permit to Work clearly showing the limits and location of work/test equipment Definitions: Electrical equipment is defined as anything used, intended to be used or installed for use, to generate, provide, transmit, transform, rectify, convert, conduct, distribute, control, store, measure or use electrical energy. Live means that the equipment in question is at a voltage, by being connected to a source of electricity as, for example, in normal use. Charged means that the item has acquired a charge either because it is live or because it has become charged by other means such as by static or induction charging, or has retained or regained a charge due to capacitance effects even though it may be disconnected from the rest of the system. Live work is defined as work on or near conductors that are accessible and which are 'live' or 'charged'. Dead means not electrically 'live' or 'charged'. Disconnected is used to describe equipment, or a part of an electrical system, which is not connected to any source of electrical energy. Isolated is used to indicate equipment, or part of an electrical system, which is disconnected and separated by a safe distance (the isolating gap) from all sources of electrical energy in such a way that the disconnection is secure, and cannot be re-energised accidentally or inadvertently. Low voltage is regarded as a voltage exceeding 50v AC or 120v DC between conductors or earth, but not exceeding 1000v AC or 1500v DC between conductors or 600v AC or 900v DC between any conductor and earth. Permit Duration: Permits-to-Work (Electrical services) may be issued for a maximum of 5 working days. These permits are location specific. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person.

Competent Person Duties: The Competent Persons shall be required to: Ensure that the requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management of premises contractors have been met; Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per the procedures in this manual;

Ensure that the works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Ensure Permits are closed as per the general permit-to-work Procedures; Ensure that there is adequate working space, adequate means of access and adequate lighting.

For non CDM works the contractor competent person can be made responsible for deciding if Permit to Work is needed. For CDM works it should be stated that the Principal Contractor/Electrical contractor is responsible. For 11,000 volt works/maintenance University specialist contractor is contracted to issue Permit to Work for those works. Model Method Statements: Method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the contractor involved; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work; Description of the work to be carried out, including type of system / components; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; All personal safety equipment that is required; The action to be taken to segregate the work area and post warning notices; Actions to be taken in emergency situations; Any inspection, examination, testing and commissioning required on completion; The action required to return the low voltage electrical equipment to service; What information, if any, must be included on the Universitys plans. Method Statement for working on dead electrical equipment: In addition to the above contents, the following should be included, where applicable: The necessary steps to be taken to protect against inadvertent contact with other live parts nearby. Wherever practicable, this should be achieved by the erection of physical barriers and/or the use of temporary insulation; The arrangements for identifying electrical equipment before disconnection or isolation. Wherever possible this process should be aided by the use of appropriate drawings, diagrams and other written information. Labelling on circuits and equipment may be used to assist in the identification process, it must however never be assumed that labelling is correct; The arrangements for ensuring that once the circuit or equipment to be worked on or near has been identified, that it shall be disconnected from every source of electrical energy; The arrangements for ensuring that electrical equipment, which has been made dead, cannot become electrically charged during the work. Wherever practicable this should be carried out by locking off all isolators.

Where such facilities are not available, the removal of fuses or links is permissible; The arrangements for testing that the isolated circuit or equipment including all parts to be worked on, or near, are dead, even if the isolation has been achieved automatically through an interlocking system. If it is a three-phase system or equipment with more than one supply, prove that all supply conductors are dead. The device used for proving dead shall itself be proved immediately before and after testing; The arrangements to ensure that, even if the above precautions fail, all conductors are earthed using properly designed earthing devices or earthing leads; Where applicable, those additional earths are available at the point of work, if this is remote from the point of isolation. But these should be applied only after proving dead at the point of work. (These procedures are essential for high voltage apparatus and stored energy equipment. The earthing conductors and their connections should be suitable for the energy that may flow in the event of a failure of the above precautions.)

