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MAY 9-15, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Aggravated assault
Incident leaves victim
with serious burns. PAGE 3
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
African
violets
at
MCCC
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The Garden State African
Violet Clubs (GSAVC) 61st An-
nual African Violet Show and
Plant Sale was to take place on
May 5 and May 6 at the Mercer
County Community College
Student Center located at 1200
Old Trenton Road in West
Windsor.
The GSAVC consists of 22
active members men and
women and has a board of
trustees. It holds monthly
meetings for nine months,
which include guest speakers
who are usually from another
African violet club or someone
of professional status relevant
to flowers, such as a botanist.
Grace and Grace Rarich, a
mother and daughter who
have been members for two
years and who reside in Ti-
tusville, explained how re-
warding it is to be members of
the GSAVC.
We love learning from this
club, the mother-daughter
duo said collectively. Its great
for people who share a passion
for flowers and violets like we
please see CLUB, page 11
Annual Pennington Day nears
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The 32nd annual Pennington
Day will take place on Saturday,
May 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., be-
ginning at the intersection of
East Curlis Avenue and Main
Street and stretching north to
Academy Drive and West to Abey
Drive.
Last year, the event attracted
more than 8,000 people who en-
joyed entertainment on all scales.
This year, organizers are hop-
ing to draw 8,000 to 10,000 people,
and the fair will host professional
and live entertainment, with
around 150 booths featuring fami-
ly fun activities.
Unlike in previous years, this
years festival will have a new
identity and feature some new
events, vendors and sources of
entertainment for the communi-
ty, according to the events co-
chairwoman Lisa Sarachman.
Pennington Day co-chair and
graphic designer Andy Parsons
designed a new logo for the event,
new banners and new crossroads
stage signage for the main stage,
she said. A new Facebook page
was also created www.face-
book.com/penningtonday to
provide news about the big event.
This year is bound to be our
biggest and best year yet.
Parsons new logo, which is a
green P with a leaf piercing
through it, was created to symbol-
ize this years eco-friendly theme
and introduction. Although its
his first year as co-chair for the
day, Parsons has created the
events T-shirts in past years.
He explained how he was able
to use his professional experience
to help with this years event.
I feel like doing these types of
things helps me and my family
connect to the community more,
Parsons said. It really has been
great getting to work with all of
these fine people. I feel like I am
walking away with more friends
than I started with.
The other two new main events
MOLLY MCDOUGALD/Special to The Sun
Pennington Day features a variety of food vendors, especially ones that serve festival fare-type food like hamburgers and french fries, as well
as fried, tasty desserts like funnel cake and zeppolis.
please see ORGANIZERS, page 9
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 9-15, 2012
Man charged with
aggravated assault
On April 19 at approximately 10
p.m., Hopewell Township police
say they responded to a Diverty
Road home to investigate an ag-
gravated assault, which resulted
in serious burns to a 43-year-old
Langhorne, Pa., resident.
Police say they learned that a
number of individuals, all adults
in their 40s and 50s, were in the
rear yard of a Diverty Road home
consuming alcohol around a fire
pit. A disagreement and subse-
quent scuffle broke out between
the 43-year-old victim and a 47-
year-old Trenton man.
During the scuffle, police say
the 47-year-old man either pushed
the victim, or according to some
witness accounts, threw the vic-
tim into the fire. The victim was
able to immediately get himself
up and out of the fire.
He was then transported by
other people present to Capital
Health Systems Hopewell Cam-
pus, according to reports.
The suspect left the residence
prior to the arrival of the police,
reports said.
The victim was transferred to
the burn unit at Temple Universi-
ty Hospital in Philadelphia. He re-
mains there in stable condition
with first- and second-degree
burns on his face, second-degree
burns on his hands and third de-
gree burns on his torso.
The suspect turned himself in
to police and was released on
$10,000 bail, reports said. He was
charged with second-degree ag-
gravated assault, they said.
NJ Ease Senior
Services Helpline
(877) 222-3737
PSA
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 9-15, 2012
20% OFF
Household Specials
Excludes Tableclothes & Sheets
Exp. 6/16/12.
25% OFF
Alterations & Repairs
Not valid with other offers.
Exp. 6/16/12.
24% OFF
Any Dry Cleaning Order
6 pieces or more
Excludes Shirts. Exp. 6/16/12.
