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Smylie & Crow Associates Consulting Engineers, Building Services A Division of Trow Associates Inc. Feasibility

Smylie & Crow Associates Consulting Engineers, Building Services

A Division of Trow Associates Inc.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System

for

Parkside Collegiate Institute

241 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, ON N5R 3C2

Institute 241 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, ON N5R 3C2 Prepared for: Thames Valley District School Board

Prepared for:

Thames Valley District School Board

951 Leathorne Street London, ON N5Z 3M7

December 16, 2010

S&C Ref: 10-058

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Introduction

Smylie & Crow Associates were retained by the Thames Valley District School Board to provide a feasibility study for the installation of a roof mounted, photovoltaic (PV) system at Parkside Collegiate Institute. Pow Peterman Consulting Engineers provided assistance in assessing the existing building structure and impact of the proposed PV system. The feasibility study is intended to be submitted to the Ministry of Education for consideration towards installation of renewable energy systems at a select number of schools.

Executive Summary

Upon review of the existing school and site conditions and further analysis utilizing the Solmetric SunEye Solar Access Device and the RETScreen software, it is our opinion that Parkside Collegiate Institute is a feasible location for the installation of a roof mounted, grid tied, photovoltaic system. The following summary recommendations are provided for review:

1. Utilize the lower southern most roof to install a photovoltaic system of solar modules. Provide installation of a new roof in the proposed area such that the life expectancy of the roof and PV system will be more closely matched.

2. Provide a structural sleeper system on the roof to accept the PV modules and racking system. This will also maintain access to the roof.

3. Install photoelectric modules (240W/module) for a total of 78 modules, a generated capacity of 18.72kWp(DC) and an anticipated 25.289MWh of energy created by the school annually. The system capacity could be increased if additional funding is available; the capacity exists to double the quantity of PV modules located within the area of roof we have proposed.

4. Provide an interactive display within the school to be used as a learning tool for staff and students.

5. Enter into a FIT contract with the Ontario Power Authority to receive 71.3¢/kWh for generated renewable energy.

Objectives of a Photovoltaic System

The primary objectives for a photovoltaic system at the site are as follows:

To provide on-site generation of electrical power thereby reducing the energy consumption from the local utility distribution system.

To provide a system which can be used as an educational tool to the students, raising their awareness of renewable energy and encouraging conservation in future generations of consumers.

To provide a system which results in a reasonable return on investment, taking advantage of the available Feed-In Tariff program established by the Ontario Power Authority

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Building and Building Site

Parkside Collegiate Institute is for the most part a single storey school with mezzanines located in the shop and gymnasium areas. This secondary school is located in the Southwest corner of St. Thomas, Ontario. The building (132,495 ft²) was constructed in 1966 and has had various interior renovations and upgrades over the years, however the original building shell has remained for the most part unchanged.

building shell has remained for the most part unchanged. Figure 1 – Gymnasium Roof (Looking South)

Figure 1 – Gymnasium Roof (Looking South)

The building site has mature trees established to the Northeast corner of the school and along the South property line (See Figure 1). Due to the distance of the school to the property lines and current tree heights, shading from these trees would not adversely affect the photovoltaic panels; this was confirmed through measurement of solar access (refer to next section for further explanation).

The roof of the building is flat with the West half of the school and a portion of the Southeast quadrant of the school at the lowest level. The roof area to the Northeast corner of the school is approximately 6’-0” higher than the lower roof. The roof area above the mechanical room, cafeteria, and gymnasium are approximately 12’-0” higher than the lowest roof. The roof system is a conventional built-up roof and appears to be in good shape. Roofing costs included in this feasibility report are based on local roof replacement/alterations to suit the proposed structure projections to support the racking.

The school’s incoming electrical service and distribution have been upgraded in the past six months. A 1200Amp, 347/600VAC three phase service is installed underground and routed up the East wall of the school into the second floor main electrical room. The capacity of the electrical service is adequate for the present needs of the building. The main electrical

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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distribution equipment is located within the schools mechanical room; additional wall space for the installation of renewable energy equipment (inverters, disconnects switches, step-up transformer, utility meter, etc.) is available.