Note: Earthing low voltage equipment is particularly desirable if there is a risk of re-energisation. In other low voltage equipment, however, it may be physically impractical to apply earths, or the risk of short circuit from introducing an earth near adjacent live parts may outweigh the benefit of earthing the apparatus being worked on. Works on, or near, Live Electrical Systems: Work on or near live conductors shall only be permitted in exceptional circumstances and only when directly authorized by the Head of Facilities or the Estates Manager having taken prior advice from an authorized or competent person. Live working shall not be permitted unless each of the following is true: It is unreasonable for the work to be carried out dead; Suitable precautions can be taken to prevent injury; and It is reasonable in all circumstances to work live. The decision to work live must not be taken lightly. All economic and operational factors must be evaluated against the risks involved before making a decision.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Lifts


Introduction: The following works carried out on lifts, or in lift shafts and lift motor rooms located on the University campus shall be subject to a permit-to-work: Any work requiring entry into a lift shaft or motor room, for the purposes of working on the lift; Any work that requires unlocking or opening of a lift landing door when the car is not at its normal position. Emergency work to release trapped passengers does not require a permit-to-work but must be carried out either by a competent person who has received formal emergency release training for that lift system, or by the emergency services. Permit Duration: Permits-to-Work (Lifts) may be issued for a maximum of 1 working day and are location specific. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person. Competent Persons Duties: The Competent Persons shall be required to ensure that no work, other than emergency work to release trapped passengers, shall be carried out on any lift or in any lifts shaft or lift motor room on the University campus unless: The requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management of premises contractors have been met; A permit-to-work is issued as per the procedures in this manual; The works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Permits are closed as per the general permit-to-work procedures; Additionally, the Competent Person shall ensure that: Works are recorded in the appropriate Lift Log; Any defects reported by the contractor are advised to the Estates Manager or the Head of Facilities; No lift (for which they have issued a permit-to-work) is returned to service unless it is confirmed safe to do so by the contractor concerned. Model Method Statements for Lift Works: Method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the contractor involved; The make and type of lift, the control system, the type of work which is to be carried out and when the work will be carried out; Details of the operatives carrying out the work, including copies of relevant training certificates etc; All Personal Protective Equipment;

The safe means of access to, and egress from the work area; Emergency procedures; The procedures for recording and reporting any defects discovered; The equipment required to carry out the work; The control measures that will be put in place to protect the safety of persons not involved in the work who might be at risk, and in particular the steps that will be taken to prevent unauthorized access to lift shafts and lift motor rooms.

Method Statements for Work in Lift Wells In addition to the standard contents, the method statement for these works should normally include, where applicable: The means by which the lift shall be electrically/mechanically isolated and locked off so that it cannot be called for; Details of any safety signs to be displayed on all lift landings and in the lift motor room to warn others that the lift is out of service. Where more than one lift is installed within a common lift well, the provision of a full height screen shall, where practicable, between adjacent lifts; Means for providing temporary lighting where required (This must be at a reduced voltage not exceeding 110 V derived from a supply with a centretapped earth. Lamps used for temporary lighting must be protected from mechanical damage.) Method Statements for Working within a Lift Well or under the Lift Car In addition to the standard contents, the method statement should normally include, where applicable: Details of safe egress from the well; Means of testing the effectiveness of any stop / safety devices; The means by which the lift motor shall be protected against entry by unauthorized personnel while persons are working within the well; The means by which power to the lift circuits are to be isolated and prevented from unintentional re-energisation. Note: The number of persons working within a well at the same time should be kept to a minimum and if possible, the simultaneous employment of different tradesmen working independently of each other should be avoided. After completion of works in the well, or below the lift car, the lift should not be returned to normal operation until it has been ascertained that no person, tools, temporary access equipment etc remain within the well. Model Method Statements for Working on a Lift Car Top No Person shall be permitted to travel on top of an ascending car unless it is considered essential to do so. Where the work requires personnel to stand or travel on the top of the lift car the provided method statements should address, where relevant: That the car top will adequately support the anticipated loads; The means by which all safety devices, top control stations etc. are to be tested before works are carried out on the lift top;