Theyre back!
SPRING SPECIALS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises Suedes and Leathers Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
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Up to 6' x 9'
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
Saver Reverse Mortgages
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dollars with an FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Saver
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Come in or call and get the facts.
The HECM Saver virtually eliminates the initial mortgage insurance
premiumsaving you thousands
We now have a fixed rate HECM Saver that eliminates the origination fee!
Why pay more? Come in and check out the HECM Savers
and save twice with our lowest cost reverse mortgage!
On May 1 at 1:22 a.m., Officer
Kevin Koveloski responded to a
local Quick Chek on a report of
an armed robbery.
According to store employees,
a man wearing a white plastic
mask walked into the store dis-
playing a knife in his hand and
told an employee to come to the
cash register. When the employee
refused to go near the cash regis-
ter, the man took the cash drawer
portion of the register and fled in
a red minivan, which headed to-
ward Hopewell Borough on Route
654, police said.
The man was described as
being stocky, 56 to 59 in height,
wearing a black hooded sweat-
shirt, blue jeans, dark sneakers
and thick grey gloves.
Anyone with information
about the robbery is asked to call
(609) 737-3100.
A senior lunch is going to be
held at Timberlane Middle School
on Wednesday, May 16 from 12:30
p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The school is lo-
cated at 51 South Timberlane
Drive in Pennington.
This event is sponsored by
Brandywine Assisted Living at
Pennington and the Hopewell Val-
ley Education Foundation. Regis-
tration is required for lunch.
To register, call the Hopewell
Township Recreation Depart-
ment at (609) 737-3753 by May 10.
Armed robbery
suspect flees scene
Senior lunch on May 16
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
MAY 9-15, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
So let Dragonfly
Farms put a fresh
artsy spin on your
home and garden!
966 Kuser Road Hamilton, NJ
609-588-0013
www.dragonfyfarmsnj.com
Located only 15 minutes from Princeton,
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Party with historical
society on May 11
The Hopewell Valley Historical
Society is hosting A House
Party for members of the Histor-
ical Society on Friday, May 11
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 121 East
Delaware Ave. in Pennington.
Mary Clare and David Garber are
graciously opening the doors to
Stony Brook Lodge so the com-
munity may enjoy the unique and
elegant features of the house the
Garbers have called home for
eight years.
Docents will recount stories
from the past when Col. John A.
Kunkle and his family built and
lived in this magnificent Queen
Anne house in Pennington.
From 1895 to now, each owner
has respected the quality of the
craftsmanship and materials that
confirm Stony Brook Lodge as
the jewel in the crown of Pen-
nington.
The Garbers have continued
the tradition of serving as stew-
ards of the past for future genera-
tions by maintaining and restor-
ing the architectural integrity of
original American chestnut pan-
eling, glazed fireplace tiles and or-
nate stained glass windows.
Their enthusiasm is infectious,
as they share stories of the house
and their efforts to restore six
fireplaces and research other de-
tails of the three-story house that
began as a country getaway.
As they prepare to move they
have offered to host one last joyful
celebration.
Guests will be able to wander
through the entire house, peeking
into secret hiding spots, relaxing
on the extensive porches and
grounds, enjoying fires in the six
working fireplaces and climbing
wood-paneled stairs to the third
floor where views of Pennington
can be enjoyed in three directions
from the turret windows.
In addition to the house tour,
members are invited to enjoy
wine and hors doeuvres. Enter-
tainment will be provided by
David Berends. All guests are wel-
come and will need to become
members at the door. The cost of
membership is $25 for an individ-
ual and $35 for a family. There is
no RSVP for this party. Parking
will be available on East
Delaware Avenue or at the St.
James Church parking lot, en-
tered from Delaware Avenue.
For more information, email
hvhist@aol.com or call (609) 737-
8377.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 9-15, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Ed Lynes
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Joe Eisele
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
D
o you have an extra $1,300 that
you dont need and wouldnt
mind giving to the govern-
ment? Didnt think so.
But, if you live in New Brunswick,
your household is on the hook for
$1,330.68 when it comes to covering ac-
cumulated sick and vacation time for
public workers, according to the gover-
nors office.
Statewide, the governor estimates
that accumulated sick and vacation
time totals more than $825 million on
municipalities books.
Seems excessive. Or, rather, just
plain wrong.
