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Alternative Energy Uniqueness
Alternative Energy Uniqueness
INDEX…………………………………………………………………………………………….1
Alt energy coming now(GENERIC)………………………………………………………………2
Solar Energy now……………………………………………………………………………….3-4
Solar and water power coming……………………………………………………………………5
Congress likes nuke power………………………………………………………………………..6
Funding for alt energy now………………………………………………………………………..7
Wind……………………………………………………………………………………………….8
Congress likes alt energy(Generic)…………………………………………………………….9-10
Congress support cellulosic ethanol……………………………………………………………...11
Congress supports coal…………………………………………………………………………..12
AT
Alt energy costs to much………………………………………………………………………....13
Alt energy ineffective(GENERIC)……………………………………………………………....14
Congress is against alt energy……………………………………………………………………15
Congress not ready for cellulosic ethanol………………………………………………………..16
Solar power doesn’t work
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AFF STUFF
Alt energy on the way

New technologies are on their way

MICHELLE BRYNER August 23, 2006 (Chemical Week


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BP says it has purchased Greenlight Energy (Charlottesville, VA), a developer of large-scale


wind energy farms, in a deal valued at $ 98 million, excluding working capital and tax
adjustments. Greenlight has about 39 wind power farms, both early stage and mature
development, in the U.S. with combined potential power generation capacity of 6.5 gigawatts. BP says it expects to
develop several of Greenlight's projects over the next few years. "This purchase gives BP
Alternative Energy immediate access to a large number of high-quality wind [power]
development projects across the country, including a number of projects we expect to be able
to develop over the next few years," says Steve Westwell, chief executive/BP Alternative Energy.

Engineers are finding new alternate engineers

Irish Independent August 31, 2007 TAKING STEPS TO ENGINEER FUTURES


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Engineers are at the forefront of research into alternative energy sources and technologies to
harness these new forms of energy. Engineering is a broad sector covering a variety of
disciplines, many of which will be required in the battle to save the world. Mechanical
engineers are focussed on developing alternative energy systems, for example geo-thermal
pumps and solar power systems, whereas biosystems engineers are developing bio-fuels to
power cars and other mechanised vehicles.

Alternative energy is being set up now

Business Recorder October 4, 2007


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. The Board will act as a forum for evaluating, monitoring and certification of alternative or renewable energy projects and products.
According to the ordinance, the Board will act as co-ordinating agency for commercial application of alternative or renewable technology.
The board will facilitate power generation through alternative or renewable energy resources
by acting as one window facility for establishing, promoting and facilitating alternative
energy projects based on wind, solar, micro-hydel, fuel cells, tidal, ocean, biogas, biomass etc.
The Board will conduct feasibility studies and surveys to identify opportunities for power generation through alternative and renewable
energy resources. It will interact and co-ordinate with national and international agencies for promotion and development of alternative
energy. Under the ordinance, the Board will set up alternative and renewable energy power pilot
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projects on its own or through joint venture or partnership with public or private entities.
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Solar energy coming
Solar energy is on the rise

Kim Hyun-cheol June 9, 2008 (Korea Times


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EVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4173725050&cisb=22_T4173725049&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=174045&docNo=3)

Korean companies are turning their attention to the development of alternative energy to
substitute for fossil fuel in the midst of surging global oil prices. While electronics and heavy industries look
to muscle into the solar energy business, automakers are in full swing developing hybrid vehicles. Refineries here are also seeking to create
funds for alternative energy. Several leading companies are making fast moves to make the sun their
business territory, as solar energy is rapidly emerging as a promising field. Hyundai Heavy Industries
launched a solar cell plant in Eumseong, North Chungcheong Province, last month. The new plant will produce
photovoltaic modules generating 30 megawatts every year, which is enough for about 10,000
households to use. The company, which exported $60-million worth solar power generating
equipment to Europe in 2006 for the first time, plans to budget some 300 billion won ($290
million) on the project to extend production to a yearly 330 megawatts. Automakers are in line with the
trend with efforts for various hybrid models. Hyundai-Kia Automotive Group is looking to develop eco-friendly hybrid vehicles, which are
The world no.6 maker plans to produce hybrid cars
more fuel efficient with lower emissions than conventional ones.
in 2009, followed by test operations of fuel cell vehicles in 2012 and their commercial
production later. As part of a master plan, it will set off production of a hybrid version of its compact car, Avante, next year.

