Volume 12

May 2012

Annual Report of Volunteer Safety

Safety of the Volunteer 2010

OFFICE OF SAFETY AND SECURITY

Table of Contents
Introduction ............................................................. …... 
 
Executive Summary ........................................................  
 
Sexual Assaults ...............................................................  
 
Rape ............................................................................  
 
Major Sexual Assault ..................................................  
 
Other Sexual Assault ..................................................  
 
Physical Assaults .............................................................  
 
Kidnapping ..................................................................  
 
Aggravated Assault .....................................................  
 
Major Physical Assault ................................................  
 
Other Physical Assault ................................................  
 
Threats ...........................................................................  
 
Property Crimes .............................................................  
 
Robbery ......................................................................  
 
 
Burglary ......................................................................  
Theft ...........................................................................  
 
Vandalism ...................................................................  
 
In‐Service Deaths ...........................................................  
 
Appendices .....................................................................  
 
    A: Severity Hierarchy and Incident Definitions ...........  
 
    B:  Methodology .........................................................  
 
    C:  Peace Corps Countries ...........................................  
 
    D:  Demographics of All Volunteers ............................  
 
    E:   Global, Regional, and Post Volume and Rates ......  
 
    F:   Country of Incident compared with Country of Service 







13 
14 
14 
15 
15 
21 
27 
28 
28 
29 
29 
35 
36 
37 
39 
41 
42 
43 
55 

 

Contributors
Edward Hobson, Associate Director for Safety and Security 
Daryl Sink, Chief of Overseas Operations, Office of Safety and Security 
David Fleisig, Lead Security Specialist, Office of Safety and Security 
Elizabeth Lowery, Program Manager, Office of Safety and Security 
Jennifer Bingham de Mateo, Data Analyst, Office of Safety and Security 
Country Directors, Peace Corps Safety and Security Coordinators, Peace Corps 
Medical Officers, Peace Corps Safety and Security Officers, and Safety and        
Security Desk Officers

Introduction
Purpose
The  Safety  of  the  Volunteer  2010  provides  summary  statistics  for  calendar  year  2010.  In  addition,  it  also  provides  a 
global trend analysis over the last 10 years and an analysis of incident and risk characteristics from 2006 to 2010.  
The objective of this publication is to provide detailed information regarding the distribution and trends in crimes oc‐
curring to Peace Corps Volunteers overseas.  
 

Profile of Volunteers on Board vs. Volunteer Crime Victims in 2010
Before  examining  crime  incidents  in  2010,  it  is  important  to  consider  the  demographic  profile  of  the  average  Peace 
Corps  Volunteer/trainee  and  to  compare  this  profile  to  that  of  the  Volunteers  who  were  victims  of  crimes  to  see  if 
there are any differences in the two populations.  Volunteers are considered trainees from the period of their staging 
event (preliminary training completed in the U.S.) through swearing in. A comparison of the Volunteer victims to the 
general Volunteer population of 2010 is provided in Table 1.   

Table 1. Comparison of Volunteer Victims to General Volunteer Population in 2010
% Volunteers on 
% Volunteer 
% Volunteers on 
% Volunteer 
Characteristic
Characteristic2
Board
Crime Victims
Board2
Crime Victims2
Female
60
69.5
Male
40
30.5
Age
Ethnicity
84
88
Caucasian
75
77
<30
30‐39
8
6
Not specified
8
3
40‐49
2
1
Asian
5
5
50‐59
2
2
Hispanic
6
6
4
3
African American
3
4
60‐69
70‐79
<1
<1
Mixed Ethnicity
3
3
0
Native American
<1
<1
80‐89
<1
 

Measuring the Volunteer Population
The  Volunteer  population  fluctuates  throughout  the  year  as  trainees  arrive  and  seasoned  Volunteers  complete  their 
service (normally 27 months). New Peace Corps posts are opening, while other posts may be suspending or closing op‐
erations. To more accurately compare crime data across countries, Volunteer/trainee years (VT years) are used in cal‐
culating crime incidence rates because this measurement provides a more accurate count of the actual length of time 
Volunteers are at risk of experiencing an incident. While there were 8,655 Volunteers and trainees serving as of Sep‐
tember 30, 2010, there were only 7,736 VT years in calendar year 2010.  
 

Overseas Post Changes
In calendar year 2010, Volunteers served in 70 Peace Corps posts in 76 countries.  Programs that close or open within a 
calendar year only provide data for those months in which Volunteers actually served (see Appendix C).  

Page 1

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Introduction
Data Source
The data used to prepare this report was collected through the Crime Incident Reporting Form (CIRF) and the Consoli‐
dated Incident Reporting System (CIRS).  The CIRS, an in‐house developed application built using web services, was re‐
leased in April 2008.   CIRS expanded on the data fields collected by the CIRF; therefore, some risk characteristics ana‐
lyzed in the report are limited to data collected since April 2008. 
 

Incident Classification
Crime incidents are ranked on a severity hierarchy ranging from Vandalism (least severe) to Death (most severe) Ap‐
pendix  A  contains  an  overview  of  this  hierarchy,  including  all  definitions  used  to  classify  incidents.    Information  col‐
lected in the CIRS falls into one of five categories: 


Sexual Assaults (rape/attempted rape, major sexual assault, and other sexual assault); 



Physical Assaults (kidnapping, aggravated assault, major physical assault, and other physical assault); 



Property Crimes (robbery, burglary, theft, and vandalism); 



Threats (including intimidation and death threat); and  



Death  (due to homicide, suicide, accident, illness, and indeterminate cause). 

An overview of the methodology utilized in preparing this report, as well as a discussion of incidence rates and data 
limitations, can be found in Appendix B.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

VOLUME 12

Page 2

 

Executive Summary
The Peace Corps is committed to minimizing risks that Volunteers face in the field so they are able to complete a suc‐
cessful and productive two‐year service.  Peace Corps’ approach to Volunteer safety is multifaceted and draws heavily 
upon the assumption that staff, Volunteers and community members will fulfill their roles and obligations as they per‐
tain to Volunteer safety.  This approach is a shared responsibility that draws its strength from building community rela‐
tionships, sharing pertinent information, providing in‐depth training, conducting thorough site development, ensuring 
accurate and timely incident reporting, developing effective incident response procedures, and implementing a com‐
prehensive  and  tested  emergency  communications/response  system.    This  report,  when  combined  with  all  of  the 
aforementioned responsibilities and activities, is one tool to assist staff and Volunteers in improving safety and security 
systems and protocols and can provide insights into reducing risks in the field.   
Worldwide, Peace Corps Volunteers reported 1,577 crimes during 2010, or an overall incidence rate of 20.38 incidents 
per 100 VT years.  Property crimes continue to be the most prevalent incidents reported (79 percent of all reported 
incidents), with thefts accounting for 45 percent of the overall total,  burglaries 22 percent and robberies 12 percent. 
Of the more serious crimes reported, there were 13 aggravated assaults, 23 rapes/attempted and 1 death by homicide. 

Figure 1:  Incidence Rates of Reported Crimes 2010 (n=1577)
Death by Homicide
Rape
Major sexual assault
Other sexual assault
Kidnapping
Aggravated assault
Major physical assault
Other physical assault
Threat
Robbery
Burglary
Theft
Vandalism

0.01
0.49
0.43
1.73
0.00
0.17
0.18
0.88
0.67
2.43
4.41
9.94
0.05
0.00

2.00

4.00

6.00

8.00

10.00

12.00

Rate per 100 VT Years

  

Sexual Assaults
Sexual  assaults  are  categorized  into  one  of  three  areas:    rape/attempted  rape,  major  sexual  assault,  or  other  sexual 
assault.  From 2009 to 2010, the number and rate of rapes/attempted rapes increased noticeably, returning to the lev‐
els seen in 2008 and earlier.  The number of reported major sexual assaults remained the same, though an increase in 
Volunteer population means this rate has declined slightly. The rate of other sexual assaults decreased slightly, though 
the number reported was an increase of one from 2009.   
In rapes/attempted rapes, the offender is typically a friend or acquaintance of the Volunteer and the incident most of‐
ten occurs in the Volunteer’s residence.  Major sexual assaults and other sexual assaults are more commonly commit‐

Page 3

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Executive Summary
ted by strangers and tend to occur in public areas at the Volunteer’s site, or, in the case of other sexual assaults, on a 
form of transportation.  Most rapes occur between midnight and 6 a.m. on Saturday night/Sunday morning.  Major sex‐
ual assaults are most common between 6 p.m. and midnight over the weekend, while other sexual assaults are more 
common during daylight hours and have no discernible pattern by day of week.  The Volunteer is rarely physically in‐
jured in a sexual assault.  It is rare for a Volunteer to decide to pursue prosecution in a sexual assault; therefore, of‐
fenders are typically not identified or apprehended.  
 

Physical Assaults
Physical  assaults  are  categorized  into  one  of  four  areas:    kidnapping,  aggravated  assault,  major  physical  assault,  or 
other physical assault.  Data on kidnapping has only been collected since 2006, and no kidnappings were reported in 
2010. Between 2009 and 2010, the incidence rate of aggravated assaults continued to decrease in the same manner it 
has since 2006.  Major physical assaults increased slightly from 2009 to 2010, while other physical assaults decreased 
from 2009 to 2010.    
Male and Caucasian Volunteers tend to be the most frequent victims of aggravated assaults.  A  large percentage of 
major physical assaults occur between midnight and 6 a.m.  Approximately half of all physical assaults occur on week‐
ends, though this is primarily seen in aggravated assaults on Saturdays and major physical assaults on Sundays.  The 
physical  assault  categories  are  distinctive  since  the  frequency  of  these  events  does  not  decrease  noticeably  with 
months in service.  Physical assaults are only slightly more likely to occur at the Volunteer’s site as compared to when 
the Volunteer is out of site.  A majority of aggravated assaults occur in rural areas, while rural areas are the least com‐
mon location for other physical assaults. 
 

Threats
Threats are  two types of incidents  combined into a  single  category: death threats and intimidation. Intimidation  has 
been  collected  only  since  2006.  The  incidence  rate  for  threats  remained  steady  from  2009  to  2010,  following  a  de‐
crease from 2008. Female and Caucasian Volunteers experience higher rates of threat incidents. Threat incidents are 
also one of the only types of crime that occur more frequently during the second half of the Volunteer’s first year. The 
offender in the majority of threat incidents is a stranger, though a relatively high percentage are the result of actions 
by a friend or acquaintance. 
 

Property Crimes
Property crimes are categorized into one of four areas: robbery, burglary, theft, or vandalism.  Between 2009 and 
2010, incidence rates for robbery and theft increased slightly, while rates for burglary and vandalism decreased.  In the 
case of theft, this continues a fairly steady increase in rate seen since 2001. The incidence rates for most property 
crimes have steadily increased over the past 10 years.  Robberies and thefts typically occur in urban areas outside of 
the Volunteer’s site, while burglary, since it involves trespass into a residence, is typically in the Volunteer’s site 
(barring rare exceptions for hotel rooms).  Robberies more often have multiple victims in a single event, while burglar‐
ies and thefts tend to impact a single Volunteer.  Almost all robberies are committed by strangers, whereas thefts and 
burglaries have no identifiable offender.  Robberies typically occur in public areas, while thefts are more common on 
transportation, primarily buses.  Property crimes can result in substantial losses to Volunteers, and since April of 2008, 
Volunteer victims of property crimes lost an estimated $886,933.

VOLUME 12

Page 4

Sexual Assaults
Definitions
 

Rape:  Penetration of the vagina or anus with a penis, tongue, finger or object without the consent and/or against the 
will of the Volunteer.  This includes when a victim is unable to consent because of ingestion of drugs and/or alcohol.  
Rape also includes forced oral sex, where: 
 
1.  the victim's mouth contacts the offender's genitals or anus, OR 
2.  the offender's mouth contacts the victim's genitals or anus, OR 
3.  the victim is forced to perform oral sex on another person.  
 