The electrical service at Parkside Collegiate Institute is provided by St. Thomas Energy Inc. and they reserve the right to approve or deny any connection to their service based on the capabilities of the existing electrical grid. Upon initial consultation of the proposed PV system installation with St. Thomas Energy, they do not have any reason to believe that a request would be denied. However, St. Thomas Energy requires an “Application for Connection” to be completed and submitted along with the OPA reference number prior to continuing any further with a photovoltaic installation project. This process has been initiated; confirmation is pending their review of the application.

Solar Access

To determine the solar access available at this site the Solmetric SunEye 210 shade and solar access tool was utilized which allows solar access readings to be taken at multiple locations on the roof to determine the most advantageous mounting locations. Two roof areas were considered for the installation of the photovoltaic panels as detailed below.

Location 1: Cafeteria and Gymnasium roof area. Located in the Southeast quadrant of the school provided a ceiling structure that was accessible from below and also provided the highest roofline to prevent any shading obstructions. Solar access was averaged at 99% accessible over the course of the year (See Figure 2)

at 99% accessible over the course of the year (See Figure 2) Figure 2 – Cafeteria

Figure 2 – Cafeteria and Gymnasium Roof - Solar Access

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Location 2: South East lower roof area. Located in the Southeast quadrant of the school provided a ceiling structure that was designed for the addition of a second floor and also provided an unobstructed view to the South. Solar access was averaged at 99% accessible over the course of the year (See Figure 3)

at 99% accessible over the course of the year (See Figure 3) Figure 3 – South

Figure 3 – South Centre Lower Roof - Solar Access

Structural Review

Pow Peterman Consulting Engineers provided a review of the building structure with regards to support of roof mounted photovoltaic modules. The amount of structural reinforcement is contingent on the array. Larger array's will require more reinforcing as the loads applied to the roof will increase. The structural review is summarized into the two areas including budget costs for each.

Location 1:

The existing structure of the cafeteria and gymnasium is constructed of open web steel joists spanning the distances between North and South walls. Upon review of the existing structure capabilities it was found that there is currently insufficient load capacity to install the system without reinforcing the roof structure. A comprehensive structural analysis should be performed to determine the actual load capacity of the open web steel joists in comparison to the specified design load. The comprehensive structural analysis will also determine the amount of modifications required to properly reinforce the open web steel joists for the additional load of the PV modules as well as the structural sleepers required to maintain roof serviceability.

Budget Costs:

- Comprehensive Structural Analysis

$ 5,000

- Cafetorium Ceiling Removal/Re-install

$10,000

- Open Web Steel Joist Reinforcing

$15,000

- Structural Mounting System

$35,000

- Roofing Modifications

$25,000

- Solar Mounting System

$27,000

- Sub Total

$117,000

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Location 2:

The existing roof structure of the lower roof areas is constructed of a precast concrete roof system. This roof system has a surplus load capacity that is suitable for the installation of PV modules. A series of longitudinal beams can be fastened directly to the concrete deck without any structural reinforcing required to the structure. The racking system then can be mounted to the beams allowing for serviceability of the roof.

Budget Costs:

- Comprehensive Structural Analysis

$1,500

- Structural Mounting System

$35,000

- Roofing Modifications

$25,000

- Solar Mounting System

$27,000

- Sub Total

$88,500

Photovoltaic System Installation

Utilizing the Lower South roof location (Location 2) for the installation of the PV modules is the preferred mounting location. This roof area will not require extensive structural reinforcing, thus reducing overall installation costs. This location also provides an area that has a limited amount of physical obstructions.

an area that has a limited amount of physical obstructions. Figure 4 – South East Lower

Figure 4 – South East Lower Roof

The proposed panel and mounting layout will cover roughly half of the South East roof area available, allowing the option to increase the amount of PV modules in that roof area. For your review we have also included an economic analysis of a 40kW system, keeping in mind that a larger sized system could be easily supported by utilizing the remainder of the lower roof areas. The roof plan (refer to Figure 5 below) gives an indication of the installation area. We do not anticipate any significant shading of the PV modules installed in this roof area, given the current site conditions.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON Page 7 of 15 Figure 5 – Roof Plan and

Figure 5 – Roof Plan and Location of Photovoltaic Modules

We have allowed for an 8’ setback from the roof edge where workers could be exposed to a fall of 10’ or more. Location of existing vents and roof drains would require coordination with the photovoltaic panel mounting structure.