Solar energy is the smartest alternative energy

Antara (Indonesia) June 25, 2008 Wednesday


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Solar energy is the best alternative energy to be developed in Indonesia, as many areas in the
country gets sunshine all year long. "Solar Cells should be the right choice. For 356 days a
year we have sunshine," economic affairs analyst at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture Iman Sugema said in Jakarta Wednesday.
He said that logically, the development of solar energy is more efficient than any other alternative energy. The only obstacle is the high price
"The only effective way sould be the mass production of solar cells, so that it would
of solar cells.
be cheaper. State-owned companies need to be encouraged to produce solar cells in large
quantities and at a relatively low production cost," he said. Besides solar electric energy, there are still many other
alternative energies which could be transformed into electricity, like water, like energy from sea waves, especially that Indonesia has a very
long coastline. In the meantime, electric energy observer Nengah Sudja said while it is true that the development of solar energy would be the
right choice, this type of energy cannot be applied in short period. And
the development of alternative energy from
sea waves or wind energy, he said the first thing to do first is to build the power plant which
would generate electricity from the alternative energy. But in the case of nuclear energy, this is practically
impossible as it would need a huge cost. "Therefore, the demonstrations that had been held to oppose the building of a nuclear power plant,
had actually been for nothing, because the money is obviously not available. Even the United States has stopped building nuclear power
plants," he added.
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Congress supports usage of solar energy

Russell Fortmeyer March 1, 2008 Architectural Record


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Nestled among the hits and misses of the dubiously named Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007,
the eight-year-old
proposal for the Sun Wall (below) somehow passed through Congress with little attention. The
project--a 200-kilowatt solar photovoltaic installation for an exterior facade of the Department
of Energy's headquarters in Washington, D.C.--resulted from a competition won by the Chicago architects Solomon
Cordwell Buenz. Once construction finishes in 2009, the wall will qualify as the largest building-
integrated solar-energy system for a federal government building in the U.S. It's also a highly visible
reminder to Washington bureaucrats of the possibilities for alternative energy sources.

Congress is fighting for solar power

St. Petersburg Times May 2,


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Why not invest our resources in the future instead? Congress has been fighting for a year over
whether to extend tax credits for wind and solar energy; the incentives for these incredibly
efficient energy sources are set to expire in December.
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Solar power and water power
Ocean power and solar power coming back

Alternative Energy October 27, 2006 Investors Chronicle


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These stocks cover a wide range of technologies. There are the well-known methods of solar,
wind and wave power represented by companies such as ReneSola, Clipper Windpower and
Ocean Power Technologies. Solar and wind tend to be the most advanced alternative energy
plays generating revenue. The biofuel companies, such as D1 Oils and China Biodiesel, are a stage behind this, hoping to
produce significant quantities of oil from plants or waste products. While these are potentially very interesting, they are largely unproven in
terms of scaleability and economics of production. Fuel-cell companies have been one of the most lucrative areas in which to invest. At one
end of the scale is Ceres Power, which is focused on producing one product, a fuel-cell-driven combined heat-and-power unit to replace the
domestic boiler. It has done well in securing a pilot test with Centrica and is making good technological process, although meaningful
At the other end is ITM, which wants to be a key player in a
revenues are not expected until 2009.
'hydrogen economy' by developing materials for electrolysers. This would have many
applications, but is a very nascent industry and a long way from profitability.