Any unsuccessful attempts to penetrate the vagina or anus are also classified as rape.   
 
Major sexual assault:  Intentional or forced contact with the victim’s breasts, genitals, mouth, buttocks, or anus OR 
disrobing of the Volunteer or offender without contact of the Volunteer’s aforementioned body parts, for sexual grati‐
fication AND any of the following:  
 
1.  the use of a weapon by the offender, OR 
2.  physical injury to the victim, OR 
3.  when the victim has to use substantial force to disengage the offender. 
 
Other sexual assault: Unwanted or forced kissing, fondling, and/or groping of the breasts, genitals, mouth, buttocks, 
or anus for sexual gratification.  

Page 5

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Sexual Assaults
The  following  section  provides  a  global  analyses  of  sex‐
ual  assault  incidents.    Incidence  of  sexual  assault  is  ex‐
pressed as incidents reported by females per 100 female 
VT years because women are at a much greater risk for 
sexual assaults than men. In 2010, 98 percent of the sex‐
ual  assaults  reported  worldwide  were  against  female 
Volunteers. Use of female‐specific incidence rates better 
characterizes  the  risk  of  sexual  assault.  However,  in 
viewing the risk factor graphs, all sexual assaults are in‐
cluded irrespective of the sex of the victim.  In compar‐
ing year‐to‐year data for rapes/attempted rapes and ma‐
jor sexual assaults, incidence rates should be interpreted 
with  caution  due  to  the  small  number  of  incidents  per‐
petrated annually against Peace Corps Volunteers.   

Figure 2:  Yearly Rates of Rape/Attempted Rape (n=212)

Events per 100 Female VT Years

1.00
0.80
0.60

0.66
0.51

0.59 0.55
0.54

0.48 0.51

0.49

0.39
0.40
0.20

0.30
10‐year avg: 0.50  

0.00

 

I. Rape/Attempted Rape
Global Analysis 

II. Major Sexual Assault

Table  2  provides  the  volume  and  rates  of  rapes/
attempted rapes reported by female Volunteers. 

Global  Analysis 
Table  3  provides  the  volume  and  rates  of  major  sexual    
assaults reported by female Volunteers 

Table 2: Summary—Rape/ Attempted Rape
Incidents reported by female Volunteers only

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

23
0.49
13
0.30
64%
‐4%

There  were  23  rapes/attempted  rapes  reported  by  fe‐
male  Peace  Corps  Volunteers  worldwide  during  2010, 
resulting  in  an  incidence  rate  of  0.49  incidents  per  100 
female VT years. The incidence rate for rapes/attempted 
rapes  has  remained  relatively  unchanged  since  2001.  In 
2009,  a  substantially  lower  number  were  reported, 
though in 2010 this number returned to the level previ‐
ously seen. 

VOLUME 12

Table 3: Summary—Major Sexual Assault
Incidents reported by female Volunteers only

 

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

20
0.43
20
0.46
‐7%
‐21%

There were 20 major sexual assaults reported by female 
Peace  Corps  Volunteers  worldwide  during  2010,  result‐
ing in an incidence rate of 0.43 incidents per 100 female 
VT years.  Over the last 10‐year period, the rate of major 
sexual assaults has varied widely from a high of 0.56 inci‐
dents in 2001 to a low of 0.24 incidents per 100 female 
VT years in 2004. Male Peace Corps Volunteers reported 
one major sexual assault worldwide during 2010, result‐
ing in an incidence rate of 0.07 per 100 male VT years.   

Page 6

 

Sexual Assaults
Figure 4:  Yearly Rates of Other Sexual Assault  (n=714)

Figure 3:  Yearly Rates of Major Sexual Assault (n=155) 
3.00

0.80
0.60

Events per 100 Female VT Years

Events per 100 Female VT Years

1.00
10‐year avg: 0.37
0.54
0.40 0.46 0.43

0.47
0.36

0.40

0.28

0.24

0.25 0.25

0.20
0.00

2.50
1.83

2.00

1.61 1.55

1.50

1.58

1.37

1.66

1.88 1.88 1.77
1.73

1.00
10‐year avg: 1.69

0.50
0.00

 

III. Other Sexual Assault

IV. Number of Incidents vs. Number of
Victims

Global Analysis 

The number of reported sexual assaults and the number 
of victims generally do not differ, meaning there is usu‐
ally only one Volunteer victim in a sexual assault.  In two 
major  sexual  assaults  and  two  other  sexual  assaults, 
more  than  one  Volunteer  was  victimized  in  each  inci‐
dent.   

Table  4  provides  the  volume  and  rates  for  other  sexual    
assaults reported by female Volunteers. 

Table 4: Summary—Other Sexual Assault
Incidents reported by female Volunteers only

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 Female VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

81
1.73
77
1.77
‐2%
7%

There  were  81  other  sexual  assaults  reported  by  Peace 
Corps Volunteers worldwide during 2010, resulting in an 
incidence rate of 1.75 incidents per 100 female VT years.  
This  number  is  slightly  higher  than  the  previous  year, 
though  an  increase  in  Volunteer  population  means  the 
rate has decreased slightly. Over the last 10‐year period, 
the incidence rate of other sexual assaults has fluctuated 
around  an  average  of  1.69  incidents  per  100  female  VT 
years. Male Peace Corps Volunteers reported two other 
sexual  assaults  worldwide  in  2010,  resulting  in  an  inci‐
dence rate of 0.98 per 100 male VT years.   

Page 7

Figure 5:  Number of Incidents vs. Number of Volunteer 
Victims for 2010
23
23

Rape

Number of Victims
Number of Incidents

 
23
21

Major Sexual

85
83

Other Sexual 

0

20

40

60

80

100

 
 

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Sexual Assaults
Volunteer Characteristics

 

Sex 

Age 
Figure 7:  Rate of Sexual Assaults by Age Group 2006‐
2010 (n=580)

Figure 6:  Rate of Sexual Assaults by Sex 2006‐2010 
(n=594)
60s+ (n=7)
Female (n=573)

0.4

0.4

0.1
0.1

1.8

0.3

50s (n=3)

0.5
40s (n=7)

Other Sexual
Major Sexual

0.1
Male (n=21)

0.01

30s (n=35)

Rape

0.01
0.00

1.00

1.50

2.00

Other Sexual
0.8

0.1

20s (n=528)
0.50

0.8

0.2
0.2

0.0

Rape

1.2

0.2
0.3
0.5

Rate per 100 VT Years

1.0

1.5

Rate per 100 VT Years

 

 

Ethnicity 

Months in Service 

Table 5: Comparison of Sexual Assaults by Race/Ethnicity to
Volunteer Population, 2010 (n=125)

Race/Ethnicity
Caucasian (n=101)
Not specified (n=4)
Hispanic (n=10)
Asian (n=4)
African American (n=4)
Two or more races (n=2)
Native American (n=0)

Major Sexual 

0.3

Figure 8:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Months in 
Service 2006 ‐2010 (n=581)
45.0%

Major Sexual  Other Sexual  Volunteer 
Rape
Assault
Assault Population
91.3%
81.0%
77.8%
74%
0.0%
0.0%
4.9%
10%
4.3%
9.5%
8.6%
6%
0.0%
4.8%
3.7%
5%
4.3%
0.0%
3.7%
3%
0.0%
4.8%
1.2%
3%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
<1

40.0%
35.0%

33.7%

Rape

30.6%

30.0%

Major Sexual 

25.0%

21.4%

Other Sexual

20.0%
15.0%

11.2%

10.0%
3.1%

5.0%

0.0%

0.0%
0 to 6

7 to 12

13 to 18 19 to 24 25 to 30 31 to 36

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
VOLUME 12

Page 8

Sexual Assaults
Offender Characteristics

 

Victim/Offender Relationship 

Day of Week 

Figure 9:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by 
Offender/Volunteer Relationship 2006‐2010 (n=594)
Local Law

Figure 11:  Percentage  of Sexual Assaults by Day of 
Week 2006‐2010 (n=594)

25.0%

22.1%

1.0%

Stranger

20.0%

36.5%

Peace Corps Staff

0.0%

Co‐worker/Mgmt.

4.8%

Other PCV

3.8%

Host Family

2.9%

15.0%
Other Sexual
Major Sexual 
Rape 

Friend/Acquaint.

11.5%

12.5%

Rape 

12.5%

Major Sexual 

10.6%

10.0%

Other Sexual

7.7%

5.0%

44.2%

Other

23.1%

4.8%

Unknown

0.0%

1.9%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

MON

80.0%

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

UNK

 
 

 

Incident Characteristics

 

Time of Day 

At Volunteer’s Site 

Figure 10:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Time of Day 
2006‐2010 (n=581)
Morning
Afternoon

22.1%

6.3%
6.1%

25.3%

4.0%

0.0%

35.2%

Other Sexual
Major Sexual 
Rape 

9.7%

32.9%
20.0%

40.0%

56.5%
64.2%
55.8%

Yes

33.0%
35.4%
35.4%

Evening
Night/Early Morning

Figure 12:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Volunteer 
Site 2006‐2010 (n=594)

Major Sexual 
Rape 

54.5%

1.0%
Unknown

60.0%
0.0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLUME 12

Other Sexual

42.5%
35.8%
44.2%

No

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

Page 9

Sexual Assaults
Location 

Weapon Type 

Figure 13:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Location 
2006‐2010 (n=594)
Workplace

Figure 15:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Weapon 
Type 2006‐2010 (n=32)

1.9%

Commercial
Transport‐related

Knife/Sharp Object

Other Sexual

11.5%

Rape 

Non‐Vol. Residence

36.5%

Public Area
Other

22.1%

10.0%

Other

10.0%

Unknown

1.9%
0.0%

10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

40.0%

50.0%

0.0%

60.0%

 

 

 

Community Size 

Property Loss 

Figure 14:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Community 
Size  2006‐2010 (n=586)
38.5%

Rural

Urban

15.0%

47.5%
44.7%

Damaged or 
Destroyed

10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

Other Sexual

1.5%

Stolen

Major Sexual 
Rape 

17.2%
11.8%

None

Other Sexual
Major Sexual
Rape 

6.5%
2.5%
1.9%

40.0%

0.4%

25.3%
23.3%

20.0%

Figure 16:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Type of  
Property Loss 2006‐2010 (n=388)

29.8%
35.0%
30.1%

Intermediate

Unknown

81.0%
85.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99.6%

1.7%
1.5%
0.0%

50.0%

 

VOLUME 12

Rape 

5.0%

 

0.0%

Major Sexual 

Drug

1.0%

Unknown

Unknown

8.3%
5.0%

Blunt Object

20.2%

Vol. Residence

8.3%
15.0%

Gun/Firearm

Major Sexual 

4.8%

83.3%

55.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

Page 10

Sexual Assaults
Persons Accompanying Volunteer 

Support Provided 

Figure 19:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Volunteer 
Accompaniment 2006‐2010 (n=397)

Figure 21:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Support 
Provided 2008‐2010 (n=338)
Medical & Counseling 
Planned/ Provided

Other Sexual

30.4%
Accompanied

Major Sexual 

Alone

2.6%

Rape 

Counseling Only 
Planned/ Provided

10.9%

68.5%
67.2%
74.6%

Medical Only 
Planned/Provided

0.9%
7.4%
10.9%

No Support Requested
1.1%
0.0%
0.0%

Unknown

0.0%

40.0%

60.0%

20.0%

 

 

 

Resulting Actions

 

Injury to Volunteer 

Suspects Apprehended 

Yes

Yes

98.7%
87.0%
76.8%
Other Sexual
Rape 

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

Unknown

0.0%

100.0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLUME 12

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

86.9%
75.0%
80.6%

Other Sexual
Major Sexual 
Rape 

7.1%
0.0%

Major Sexual 

10.3%
17.5%
15.5%

No 

Major Sexual 
Unknown

Other Sexual

Figure 22:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Suspect 
Apprehended 2006‐2010 (n=589)