The photovoltaic modules would be installed on a structural steel sleeper system installed approximately 12 to 18” above the roof; modules would be oriented at a 25° angle of tilt. The tilt angle for optimum output (as calculated in the analysis software) was found to be 34°; the reduction to 25° resulted in a decrease of 1% output. The tilt angle of 25° was selected to reduce the impact of wind on the modules, reduce possible spacing between sections, and aid in shedding snow from the modules in winter. A racking system will be installed on the structural sleeper system with the PV modules secured to the racking. There are various manufacturers of racking systems. Schletter is one manufacturer with a local presence (Windsor, Ontario) that would be considered. Schletter has many racking systems with various layout options to meet the needs of any installation type and size. The standard layout system we utilized was a 2V system, which is a row mounting layout of 2 panels vertically. This system will allow for a reduction in the amount of roof penetrations required for the support structure over a single panel row arrangement.

For the purpose of analysis we, utilized a PV module with a rated power of 240 watts, to increase the amount of power created per panel. A model manufactured by Canadian Solar was utilized although the specific model installed may differ as per a number of factors (contractor preference, requirements for Domestic Content, evolving technology, etc.). The total output of the system (with 78 modules) is 18.72kWp and the calculated energy exported to the grid is 25.289MWh. Other manufacturers of PV modules (who have plans to locate in Ontario) include the following: Photowatt, Siliken, Solar Semiconductor, Conergy and Schuco.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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The PV modules would be series connected into strings (13 modules per string) and connected to three inverters (two strings per inverter); we would suggest using three Sunny Boy 6kW inverters. The inverters would be selected to provide a 208VAC output. A dry type, 30kVA, 208V-347/600V distribution transformer will be required to step up the voltage at Parkside Collegiate Institute to match the 347/600V incoming electrical service.

Summary of Major PV Components

Solar Modules

Seventy eight (78) PV modules, Canadian Solar model CS6P- 240P, rated at 240W (DC) per module.

Inverter

Three (3) SMA Sunny Boy, SB6000 inverters, each rated at 7.5kW (DC).

Further information on the above components is attached to this study.

Photovoltaic System Operation

The photovoltaic (PV) system would be classified as a grid-tied connection without battery backup. The system will operate as follows:

During daylight hours the PV modules will convert radiant energy from the sun into direct current electricity. This power is gathered and converted to alternating current electricity by inverters to be installed in the main electrical room. From the inverters, the AC power is routed through a transformer to match the incoming service. The power is then routed through the utility meter (to measure the renewable energy that has been generated) and connected to the incoming electrical service. Note: Recent changes mandated by Measurements Canada dictate that ‘behind the meter facilities’ (in-series metering) is no longer permitted. The renewable energy connection to the distribution system must be made ‘upstream’ of the existing utility metering.

The energy consumption and billing within the building will not be effected by the PV system as per the arrangement of the metering. The school will be generating a portion of the energy it consumes however, for billing purposes, these will be two separate measurements; the impact of the generated power will not be reflected in the consumed power.

During utility power outages, the PV system will automatically shutdown. Safety features within the inverters (required for UL and CSA certification) will prevent the inverters from generating power when a ‘dead bus’ condition is sensed on the utility source. On restoration of the utility source, the PV system will automatically reconnect and resume normal operation.

A real-time display will be provided within the school for interactive use by the student population. The intent is to provide feedback to the students as to real-time performance, trending data, environmental benefits and other features as directed by the TVDSB.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Renewable Energy Incentives

A roof mounted photovoltaic system installed at Parkside Collegiate Institute should be eligible

for incentives available within the Ontario Power Authority’s (OPA) Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program. Upon securing a FIT contract, the School Board (Owner) will receive 71.3¢/kWh for the photovoltaic energy generated at the site. The FIT contract would be a long term (20 year) agreement with the OPA.

Renewable Energy Modelling and Analysis

The RETScreen Clean Energy Project Analysis Software was utilized within the preparation of

this report. This software provided energy modeling, cost analysis and financial analysis for use

in the study.

Economic Analysis – 20kW System

An opinion of probable costs has been provided below based on the recommended approach for installation of a photovoltaic system at Parkside Collegiate Institute.