Hydropower is an important in alternative energy

Karen Mclauchlan December 12, 2006 (Evening Gazette


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The region's renewable energy industry has received a further boost with news that a new company has set up on Teesside to develop state-of-
the-art fuel cell technology. And the Tees Valley firm, which aims to create around 20 jobs, is going nationwide to seek out commercial uses
for alternative energy. Cell Space has set up at the Wilton Centre, where it will work in collaboration with experts at a hi-tech development
centre for fuel cell systems. The company, which is working on new products for the building industry, was attracted to Wilton after the
CPI is aiming to develop a cluster
Centre for Process Innovation announced plans to open a Fuel Cell Application Facility.
of companies working on developing fuel cells, using hydrogen production in the existing
Tees Valley chemical industry. Cell Space managing director John Thompson said the firm
hopes to supply alternative energy systems to national clients such as national restaurant and
hotel chains. And the firm hopes to recruit 20 people in the next two or three years. "We believe fuel cells will have a
very important part to play in the way energy is supplied in this country. "We see a big future in micro
generation and are aiming to establish a successful business here," he said. Cell Space is setting out to supply alternative
energy systems including fuel cells in existing buildings, and is targeting chains who have similar structures nationwide. Fuel
Cell Application Facility director Graham Hillier said: "We are naturally delighted that Cell Space has seen the huge
commercial opportunities that alternative energy offers, and we hope many more companies will join us to build an industry
which will bring great benefits to the North-east." CPI, which is supported by regional development agency One NorthEast, is
planning to open the doors of its Fuel Cell Application Facility (FCAF) at the end of the month. The pounds 1.5m facility is
the first of its type in the country. It will provide a test bed for companies operating in the North-east to develop fuel cells
systems for commercial applications. In the last two years the FCAF has produced and tested a number of fuel cell systems
across the Tees Valley. CPI has already trialled fuel cells powering a speed control; a sign on the Transporter Bridge and the
lighting at Teesside Crematorium's chapel of remembrance. Fuel cells use an electrochemical process, similar to that in a
battery, to transform a range of gaseous and liquid fuels into heat and power. The highly efficient process reduces
carbon dioxide emissions by up to 50% and produces no harmful emissions. Experts from
across the world see the technology as an essential element in developing cleaner, low carbon
highly efficient energy supplies.
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Congress likes nuclear power


Congress is funding nuclear deal

Jenny Weil March 17, 2008Inside N.R.C


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NRC will distribute $15 million allocated by Congress for educational programs
For its part,
supporting the nuclear power industry. Klein said the agency would use the money for scholarships, fellowships and
faculty development at colleges, universities and trade schools. "I am aware not everyone agrees with the decision to move this program from
Congress, and the NRC is committed to running
DOE to our agency," he said, "but the decision has been made by
the program as well as possible, and making the most of the opportunity."
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Funding for alternative energy now
Money being invested alt energy now

Aaron Siegel May 12, 2008(Investment News


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LEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4174343406&cisb=22_T4174343405&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=224239&docNo=
4)

Amid concerns about rising energy costs, Firsthand Capital Management Inc. is widening its focus on technology to include alternative
energy. In October, the San Jose, Calif.-based company unveiled the Firsthand Alternative Energy Fund (ALTEX) to invest in technologies
The fund invests in companies developing the use of solar, wind, fuel
aimed at reducing oil consumption.
cells, hydroelectric power and other forms of alternative energy. ``The promise of these
technologies has attracted significant interest from the investment community in a short
period of time,'' according to Firsthand's website. Green technology The launch of the fund
comes as many Americans are looking to cut back on their use of oil. The price of a barrel of
crude increased 101% to $123.53 per barrel over the one-year period ended last Wednesday.

Funding for alternative energy is high now

Aaron Siegel May 12, 2008 (Investment News


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3)

Amid concerns about rising energy costs, Firsthand Capital Management Inc. is widening its focus on technology to include alternative
In October, the San Jose, Calif.-based company unveiled the Firsthand Alternative
energy.
Energy Fund (ALTEX) to invest in technologies aimed at reducing oil consumption. The fund
invests in companies developing the use of solar, wind, fuel cells, hydroelectric power and
other forms of alternative energy. ``The promise of these technologies has attracted significant interest from the investment
community in a short period of time,'' according to Firsthand's website. Green technology The launch of the fund comes as many Americans
are looking to cut back on their use of oil. The price of a barrel of crude increased 101% to $123.53 per barrel over the one-year period ended
last Wednesday. Meanwhile,
the amount of money invested in alternative energy and efficiency
technologies increased to more than $70 billion in 2006, from $27.5 billion in 2004, according
to data from New Energy Finance Ltd. of London. From its inception Oct. 29 through March 31, the Firsthand
Alternative Energy Fund amassed $2.8 million in assets. ``Many investors don't make the connection between technology and alternative
energy,'' said Kevin Landis, Firsthand's president and chief executive. ``The socially responsible investment-screening progress is different
because it looks at a larger array of investment criteria. We are looking for companies that are filing patents.'' Expense vs. Performance The
fund, which is sold through financial advisers, invests in 27 companies. It comes with an expense ratio of 2.1%, compared with 1.56% for the
average fund in its category.
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WIND power
Wind power is on the rise