As one of the exercise gurus from
the 80s or 90s said: Stop the insanity.
The Star-Ledger last week had a
great report on how a number of polit-
ical figures stand to cash out hand-
somely when they retire. It also points
out that, while some reform was
passed in 2010 capping new employees
payouts, theres still a lot of political
wrangling going on. The newspaper
reported that the Democrats want to
allow public workers to keep only the
time theyve accumulated, while Gov.
Christie wants to force employees to
use banked time when taking days in
the future, thereby reducing the num-
ber of payable days upon retirement.
For those of us in the private sector,
chances are the decision already has
been made: Were not banking any-
thing. Were lucky to have a job. Were
fighting rising health-care premiums
and the like, while probably not get-
ting much of a raise if any raise at
all.
So, the whole concept of banked
sick pay is foreign to us. Politicians
should take note.
It seems the governor and the De-
mocrats both recognize the larger
problem here, and, in fact, have
worked to address it moving forward
with new employees.
Lets hope that they can reach an
agreement on the details. Taxpayers
are footing some mighty big bills
now and will be in the future.
Sick means sick
Sick days are for when you are sick, not for when you retire
Sick day reform
The governor and Democrats already
have reached an agreement on bene-
fits for new employees. Now they
should be able to work out the details
on the big bills for which taxpayers
are still on the hook.
This summer, the Hopewell Valley
YMCA is offering a wide range of fun and
memorable activities at Camp Reign.
Campers will grow individually as well
as a team through an extensive hands-on
curriculum. Campers enrolled in Turtles
through Wolves will participate in special-
ty activities such as arts and crafts, games
and more, sports, and wiz kids.
Campers enrolled in sports camp will
take part in structured fun drills as well as
various sports.
Of course, one of the best ways to beat
the summer heat is through swimming,
which is why all campers will receive both
instructional and recreational swimming
during the week.
Daily snacks and weekly trips are also
included.
Have more than one child? No problem.
By having more than one child enrolled,
your oldest childs summer fun will be at a
10 percent discount.
For more information, contact the
Hopewell Valley YMCA at (609) 737-3048,
email info@hvymca.com, or visit
www.hvymca.org.
Also, please join us at our summer camp
2012 open house on May 29 from 6:30 p.m. to
8 p.m. at the Toll Gate Grammar School.
Hopewell Valley YMCA offering array of summer activities
The University of Dubuque Choir will
sing at the First Presbyterian Church of
Titusville on May 20 at 11 a.m. as part of its
nine-state tour. The choir, under the direc-
tion of Dr. Charles Barland, will lead the
churchs morning worship service through
a variety of sacred works including
Psalms, classical works, spirituals and folk
songs.
We are honored to be hosting the
Dubuque choir for one of its two appear-
ances in New Jersey, said the Rev. Will
Shurley, pastor of the church. This con-
gregation and the surrounding communi-
ty have a deep appreciation for the arts,
and we especially look forward to the choir
leading us in worship and song.
The choir at the University of Dubuque,
a Presbyterian-affiliated school, began in
1918 and as early as the 1920s began tour-
ing throughout the Midwest.
Its performance schedule and tours have
expanded to include this years 11-day tour,
which will see the choir singing at loca-
tions such as St. Patricks Cathedral in
New York City and Nationals Park in
Washington, D.C., where the choir will per-
form the anthem before the Washington
Nationals and Pittsburgh Pirates baseball
game.
We are very excited to travel as a choir
to the Eastern States and our nations capi-
tal, said Barland. For many of our stu-
dents, this will be their first trip to these lo-
cales. The choir is eager to share our
music, meet new people, and see many
wonderful sites.
The choirs appearance at the First Pres-
byterian Church of Titusville is free and
open to the public. A breakfast with the
choir will precede the service at 9:45 a.m.
in the churchs Heritage Room.
For more information, please call the
church office at (609) 737-1385 or visit
www.titusvillechurch.org.
The First Presbyterian Church of Ti-
tusville, founded in 1838, is located at 48
River Drive along the banks of the
Delaware River, one mile north of the
Washington Crossing Bridge and six miles
south of Lambertville.