13.0%
16.1%

No

45.4%

Rape 

 

Figure 20:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Volunteer 
Physical Injury 2008‐2010 (n=342)

72.7%

45.4%

5.7%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%

80.0%

33.3%

18.5%

5.5%

Unknown
20.0%

37.0%

2.7%
7.5%
3.9%
20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

Page 11

Sexual Assaults
Intention of Volunteer to Prosecute 
Figure 23:  Percentage of Sexual Assaults by Intention to 
Prosecute 2006‐2010 (n=593)
Yes

10.5%

34.6%
33.7%

No

35.8%

Undecided

7.1%
13.6%
9.6%

Unknown

9.6%
16.0%
5.8%

0.0%

20.0%

72.8%
51.0%
Other Sexual
Major Sexual 
Rape 

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

 
Volunteers  who  report  any  incident  to  the  Peace  Corps 
also have the option of reporting the incident to the ap‐
propriate  law  enforcement  agency.  Beginning  in  2010, 
the  Peace  Corps  began  tracking  the  outcomes  for  inci‐
dents in which Volunteer victims chose to report to local 
authorities  and  pursue  prosecution  of  the  offender    
(Table 6). 
Table 6: Outcomes in Rape/Attempted Rape and
Major Sexual Assault Incidents, 2010 (n=44)
Number Percent
Volunteer Declined to Pursue 
Prosecution
Volunteer Pursued Prosecution
Under Investigation
Suspect Apprehended
State Declined to 
Prosecute
In Judicial Process
Verdict: Guilty

32
12

73%
27%
33%
67%

4
8
1
3
4

13%
38%
50%

 

 
 
 
 

VOLUME 12

Page 12

Physical Assaults
Definitions
Kidnapping:  The  unlawful seizure, transportation, and/or detention of a victim against her/his will for ransom or re‐
ward.  This category includes hostage‐taking.  
  
Aggravated assault: Attack or threat of attack with a weapon in a manner capable of inflicting severe bodily injury or 
death.  Attack without a weapon or object when severe bodily injury results. Severe bodily injury includes broken 
bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe laceration,  loss of consciousness, or  any injury requiring two or more days 
of hospitalization.  Attempted murder should be reported as aggravated assault. 
  
Major physical assault: Aggressive contact that requires the Volunteer to use substantial force to disengage the of‐
fender OR that results in major bodily injury, including any of the following: injury requiring less than two days of hos‐
pitalization; or diagnostic X‐rays to rule out broken bones (and no fracture is found); or surgical intervention (including 
stitches).
  
Other  physical  assault: Aggressive contact that does not require the Volunteer to use substantial force to disengage 
the offender and results in no injury or only minor injury.  Minor injury does not require hospitalization, X‐ray or surgi‐
cal intervention (including stitches).   

Page 13

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Physical Assaults
The  following  section  provides  global  analyses  of  all 
physical assault incidents.  Incidence of physical assaults 
is expressed per 100 VT years.   

Figure 24:  Yearly Rates of Kidnapping (n=4)
0.04
Events per 100 VT years

Physical  assault  definitions  have  undergone  several 
changes  in  the    past  five  years  which  make  long‐term 
trend  monitoring  difficult.    Prior  to  2006,  robbery  was 
defined  as  an  incident  devoid  of  violence  or  threat  of 
violence in which property or cash is taken directly from 
a Volunteer.  If the robbery was accompanied by an at‐
tack, the robbery would have been reported as a physi‐
cal assault.  Some incidents that would have been classi‐
fied  as  aggravated  assaults,  major  physical  assaults,  or 
other  physical  assaults  prior  to  2006  are  now  classified 
as robberies, leading to a general decline in the physical 
assault rates and an increase in robbery rates from 2006.   

0.03

0.02
0.02
0.01
0.01

0.00

0.00

0.00

II. Aggravated Assault
Global Analysis 
Table  8  provides  the  volume  and  rates  of  aggravated  
assaults.  

Table 8: Summary—Aggravated Assault
2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

 

I. Kidnapping
Global Analysis 
Table 7 provides the volume and rates of kidnappings. 

Table 7: Summary—Kidnapping
0
0.00
2
0.03
‐100%
0%

0.03

0.03
5‐year avg: 0.01

0.00

The  next  change  involved  only  physical  assaults.  Inci‐
dents  involving  any  type  of  weapon  use  or  threat  are 
classified as aggravated assaults prior to 2009, including 
children throwing small rocks or threats made with plas‐
tic bottles.  In 2010, assaults involving weapons are clas‐
sified  on  the  basis  of  the  potential  of  the  weapon  to 
cause  severe  bodily  injury  or  death  (aggravated  as‐
saults), major bodily injury (major physical assault), or no 
injury to minor injury (other physical assault). 

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

0.03

13
0.17
19
0.26
‐36%
‐68%

There  were  13  aggravated  assaults  reported  by  Peace 
Corps Volunteers worldwide during 2010, resulting in an 
incidence  rate  of  0.17  incidents  per  100  VT  years.    The 
aggravated  assault  number  and  rate  decreased  36  per‐
cent from 2009 and has decreased by  68 percent since 
2006.

 

Kidnapping was added to the list of reportable incidents 
in  2006,  but  there  were  no  kidnapping  incidents  re‐
ported in 2006 or 2007.  Two incidents were reported in 
each  of  2008  and  2009;  however,  in  2010  the  number 
reported returned to zero. 

VOLUME 12

Page 14

 

Physical Assaults
Figure 25:  Yearly  Rates of Aggravated Assault  (n=610)

Figure 26:  Yearly Rates of Major Physical Assault 
(n=164)
1.00

2.50

5‐year avg: 0.35

2.00
1.50

1.38 1.39 1.26

1.00

Events per 100 VT Years

Events per 100 VT Years

3.00

1.60
1.21
0.53 0.53*

0.50

0.53
0.26 0.17

0.00

0.80

5‐year avg: 0.18

0.60
0.40

0.31 0.32 0.30

0.20

0.35
0.22
0.13

0.13*

0.18
0.13 0.17

0.00

* 2006 change in definition

* 2006 change in definition

The  sharp  decline  in  aggravated  assaults  from  2005  to 
2006 reflects the definition change.  Aggravated assault 
rates  continued  to  decline  from  2006  to  2009,  and 
dropped  substantially  in  2010,  perhaps  as  a  result  of  
changes to the definitions.  

The decline in major physical assaults from 2005 to 2006 
reflects the definition change.  Between 2006 and 2009, 
the rate for major physical assaults showed no clear di‐
rectional  trend,  though  in  2009,  the  rate  increased 
slightly, perhaps as a result of the second change in defi‐
nition. 

III. Major Physical Assault

 

IV. Other Physical Assault

Global Analysis 

Global Analysis 

Table 9 provides the volume and rates of major physical 
assaults. 

Table 10 provides the volume and rates of other physical  
assaults. 

 

Table 9: Summary—Major Physical Assault
2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

14
0.18
12
0.17
9%
40%

There were 14 major physical assaults reported by Peace 
Corps Volunteers worldwide during 2010, resulting in an 
incidence  rate  of  0.18  incidents  per  100  VT  years.    The 
major  physical  assault  rate  increased  9  percent  com‐
pared  to  2009,  which  is  also  an  increase  of  40  percent 
from 2006. 

Page 15

Table 10: Summary—Other Physical Assault

 

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

68
0.88
70
0.97
‐9%
52%

There were 68 other physical assault incidents reported 
by  Peace  Corps  Volunteers  worldwide  during  2010,  re‐
sulting in a rate of 0.88 incidents per 100 VT years.  The 
other  physical  assault  rate  experienced  a  large  increase 
between  2006  and  2010  (52  percent),  though  the  rate 
has declined slightly since 2009 (9 percent). 

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

 

Physical Assaults
V. Number of Incidents vs. Number of
Victims

Figure 27:  Yearly Rates of Other Physical Assault (n=657)

The number of reported physical assaults and the num‐
ber of victims reported in 2010 differ more than in past 
years.  This is primarily due to a single aggravated assault 
involving  five  Volunteers  and  an  other  physical  assault 
involving six Volunteers.   

Events per 100 VT Years

3.00
2.50

5‐year avg: 0.69

2.00
1.50

1.29 1.29

1.00
0.50

1.11 1.19 1.14

0.97 0.88
0.58

0.58*

0.57

Figure 28:  Number of Incidents vs. Number of Volunteer 
Victims for 2010

0.00

* 2006 change in definition

0
0

Kidnapping
Aggravated 
Assault

 

The decline in other physical assaults in 2006 reflects the 
definition  change.  Since  2006,  the  incidence  rate  for 
other  physical  assaults  shows  an  upward  trend.    This 
trend accelerated in 2009, likely as a result of the second 
definition  change,  which  classified  previous  aggravated 
assaults as other physical assaults when the likelihood of 
severe bodily injury from use of a weapon is low. 

Number of Victims
Number of Incidents

20
13
15
14

Major Physical

77

Other Physical

68
0

20

40

60

80

100

  

VOLUME 12

Page 16

Physical Assaults
Volunteer Characteristics

 

Sex 

Age 
Figure :  Rate of Physical Assaults by Sex 2006‐2010 
(n=449)

Figure 30:  Rate of Physical Assaults by Age Groups 2006‐
2010 (n=439)

0.64
0.18

Female (n=248)

0.2
0.2

60s+ (n=4)

0.30
0.02
0.7
0.2

Male (n=201)

0.1

40s (n=3)

0.5

0.0
0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

0.3
0.7

0.2

20s (n=393)
0.2

0.6

0.1

30s (n=32)

0.5

0.0

0.6

50s (n=7)

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

0.4

0.0
0.0

0.2

Rate per 100 VT Years

0.4

0.6

0.8

Rate per 100 VT Years

 
 

 

Ethnicity 

Months in Service 

Table 11: Comparison of Physical Assaults by Race/Ethnicity to Volunteer
Population 2010 (n=94)

Figure 31:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Months in 
Service 2006 ‐2010 (n=431)
70.0%

Aggravated  Major  Other  Volunteer 
Race/Ethnicity
Kidnapping Assault Physical Physical Population
Caucasian (n=67)
N/A
53.8%
71.4%
74.6%
74%
Not specified (n=4)
N/A
15.4%
0.0%
3.0%
10%
Hispanic (n=7)
N/A
0.0%
7.1%
9.0%
6%
Asian (n=4)
N/A
7.7%
7.1%
3.0%
5%
African American (n=8)
N/A
23.1%
14.3%
4.5%
3%
Two or more races (n=4)
N/A
0.0%
0.0%
6.0%
3%
Native American (n=0)
N/A
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
<1

60.0%

Kidnapping
Aggravated Assault
Major Physical
Other Physical

50.0%
40.0%
30.0%

22.1%

27.9%
22.8%

22.8%

20.0%
2.2%

10.0%

2.2%

0.0%
0 to 6

7 to 12

13 to 18

19 to 24

25 to 30

31 to 36

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Page 17

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Physical Assaults
Offender Characteristics

 

Victim/Offender Relationship 

Day of Week 

Figure 32:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by 
Offender/Volunteer Relationship 2006‐2010 (n=450)
Local Law

Figure 34:  Percentage  of Physical Assaults by Day of 
Week 2006‐2010 (n=454)
30.0%

2.9%

Stranger

25.0%

62.6%

Peace Corps Staff

0.0%

Co‐worker/Mgmt.