Derek Sands January 28, 2008 Inside Energy with Federal Lands
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)

In another step toward developing alternative energy on the Outer Continental Shelf, the Minerals Management Service announced last week
it had received 43 nominations to set up data-collection projects in federal waters. "We are excited about the level of response and the
"This confirms there is
number of areas nominated for potential development," MMS Director Randall Luthi said in a statement.
tremendous interest in tapping the wealth of renewable energy resources offshore." While Luthi
may be excited about the potential for offshore alternative-energy development, the only OCS wind-energy production projects proposed so
far fall outside the authority of the experimental and data collection rules, and are facing intense opposition from some community groups. In
November, MMS began accepting applications for short-term alternative energy projects, including wind, wave, tidal and ocean-current
energy, which would assess the extent of such resources, as well as the potential for alternative technologies, on the OCS. The projects are
meant to pave the way for permanent rules governing OCS alternative-energy production. MMS is still writing those regulations, and has
said it is difficult to comprehensively examine the environmental impact of these alternative technologies while they are immature.
According to MMS, most of the applications received last week were for facilities to collect weather and oceanographic data for wind energy
projects on the OCS off the coasts of Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina and Virginia.
There were also applications to test the possibilities for wave energy projects off the Pacific Coast, as well as a tidal power project in Alaska's
While alternative energy on the OCS is still in its infancy, alternative energies on land
Cook Inlet.
are showing remarkable growth. Wind energy, one of the most promising and proven of the
offshore alternative-energy technologies, has expanded onshore by 45% in 2007, according a
report released recently by the American Wind Energy Association, an industry group. With nearly 5,244 MW installed in 2007,
AWEA estimates wind-energy investment has contributed $9 billion to the US economy. Currently there are 16,818 MW of installed wind
energy in the US, spread out over 34 states. Offshore, development is going more slowly. The first wind farm on the OCS may be built in
Massachusetts's Nantucket Sound if local developers get their way, but it has already attracted substantial controversy. The Cape Wind
Energy project has faced consistent pressure from the local community group Alliance to Protect Nantucket Sound, as well as powerful
politicians, including Democratic Senator Edward Kennedy, who has otherwise been a staunch supporter of alternative energy, and former
Republican governor and presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Opponents argue that Cape Wind will interfere with fisheries and navigation,
and could have a negative impact on bird populations in the area, while those in favor of the project, including Greenpeace, have said that
opponents are suffering from "not-in-my-backyard" syndrome (IE, 21 January, 8). The project lies about 5.5 miles from Martha's Vineyard,
within sight of the Kennedy family compound in Hyannis Port. Alternative energy is a new jurisdiction for MMS, which is a part of the
The Energy Policy Act of 2005
Interior Department and has traditionally been responsible for oil and natural gas on the OCS.
called on Interior to oversee alternative energy development on the OCS.
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Congress likes alternative energy

Congress is putting alternative development first

George Leopold February 19, 2007NEWS ANALYSIS; Pg. 20 ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING


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- Alternative energy sources have moved front and center in Congress in


HIGHLIGHT: Washington
response to voter outrage over energy prices and oil company profits, as well as rising
concerns over U.S. dependency on foreign sources and fossil fuels' role in climate change.

Congress taking initiative to have alternative energy

Dipka Bhambhani June 16, 2008 Inside Energy with Federal Lands OIL; Pg.
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o=7