Dubuque Choir performing at First Presbyterian
MAY 9-15, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
5/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any tother offers. Expires
5/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/12.
oooa/s Vaoyoy as/c/s -o/ca/s v/ao/c-s
vc-cooa/s -ccs J/-o/s

lANDSCAPf lNSTAllATlON & RfNOVATlON:


PATlOS - WAlkWAYS - RfTAlNlNG WAllS - ClfAN-UPS - MUlCHlNG
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Mix & Match - 3 GaIIon

PfRfNNlAlS
Mix & Match
Bring in your
pots and pIantcrs
for pIanting!
(reg. $22.95-26.95)
Political collectors meet
to trade, share on May 19
To help celebrate the 2012 Unit-
ed States presidential campaign,
collectors of political buttons,
badges, ribbons and related items
will meet in Titusville on Satur-
day, May 19, to sell, trade and dis-
play memorabilia from the cur-
rent campaigns, as well as from
political campaigns through the
centuries.
This ninth-annual button show
is scheduled from 9 a.m. through
3 p.m. at the Titusville United
Methodist Church located at the
corner of River Road (Route 29)
and Church Road alongside the
Delaware River. The button show
will be held in the church's educa-
tion building. Ample free parking
is available.
Attendees can expect to see a
wide variety of political items,
ranging from 2012 presidential-
campaign buttons from President
Obama, Mitt Romney and Ron
Paul, to items from former presi-
dents such as Teddy and Franklin
Roosevelt, Harry Truman,
Dwight Eisenhower, Ronald Rea-
gan and Bill Clinton.
Admission to the event is $3 for
each adult. Any child 12 years or
younger will enter free of charge
and, to encourage a lifelong love of
political history and collecting, will
receive buttons, free of charge, to
start a personal collection.
Free appraisals will be offered
for all political items brought in
by members of the general pub-
lic; the public also may bring
items for auction, with a commis-
sion rate of 10 percent of the
overall sale.
Breakfast and lunch will be of-
fered for sale (with net profits
from food sales to benefit the
church's summer 2012 Camp
TUMC day-camp program for
area youngsters).
For more information, contact
Tony Lee at (609) 730-9490 or by
email at thefourlees@
verizon.net.
Special to The Sun
In lieu of the 2012 United States
presidential campaign, political
badge collectors, who collect and
show badges like the ones above,
will meet in Titusville on May 19.
WEDNESDAY MAY 9
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
THURSDAY MAY 10
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Public Library Board of
Trustees meeting: 7 p.m. in the
library building, 13 East Broad St.,
Hopewell. All meetings open to
the public. For more information
call (609) 466-1625.
MONDAY MAY 14
Butterflies in the Garden presen-
tation by Jim Springer: 7:30 to 8
p.m. at Stainton Hall on campus
of Pennington School, 112 W.
Delaware Ave., Pennington. Host-
ed by Washington Crossing
Audubon Society. Free and open
to the public. Refreshments will
be served. This presentation will
overview the diversity of the
more than 100 species of butter-
flies found in New Jersey, as well
as their host plants and habitats.
Mr. Springer is Vice President of
the North American Butterfly
Association. For more informa-
tion visit www.washington-
crossingaudubon.org.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
TUESDAY MAY 15
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Child Care Seat Safety Check: 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Representatives of Prince-
ton HealthCare will check car
seat installations. No registration
necessary. Try to bring car seat
instructions.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. A great way to introduce
your child to library story times
and reading. Age-appropriate
books shared. Songs, nursery
rhymes, puppets and felt board
figures create a rich audio-visual
and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washing-
ton Crossing-Pennington Rd. the
third Tuesday of the month. Veri-
fy time at hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the Hopeell
Township Main Administration
Building the third Tuesday of the
month. For more information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 9-15, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Minutes from Pennington, Hopewell and Princeton
Programs for Infants - 6 years
Coupon expires
May 24
Established 1998
Member, American Montessori
Society
MONTGOMERY
609-252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
Every Sunday at 10 a.m., the
Princeton Community Church
(PCC) holds services at 2300 Pen-
nington Road (Route 31) in Pen-
nington.
At PCC, youll find real people
and relevant messages, a dynam-
ic kids program and tender child-
care.
We provide a welcoming set-
ting in which everyone can expe-
rience the life-changing love of
Christ, and discover loving and
supportive relationships.
Need more information? Call
Pastor Craig Casey at (609) 730-
1114 or visit www.prince-
tonchurch.com.