 

Opinion of Probable Costs

Item

Description

Cost

1

Feasibility Study

$

15,000.00

2

Engineering & Approvals

$

20,000.00

3

Photovoltaic Modules 1

$

75,000.00

4

Inverters 1

$

25,000.00

5

Racking 1

$

27,000.00

6

Conduit & Cabling 1

$

14,000.00

7

Miscellaneous (Disconnects, Combiner, Meter Base, etc.) 1

$

6,000.00

8

Monitoring (Student Display) 1

$

10,000.00

9

Structural Work 2

$

35,000.00

10

Roof Replacement

$

25,000.00

11

Sub Total

$252,000.00

12

HST (13%)

$

32,760.00

13

Total

$284,760.00

Notes on the Opinion of Probable Costs:

1. Installation costs are included with the equipment costs.

2. The sleeper system needs to be implemented to get the PV modules off the roof for serviceability. The system can be optimized based on the racking system to reduce the amount of structural support/reinforcing.

3. Insurance and maintenance costs have not been included in the above. We would anticipate an annual maintenance charge of approximately $500.00; it is anticipated that the modules will receive an annual cleaning and inspection. Whether this is performed by the TVDSB or contracted out, there will be a cost associated with the work.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Financial Analysis – 20kW System

On the basis of the proposed system size (18.72kW), expected installation costs ($284,760.00) and expected revenue on generated energy the photovoltaic system has an expected Internal Rate of Return of 2.0%. The simple payback period for the proposed system is approximately 16.2 years. A 20 year period of evaluation was selected to coincide with the term of the FIT contract; it is uncertain at this point in time what incentives will be offered beyond the 20 year term. The anticipated annual income from exported energy (generated by the PV system) is $18,031.; this is on the basis of securing a FIT contract and receiving 71.3¢/kWh.

A summary of the Yearly Cash Flows (see Figure 6 below) and the Cumulative Cash Flow (see Figure 7 below) as determined by the RETScreen analysis software is provided below:

(see Figure 7 below) as determined by the RETScreen analysis software is provided below: Figure 6

Figure 6 – Yearly Cash Flow

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON Page 11 of 15 Figure 7 – Cumulative Cash Flow Energy

Figure 7 – Cumulative Cash Flow

Energy Analysis – 20kW System

On the basis of the proposed PV system (18.72kW) it is anticipated that 25.289MWh of energy will be generated. This represents 1.6% of the energy consumed by the school on an annual basis. A summary of the energy analysis is presented in the table below.

 

Energy Analysis Summary

 

Month

Energy Consumption (kWh)

Energy Production (kWh)

January

155,215

 

1,365

February

139,617

 

1,792

March

131,503

 

2,291

April

132,169

 

2,501

May

144,045

 

2,886

June

156,375

 

2,897

July

58,968

 

2,899

August

73,003

 

2,586

September

147,650

 

2,137

October

159,744

 

1,786

November

132,204

 

1,110

December

131,090

 

1,038

Total (Annual)

1,561,583

 

25,289

Notes on Energy Analysis:

1. Consumption values were provided by the TVDSB and represent the latest information available.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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GHG Reduction Summary – 20kW System

Installation of the proposed photovoltaic system will result in a number of benefits to the environment. For the system that has been proposed, an annual reduction of 5.0 tonnes of CO 2 (which would have been generated to produce the energy utilizing the existing generation methods) should be realized. This is the equivalent of the following:

Environmental Impact

Quantity

Cars/light trucks removed from the road

0.9

Gasoline not consumed (by vehicles)

2,148 litres

Barrels of crude oil not consumed

11.6

Economic Analysis – 40kW System

An opinion of probable costs has been provided below based on the recommended approach for installation of a photovoltaic system at Parkside Collegiate Institute.

 

Opinion of Probable Costs

Item

Description

Cost

 

1

Feasibility Study

$

15,000.00

2

Engineering & Approvals

$

20,000.00

3

Photovoltaic Modules 1

$

150,000.00

4

Inverters 1

$

40,000.00

5

Racking 1

$

50,000.00

6

Conduit & Cabling 1

$

20,000.00

7

Miscellaneous (Disconnects, Combiner, Meter Base, etc.) 1

$

8,000.00

8

Monitoring (Student Display) 1

$

10,000.00

9

Structural Work 2

$

50,000.00

10

Roof Replacement

$

45,000.00

11

Sub Total

$408,000.00

 

12

HST (13%)

$

53,040.00

13

Total

$461,040.00

 

Notes on the Opinion of Probable Costs:

1. Installation costs are included with the equipment costs.

2. The sleeper system needs to be implemented to get the pv modules off the roof for serviceability. The system can be optimized based on the racking system to reduce the amount of structural support/reinforcing.