Vice President Cheney sounded off on soaring gasoline prices last week, scolding Democratic
lawmakers for refusing to allow more oil and natural gas drilling on the Outer Continental
Shelf and in wilderness areas such as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In a speech Wednesday at the
US Chamber of Commerce in Washington, Cheney said the US must be willing to tap more of its own energy resources, and stop begging
other countries to pump more oil. "Today, we're in a situation where we're supposed to go out and scream and yell at folks who are producing
and try to get them to produce more, while we aren't willing to produce all that we have here at home ourselves," Cheney told an audience of
business leaders. For
the sake of lower gas prices, greater energy independence, a stronger economy
and our national security, "we must produce more energy right here in the United States," the
vice president said. US gasoline prices hit another all-time high last week, with regular unleaded averaging $4.03 per gallon, according to the
Energy Information Administration, the statistical arm of the Energy Department. Oil prices hovered around $130 per barrel. Energy
Secretary Samuel Bodman said he planned to attend a meeting that Saudi Arabia will host on June 22 on oil prices. In his speech last week,
Cheney blamed Democrats in Congress for standing in the way of energy production. "Many have ignored the obvious [and have] stood in
the way of energy production [because] they fail to see the immediate day-to-day needs of the economy," he said. Last week, however,
Senate Republicans blocked a bill that sought to lower gasoline prices by forcing big oil
companies to invest more of their profits in ethanol and other alternative forms of energy. The
so-called Consumer-First Energy Act would have levied a 25% "windfall profits" tax on major oil companies' earnings above a certain level
if the companies did not meet the measure's goal for investments in alternative energy technologies. The act also would have required higher
investment margins for oil futures traders, and tightened rules for overseas trading in US markets. Speculation has been blamed by many
lawmakers for high oil prices. The bill stalled hours after the White House released a statement saying President Bush would veto the
measure if it passed came to his desk. "You do not get more of something by taxing it higher. That's just a basic fundamental law of
economics," Cheney said. The Democrat-authored gasoline bill would also have authorized the Justice Department to take legal action
against OPEC countries for price-fixing activities, and established penalties for US oil companies charging artificially high prices during
emergencies. The Bush administration opposes those provisions, saying they would antagonize OPEC nations and lead to gasoline shortages
in the US. The administration maintains that rising prices are reflected in an increase in global demand, while the supply has remained steady
for the past three and a half years (IE, 26 May, 16). While Congress has tried to advance legislation to encourage use of alternative energy,
Cheney told business leaders that it would take 20 to 50 years before alternative energy sources would replace the petroleum-based economy
the US lives under now. "In the here and now, we are an economy that runs on petroleum ? some 20 million barrels of it a day. That can and
will change over time, but it will be a very long time. It will not change overnight," he said. At this point, Cheney said, "There isn't anything
on the horizon that's [more] economic than the basic good old oil and gas." Cheney said. Cheney claimed that the Chinese government is
drilling for more oil 60 miles off the coast of Florida, in cooperation with the Cuba. "Even the communists have figured out that a good
answer for high prices is more supply," Cheney said. But Democrats, led by House speaker Nancy Pelosi, disputed Cheney's claim. A few
hours after Cheney's speech, Pelosi, a California Democrat, issued a statement scolding the vice president and other Republicans for using
"scare tactics" to promote their "failed drill-and-veto energy policies." "The facts show China does not have a deepwater drilling contract in
Cuba," Pelosi said in a statement. "The American people deserve the truth and a cleaner, greener, more energy efficient future." Cheney,
meanwhile, blasted the Democratic-controlled Congress for saying "no to drilling in ANWR, no to drilling off the East coast, no to drilling
off the West coast, no to drilling off of Florida." "Given the high prices Americans are paying, we should hear no more complaining from
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politicians who stood in the way of increasing energy production," Cheney said. Cheney said energy was one of the top
three "big economic decisions" the US has to make.

Congress pushing for alternative energy now

DANIEL GROSS June 29, 2008 The New York Times


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8)

All the talk about the bad oil bubble obscures the potentially good bubble still inflating in the realm of alternative energy. Wind turbine
installations more than doubled last year. Ethanol production capacity will nearly double once all the plants under construction are
completed. Investors have given SunPower, a solar panel spinoff from Cypress Semiconductor, a market value much larger than that of its
former parent. Such exuberance is characteristic of bubbles that periodically inflate. Some, like the one we've had in housing, end in losses
During a bubble,
and Congressional investigations. Others, like the dot-com boom, leave behind something useful.
investment is spurred by technological progress and new economic assumptions -- in this case
about the price of oil, climate change and the desire to curb carbon emissions. Government does its
part by using subsidies and the tax code to encourage the new industry. Just as in the 19th century the federal government offered land grants
Congress today is pushing an alternative energy boom by mandating
to inspire a railroad boom,
ethanol use and giving generous tax credits for solar and wind-based energy. The investment
has already led to more efficient solar panels, wind turbines and storage batteries. Many of the new
alternative energy companies will fail. But that's when the fun will begin. Think about what happened after the dot-com bust. The
commercial infrastructure laid down in the 1990s -- fiber-optic cables, servers, payment systems -- was put to use by new companies like
Google, YouTube and Facebook. Bubbles also leave behind mental infrastructure. People didn't stop buying books online or sending e-mail
messages when pioneering Internet firms failed. Since concerns about global energy demand, emissions and climate change are likely to
survive the oil bubble, the market for alternative energy won't evaporate. It's hard to say what we'll be left with after this bubble. But a few
years from now, as ethanol companies linger in bankruptcy and the stocks of alternative energy firms wallow in the single digits, I'll pick you
up in my plug-in hybrid, which I've just recharged using the wind turbine in my driveway, and we can discuss it.