Welcome setting at church
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
will include an acoustic music
stage that will be stationed in
Howe Commons near Academy
Avenue from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., as
well as a green alley at Howe
Commons, where environmental-
ly friendly vendors will be
grouped together to share infor-
mation about sustainable living,
which was inspired by the
Hopewell Valley Green Team.
This year, a food court will be
set up in front of Toll Gate Gram-
mar School, where 20 food ven-
dors will provide attendees with
an array of different foods to
choose from.
Food options will be especial-
ly diverse this year, Sarachman
said. They will be running the
gamut from Chinese and Mexican
choices, to more gourmet crab
cakes and French tarts, to tradi-
tional festival fare of hot dogs,
sausage sandwiches, cotton
candy, funnel cake, and of course,
ice cream.
More food will be provided by
the Kids Pavilion at the rear of
Toll Gate Grammar School and
near the Childrens and Family
Entertainment tent at the inter-
section of Laning Avenue and
South Main Street.
Throughout the day, the festi-
val will feature live music from
Hopewell-based bands, perform-
ances from local dance organiza-
tions and a variety of childrens
activities.
Along with all of the food and
entertainment offered, the festi-
val will also incorporate two ath-
letic events that benefit two chari-
ties.
The Battle Against Hunger
Childrens Bike Ride will assist
in aiding the hungry at the Tren-
ton Area Soup Kitchen and at the
Rescue Mission of Trenton and
the 36th Annual Pennington 5K
(The Race to Remember) will
benefit the areas youth through
the YMCA and Hopewell Valley
Municipal Alliance Programs.
Co-president of Pennington
Day and four-year volunteer
Gretchen Overhiser explained an-
other purpose Pennington Day
serves.
Each year, Pennington Day,
Inc. gives out between $5,000 to
$10,000 in grants to organizations
that serve the residents of the
greater Hopewell Valley, she
said.
In the past few years, the board
has provided the initial start-up
money for Penningtons Farmers
Market, given grants to Eagle
Scouts and contributed funds to
create a community teen center
in the YMCA on Main Street.
We look for groups whose
projects will really make an im-
pact on the lives of residents in
our area, Overhiser said.
Sarachman and Parsons, along
with a crew of hard-working and
dedicated volunteers and organi-
zations, have made it their priori-
ties to execute one of the most
polished and professional fairs
yet.
Having just moved to Pen-
nington in 2011, I am constantly
impressed by and honored to
work with such an ambitious and
well-organized group of volun-
teers, Sarachman said. We have
a whole lot planned for Penning-
ton Day 2012. Our entertainment
and family activities are top-
notch and the vendors are coming
from near and far to participate
in our most cherished communi-
ty day.
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Hamilton NJ 08619
(609) 586-8888
PROFESSIONAL, ACCURATE, UNHURRIED
Wendy Scloiland VMD Debbie Ellioii, DVM
ORGANIZERS
Continued from page 1
Organizers hope to draw more
than 8,000 to Pennington Day
The Hopewell Township Parks
and Recreation Department is
sponsoring a variety of half-day,
sports camps for the upcoming
summer.
The Summer Sticks Field
Hockey Camp will be held the
week of June 25 to June 29 and is
open to girls of all skill levels in
grades one through eight. Players
will work on game fundamentals,
including passing, receiving, ball
and stick control, shooting and
positioning. The camp will be
held at the new synthetic turf
field at Twin Pines each day from
9 a.m. to noon. The summer field
hockey league will also be held on
Tuesday and Thursday nights
throughout the month of July.
The Bulldog Baseball Camp
will offer two sessions for various
age groups. The first session, for
ages 12 to 15, will be held the week
of June 25 to June 29 and the sec-
ond session, for ages 6 through 11,
will be held the week of July 9 to
July 13.
Both camps will include spe-
cialized instruction and daily
games while reinforcing funda-
mentals and skills development.
The camp will be held at the
Bacon Field each day from 9 a.m.
to noon.
Additional camps include the
Bulldog Soccer Academy, which
will have two sessions in July, a
conditioning camp in August, and
a boys soccer league on Monday
and Wednesday nights through
the month of July.