3. Insurance and maintenance costs have not been included in the above. We would anticipate an annual maintenance charge of approximately $750.00; it is anticipated that the modules will receive an annual cleaning and inspection. Whether this is performed by the TVDSB or contracted out, there will be a cost associated with the work.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Financial Analysis – 40kW System

On the basis of the proposed system size (37.4kW), expected installation costs ($461,040.00) and expected revenue on generated energy the photovoltaic system has an expected Internal Rate of Return of 4.4%. The simple payback period for the proposed system is approximately 13.1 years. A 20 year period of evaluation was selected to coincide with the term of the FIT contract; it is uncertain at this point in time what incentives will be offered beyond the 20 year term. The anticipated annual income from exported energy (generated by the pv system) is $36,062.; this is on the basis of securing a FIT contract and receiving 71.3¢/kWh.

A summary of the Yearly Cash Flows (see Figure 8) and the Cumulative Cash Flow (see Figure

9).

summary of the Yearly Cash Flows (see Figure 8) and the Cumulative Cash Flow (see Figure

Figure 8 – Yearly Cash Flow

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON Page 14 of 15 Figure 9 – Cumulative Cash Flow Energy

Figure 9 – Cumulative Cash Flow

Energy Analysis – 40kW System

On the basis of the proposed PV system (37.4kW) it is anticipated that 50.577MWh of energy will be generated. This represents 3.2% of the energy consumed by the school on an annual basis. A summary of the energy analysis is presented in the table below.

 

Energy Analysis Summary

 

Month

Energy Consumption (kWh)

Energy Production (kWh)

January

155,215

 

2,730

February

139,617

 

3,584

March

131,503

 

4,581

April

132,169

 

5,002

May

144,045

 

5,771

June

156,375

 

5,795

July

58,968

 

5,798

August

73,003

 

5,173

September

147,650

 

4,275

October

159,744

 

3,573

November

132,204

 

2,220

December

131,090

 

2,076

Total (Annual)

1,561,583

 

50,577

Notes on Energy Analysis:

1. Consumption values were provided by the TVDSB and represent the latest information available.

Feasibility Study for Installation of a Photovoltaic System Parkside Collegiate Institute, St. Thomas, ON

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GHG Reduction Summary – 40kW System

Installation of the proposed photovoltaic system will result in a number of benefits to the environment. For the system that has been proposed, an annual reduction of 9.9 tonnes of CO 2 (which would have been generated to produce the energy utilizing the existing generation methods) should be realized. This is the equivalent of the following:

Environmental Impact

Quantity

Cars/light trucks removed from the road

1.8

Gasoline not consumed (by vehicles)

4,254 litres

Barrels of crude oil not consumed

23.0

Conclusion

Parkside Collegiate Institute represents a feasible location for the installation of a grid-tied, roof mounted, photovoltaic renewable energy system. The existing lower roof areas of the school have a structure that is more than adequate to support the additional loads of the PV modules and does not require any additional structural reinforcing. This roof area is also not affected by shading from trees or higher portions of roof.

This feasibility study is based on a 20kW system utilizing the Southeast corner of the lower roof.

If funding is available for a larger sized photovoltaic installation, Parkside Collegiate Institute would represent a good candidate; a 40kW system has been analysed in this regard. The remainder of the lower roof area is for the most part unused space that has been determined adequate to support the additional loads of the PV modules. This roof area could also be used

to

increase the size of the PV system beyond 40kW. The economic analysis for the installation

of

the 20kW system indicates an Internal Rate of Return of 2.0% and the 40kW system

indicates an Internal Rate of Return of 4.4%.

Smylie & Crow Associates

A Division of Trow Associates Inc.

& Crow Associates A Division of Trow Associates Inc. Jason Allair Electrical Designer Miles Buckrell, P.Eng.