Congress supports all forms of alternative energy


E&E News PM March 8,
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sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4235732137&cisb=22_T4235732136&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=302445&
docNo=2)

Mike Linn: I think it's going to be an uphill battle. It


was an uphill battle during a Republican-controlled
Congress. It will be a bigger uphill battle I think in this Congress. This Congress is focused on
alternative energy, which we're in favor of alternative energy. We need all forms of energy in this
country. We need more nuclear. We need clean burning coal. We need more wind, solar, and
ethanol. We also need other forms of energy we haven't even discovered yet. But in the meantime we could use our
resources to back out other oil, also to find natural gas offshore and in the inner mountain west that helps power new
generators with natural gas which is cleaner burning than building a coal plant. And in addition, it's faster to put
those facilities in place while you're building the coal plant. You can also discover more natural gas so you can co-
fire with coal to clean the emissions from a coal plant.
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Congress support cellulosic ethanol


Congress supporting cellulosic energy

Joe Kamalick February 12, 2007ICIS Chemical Business


America(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T42
24859317&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4224859323&cisb=22_T
4224859322&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=304079&docNo=2)

US ENERGY Secretary Samuel Bodman is seeking a 20% boost in spending to nearly $180m in fiscal year 2008 to support development of
cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels.He said the increased funding for biofuels research and development, part of the Energy Department's
Congress, is intended to "crack the code of cellulosic ethanol production
total $24.3bn budget request to
to make it cost-competitive within the next few years."The department's budget request is part of President
George W. Bush 's overall budget proposal of some $2.9trn for fiscal 2008. The budget proposal is subject to congressional approval and
usually is altered in significant ways by Congress.However, the requested $29m spending increase for ethanol R&D signals an expansion of
Bush's commitment to "transform the nation's domestic biomass resources into affordable
biofuels and support the president's goal to make cellulosic ethanol cost competitive by 2012,"
Bodman said.He said the department's research in this area would in part focus on "reducing the cost of outputs and by-products from
biochemical and thermochemical processes and integrating these processes into biorefineries that co-produce liquid and gaseous fuels,
chemicals and materials, and/or heat and power."In addition to the $180m that the department seeks to spend on biofuels research, the budget
establish a $9bn Energy Department loan guarantee
also includes the first allocation of money, just over $8m, to
program, in part to help advance construction of commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol
production facilities.

Congress votes for cellulosic ethanol

States News Service June 27, 2008


Friday(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4239283250&format=GNBFI
&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4239283253&cisb=22_T4239283252&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=8058&
docNo=1)

Congress, where we have voted


Development of these fuels is a priority of Governor Phil Bredesen in Tennessee and of mine in
repeatedly to boost cellulosic ethanol production in tax legislation originating from the Ways and
Means Committee, on which I serve. There were also extensive biofuels production boosts in the
historic farm bill we recently passed over the President's veto.
HBR SDI
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Alt NRG coming now

Congress supports coal

Clean coal is on bush and congresses agenda

Jean Chemnick February 4, 2008 Inside Energy with Federal Lands


(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4239886281&format=GNBFI&sort=R
ELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4239886284&cisb=22_T4239886283&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=7989&docNo=2
)

Bush announced that he would ask Congress for $2 billion for an intitiative to promote
nuclear, clean-coal and renewable technologies abroad. "Let us create a new international clean technology fund,
which will help developing nations like India and China make greater use of clean energy sources." The funding proposal, mentioned in the
outline but not in the speech, was the only specific new recommendation on energy that Bush laid out Monday, and it was well received by
advocates for energy-consuming industries. "If
we are to meet rising energy demand while reducing
greenhouse gas emissions and preserving economic strength, Congress must invest in lower-
emission energy technologies such as nuclear, renewables and clean coal," said the American Chemistry
Council. "We would welcome an international clean energy technology fund."
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NEG STUFF
Alternative energy isn’t cost effiecent