There will also be a soccer tech-
nical training camp for boys on
Tuesday and Thursday mornings
in July, and the girls technical
training camp will begin in June
and run Tuesday and Thursday
mornings as well. Other camps
include the US Sports Institute
multi-sport camp for children
ages 5 through 10 and the Sport
Squirts for ages 3 through 5, USSI
Tennis Camp, skate camp,
wrestling camp for grades K
through 8, and a golf camp at
Stony Brook Golf Course.
For additional information on
any of the camps, call the Parks
and Recreation Department at
(609) 737-3753 or visit
www.hopewelltwp.org for a regis-
tration packet.
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offers sports camps this summer
do, and its a great family to share
your passions and joys with.
After nine months of meetings,
the GSAVC holds an annual show,
which focuses on a different
theme every year.
The theme of this years show
was Revolutionary Violets,
which featured plants and flower
arrangements that evoked the im-
portance of New Jerseys role at
the crossroads of the American
Revolution.
At the show, there were to be
different plant displays that inte-
grated events from the American
Revolution, including Molly
Pitchers role, New Jerseys role
at the Crossroads of the Revolu-
tionary War and the Battle of
Trenton, among others.
The scenarios needed to con-
tain at least one African violet
plant, and included other materi-
als to create the backgrounds.
At the two-day show, members
were to showcase their plants,
which ranged from terrariums to
dishgardens, in front of a panel of
judges for awards and recogni-
tion.
The judges would focus on dif-
ferent categories, which included
the design, type of bloom, size,
type of leaves and what type of
condition the plant was in, ac-
cording to the Rarichs.
Each contestant was allotted
100 points when they began the
contest and continued to lose
points according to the condition
of their plant(s) displayed. The
members with the most points, or
with the fewest points deducted,
at the end of the show would win
red, white and blue awards ac-
cordingly.
The judging is very critical and
members could lose points for a
variety of things that included
water spots on a leaf, a yellow or
torn leaf, a discolored flower or
even a missing leaf within the
bunch of other leaves.
Its kind of like a dog show,
where there are different pedi-
grees, former vice president of
GSAVC and 12-year member Lu-
anne Arico said. They (plants)
are essentially treated like pets.
They need to be groomed and
picked, and tended to.
The ideal, perfect plant is one
whose characteristics are perfect-
ly symmetrical with leaves that
are evenly distributed, a big bou-
quet of blossoms in the middle
and tiered leaves on the outside,
with the smallest leaves on the in-
side and largest on the outside,
according to Arico.
These are definitely not your
grandmothers African violets,
she said.
There were also to be lectures
each day given by two members of
the GSAVC.
On Saturday, Hunter was slated
to give a presentation called
African Violet Species and the
History of the Saintpaulia and
on Sunday, vice president of the
GSAVC Paula Ball was to give a
presentation about the Specific
Care of African Violets.
The GSAVC is part of a larger
organization known as the
African Violet Society of Ameri-
ca (AVSA), where African violet
growers from all over the country
join to expose their plants.
AVSA holds a convention in a
different state every year, which
draws in hundreds of growers
who display and discuss all types
of African violets with other
growers.
There are thousands of differ-
ent types of African violets, most
of which have designated names
such as Irish Flirt, depending on
their look, size and color.
In 2011, the AVSAs convention
was sponsored by Philadelphia,
but since there werent enough
hotels to house the attendees, it
was moved to Cherry Hill so
GSAVC members were able to at-
tend.
Theres a whole sub-culture of
African violet enthusiasts, Arico
said. Were not just old ladies.
Like Arico, The Rarichs gen-
uinely enjoy growing and learn-
ing about African violets and are
grateful a club like GSAVC exists
to entertain their hobbies.
Weve always loved house-
plants and African violets and
joining this club showed us how
vast the collection can be, the
elder Rarich said.
Its been a really great experi-
ence working with my mom, the
younger Rarich said. Both of
our collections have grown and
so has our relationship.
The GSAVC holds meetings at
the Robbinsville Branch of the
Mercer County Library located at
42 Robbinsville Allentown Road
in Robbinsville on the first Thurs-
day of every month from Septem-
ber to June. Meetings are open to
the public.
For more information about
the GSAVC, call (732) 771-7117,
email GSAVCmail@gmail.com, or
visit
www.princetonol.com/groups/gs
avc.
MAY 9-15, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
800 B. Denow Road Penn|ngton, NJ 08654
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$10 Per Tire/Minimum of 2
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 5/30/12.