0.7%

Other PCV

0.0%
1.4%

Host Family
Friend/Acquaint.
Other
Unknown

0.0%

20.0%

17.6%

15.0% 11.3%
Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

12.9%
10.8%
8.6%

13.4%

14.8%

12.0%

8.5%

10.0%
5.0%

2.1%

0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

MON TUE

100.0%

WED THU

FRI

 

 

 

 

Incident Characteristics

 

Time of Day 

Occurred at Volunteer Site 

Figure 33:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Time of 
Day 2006‐2010 (n=442)
Morning

14.0%

Afternoon

24.3%

Evening

SUN

UNK

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

53.9%
59.7%
55.8%
50.0%

Yes

46.1%
37.1%
43.5%
50.0%

No

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault

Night/Early 
Morning

22.8%
10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

Unknown
40.0%

Kidnapping

3.2%
0.7%

50.0%
0.0%

Morning = 6:01 a.m. to noon; Afternoon = 12:01 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Evening = 6:01 p.m. to midnight; 
Night/Early Morning = 12:01 a.m. to 6 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Page 18

SAT

Figure 35:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Volunteer 
Site 2006‐2010 (n=445)

39.0%

0.0%

Kidnapping
Aggravated Assault
Major Physical
Other Physical

20.4%

50.0%

100.0%

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Physical Assaults
Location 

Weapon Type 

Figure 36:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Location 
2006‐2010 (n=450)
Workplace

5.8%

Commercial

6.5%

Non‐Vol. Residence

3.6%

Vol. Residence

Knife/Sharp Object

Drug

1.6%

Other
Unknown

0.0%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

66.7%

15.9%
0.0%
0.0%

80.0%

100.0%

33.3%
37.3%

1.4%

Other

Aggravated Assault

18.3%

Blunt Object

57.6%

Major Physical

27.0%

Gun/Firearm

13.7%

Public Area

Unknown

Other Physical

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

11.5%

Transport‐related

Figure 38:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Weapon 
Type 2006‐2010 (n=131)

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

 

 

 

 

Community  Size 

Persons Accompanying Volunteer 

Figure 37:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by 
Community Size 2006‐2010 (n=446)

Intermediate

32.6%
38.7%
33.3%
25.0%

Urban

Unknown

6.2%
1.6%
3.6%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

Alone

Unknown

80.0% 100.0%

29.4%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20.0%

40.0%

65.7%

52.4%
47.7%
50.0%

1.0%
2.3%
4.9%
0.0%
0.0%

 

Page 19

46.6%
50.0%

Accompanied

50.0%

33.1%
29.0%
23.9%
25.0%

100.0%

Figure 41:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Volunteer 
Accompaniment 2006‐2010 (n=358)

28.1%
30.6%
39.1%
50.0%

Rural

80.0%

60.0%

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping
80.0%

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Physical Assaults
Resulting Actions

 

Injury to Volunteer 

Suspects Apprehended 

Figure 42:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Volunteer 
Injury 2008‐2010 (n=271)
23.3%
Yes

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

48.5%

29.3%
25.0%

70.7%
75.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

81.9%
75.8%
70.4%
Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

50.0%
2.5%
4.8%
8.9%

Unknown

0.0%

50.0%

No 

1.1%
3.0%

Unknown

15.6%
19.4%
20.7%

Yes

75.6%

48.5%

No 

Figure 44:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Suspect 
Apprehended 2006‐2010 (n=444)

80.0%

0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

 

 

 

 

Support Provided 

Intention of Volunteer to Prosecute 
Figure 45:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Intention 
to Prosecute 2006‐2010 (n=450)

Figure 43:  Percentage of Physical Assaults by Support 
Provided 2008‐2010 (n=270)
Medical & Counseling 
Planned/Provided

Yes

10.3%

Counseling 
Planned/Provided

34.5%

Medical 
Planned/Provided
No Support Requested

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

22.4%

Unknown

Undecided

Unknown

5.2%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

13.1%
22.6%
19.4%
32.3%

No

27.6%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%

68.2%
55.4%

8.2%
16.1%
6.5%

Other Physical
Major Physical
Aggravated Assault
Kidnapping

10.6%
29.0%
18.7%
20.0%

40.0%

100.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 20

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Threats
Definitions
 
 
Threat:  A  threat  is  made  without  physical  contact  or  injury  to  the  Volunteer.  Threat  occurs  when  the  Volunteer  is 
placed in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct. This offense in‐
cludes stalking and may be determined by the perception of the Volunteer.  
 
 

VOLUME 12

Page 21

Threats
The  following  section  provides  global  analyses  of  all 
threat  incidents.    Incidence  of  threats  is  expressed  per 
100 VT years.   

dence rate for threats has been highly variable, reaching 
its peak in 2008, followed by its lowest point in 2010. 
 

 

II. Number of Incidents vs. Number of Victims

I. Threat
Global Analysis 

The  number  of  victims  of  a  threat  incident  is  generally 
one; however there were three incidents in which more 
than  one  Volunteer  was  threatened  during  the  incident 
(Figure 47).   

Table 12 provides the volume and rates of threats. 

Table 12: Summary—Threat
2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

Figure 47:  Number of Incidents vs. Number of Volunteer 
Victims for 2010

52
0.67
49
0.68
‐1%
‐21%

55
Threats

 

52

There were 52 threat incidents reported by Peace Corps 
Volunteers worldwide during 2010, resulting in a rate of 
0.67  incidents  per  100  VT  years.    The  threat  rate  de‐
creased  only  slightly  since  2009,  and  has  decreased  by 
21 percent since 2006.   

0

50

Number of Victims
Number of Incidents

100

 
Figure 46:  Yearly Rates of Threat (n=328)

 

Events per 100 VT years

3.00
2.50

 
 

5‐year avg: 0.82

2.00
1.50
1.00

1.19
0.85

0.76

0.68

0.67

0.50
0.00

 
It  is  important  to  note  that  prior  to  2006,  only  death 
threats  were  a  reportable  category;  therefore,  some  of 
the increase since 2006 may be the result of  including a 
new class of incidents—intimidation.  Due to this change 
in reporting practice, the trend graph shows only the 5‐
year period covered in this report (Figure 46).  The inci‐
Page 22

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Threats
Volunteer Characteristics

 

Sex 

Age 
Figure 48: Rate of Threats by Sex 2006‐2010 (n=306)

Figure 49: Rate of Threats by Age Groups
2006‐2010  (n=302)
60s+ (n=2)

Female (n=238)

1.1

Male (n=68)

0.2

50s (n=3)

0.5

0.3

40s (n=6)

1.0

30s (n=30)

1.0

20s (n=261)
0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

0.8
0.0

Rate per 100 VT Years

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

Rate per 100 VT Years

 
 

 

Ethnicity 

Months in Service 
Figure 50:  Percentage of Months in Service  for Threats 
2006 ‐2010 (n=295)

Table 13: Comparison of Threats by Race/Ethnicity to
Volunteer Population 2010 (n=52)

Race/Ethnicity
Caucasian (n=41)
Not specified (n=2)
Hispanic (n=4)
Asian (n=2)
African American (n=3)
Two or more races(n=0)
Native American (n=0)

Threat
78.8%
3.8%
7.7%
3.8%
5.8%
0.0%
0.0%

35.0%

Volunteer 
Population
74%
10%
6%
5%
3%
3%
<1%

30.0%

26.4%

25.0%
17.6%

20.0%

16.9%

15.0%
10.0%

5.1%

5.0%

1.7%

0.0%
0 to 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 23

32.2%

7 to 12

13 to 18 19 to 24 25 to 30 31 to 36

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Threats
Offender Characteristics

 

Victim/Offender Relationship 

Day of Week 
Figure 53:  Percentage  of Day of Week for Threats 2006‐
2010 (n=306)

Figure 51:  Percentage of Offender/Volunteer 
Relationship for Threats 2006‐2010 (n=305)
Local Law

20.0%

1.0%

Stranger

51.5%

Peace Corps Staff

14.7%

13.1%

14.1%

13.1%

12.4%

FRI

SAT

12.0%

2.6%

Other PCV

15.0%

16.0%

0.0%

Co‐worker/Mgmt.

17.6%

0.7%

Host Family

8.0%

4.6%

Friend/Acquaint.

14.1%

Other

12.8%

Unknown

12.8%
0.0%

10.0%

4.0%
0.0%

20.0%

30.0%

40.0%

50.0%

MON

60.0%

TUE

WED

 

 

 

 

Incident Characteristics

 

Time of Day 

Occurred at Volunteer Site 

Figure 52:  Percentage of Threats by Time of Day    
2006‐2010 (n=284)

THU

SUN

Figure 54:  Percentage of Threats Occurring at Volunteer 
Site 2006‐2010 (n=305)

Night/Early 
Morning, 14.1%

Unknown, 1.6%

No, 21.0%

Morning, 26.8%
Evening, 32.4%
Yes, 77.4%

Afternoon, 
26.8%

Morning = 6:01 a.m. to noon; Afternoon = 12:01 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Evening = 6:01 p.m. to midnight; 
Night/Early Morning = 12:01 a.m. to 6 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 24

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Threats
Resulting Actions

Location 

Support Provided 

Figure 55:  Percentage of Location for Threats 
2006‐2010 (n=306)
Workplace

Figure 59:  Percentage of Support Provided  for Threats 
2008‐2010 (n=165)

7.2%

Commercial

5.6%

Transport‐related

Medical & Counseling 
Planned/Provided

3.6%

Non‐Vol. Residence

1.2%

Counseling 
Planned/Provided

2.0%

Vol. Residence

32.1%

40.2%

Public Area
Other
Unknown

Medical 
Planned/Provided

32.4%
7.2%

0.0%

No Support Requested

63.0%

2.0%
0.0%

10.0%

20.0%

30.0%

40.0%

Unknown

50.0%

3.6%
0.0%

 
 

 

Persons Accompanying Volunteer 

 

Figure 58:  Percentage of Volunteer Accompaniment for 
Threats  2006‐2010 (n=220)

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

Suspects Apprehended 
Figure 60:  Percentage of Suspects Apprehended for 
Threats 2006‐2010 (n=303)

Unknown, 2.7%

Unknown, 4.3%

Yes, 15.8%
Accompanied, 
38.6%
Alone, 58.6%

No , 79.9%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Page 25

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Threats
Intention of Volunteer to Prosecute 
Figure 61:  Percentage of Volunteers Intending to 
Prosecute  for Threats 2006‐2010 (n=305)

Yes, 
10.8%

Unknown, 
21.6%
Undecided, 
8.2%

No, 59.3%

 

Page 26

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Property Crimes
Definitions
Robbery:  The taking or attempting to take anything of value under confrontational circumstances from the control, 
custody or care of the Volunteer by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear of immedi‐
ate harm.  Also includes when a robber displays/uses a weapon or transports the Volunteer to obtain his/her money 
or possessions.  
Burglary with Assault: Unlawful or forcible entry of a Volunteer’s residence accompanied by an Other Sexual Assault 
or Other Physical Assault.  Also includes illegal entry of a hotel room accompanied by an Other Sexual Assault or Other 
Physical Assault.  
Burglary—No  Assault:    Unlawful  or  forcible  entry  of  a  Volunteer’s  residence.  This  incident  type  usually,  but  not  al‐
ways, involves theft. As long as the person entering has no legal right to be present in the residence, a burglary has 
occurred.  Also includes illegal entry of a hotel room.  
Theft: The taking away of or attempt to take away property or cash without involving force or illegal entry.  Includes 
pickpocketing, stolen purses, and thefts from a residence that do not involve an illegal entry.  
Vandalism: Mischievous or malicious defacement, destruction, or damage of property. 

Page 27

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Property Crimes
II. Burglary

The  following  section  provides  global  analyses  of  all 
property  crime  incidents.    Incidence  of  property  crimes  
is expressed per 100 VT years.   

Global Analysis 
Table 15 provides the volume and rates of burglaries. 

 

Table 15: Summary—Burglary

I. Robbery
Global Analysis 

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

Table 14 provides the volume and rates of robberies. 