Jason Allair Electrical Designer

of Trow Associates Inc. Jason Allair Electrical Designer Miles Buckrell, P.Eng. Consulting Engineer Attachments: PV

Miles Buckrell, P.Eng. Consulting Engineer

Attachments: PV module & Inverter Information

                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                           

                           

SB 5000US / SB 6000US / SB 7000US / SB 8000US

SUNNY BOY 5000-US / 6000-US / 7000-US / 8000-US

/ SB 8000US SUNNY BOY 5000-US / 6000-US / 7000-US / 8000-US UL Certified • For

UL Certified

• For countries that require UL certification (UL 1741/IEEE 1547)

Efficient

• 97% peak efficiency • OptiCool™ active temperature management system

Safe

• Galvanic isolation

Simple • Patented automatic grid voltage detection* • Integrated DC disconnect switch
Simple
• Patented automatic grid
voltage detection*
• Integrated DC disconnect switch

SUNNY BOY 5000-US / 6000-US / 7000-US / 8000-US

Versatile performer with UL certification

The Sunny Boy 5000-US, 6000-US, 7000-US and 8000-US inverters are UL certified and feature excellent efficiency. Gradu- ated power classes provide flexibility in system design. Automatic grid voltage detection* and an integrated DC disconnect switch simplify installation, ensuring safety as well as saving time. These models feature galvanic isolation and can be used with all types of modules—crystalline as well as thin-film.

* US Patent US7352549B1

Sunny Boy, OptiCool, and SMA are registered trademarks of SMA Solar Technology AG. Text and figures comply with the state of the art applicable when printing. Subject to technical changes. We accept no liability for typographical and other errors. Printed on chlorine-free paper.

SUNNYBOY5678-DUS103927

Technical data

 

Sunny Boy 5000-US

Sunny Boy 6000-US

Sunny Boy 7000-US

Sunny Boy 8000-US

208 V AC

240 V AC

277 V AC

208 V AC

240 V AC

277 V AC

208 V AC

240 V AC

277 V AC

240 V AC

 

277 V AC

Input (DC)

         

Max. recommended PV power (@ module STC)

 

6250

W

 

7500

W

 

8750

W

 

10000 W

 

Max. DC power (@ cos ϕ = 1)

 

5300

W

 

6350

W

 

7400

W

 

8600

W

 

Max. DC voltage

   

600

V

 

600

V

 

600

V

 

600

V

 

DC

nominal voltage

 

310

V

 

310

V

 

310

V

 

345

V

 

MPP voltage range

   

250

V – 480 V

   

250

V – 480 V

 

250

V – 480 V

   

300

V – 480 V

 

Min. DC voltage / start voltage

 

250

V

/ 300 V

   

250

V

/ 300 V

 

250

V

/ 300 V

   

300

V

/ 365 V

 

Max. input current / per string (at DC disconnect)

 

21 A / 20 A

   

25 A / 20 A

   

30 A / 20 A

   

30 A / 20 A

 

36

A @ combined terminal

36

A @ combined terminal

36

A @ combined terminal

36

A @ combined terminal

Number of MPP trackers / fused strings per MPP tracker

 

1 / 4 (DC disconnect)

 

Output (AC)

         

AC

nominal power

 

5000

W

 

6000

W

 

7000

W

7680 W

 

8000 W

Max. AC apparent power

 

5000

VA

 

6000

VA

 

7000

VA

 

8000

VA

 

Nominal AC voltage / adjustable

208

V / ●

240

V / ●

277

V / ●

208

V / ●

240

V / ●

277

V / ●

208

V / ●

240

V / ●

277

V / ●

240 V / ●

 

277 V / ●

AC

voltage range

183

– 229 V

211

– 264 V

244

– 305 V

183

– 229 V

211

– 264 V

244

– 305 V

183

– 229 V

211

– 264 V

244

– 305 V

211 – 264 V

244 – 305 V

AC

grid frequency; range

60 Hz; 59.3 – 60.5 Hz

60 Hz; 59.3 – 60.5 Hz

60 Hz; 59.3 – 60.5 Hz

60 Hz; 59.3 – 60.5 Hz

Max. output current

 

24

A

21 A

18 A

29

A

25 A

22 A

34

A

29 A

25 A

 

32 A

 

Power factor (cos ϕ)