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CLUB
Continued from page 1
Club holds monthly meetings
National Youth
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(800) 448-4663
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Send us your
Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at (856) 427-0934. Call the
editor at (609) 751-0245.
Timberlane Middle School stu-
dents have forged a charitable
partnership with local organiza-
tion Christines Hope for Kids,
raising thousands of dollars for a
great cause.
Recently, the students raised
$3,000 for Good Grief (www.good-
grief.com), a grief-counseling
service headquartered in Morris-
town that assists kids throughout
the state after the loss of a parent
or sibling.
Christines Hope (www.christi-
neshope.org), the charity founded
in honor of Timberlane graduate
Christine Gianacaci, who died in
the 2010 Haiti earthquake while
on a charitable mission with her
college, matched the Timberlane
funds for a grand total of $6,000,
all contributed to Good Grief.
U.S. Rep. Rush Holt, D-12,
stopped by last week to congratu-
late the students on their efforts.
Small actions really can add
up to create something big, Holt
said. Thats what Timberlane
Middle School students proved by
raising $3,000 to help families
struggling with grief. Their ef-
forts are impressive and inspir-
ing, and the matching donation
from Christines Hope for Kids
will ensure that the students con-
tributions have a meaningful and
lasting effect.
The students raised the money
through a drive they call Penny
Wars, in which students bring in
donations, from spare change to
larger gifts, for a one-week period
and where homerooms engage in
a friendly competition to raise the
most.
Just a week before, Timber-
lanes sixth-graders and Chris-
tines Hope pooled their resources
to present 100 emergency toi-
letry/basic-need kits to the Red
Cross to distribute to disaster vic-
tims around the country.
They also put together 60
overnight bags for kids, which
included pajamas, toiletries, a
book and a teddy bear, to be dis-
tributed to local charities for kids
after disasters such as house
fires.
The sixth-graders raised more
than $1,400 through the sale of
Christines Hope bracelets and T-
shirts, and through donations,
which Christines Hope then
matched.
The Timberlane students
have been unbelievable, Chris-
tines mother and founder of
Christines Hope for Kids Jean
Gianacaci said.
The charity has worked with
other Hopewell schools, as well,
in raising money for various
causes.
Since its founding in 2010, the
charity has given away more than
$130,000.
But, Gianacaci said their proj-
ects are not always about money.
Timberlane has also been a
partner in collecting used sport-
ing equipment and used books
that then go to kids without the
funds to buy their own.
Next on the list of Timber-
lanes projects: Bagging Summer
Hunger.
Students attending the sixth-
grade activity night will bring
along breakfast and lunch items
and Christines Hope will bag
them up for local charities to dis-
tribute this summer to kids who
normally count on free school
breakfast and lunch programs to
keep from going hungry.
Timberlane just has great
kids, said Gianacaci.
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Students help raise thousands for Good Grief
Special to The Sun
From left, Timberlane Vice Principal, Darren Lewan; Student Council
co-advisor/teacher, Barbara McCarty; Claire King and Chandler
Habig; Barbara Chabner of Good Grief; Cameron Habig; Rep. Rush
Holt; Julia Immordino; Jean Gianacaci of Christine's Hope for Kids;
and Timberlane Principal Tony Suozzo present a $6,000 check to
Good Grief counseling services in remembrance of Christine Gi-
anacaci, who died in the 2010 Haiti earthquake.
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
MAY 9-15, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 13
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The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On April 19 at 8:56 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino responded to a
Columbia Avenue address for the
report of a burglary. Sometime
between Dec. 23 and April 15,
someone entered the home and
removed $10,000 worth of jewelry
along with a keyboard and mouse
to a home computer.
On April 20 at 8:33 p.m., Officer
William Gaskill responded to a
Pennington Harbourton Road ad-
dress for the report of a burglary.
Sometime between March 1 and
April 20, someone forced entry to
the rear door of the vacant resi-
dence. Nothing was reported
missing.
On April 18 at 7:12 p.m., Officer
Mandy Grey responded to Har-
bourton Rocktown Road for the
report of a three-car motor vehi-
cle crash. Police say a 2007 Sub-
aru Tribeca, driven southbound
by a 41-year-old man, entered into
the northbound lane and struck
the drivers side of a 2011 Chevro-
let Traverse driven by a 55-year-
old woman. The mans vehicle
struck a second northbound car, a
2007 Hyundai Santa Fe driven by
a 45-year-old woman, causing
damage to her passenger-side
mirror.