Table 14: Summary—Robbery
2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
5‐Year Rate Comparison (2006 to 2010)

188
2.43
170
2.35
4%
4%

341
4.41
342
4.72
‐7%
47%

 

There were 341 burglaries reported by Peace Corps Vol‐
unteers worldwide during 2010, resulting in a rate of 4.7 
incidents per 100 VT years.  Beginning in 2009, burglaries 
were  categorized  as  either  “with  assault”  or  “no  as‐
 
sault.”    Only  five  burglaries  were  reported  as  burglary 
There were 188 robberies reported by Peace Corps Vol‐
with  assault  in  2010,  for  an  incidence  rate  of  0.06  per 
unteers  worldwide  during  2010,  resulting  in  a  rate  of 
100  VT  years.    The  total  burglary  rate  decreased  by  7 
2.43  incidents  per  100  VT  years.    The  robbery  rate  has 
percent from 2009 to 2010 and has increased 47 percent 
increased  by  the  same  percentage  (4  percent)  between 
since 2001 (Figure 63). 
2009 and 2010 and from 2006 to 2010. 
Figure 63:  Yearly Rates of Burglary (n=2626)
Figure 62:  Yearly Rates of Robbery (n=1478)
4.72

Events per 100 VT Years

5.00
Events per 100 VT Years

5.00
4.00

5‐year avg: 2.40

3.00
2.00

1.66 1.55 1.67

2.04

2.33 * 2.40 2.41 2.35 2.43
1.78

1.00

4.00
3.00

4.29
3.00 3.14

3.39

4.21

4.41

3.73
3.18

2.63

2.00
1.00

10‐year avg: 3.67

0.00

0.00

* 2006 change in definition

 
 

As noted in the  physical assaults section, prior to 2006, 
incidents  that  would  have  been  categorized  as  physical 
assaults  in  previous  years  are  now  classified  as  robber‐
ies, resulting in an increase in the incidence rate (Figure 
62).    Since  2006,  the  incidence  rate  for  robberies  has 
increased slightly. 
VOLUME 12

Page 28

Property Crimes
III. Theft

Table 17: Summary—Vandalism

Global Analysis 

2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

Table 16 provides the volume and rates of thefts. 

Table 16: Summary—Theft
2010 Number of Incidents
2010  Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
2009  Number of Incidents
2009 Incidence Rate (per 100 VT years)
Yearly Rate Comparison (2009 to 2010)
10‐Year Rate Comparison (2001 to 2010)

769
9.94
714
9.85
1%
61%

4
0.05
9
0.12
‐58%
‐77%

 

Events per 100 VT Years

There  were  4  vandalism  incidents  reported  by  Peace 
Corps  Volunteers  worldwide  during  2010,  resulting  in  a 
rate of 0.05 incidents per 100 VT years.  The number of 
  reported vandalisms is too small for reliable rate calcula‐
tions and, due to its low incidence rate, this crime cate‐
There  were  769  thefts  reported  by  Peace  Corps  Volun‐
property 
gory is not included on the graphs created for 
teers worldwide during 2010, resulting in a rate of 9.94 
crimes overall. 
incidents  per 100 VT years.  The  theft  rate increased  1 
percent compared to 2009.  Reported thefts have gener‐
 
ally increased over the past 10 years, and between 2001  
V. Number of Incidents vs. Number of
and  2010,  the  rate  of  thefts  increased  by  61  percent. 
Victims
(Figure 64). 
The  number  of  reported  incidents  and  the  number  of 
victims  generally  differ  across  property  crimes  (Figure 
Figure 64:  Yearly Rates of Theft (n=5948)
65).    Because  property  crimes  focus  more  on  the  items 
of value rather than the person, it is not unusual to have 
9.99 9.85 9.94
10.00
property stolen from more than one Volunteer during an 
8.57
8.31
8.14
7.52 7.38
7.29
incident.   
8.00
6.17

6.00

Figure 65:  Number of Incidents vs. Number of Volunteer 
Victims for 2010

4.00
2.00

10‐year avg: 8.31

239
188

Robbery

Number of Victims
Number of Incidents

0.00
399
341

Burglary

 

IV. Vandalism
Global Analysis 

796
769

Theft

0

200

400

600

800

1000

Table 17 provides the volume and rates of vandalism. 

Page 29

 

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Property Crimes
Volunteer Characteristics

 

Sex 

Age 
Figure 67:  Percentage of Property Crimes Within 
Volunteer Age 2006 ‐ 2010 (n=5734)

Figure 66:  Rate of Property Crimes by Sex 2006‐2010 
(n=5820)

3.2

60+ (n=160)

4.7
Female (n=3791)

10.2

2.6

50 to 59 (n=115)

3.6

40 to 49 (n=70)

3.4
7.8

4.2

18 to 29 (n=4992)
5.0

10.0

2.0

 

 

 

 

Ethnicity 

Months In Service 

Table 18: Comparison of Property Crimes by Race/Ethnicity to
Volunteer Population 2010 (n=1263)

Race/Ethnicity
Caucasian (n=1002)
Not specified (n=41)
Hispanic (n=72)
Asian (n=62)
African American (n=46)
Two or more races (n=35)
Native American (n=5)

Robbery
86.3%
1.1%
3.8%
2.7%
3.8%
2.2%
0.0%

Theft  Burglary
78.3%
77.9%
3.3%
4.2%
6.4%
5.1%
4.9%
6.0%
3.5%
3.9%
2.9%
2.7%
0.7%
0.0%

9.3

2.4
0.0

Rate per 100 VT Years

Robbery

8.0

1.5

2.5
0.0

Theft 

3.8

30 to 39 (n=397)

Robbery

Burglary

6.6

1.7

Theft 

Male (n=2056)

7.6

1.9

2.3
Burglary

8.7

1.6

4.0
6.0
Rate per 100 VT Years

8.0

10.0

Figure 68:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Months in 
Service 2006 ‐2010 (n=5630)
35.0%

Volunteer 
Population
74%
10%
6%
5%
3%
3%
<1

27.4%

30.0%

25.3%

25.0%

Robbery

21.9%

Theft 

16.8%

20.0%

Burglary

15.0%
10.0%

6.8%

5.0%

1.7%

0.0%
0 to 6

7 to 12

13 to 18 19 to 24 25 to 30 31 to 36

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLUME 12

Page 30

Property Crimes
Offender Characteristics
Victim/Offender Relationship 

Day of Week 

Figure 69:  Percentage of Property Crimes by 
Offender/Volunteer Relationship 2006‐2010 (n=5827)

Figure 71:  Percentage  of Property Crimes by Day of 
Week 2006‐2010 (n=4333)
25.0%

Local Law

0.1%

Stranger

20.1%

93.4%

Peace Corps Staff
Co‐worker/Mgmt.

0.0%
0.0%

Other PCV

0.0%

Host Family

0.0%

Friend/Acquaint.

0.2%

Other

0.6%

Unknown

20.0%
15.0% 11.2%

Burglary
Theft 

10.6% 10.4% 10.9%

10.0%

Robbery

Robbery
Theft 

5.0%

5.6%
0.0%

17.0%

18.2%

1.6%

0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

MON

100.0%

 

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

UNK

 

Note: Burglaries often occur while Volunteers are away 
from site for an extended period of time; therefore, data 
on time of day or day of week for burglaries are broad 
estimates and not analyzed. 

Incident Characteristics

 

Time of Day 

Occurred at Volunteer Site 

Figure 70:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Time of 
Day 2006‐2010 (n=3916)
Morning

26.1%

15.6%

92.2%

Afternoon

22.7%

Yes

43.0%

26.2%

Evening

Figure 72:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Volunteer 
Site 2006‐2010 (n=5817)

29.3%
29.8%
7.8%

Burglary

No

38.2%

69.7%
69.8%

Theft

Night/Early 
Morning
0.0%

8.1%
10.0%

20.0%

Robbery

Robbery

20.0%

Unknown
30.0%

40.0%

Theft

50.0%

0.0%
1.0%
0.3%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

 
 
 
 
 
VOLUME 12

Page 31

Property Crimes
Location 

Transportation Type ‐ Theft 

Figure 73:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Location 
2006‐2010 (n=5831)
Workplace

0.2%

Commercial

Minibus/Maxi‐
taxi, 13.1%
Pedestrian*, 
10.4%

Burglary

3.8%

Transport‐related

Theft 
Robbery

16.1%

Non‐Vol. Residence

Figure 75:  Percentage of Thefts by Volunteer 
Transportation Type 2008‐2010 (n=624)

Motorcycle, 0.3%

1.2%

Vol. Residence

Water Vehicle , Truck, 1.1%
1.3%
Air Vehicle , 1.3%

5.5%

Public Area

72.9%

Other

0.1%

Unknown

0.1%
0.0%

Car, 7.1%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

*Pedestrian refers to crimes committed at a designated transportation stop or station.

 

 

 

Transportation Type ‐ Robbery 

Community Size 

Figure 74:  Percentage of Robberies by Volunteer 
Transportation Type 2008‐2010 (n=77)

Figure 76:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Community 
Size 2006‐2010 (n=5797)

Minibus/Maxi‐
taxi, 14.3%

Rural

Pedestrian*, 6.5%

22.9%
24.7%
21.2%

Bus, 44.2%

12.5%

Urban

Motorcycle, 3.9%
Truck, 2.6%

0.0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burglary

48.1%

Theft

60.5%

Robbery

4.2%
6.9%
5.1%

Unknown

Car, 22.1%

60.3%

20.3%
13.2%

Intermediate

Bicycle, 2.6%

VOLUME 12

Bus, 58.2%

Other , 6.7%

 

Other , 3.9%

Unknown, 0.5%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

Page 32

Property Crimes
Property Loss 

Weapon Type 

Figure 77:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Type of 
Property Loss 2006‐2010 (n=5807)
76.2%

Stolen

81.4%

Damaged or 
Destroyed

2.5%
0.2%
0.7%

None

2.3%

Figure 78:  Percentage of Robberies by Weapon Type 
2006‐2010 (n=492)
Knife/Sharp 
Object

97.4%

Gun/Firearm

Burglary

20.6%

Drug

Theft 

17.5%

6.3%
0.6%

Other

0.7%
0.1%
0.5%
0.0%

33.7%

Blunt Object

Robbery

Unknown

52.4%

4.3%

Unknown
20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

2.6%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

 

 

 

 

Value of Property Loss 

Persons Accompanying Volunteer 

 

Table 19: Value of Property Loss
(USD), 2008 - 2010

Incident Type
Robbery
Burglary
Theft
Vandalism

60.0%

Figure 80:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Volunteer 
Accompaniment 2006‐2010 (n=4331)

Mean ($)
Median ($)
Sum ($)
$309.27
$100.00 $121,543.00
$649.57
$200.00 $339,726.00
$214.22
$87.00 $425,220.00
$37.00
$20.00
$444.00

40.9%

Accompanied

54.7%

56.5%

Alone

 

Theft

2.6%
1.0%

Unknown

 
 

44.3%

0.0%

Robbery

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLUME 12

Page 33

Property Crimes
Resulting Actions

 

Injury to Volunteer 

Suspects Apprehended 

Figure 81:  Percentage of Robberies by Volunteer Injury 
2008‐2010 (n=500)

Figure 83:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Suspect 
Apprehended 2006‐2010 (n=5777)

Unknown, 0.4%
12.0%
3.8%
5.8%

Yes
Yes, 18.8%

82.7%
90.4%
92.2%

No 

5.3%
5.8%
2.1%

Unknown

0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

 

 

 

 

Support Provided 

Intention of Volunteer to Prosecute 

Figure 82:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Support 
Provided to Volunteer 2008‐2010 (n=3473)

Medical 
Planned/Provided

Yes

Theft
Robbery

19.9%

Undecided
56.6%

Unknown

Unknown

2.8%
0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

8.5%

16.3%
20.8%
47.3%

No

11.4%

No Support Requested

100.0%

Figure 84:  Percentage of Property Crimes by Intention 
to Prosecute 2006‐2010 (n=5823)

Burglary

9.2%

Counseling 
Planned/Provided

Theft
Robbery

No, 80.8%

Medical & Counseling 
Planned/Provided

Burglary

100.0%

0.0%

51.1%
12.2%
7.5%
9.3%

Burglary
Theft

24.2%

Robbery

14.7%
18.8%
20.0%

69.4%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
VOLUME 12

Page 34

In-Service Deaths
Definitions
Volunteer Deaths by: 
Homicide: The willful (non‐negligent) killing of a Volunteer by another person. Deaths caused by negligence, suicides 
and accidental deaths are excluded. 
Suicide: The act of a Volunteer killing him/herself intentionally. 
Accident: Death of a Volunteer due to unintentional injury. 
Illness: Death of a Volunteer due to illness or natural causes. 
Indeterminate cause: Death of a Volunteer pending further investigation to establish cause of death. Deaths catego‐
rized as this type will be updated after 6 months and re‐categorized as death due to homicide, suicide, accident or ill‐
ness.  
 