   

1

 

1

 

1

 

1

Phase conductors / connection phases

1/2

1 / 2

1 / 1

1/2

1 / 2

1 / 1

1/2

1 / 2

1 / 1

 

1 / 2

 

1 / 1

Harmonics

   

<

4%

   

<

4%

   

<

4%

   

<

4%

 

Efficiency

         

Max. efficiency

 

96.7%

96.8%

96.8%

96.9%

96.8%

97.0%

97.1%

96.9%

97.0%

 

96.3%

 

96.5%

CEC efficiency

 

95.5%

95.5%

95.5%

95.5%

95.5%

96.0%

95.5%

96.0%

96.0%

96.0%

 

96.0%

Protection devices

         

DC

reverse-polarity protection

 

 

 

 

AC

short circuit protection

 

 

 

 

Galvanically isolated / all-pole sensitive monitoring unit

 

●/—

   

●/—

   

●/—

   

●/—

 

Protection class / overvoltage category

 

I

/ III

   

I

/ III

   

I

/ III

   

I

/ III

 

General data

         

Dimensions (W / H / D) in mm (in)

 

470 / 615 / 240

(18.5 / 24 / 9)

 

DC

Disconnect dimensions (W / H / D) in mm (in)

 

187

/ 297 / 190

(7 / 12 / 7.5)

 

Packing dimensions (W / H / D) in mm (in)

 

390

/ 580 / 800

(16 / 23 / 31.5)

 

DC Disconnect packing dimensions (W / H / D) in mm (in)

 

370

/ 240 / 280

(15 / 9 / 11)

 

Weight / DC Disconnect weight

 

64 kg

(141 lb) / 3.5 kg

(8 lb)

66 kg (145 lb) / 3.5 kg

(8 lb)

Packing weight / DC Disconnect packing weight

 

67 kg

(147 lb) / 4 kg

(9 lb)

69

kg

(152 lb) / 4 kg

(9 lb)

Operating temperature range (full power)

 

–25 °C

+45 °C

(–13 °F

+113 °F)

 

Noise emission (typical)

 

44 dB(A)

   

45 dB(A)

   

46 dB(A)

   

49 dB(A)

 

Internal consumption at night

 

0.1 W

   

0.1 W

   

0.1 W

   

0.1 W

 

Topology

   

LF transformer

   

LF transformer

 

LF transformer

   

LF transformer

 

Cooling concept

   

OptiCool

   

OptiCool

   

OptiCool

   

OptiCool

 

Electronics protection rating / connection area

NEMA 3R / NEMA 3R

NEMA 3R / NEMA 3R

NEMA 3R / NEMA 3R

NEMA 3R / NEMA 3R

Features

         

Display: text line / graphic

 

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●/—

   

●/—

   

●/—

 

Interfaces: RS485 / Bluetooth

 

○/○

   

/○

   

○/○

   

○/○

 

Warranty: 10 / 15 / 20 years

 

●/○/○

   

●/○/○

   

●/○/○

   

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Certificates and permits (more available on request)

 

UL1741, UL1998, IEEE 1547, FCC Part 15 (Class A & B). CSA C22.2 No. 107.1-2001

 

NOTE: US inverters ship with gray lids.

       

Data at nominal conditions

       

● Standard features

○ Optional features

— Not available

 

Type designation

   

SB 5000US

   

SB 6000US

   

SB 7000US

   

SB 8000US

 
    SB 7000US     SB 8000US   Toll Free +1 888 4 SMA USA
Toll Free +1 888 4 SMA USA www.SMA-America.com
Toll Free +1 888 4 SMA USA
www.SMA-America.com

Accessories

RS485 interface 485USPB-SMC-NR
RS485 interface
485USPB-SMC-NR
Combi-Switch DC disconnect and PV array combiner box COMBO-SWITCH
Combi-Switch
DC disconnect and PV
array combiner box
COMBO-SWITCH
Bluetooth ® Piggy Back BTPBINV-NR
Bluetooth ® Piggy Back
BTPBINV-NR
Combiner Box Simplify wiring for added convenience and safety SBCB-6-3R or SBCB-6-4
Combiner Box
Simplify wiring for added
convenience and safety
SBCB-6-3R or SBCB-6-4

SMA America, LLC