The mans vehicle then left the
roadway and struck a stone wall
and a tree. The 55-year-old female
was extricated from her car by
the Hopewell and Union fire de-
partments and was transported to
a local hospital for the complaint
of pain to her chest and arms.
She was treated and later re-
leased. The man received sum-
monses for careless driving and
driving an unregistered vehicle,
which will be heard in municipal
court.
On April 19, a 42-year-old Beth-
lehem, Pa., man was arrested in
Mount Pocono, Pa. He was taken
into custody by the Pennsylvania
State Police after an alleged hold
up at a bank in Mt. Pocono, police
said. Police also said he is a sus-
pect in the robbery of the PNC
bank branch located within the
Stop & Shop supermarket that oc-
curred on April 14. The FBI con-
tinues to investigate this robbery
and federal charges are expected
to be filed against him, according
to reports.
On April 21 at 11:58 p.m., Offi-
cer Joseph McNeil observed a car
traveling at 64 mph in a 45 mph
zone along Washington Crossing
Pennington Road. McNeil says he
stopped the car and spoke with
the driver, a 50-year-old man, who
had the odor of alcohol on his
breath. After performing field-so-
briety tests, the man was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with DWI,
reckless driving, speeding, failure
to maintain lane and driving
while suspended. He was later re-
leased to an acquaintance and his
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On April 25 at 12:25 p.m., Offi-
cer Sara Erwin responded to a
Baker Way address for the report
of a theft. Police say a 16-year-old
boy had taken $20 from a relative
and was also found to be in pos-
session of marijuana. The boy
was charged with theft and the
possession of marijuana (under
50 grams). The case will be for-
warded to Family Court for re-
view, reports said.
On April 24 at 1:33 p.m., Officer
Kevin Koveloski, along with ani-
mal control officers Belinda Ogi-
tis and Robert English, responded
to Weldon Way for the report of a
loose dog. Police say a dog owned
by a 46-year-old woman had en-
tered a neighbors property and
attacked a cat.
The cats owner had to hit the
dog with a mop to stop the attack.
This cat was taken to a veteri-
narian where it was treated for its
injuries. The dog then attacked
another cat in the neighborhood
severely injuring it.
This cat was also taken to a vet-
erinarian, but was unable to be
saved due to extensive injuries.
After the dog was finally sub-
dued, it was taken to a holding fa-
cility where it is currently being
quarantined.
Ogitis issued several sum-
monses to the dogs owner for or-
dinance violations including dog
running at large, three counts of
public nuisance and finding to de-
clare potentially dangerous dog.
These charges will be heard in
municipal court.
On April 24 at 12:38 a.m., Offi-
cer James Hoffman responded to
the Wells Fargo Bank on Route
546 for the report of a forgery. An
investigation found that a 33-year-
old man attempted to cash a
fraudulent check in the amount
of $7,392.50.
He was placed under arrest
and transported to police head-
quarters for processing, where he
was charged with forgery and bad
checks.
These charges will be forward-
ed to the Mercer County Prosecu-
tors Office for review.
He also had several outstand-
ing arrest warrants out of Tren-
ton, Hamilton Township and
Ewing Township.
He was later remanded to the
Mercer County Correction Cen-
ter after he was unable to post
$20,000 bail.
POLICE REPORT
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MAY 9-15, 2012 PAGE 15
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Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Gold Coast 2nd floor condo. This
unit features 3 bedrooms 2 baths, is
being offered furnished with a great
rental history. The roof is 3 years old,
the deck is 3 years old, water heater
is 2 years old, outside electric at bot-
tom and top of stairs all redone, fans
is bedrooms and family room 2 years
old, new microwave and refrigerator,
and all hardwood floors were re-
done 3 years ago. Property also has
plenty of off-street parking and is
close to the beach! JUST PAINTED
AND CARPETS CLEANED! $459,900
OCEAN CITY
ASBURY AVENUE
856-356-2775
Board Your
Dog In A
Loving Home -
Not A KenneI
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics Professional Installation
www.cooperroofing.com
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 5/23/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 5/23/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 5/23/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 5/23/12.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job

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