 
Volunteer death encompasses the categories of: homicide, suicide, accidental death, death due to illness, and/or death 
due to indeterminate cause. 
From 1961 through the end of 2010, there have been 23 homicides in the Peace Corps. There were 2 in‐service deaths 
in 2010: 1 homicide and 1 death due to indeterminate cause. From 2006 to 2010, there were 14 Volunteer deaths: 7 
accidental deaths, 3 deaths due to illness, 3 homicides, and 1 death due to indeterminate cause. A summary table and 
figures for in‐service deaths are not provided because the small number of deaths does not allow for meaningful analy‐
sis. 
 

Page 35

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendices
Appendix A:  Severity Hierarchy and Incident Definitions 
 
Appendix B:  Methodology 
 
Appendix C:  Peace Corps countries, 2010 
 
Appendix D:  Demographics of All Volunteers, 2010 
 
Appendix E:  Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates, 2010 
 
Appendix F: Country of Incident compared with Country of Service, 2010 

VOLUME 12

Page 36

Appendix A: Severity Hierarchy and Incident Definitions
 
Death by Homicide > Kidnapping > Rape > Major Sexual Assault > Robbery > Aggravated Assault > Major Physical As‐
sault > Burglary with Assault > Other Sexual Assault > Other Physical Assault > Burglary – No Assault> Threat > Theft >  
Vandalism   
Death by Homicide 

Kidnapping 

Rape 



The willful (non‐negligent) killing of one human being by another 



Deaths caused by negligence, suicides, and accidental deaths are excluded  



Unlawful seizure and/or detention of a Volunteer against his/her will for ransom or re‐
ward 



Includes hostage‐taking  



Penetration of the vagina or anus with a penis, tongue, finger or object without the con‐
sent and/or against the will of the victim 
 Includes when a victim is unable to consent because of ingestion of drugs and/or alcohol 
 Includes forced oral sex and any unsuccessful attempts to penetrate the vagina or anus  

Major Sexual Assault   Intentional or forced contact with the breasts, genitals, mouth, buttocks, or anus OR 
disrobing of the Volunteer or offender without bodily contact 


AND any of the following:  
1.  the use of a weapon by the assailant, OR 
2.  physical injury to the victim OR 
3.  when the victim has to use substantial force to disengage the assailant  

Robbery 

Aggravated Assault 

Major Physical        
Assault 



The taking or attempting to take anything of value under confrontational circumstances 
from the control, custody or care of another person by force, threat of force, violence, 
and/or by putting the victim in fear of immediate harm  



Also includes when a robber displays/uses a weapon or transports the Volunteer to ob‐
tain his/her money or possessions  



Attack or threat of attack with a weapon in a manner capable of causing severe bodily 
injury or death 



Attack without a weapon when severe bodily injury results.   



Severe bodily injury includes: broken bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, severe lacera‐
tion, loss of consciousness, or any injury requiring two or more days of hospitalization  



Aggressive contact that requires the Volunteer to use substantial force to disengage the 
offender or that results in major bodily injury 



Major bodily injury includes: injury requiring less than two days of hospitalization, OR 
diagnostic X‐rays to rule out broken bones (and no fracture is found), OR surgical inter‐
vention (including suturing)  

 
 

 

Page 37

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix A: Severity Hierarchy and Incident Definitions

Burglary with Assault 

Other Sexual Assault 

Other Physical Assault 

Burglary—No Assault 

Threat 

Theft 

Vandalism 
Other Security Incident 



Unlawful or forcible entry of a Volunteer’s residence accompanied by an other sexual 
assault or other physical assault 



The illegal entry may be forcible, such as breaking a window or slashing a screen, or 
may be without force by entering through an unlocked door or an open window  



Unwanted or forced kissing, fondling, and/or groping of the breasts, genitals, mouth, 
buttocks, or anus for sexual gratification  



Aggressive contact that does not require the Volunteer to use substantial force to 
disengage the offender and results in no injury or only minor injury   



Minor injury does not require hospitalization, X‐ray or surgical intervention (including 
stitches)  



Unlawful or forcible entry of a Volunteer’s residence  



This crime usually, but not always, involves theft 



The illegal entry may be forcible, such as breaking a window or slashing a screen, or 
may be without force by entering through an unlocked door or an open window 



Also includes illegal entry of a hotel room  



When the Volunteer is placed in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of 
threatening words and/or other conduct  



This offense includes stalking and may be determined by the perception of the      
Volunteer  



The taking away of or attempt to take away property or cash without involving force 
or illegal entry 



There is no known direct contact with the victim 



Includes pick‐pocketing, stolen purses, and thefts from a residence that do not in‐



Mischievous or malicious defacement, destruction, or damage of property  



Any situation that directly impacts the security of a Volunteer but that does not meet 
any of the definitions of a crime  
 

The Peace Corps uses a hierarchy rule in classifying incidents, similar to that used by the Federal Bureau of Investiga‐
tion in its Uniform Crime Reporting system.  When a single offense is committed, the incident is classified according to 
the details of that offense.  However, in multiple‐offense situations, the hierarchy rule requires that the reporter locate 
the classification that is highest on the severity hierarchy and report the entire incident using that classification, rather 
than multiple, less‐severe classifications.  This does not affect the charges that an offender may incur according to local 
law.   

VOLUME 12

Page 38

Appendix B: Methodology
Data Analysis
The Crime Statistics and Analysis Unit conducts a multi‐step  quality‐assurance process to  mitigate  errors inherent to 
the data collection process (i.e., respondent errors, non‐response errors, misclassifications, etc.).  Each report received 
at  headquarters  is  reviewed  for:  1)  appropriate  crime  classification;  and  2)  any  discrepancies  between  the  summary 
and the closed‐ended questions (i.e., questions with multiple choice responses).  Data are reviewed daily for misclassi‐
fication,  inconsistencies, errors or missing data and are sent back to the submitter for correction or clarification.   
The Safety of the Volunteer 2010 reports on three periods of data collection and analysis: the 2010 calendar year, the 5
‐year period from 2006‐2010, and the 10‐year period from 2001‐2010. Analyzing multiple time periods provides a good 
understanding of areas of fluctuation and long‐standing crime trends. Data for this report are current as of January 31, 
2012. Longitudinal data are represented in scatter plots that provide crime incidence rates for each year. Within each 
scatter plot, a trend line approximates the best‐fit line through the data points.  
This  report  displays  the  data  in  four  categories:  sexual  assaults,  physical  assaults,  threats,  and  property  crimes.  Inci‐
dence rates, global trend analyses, and crime profiles are provided in each of the four categories. Each figure included 
in the crime profile analysis sections includes the number of incidents and the specific years contributing to that par‐
ticular analysis and is denoted as n = ## within the figure.  In some analyses, the n is less than the total number of re‐
ported incidents for that particular crime because respondents may have left data fields unanswered within the inci‐
dent reports. 
 

Incidence Rates
 

Incidence Rate =

 

(Number of reported incidents/VT Years) x 100

 
 
Incidence rates are more accurate indicators of reported crimes for comparative purposes than are the raw number of 
incidents, or the crime volume.  By reporting incidence rates (i.e., the number of incidents as a function of the number 
of  Volunteers  serving  in  a  given  country  over  time),  more  meaningful  comparisons  can  be  made  across  Peace  Corps 
countries or regions that have differing numbers of Volunteers. For example, 25 reported incidents of aggravated as‐
sault affect a higher percentage of Volunteers at a post with 100 Volunteers than a post with 200 Volunteers.   
Furthermore, incidence rates are calculated using VT years, which are more accurate than using the number of Volun‐
teers in the denominator. The VT year calculation considers the length of time Volunteers were at risk; or, the length of 
time served by Volunteers.  A VT year encompasses the amount of time a Volunteer/trainee served during a given year 
between the start of domestic training (“staging”) through the end of service. For example, if a Volunteer leaves after 
six months, he or she is only at risk during that six‐month period, and only half (0.5) of a VT year is contributed to the 
incidence rate denominator. If a Volunteer stays the full year, one full (1.0) VT year is contributed. Unless otherwise 
noted in the report, incidence rates are reported as incidents per 100 Volunteer/trainee (VT) years.   
 

Data Limitations
There are three limitations to interpreting the data in this report that the reader should bear in mind. 
The first limitation relates to the selective reporting of security incidents by Volunteers. In reviewing the frequency of 
incidents, the reader should keep in mind that these are the numbers for reported incidents. Victimization and Volun‐
teer survey findings consistently show that underreporting of crimes does occur.  Related to the self‐reported nature of 

Page 39

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix B: Methodology
the  incident  reporting  process  is  the  potential  for  misclassification  of  incidents.  Incidents  are  classified  solely  on  the 
information provided by the Volunteer, which could lead to inaccurate classification if a Volunteer does not provide all 
necessary and relevant information.  The incident definitions are included in Appendix A.  
The second limitation is more of a cautionary note and relates to comparing incidence rates across Peace Corps posts. 
While  the  use  of  incidence  rates  does  allow  for  comparisons  across  posts,  caution  should  be  used  when  comparing 
crime  rates  for  countries  with  limited  VT  years,  such  as  Indonesia  (15  VT  years),  because  they  appear  dramatically 
higher  when  compared  to  rates  for  countries  with  greater  VT  years,  such  as  Ukraine  (344  VT  years),  even  when  the 
number of incidents is small. To illustrate, an increase from one theft to two thefts at a post with 25 VT years results in 
theft  incidence  rates  increasing  from  4.0  to  8.0  incidents  per  100  VT  years.  Whereas,  with  a  large  post  with  175  VT 
years, the theft incidence rates would increase from 0.6 to 1.1 per 100 VT years.  In 2010, there were 11 posts (16 per‐
cent) with fewer than 50 VT years.  In addition, rates based on a small number of incidents (fewer than 30), such as 
rapes, should be interpreted with caution as they may not be an accurate indication of risk. Appendix E provides the 
number of reported incidents and the number of VT years contributed by each country in 2010.  
A third limitation involves the analysis of the data by the Volunteer’s country of service. The vast majority of incidents 
occur in the Volunteer’s country of service. However, incidents against Volunteers do happen outside their country of 
service; for example, when a Volunteer is vacationing in another country. The percentage of incidents occurring outside 
the Volunteer’s country of service is typically 3 percent or less (Appendix F).  

VOLUME 12

Page 40

Appendix C: Peace Corps Countries and Regions (2010)
Europe,
Mediterranean
Africa
and Asia
Benin 
Albania
Botswana 
Armenia
Burkina Faso 
Azerbaijan
Cameroon 
Bulgaria
Cape Verde 
Cambodia
Ethiopia 
China
Ghana 
Georgia 
Guinea 
Indonesia**
Kenya 
Jordan
Lesotho 
Kazakhstan
Liberia 
Kyrgyz Republic
Madagascar 
Macedonia
Malawi 
Moldova
Mali 
Mongolia 
Mozambique 
Morocco
Namibia 
Philippines
Niger 
Romania
Senegal 
Thailand
Sierra Leone**  Turkmenistan
South Africa 
Ukraine
Swaziland 
 
Tanzania 
 
The Gambia 
 
Togo 
 
Uganda 
 
Zambia 
 


** 
*** 

Inter-America
and the
Pacific
Belize
Bolivia*
Colombia**
Costa Rica
Dominican Republic 
Eastern Caribbean 
Ecuador 
El Salvador
Fiji
Guatemala
Guyana
Honduras
Jamaica
Mexico 
Micronesia
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Samoa
Suriname 
Tonga
Vanuatu

Peace Corps countries suspended:  Bolivia 
Peace Corps countries opened or 
Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone 
reopened: 
Peace Corps countries closed:  None 

 

 

Note:  Programs noted above do not provide data for a full calendar year, so incidence of security events for this country 
should be interpreted cautiously.   