The arrangements for ensuring that operatives involved can communicate clearly and immediately with each other at all times; The identity of the person to be in sole control of the starting and stopping of car movements; Note: Keeping the car and/or landing doors open in order to interrupt the normal control circuit must not be the sole means of preventing car movement. The number of persons permitted to travel on the top of a car at any one time shall be kept to a minimum. General Guidance for Safe Working: Landing Doors: Unlocking or opening of a lift-landing door when the car is not at its normal position at a landing should only be done when absolutely necessary to carry out the work, or a lift rescue. These may only be carried out by: The emergency services; A competent person who is trained and experienced in either the work to be carried out or appropriate lift rescue from the lift in question. Landing doors should not be allowed to remain open any longer than is absolutely necessary. Whenever lift doors or gates are unlocked or opened for maintenance, inspection or repair work, strict precautions shall be taken to prevent persons: Falling down the lift shaft; Gaining access to the car when it is not at the level of the landing; Gaining access to parts of the car which are not normally accessible; or Coming into contact with moving parts of the lift. Where landing doors must be kept open, then landing entrance barriers of solid or mesh construction at least 915mm high must be secured at an appropriate distance from the landing threshold. (Details of protective equipment must be included in contractors method statements.) This will apply when work is required at landings when the car is not in its normal position relative to that landing; or the car is to be moved. Lone Working Lone working shall not be permitted on work on lifts or lift shafts that require a permit-to-work. Lift Log Full details of any work carried out on lifts located on the University campus shall be recorded in the lift log that shall be maintained in the lift motor room. The Competent Person will be responsible for ensuring this has been done when closing the permit. Any defects discovered must be: recorded in the lift log; and reported immediately to the Estates Manager or the Head of Facilities The Competent Person shall ensure that no lift is returned to service until any defect recorded in the Lift Log that may affect the safe operation of the lift has been rectified and the Estates Manager or the Head of Facilities, or their appointed agent, has signed the Lift Log to confirm the action.

Specific Permit-to-Work: Work at Height


Work at height means work in any place, including a place at or below ground level or when a person is accessing or exiting from such a place (except via a staircase in a permanent workplace) where if regulatory measures are not taken, a person could fall a distance likely to cause personal injury. A risk assessment, safe working procedure/method statement and permit to work covering all work must be authorised and in operation for the duration of the task No person whether working for the University, or working on the University campus, shall enter, or be instructed to work at height for any purpose: Unless it is not reasonably practicable to achieve that purpose without working at height; Until they have received a valid permit-to-work. Work at Height Permits-to-Work shall only be issued by a Competent Person. Note: Work at Height Permits-to- Work confer a right to work at height; they do not confer a right to carry out works that are subject to other Permits-to-Work. e.g. asbestos removal in a confined space would require two Permits-to-Work, one to work at height, the other to carry out the asbestos removal. Permit Duration: Work at Height Permits-to-Work may be issued for a maximum of 5 working days. Where works exceed this period then new permits shall be raised by the Competent Person. Competent Person Duties: Prior to raising a permit-to-work, the Competent Person shall: Ensure that the requirements of the Universitys procedures for the management contractors have been met; Ensure that a permit-to-work is issued as per University procedures; Ensure that the works are adequately monitored for safety compliance; Ensure Permits are closed as per University procedures;

Model Method Statements: Work at Height method statements should normally include the following so far as is relevant in the circumstances: Name and address of the contractor involved; Name and address of the site to which the method statement relates; Names of the supervisor/foreman and appointed safety adviser and arrangements for monitoring the work; Description of the work to be carried out; Details of the personnel to be used and their training / experience; Details of the plant, equipment and/or substances to be used; Details of the possible hazards, including environmental; Details of the arrangements for access to and egress from the work area; Details of the PPE to be used for the protection of the persons working. Details of measures to reduce the risk of personal injury by a falling object or person. Details of any work on or near to a fragile surface and measure taken to minimise any risks. Emergency equipment and procedures including: Fall arrest equipment e.g safety nets, harnesses etc.; Any nets provided must be properly installed by competent riggers. Rescue plans must be
in place should a person fall into a net.