All new alternative energy is not cost-effiecient

Alternative Energy October 27, 2006 Investors Chronicle


(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4187341152&format=GNBFI&sort=R
ELEVANCE&startDocNo=26&resultsUrlKey=29_T4187341155&cisb=22_T4187341154&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=234036&docN
o=42)

Most of these quoted alternative energy stocks are characterised by being relatively immature
businesses - loss-making and expensive on any conventional valuation measures. The share
prices have also been very volatile and some investments have already disappointed.
However, this is a growing sector that does now have both investment credibility and
mainstream political support. A basket approach to investing in this area is sensible, as there
will be winners and losers. It will be a rollercoaster ride, but, on a long-term basis, there will
be some very exciting companies in this space.

All alt energy is not cost-effective therefore most people won’t use it

The Straits Times (Singapore) October 23,


(2006(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4173725041&format=GNBFI&so
rt=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=26&resultsUrlKey=29_T4173725050&cisb=22_T4173725049&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=144965&d
ocNo=31)

However, most forms of alternative energy are still not cost-competitive at current technology
levels. For instance, solar energy costs much more than current electricity tariffs even with
today's high oil prices. Moreover, even if most of the available rooftop space in Singapore
were covered with solar panels, only about 3 to 4 per cent of Singapore's current annual
electricity consumption could be met. Other forms of renewables such as geothermal and
hydro sources are not feasible due to our geography. Our wind speed and tidal differences are
also not high enough for significant electricity generation. Our electricity system can accept
electricity from renewable sources. However, electricity from renewables is currently more
expensive than conventional sources. Unless consumers are prepared to pay higher prices for
electricity, investments in renewable energy are not viable until they are cost-competitive. We
would like to assure Mr Tan and other readers that the Government is keeping a close watch on the development of new energy sources in
meeting Singapore's energy needs. Concurrently, the Energy Market Authority will ensure our electricity market stays open to new
technologies as they arise and become viable.
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Alt Energy is ineffective

Solar power is overrated

Kim Hyun-cheol June 9, 2008 (Korea Times


http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4173725041&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEV
ANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4173725050&cisb=22_T4173725049&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=174045&docNo=3)

In spite of its availability, solar energy has long been estimated to be of low efficiency due to
its high power-generating cost. However, recent predictions that oil prices will jump to over $200 per barrel cast new light on
its prospects as it takes only $160-180 to produce the same amount of energy as petroleum. The global solar market has been seeing an
average 53.5 percent of annual growth since 2004, and the tendency is predicted to continue for at least for three more years. LG Group
recently confirmed an internal plan to foster solar business as a new growth engine. Following last year's establishment of LG Solar Energy,
which will exclusively take charge of solar energy generation business, it has recently set up separate develop projects for a solar lighting
module for LG Electronics, and polycrystalline silicon, usually dubbed as polysilicon, for LG Chemical. Samsung Electronics has also built a
photovoltaic research institute at its LCD research center, where a project to develop solar battery products is underway.

Alternative Energy may be good, but can’t help right now

Claire Bisseker June 06, 2008 Financial Mail (South Africa


http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4187435899&format=GNBFI&sort=RE
LEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4187437702&cisb=22_T4187437701&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=163767&docNo=
3)

Substantial public and private investment is going into solar, wind and biofuel development,
but alternative energy sources are making only a marginal contribution to energy supplies thus
far. With growth in oil demand in emerging economies likely to remain robust, and various
geopolitical and geological obstacles hampering an increase in supply, it appears the world is heading for an
energy crunch, possibly by 2015.

OCS Wind energy is far from being development

Derek Sands January 28, 2008 Inside Energy with Federal Lands
(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4197472887&format=GNBFI&sort=R
ELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4197472890&cisb=22_T4197472889&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=7989&docNo=1
)

While Luthi may be excited about the potential for offshore alternative-energy development, the
only OCS wind-energy production projects proposed so far fall outside the authority of the
experimental and data collection rules, and are facing intense opposition from some community
groups. In November, MMS began accepting applications for short-term alternative energy projects, including wind, wave, tidal and ocean-
current energy, which would assess the extent of such resources, as well as the potential for alternative technologies, on the OCS. The
projects are meant to pave the way for permanent rules governing OCS alternative-energy
production. MMS is still writing those regulations, and has said it is difficult to comprehensively examine the environmental impact of
these alternative technologies while they are immature. According to MMS, most of the applications received last week were for facilities to
collect weather and oceanographic data for wind energy projects on the OCS off the coasts of Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New
Jersey, New York, South Carolina and Virginia. There were also applications to test the possibilities for wave energy projects off the Pacific
Coast, as well as a tidal power project in Alaska's Cook Inlet
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Congress is against alternate energy

Congress is against passing anything with alternative energy


May 8, 2008 The New York Times Section ; Column 0; Editorial Desk; LETTER; Pg.(
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30&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=6742&docNo=3)

one would think that the reason


To read ''Dumb as We Wanna Be,'' by Thomas L. Friedman (column, April 30),
Congress hasn't extended tax incentives for wind, solar and other alternative energy is that
childish Democrats and Republicans squabble in Congress while a benign President Bush
refuses to stop the fracas. In the 110th Congress alone, the Republicans have blocked four
different attempts by the Democrats to extend the alternative tax provisions. On June 21 of last year,
the extension of the energy credits received 57 votes; on Dec. 7, it received 53 votes; on Dec. 13, it received 59 votes; and on Feb. 6 of this
year, it received 58 votes. Each time, Republicans put up roadblocks requiring 60 votes to pass the bill. Each time, the overwhelming
President Bush vigorously
majority of Democrats voted for the bill; the overwhelming majority of Republicans voted against.
opposed all of the bills because they taxed oil companies to pay for the tax breaks for
alternative fuels. Democrats and Republicans are not equally to blame. We won't get a real change in energy policy until we change
the composition of the Senate. Charles E. Schumer U.S. Senator from New York Washington, May 1, 2008

Congress isn’t able to pass anything about Alt energy

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT; Pg. 15 June 30, 2008 Inside Energy with Federal
Lands(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4221221628&format=GNBFI
&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4221221631&cisb=22_T4221221630&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=7989&
docNo=4

"Foremost, we must encourage private sector investment in clean energy technology


development and deployment," the New Mexico Democrat said. "We have a chance right now
in Congress with tax incentives to do just that."Congress has been struggling in recent months
to extend tax incentives for alternative energy technology, such as wind and solar power.

Congress hates alternative energy

The Kiplinger Letter March 7, 2008 ENERGY; Vol. 85, No.


10(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4221221628&format=GNBFI&sort
=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4221221631&cisb=22_T4221221630&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=146142&doc
No=2)

As for Congress' effort to push alternative energy: Forget it. At least for this year. Expect the Senate
to bury the House plan to add a 50 cents a gallon tax credit for ethanol produced from farm
waste and forestry, trash, etc. Dead, too, are bigger breaks for buyers of hybrid cars and
double credits for home energy efficiency measures. The problem is the cost: $18 billion. Democrats would pay for
it by revoking oil company credits, but that'll never get past Republicans.
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Congress won’t be prepared for new cellulosic ethanol

Amanda Paulson May 1, 2008Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor


(http://www.lexisnexis.com/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T4225009329&format=GNBFI&sort=R
ELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4225009332&cisb=22_T4225009331&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=7945&docNo=7
)

In the end, the market may dictate the demand for ethanol production. "Up to 14 billion
gallons, corn ethanol is going to grow," predicts Bruce Babcock, director of the Center for
Agricultural and Rural Development at Iowa State University in Ames. "Somewhere around
there, it will stop because ... the trade-offs will get too severe." Eventually, he adds, cellulosic
ethanol will become a major player, and will likely complement the corn-fed production. "But
it won't happen overnight, and it won't be on a schedule that Congress dictates."
HBR SDI
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Solar power failed by congress


Solar power empirically fails
HBR SDI
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Thomas L. Friedman May 3, 2008 The International Herald Tribune


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VANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T4238445070&cisb=22_T4238445069&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=8357&docNo=14)
HBR SDI
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Congress has been bickering over whether and how to
Few people know it, but for almost a year now,
renew the investment tax credit to stimulate investment in solar energy and the production tax
credit to encourage investment in wind energy. The bickering has been so poisonous that when
Congress passed the 2007 energy bill last December, it failed to extend any stimulus for wind
and solar energy production. Oil and gas kept all their credits, but those for wind and solar have been left to
expire this December.Bottom of Form