Page 41

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix D: Demographics of All Volunteers (2010)
Dem ographic Characteristic

N

%

Dem ographic Characteristic

3,420
5,235
1,475
576
86
27.9/25/24

40
60
19
7

Age:
20‐29
30‐39
40‐49
50‐59
60‐69
70‐79
80‐89

7,297
650
132
200
333
42
1

84
8
2
2
4
<1
<1

Ethnicity :
Caucasian
Not Specified
Asian American
Hispanic
African American
Mixed Ethnicity
Native American

6,460
720
417
547
274
220
17

75
8
5
6
3
3
<1

Men
Women
Racial Minority Volunteers/Trainees  
Seniors (50+)  
Oldest Volunteer 
Age:  Average/Median/Most Common

VOLUME 12

N

%

Marital status:
Single
Married
Divorced
Engaged
Married/serving alone
Widowed
Married/while serving

7,516
537
344
140
64
53
1

87
6
4
2
<1
<1
<1

Educational lev el:
No High School Diploma/Other
High School Diploma
1‐2 years college
Technical School Graduate
AA Degree
3 years college
Bachelor's Degree
Graduate Study
Graduate Degree
Not Specified

5
21
30
12
56
713
5,535
119
886
1,278

<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
8
64
1
10
15

Notes:
1.  As  reported on September 30, 2010.
2.  N = Vol unteers  i n the fi el d. Reported by the Pea ce Corps ' Offi ce of  
     Stra tegi c Informa ti on, Res ea rch, a nd Pl a nni ng.
3.  Some percenta ges  do not equa l  100 due to roundi ng error.

Page 42

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Sexual Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
Global
All Countries

Female
VT
Years
4679

Rape
Events Rate
23
0.49

Major Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
21
0.45

Other Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
83
1.77

All Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
127 2.71

Africa Region
Countries

BENIN
BOTSWANA
BURKINA FASO
CAMEROON
CAPE VERDE
ETHIOPIA
GHANA
GUINEA
KENYA
LESOTHO
LIBERIA
MADAGASCAR
MALAWI
MALI
MOZAMBIQUE
NAMIBIA
NIGER
RWANDA
SENEGAL
SIERRA LEONE*
SOUTH AFRICA
SWAZILAND
TANZANIA
THE GAMBIA
TOGO
UGANDA
ZAMBIA
TOTAL AFRICA

Female
VT
Years
70
84
80
95
28
43
75
2
56
55
12
63
69
92
100
70
56
75
106
12
86
43
89
59
65
75
105
1767

Rape
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
7

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.18
0.00
1.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.38
0.00
1.34
0.00
0.40

Major Sexual
Assault
Events
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
8

Rate
1.43
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.18
2.00
1.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.54
0.00
0.00
0.45

Other Sexual
Assault
Events
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
0
2
1
1
0
2
0
0
2
2
0
2
19

Rate
1.43
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.33
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.09
4.00
0.00
3.55
1.34
0.94
0.00
2.32
0.00
0.00
3.38
3.08
0.00
1.90
1.08

All Sexual
Assault
Events
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
5
6
2
2
1
1
0
2
0
0
4
3
1
2
34

Rate
2.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.33
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
5.45
6.01
2.84
3.55
1.34
0.94
0.00
2.32
0.00
0.00
6.77
4.61
1.34
1.90
1.92

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
Page 43

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Sexual Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

Female
VT
Years
4679

Rape
Events Rate
23
0.49

Major Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
21
0.45

Other Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
83
1.77

All Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
127 2.71

EMA Region
Countries

ALBANIA
ARMENIA
AZERBAIJAN
BULGARIA
CAMBODIA
CHINA
GEORGIA
INDONESIA*
JORDAN
KAZAKHSTAN
KYRGYZ REPUBLIC
MACEDONIA
MOLDOVA
MONGOLIA
MOROCCO
PHILIPPINES
ROMANIA
THAILAND
TURKMENISTAN
UKRAINE
TOTAL EMA

Female
VT
Years
53
46
85
79
44
67
27
10
36
73
53
50
58
64
139
99
62
63
27
217
1352

Rape
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
5

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.37
1.89
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.72
1.01
1.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.37

Major Sexual
Assault
Events
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
5

Rate
1.87
2.16
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.46
0.37

Other Sexual
Assault
Events
4
5
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
4
6
0
0
2
2
1
1
1
41

Rate
7.49
10.79
2.36
2.52
2.27
1.49
3.73
10.42
11.22
2.73
1.89
7.93
10.32
0.00
0.00
2.01
3.21
1.59
3.73
0.46
3.03

All Sexual
Assault
Events
5
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
5
3
2
4
6
0
2
3
3
1
1
2
51

Rate
9.36
12.94
2.36
2.52
2.27
1.49
3.73
10.42
14.03
4.10
3.79
7.93
10.32
0.00
1.44
3.02
4.81
1.59
3.73
0.92
3.77

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.

VOLUME 12

Page 44

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Sexual Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

Female
VT
Years
4679

Rape
Events Rate
23
0.49

Major Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
21
0.45

Other Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
83
1.77

All Sexual
Assault
Events Rate
127 2.71

IAP Region
Countries

BELIZE
BOLIVIA**
COLOMBIA*
COSTA RICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EASTERN CARIBBEAN
ECUADOR
EL SALVADOR
FIJI
GUATEMALA
GUYANA
HONDURAS
JAMAICA
MEXICO
MICRONESIA
NICARAGUA
PANAMA
PARAGUAY
PERU
SAMOA
SURINAME
TONGA
VANUATU
TOTAL IAP

Female
VT
Years
57
0
1
80
119
75
122
79
38
149
46
107
47
22
31
125
92
119
122
25
25
31
49
1560

Rape
Events
0
0
0
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
0
0
0
0
11

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.50
0.84
0.00
0.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.88
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.84
2.45
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.71

Major Sexual
Assault
Events
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
8

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.66
1.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.00
0.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.04
0.51

Other Sexual
Assault
Events
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
9
1
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
3
23

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.25
0.84
0.00
0.00
1.27
0.00
6.05
2.15
1.88
2.13
0.00
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.00
0.82
0.00
4.06
3.21
6.13
1.47

All Sexual
Assault
Events
0
0
0
3
2
2
3
1
0
9
1
5
1
0
0
3
0
1
5
0
1
1
4
42

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.76
1.68
2.66
2.47
1.27
0.00
6.05
2.15
4.69
2.13
0.00
0.00
2.39
0.00
0.84
4.08
0.00
4.06
3.21
8.18
2.69

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
Page 45

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Physical Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Kidnapping
Events Rate
0
0.00

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
13
0.17

All Physical
Major Physical Other Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
14
0.18
68
0.88
95 1.23

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
0
0.00
2
1.70
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
1.28
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
1.15
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.72
0
0.00
5
0.17

All Physical
Major Physical Other Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
0
0.00
2
1.84
2
1.84
0
0.00
0
0.00
2
1.70
0
0.00
1
0.76
1
0.76
0
0.00
2
1.38
2
1.38
0
0.00
1
1.67
1
1.67
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
1.28
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
2
7.84
2
7.84
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
1.15
0
0.00
1
0.82
1
0.82
1
0.64
3
1.91
4
2.55
1
0.70
1
0.70
2
1.39
0
0.00
2
1.85
2
1.85
0
0.00
1
1.23
1
1.23
0
0.00
2
1.97
2
1.97
2
1.09
0
0.00
2
1.09
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.72
0
0.00
1
0.60
1
0.60
4
0.14
19
0.66
28 0.98

Africa Region
Countries
BENIN
BOTSWANA
BURKINA FASO
CAMEROON
CAPE VERDE
ETHIOPIA
GHANA
GUINEA
KENYA
LESOTHO
LIBERIA
MADAGASCAR
MALAWI
MALI
MOZAMBIQUE
NAMIBIA
NIGER
RWANDA
SENEGAL
SIERRA LEONE*
SOUTH AFRICA
SWAZILAND
TANZANIA
THE GAMBIA
TOGO
UGANDA
ZAMBIA
TOTAL AFRICA

VT
Years
108
118
132
144
60
78
152
4
101
87
25
87
122
157
144
108
82
101
183
22
138
68
144
90
102
139
168
2865

Kidnapping
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.

VOLUME 12

Page 46

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Physical Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Kidnapping
Events Rate
0
0.00

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
13 0.17

All Physical
Major Physical Other Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
14 0.18
68 0.88
95 1.23

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
2.01
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
2
1.60
0
0.00
1
0.61
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
2.31
0
0.00
5
0.22

All Physical
Major Physical Other Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
0
0.00
1
1.17
1
1.17
0
0.00
2
2.12
2
2.12
1
0.81
0
0.00
1
0.81
1
0.68
1
0.68
2
1.35
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.80
1
0.80
0
0.00
2
4.01
3
6.02
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
9
15.36
9
15.36
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
1.29
3
3.87
4
5.16
0
0.00
1
0.93
1
0.93
0
0.00
5
4.00
7
5.61
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.61
0
0.00
1
1.00
1
1.00
1
0.95
0
0.00
1
0.95
0
0.00
1
2.31
2
4.62
0
0.00
2
0.58
2
0.58
4
0.17
29 1.25
38 1.64

EMA Region
Countries
ALBANIA
ARMENIA
AZERBAIJAN
BULGARIA
CAMBODIA
CHINA
GEORGIA
INDONESIA*
JORDAN
KAZAKHSTAN
KYRGYZ REPUBLIC
MACEDONIA
MOLDOVA
MONGOLIA
MOROCCO
PHILIPPINES
ROMANIA
THAILAND
TURKMENISTAN
UKRAINE
TOTAL EMA

VT
Years
86
94
124
148
75
125
50
15
59
124
103
78
107
125
245
165
100
105
43
344
2314

Kidnapping
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.

Page 47

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Physical Assault Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Kidnapping
Events Rate
0
0.00

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
13 0.17

Major Physical Other Physical
All Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
14 0.18
68 0.88
95 1.23

Aggravated
Assault
Events Rate
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.54
1
1.15
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
2.19
0
0.00
0
0.00
3
0.12

All Physical
Major Physical Other Physical
Assault
Assault
Assault
Events Rate
Events Rate
Events Rate
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.80
1
0.80
0
0.00
1
0.54
1
0.54
2
1.94
2
1.94
4
3.89
0
0.00
1
0.55
1
0.55
1
0.69
1
0.69
2
1.39
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.46
4
1.85
5
2.31
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.54
0
0.00
2
1.07
0
0.00
3
3.45
4
4.60
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
0.51
1
0.51
2
1.02
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
2
0.96
2
0.96
0
0.00
1
0.48
1
0.48
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
2.19
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
3
4.02
3
4.02
6
0.23
20 0.78
29 1.13

IAP Region
Countries
BELIZE
BOLIVIA**
COLOMBIA*
COSTA RICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EASTERN CARIBBEAN
ECUADOR
EL SALVADOR
FIJI
GUATEMALA
GUYANA
HONDURAS
JAMAICA
MEXICO
MICRONESIA
NICARAGUA
PANAMA
PARAGUAY
PERU
SAMOA
SURINAME
TONGA
VANUATU
TOTAL IAP

VT
Years
91
0
2
125
185
103
181
144
68
217
71
186
87
48
51
196
177
209
207
43
46
46
75
2556

Kidnapping
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
VOLUME 12

Page 48

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Threat Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Threat
Events Rate
52
0.67

Africa Region
Countries
BENIN
BOTSWANA
BURKINA FASO
CAMEROON
CAPE VERDE
ETHIOPIA
GHANA
GUINEA
KENYA
LESOTHO
LIBERIA
MADAGASCAR
MALAWI
MALI
MOZAMBIQUE
NAMIBIA
NIGER
RWANDA
SENEGAL
SIERRA LEONE*
SOUTH AFRICA
SWAZILAND
TANZANIA
THE GAMBIA
TOGO
UGANDA
ZAMBIA
TOTAL AFRICA

VT
Years
108
118
132
144
60
78
152
4
101
87
25
87
122
157
144
108
82
101
183
22
138
68
144
90
102
139
168
2865

Threat
Events
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
4
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
16

Rate
1.84
0.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.99
0.00
3.92
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.70
1.23
0.00
0.55
0.00
0.73
1.47
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.72
0.60
0.56

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia,
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
Page 49

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Threat Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Threat
Events Rate
52
0.67

EMA Region
Countries
ALBANIA
ARMENIA
AZERBAIJAN
BULGARIA
CAMBODIA
CHINA
GEORGIA
INDONESIA*
JORDAN
KAZAKHSTAN
KYRGYZ REPUBLIC
MACEDONIA
MOLDOVA
MONGOLIA
MOROCCO
PHILIPPINES
ROMANIA
THAILAND
TURKMENISTAN
UKRAINE
TOTAL EMA

VT
Years
86
94
124
148
75
125
50
15
59
124
103
78
107
125
245
165
100
105
43
344
2314

Threat
Events
1
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
8

Rate
1.17
0.00
0.00
1.35
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.81
0.00
1.29
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.00
1.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.35

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia,
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.

VOLUME 12

Page 50

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Threat Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Threat
Events Rate
52
0.67

IAP Region
Countries
BELIZE
BOLIVIA**
COLOMBIA*
COSTA RICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EASTERN CARIBBEAN
ECUADOR
EL SALVADOR
FIJI
GUATEMALA
GUYANA
HONDURAS
JAMAICA
MEXICO
MICRONESIA
NICARAGUA
PANAMA
PARAGUAY
PERU
SAMOA
SURINAME
TONGA
VANUATU
TOTAL IAP

VT
Years
91
0
2
125
185
103
181
144
68
217
71
186
87
48
51
196
177
209
207
43
46
46
75
2556

Threat
Events
4
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
5
0
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
6
2
28

Rate
4.41
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.08
0.97
0.55
0.00
7.38
0.00
1.41
1.07
1.15
0.00
1.95
0.00
0.57
0.00
0.48
0.00
0.00
13.00
2.68
1.10

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia,
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
Page 51

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Property Crime Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Robbery
Events Rate
188 2.43

Burglary
Events Rate
341 4.41

Theft
Events Rate
769 9.94

Vandalism
Events Rate
4
0.05

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
1302 16.83

Africa Region
Countries

VT
Years

BENIN
BOTSWANA
BURKINA FASO
CAMEROON
CAPE VERDE
ETHIOPIA
GHANA
GUINEA
KENYA
LESOTHO
LIBERIA
MADAGASCAR
MALAWI
MALI
MOZAMBIQUE
NAMIBIA
NIGER
RWANDA
SENEGAL
SIERRA LEONE
SOUTH AFRICA
SWAZILAND
TANZANIA
THE GAMBIA
TOGO
UGANDA
ZAMBIA
TOTAL AFRICA

108
118
132
144
60
78
152
4
101
87
25
87
122
157
144
108
82
101
183
22
138
68
144
90
102
139
168
2865

Robbery
Events
2
1
5
6
0
1
3
0
2
3
1
0
3
3
11
5
2
2
4
1
10
3
5
0
1
11
2
87

Rate
1.84
0.85
3.80
4.15
0.00
1.28
1.98
0.00
1.98
3.43
3.92
0.00
2.45
1.91
7.65
4.63
2.45
1.97
2.19
4.64
7.27
4.42
3.46
0.00
0.98
7.93
1.19
3.04

Burglary
Events
8
4
11
2
6
2
5
0
6
0
8
13
20
10
14
7
7
5
3
4
4
5
6
5
7
9
11
182

Rate
7.38
3.39
8.36
1.38
10.00
2.55
3.30
0.00
5.94
0.00
31.38
14.91
16.36
6.38
9.73
6.48
8.58
4.93
1.64
18.55
2.91
7.37
4.15
5.55
6.85
6.49
6.55
6.35

Theft
Events
14
7
9
5
2
14
9
1
10
6
5
17
16
19
5
11
5
13
18
7
12
8
1
21
18
19
35
307

Rate
12.91
5.94
6.84
3.46
3.33
17.86
5.93
22.42
9.90
6.87
19.61
19.50
13.09
12.13
3.48
10.19
6.13
12.81
9.84
32.47
8.72
11.79
0.69
23.33
17.61
13.70
20.84
10.72

Vandalism
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.93
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.03

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
24 22.13
12 10.18
25 19.00
13 9.00
8
13.33
17 21.68
17 11.20
1
22.42
18 17.81
9
10.30
14 54.91
30 34.41
39 31.91
32 20.43
30 20.85
24 22.23
14 17.16
20 19.71
25 13.67
12 55.66
26 18.89
16 23.59
12 8.31
26 28.88
26 25.44
39 28.13
48 28.58
577 20.14

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
VOLUME 12

Page 52

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Property Crime Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Robbery
Events Rate
188 2.43

Burglary
Events Rate
341 4.41

Theft
Events Rate
769 9.94

Vandalism
Events Rate
4
0.05

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
1302 16.83

EMA Region
Countries
ALBANIA
ARMENIA
AZERBAIJAN
BULGARIA
CAMBODIA
CHINA
GEORGIA
INDONESIA*
JORDAN
KAZAKHSTAN
KYRGYZ REPUBLIC
MACEDONIA
MOLDOVA
MONGOLIA
MOROCCO
PHILIPPINES
ROMANIA
THAILAND
TURKMENISTAN
UKRAINE
TOTAL EMA

VT
Years
86
94
124
148
75
125
50
15
59
124
103
78
107
125
245
165
100
105
43
344
2314

Robbery
Events
0
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
2
13

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.68
3.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.86
1.60
0.41
0.61
1.00
0.00
0.00
0.58
0.56

Burglary
Events
2
1
0
3
0
2
0
0
2
0
2
1
0
2
4
4
2
4
0
5
34

Rate
2.33
1.06
0.00
2.03
0.00
1.60
0.00
0.00
3.41
0.00
1.93
1.29
0.00
1.60
1.63
2.43
2.00
3.81
0.00
1.45
1.47

Theft
Events
3
7
1
3
12
7
7
2
5
5
5
4
8
11
14
13
3
4
0
16
130

Rate
3.50
7.43
0.81
2.03
15.90
5.61
14.04
13.59
8.53
4.04
4.84
5.16
7.46
8.81
5.72
7.90
2.99
3.81
0.00
4.65
5.62

Vandalism
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.04

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
5
5.83
8
8.49
1
0.81
7
4.74
15 19.88
9
7.21
7
14.04
2
13.59
7
11.95
5
4.04
7
6.77
5
6.44
10 9.32
16 12.81
19 7.76
18 10.93
6
5.99
8
7.62
0
0.00
23 6.69
178 7.69

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.

Page 53

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Appendix E: Global, Regional, and Post Crime Volume and Rates
(2010)
Property Crime Events and Incidence Rates (2010)
(cont'd)
Global
All Countries

VT
Years
7735

Robbery
Events Rate
188 2.43

Burglary
Events Rate
341 4.41

Theft
Events Rate
769 9.94

Vandalism
Events Rate
4
0.05

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
1302 16.83

IAP Region
Countries

VT
Years

BELIZE
BOLIVIA**
COLOMBIA*
COSTA RICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EASTERN CARIBBEAN
ECUADOR
EL SALVADOR
FIJI
GUATEMALA
GUYANA
HONDURAS
JAMAICA
MEXICO
MICRONESIA
NICARAGUA
PANAMA
PARAGUAY
PERU
SAMOA
SURINAME
TONGA
VANUATU
TOTAL IAP

91
0
2
125
185
103
181
144
68
217
71
186
87
48
51
196
177
209
207
43
46
46
75
2556

Robbery
Events
2
0
0
3
7
3
10
7
3
14
0
12
3
2
0
10
0
4
7
1
0
0
0
88

Rate
2.21
0.00
0.00
2.40
3.79
2.92
5.52
4.86
4.43
6.46
0.00
6.44
3.45
4.16
0.00
5.11
0.00
1.91
3.39
2.33
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.44

Burglary
Events
8
0
0
1
18
10
2
7
7
6
6
11
4
1
1
7
5
4
2
8
3
4
10
125

Rate
8.82
0.00
0.00
0.80
9.74
9.72
1.10
4.86
10.34
2.77
8.49
5.90
4.60
2.08
1.95
3.58
2.83
1.91
0.97
18.68
6.57
8.67
13.41
4.89

Theft
Events
13
0
0
18
32
9
7
17
8
61
5
24
7
5
3
38
6
28
33
5
6
4
3
332

Rate
14.34
0.00
0.00
14.42
17.31
8.75
3.86
11.81
11.81
28.14
7.07
12.88
8.04
10.40
5.84
19.43
3.40
13.39
15.97
11.67
13.13
8.67
4.02
12.99

Vandalism
Events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2

Rate
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.34
0.08

All Property
Crime
Events Rate
23 25.37
0
0.00
0
0.00
22 17.62
57 30.84
22 21.39
19 10.48
31 21.53
18 26.58
81 37.37
11 15.56
47 25.23
15 17.24
8
16.64
4
7.79
55 28.12
11 6.22
36 17.22
42 20.33
14 32.68
9
19.70
8
17.34
14 18.77
547 21.40

Notes
1.*   Peace Corps countries opened or reopened in calendar year 2010: Colombia, Indonesia, Sierra Leone
2.** Peace Corps countries suspended in calendar year 2010: Bolivia
3.   For Sexual Assaults, incidence rates are per 100 Female VT years.
      For Physical Assaults, Threats, and Property Crimes, incidence rates are per 100 VT years.
VOLUME 12

Page 54

Appendix F: Country of Incident compared with Country of
Service (2010)
Volunteers serving in . . .
Armenia
Belize
Benin
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Gambia
Ghana
Guatemala
Honduras
Lesotho
Liberia
Macedonia
Moldova
Morocco
Nicaragua
Niger
Paraguay
Romania
Togo
Turkmenistan
Uganda
Ukraine
Zambia

Also reported . . .
Theft in Georgia and Russia*
Theft in Guatemala
Theft in Ghana and Egypt*
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Togo
Theft in Namibia
Robbery in Ghana
Theft in Benin
Robbery in Nicaragua
Theft in Nicaragua
Theft in Sierra Leone
Theft in Togo
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Nicaragua
2 Thefts in Nicaragua
Robbery in South Africa
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Sierra Leone
Theft in Bosnia‐Herzegovina* and Spain*
Theft in Ukraine
Robbery in Romania and Poland*
2 Thefts in Spain* and 1 in Canada*
Theft in United States*
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Togo
2 Thefts in Argentina*
Robbery in Spain*
Theft in Greece*
Major Sexual Assault in Ghana
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Ghana and Benin
Aggravated Assault in Thailand
2 Robberies in Kenya and 1 in Tanzania
Theft in Greece*
Theft in Tanzania and Namibia
Burglary ‐ No Assault in Benin

*Not a current Peace Corps post.
Note:  In 2010, 43 incidents occurred in a country other than the Volunteer's country of 
service.  Of the 43 incidents, 11 occurred in a country that is not a current Peace Corps 
post. 

Page 55

S A F E T Y O F T HE V O L U N T E E R 2 0 1 0

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful