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Product Review VocAlign Pro Plug-in Product Review Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6 Record Reviews Christy
Product Review VocAlign Pro Plug-in Product Review Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6 Record Reviews Christy
Product Review VocAlign Pro Plug-in Product Review Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6 Record Reviews Christy
Product Review VocAlign Pro Plug-in Product Review Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6 Record Reviews Christy

Product Review

VocAlign Pro Plug-in

Product Review

Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6

Record Reviews

Christy Nockels l Passion l Foursquare United Generation l Desperation Band l Fike

Songchart ‘Manifesto’ l Tips for Tight Teams

MAY/JUN 2012 Volume 10, Issue 3 0 5 0 74470 58440 7
MAY/JUN 2012
Volume 10, Issue 3
0 5
0
74470 58440
7

US $5.95 Can $6.95

an Interview with Sandy Hoffman

Finding the Right Music Gear for Your Church Just Got Easier!
Finding the Right Music Gear
for Your Church Just Got Easier!
Volume 5 Church Sound & Music Technology Guide NEW FREE ISSUE! Brandon Heath Sweetwater Exclusive!
Volume 5
Church Sound & Music Technology Guide
NEW
FREE
ISSUE!
Brandon Heath
Sweetwater Exclusive!
Learn how this award-winning
singer/songwriter found his voice —
and his true calling.
CASE FINDER
Introducing the easiest way to find
exactly the right case for your gear!
pg. 6
Sweetwater.com/casefinder
GetGet thethe detailsdetails onon pg.pg. 101.101.
NEW!
NEW
INTRODUCING
PRO WORSHIP
MUSIC
Backing Tracks and Beyond
Practice • Rehearse • Perform
form
Tracks and Mixes for Your Worship Team
pg. 108
Go to Sweetwater.com or call (800) 222–4700.
Worship Sound Pro 101 Guides Worship Sound Pro 101 Guides RSS V-MIXING -MIXING SYSTEM EM
Worship Sound Pro 101 Guides
Worship Sound Pro 101 Guides
RSS V-MIXING
-MIXING
SYSTEM
EM
Customer-favorite
Take
a look at the instruments we’ve highlighted in this guide, including
Keyboard
>> Roland
$ 3499 00
Roland’s BK-5, the affordable Casio Privia PX-830, and the piano-like Kurzweil
Worship Sou
Worship Sound Pro 101 Guides
nd Pro 101 Guides
The Basics of
JUPITER 80
PC3K8. You’ll also want to check out the Nord C2D.
More info on pg. 104
Picks
Workstations: Powerful Tools
for
the Worship Leader
Roland BK-5
Photo by Jon James and Troy Behrens
Ideal for Contemporary
While
streamlined, piano-like instruments are ideal for a number of
Building a Mix
$
Dropout is just as bad as feedback. Even intermittent
Worship Songs
999 00
7.
Have the worship team begin to play a song.
worship leaders and church pianists, many other houses of worship rely on
dropout can ruin an otherwise wonderful service. An
keyboards for much more than just piano sounds. In fact, if you’re a piano-
More info on pg. 104
Watch for red overload or “clip” lights on the mixer. If you
>> LINE 6
$
Choosing the Right
unbroken line of sight between the transmitter and the e
2499 99
centric worship leader, you may very well be able to perform and produce
receiver’s antennas is ideal, but seldom is that possible. More More
see these, turn down the gain controls at the top of that
STAGESCAPE M20D
your
entire service with a single powerful instrument called a keyboard
More info on pg. 31
times than not, the wireless signal must rebound off of walls walls
source’s channel.
workstation. More than just keyboards with hundreds, sometimes thousands,
and other surfaces to reach the receiver, and that increases ases
It’s bound to happen at some point: the mix disaster. Maybe your church’s regular
spikes in sound. Ask each worship team member what he or
of
instrument sounds, these instruments often feature multitrack sequencers,
8.
Build the mix by bringing up the volume
she needs to hear from the monitors — one at a time so that
the risk of dropout. If you put a bodypack transmitter in n
sound person calls in sick at the last minute. Maybe the new volunteer sound person
so
you can layer all the different instrument parts into a full orchestration.
Kurzweil PC3K8
everyone doesn’t speak at once — and adjust the auxiliary
your back pocket, the signal (unable to pass through you) ou)
faders for the basics first.
KEYBOARD
It’s
very similar to working with audio editing and production software, only
>> Sennheiser
>>
Sen
nheiser
$
$
849
849
95
95
Amazing Feel and
doesn’t know a volume slider from a sliding door, or a mixing board from a mixing
sends accordingly.
will have to find an alternative path to the receiver. So, to
,
to
$
you’re not tethered to a computer — and you can easily play these backing
EW 335 G3
EW 33
5 G3
Piano Sounds
3495 00
Start with the bass drum and the bass guitar, turning them
minimize the risk of signal dropout, keep your bodypack in
ck
in
More info on pg. 20
More info on pg. 20
tracks right from your keyboard during services. And even if you do have
bowl. Whatever the circumstance, something has to be done to save the service.
up to a comfortable level and balancing them against one
13.
Don’t try to overtune the mix,
More info on pg. 98
Churches across the country swear by
Churche
s
across the country swear by
your front jacket pocket.
a
complete worship band, you can use a workstation to add a few choice
another. You may need to adjust the level of the master
this pro-level UHF wireless system!
this pro
level
UHF wireless system!
Without decent sound, the congregation won’t be engaged or inspired by the music,
and don’t make it too loud.
Another major problem is broadband noise and radio
backing instruments to fill out your sound — perhaps a second trumpet part,
volume fader to get the overall level to the right point.
interference. If your church is in a city, chances are that an an
Set things up so that they are clean and clear, and at a
a
string section, or even an extra kick drum sound for more power.
and the message may be completely lost.
W Worry-free
orry-freeorry-free
inexpensive entry-level wireless system simply won’t work rk
9.
Turn up the volume faders for the vocals.
comfortable, conservative volume level. Then stop! Once you
Whether you’re looking for a simple instrument that just plays and sounds like a real acoustic
A
Balance of Features for Modern Worship
Korg Kronos 88
for you. The same precision technology responsible for the the
get to the point where it sounds okay — this should happen
Though creating the perfect sound mix for a service is a
system may not be perfect — forewarning the team that
Now focus on the vocals. Set them to a comfortable level,
piano, or you’re seeking a powerful centerpiece for all your worship team’s ambitions, there’s
high simultaneous channel count common to most high-end -end
fairly quickly — stop tweaking the knobs. It’s easy to lose
Performance Ready with
If
you don’t need the all-out power of a workstation, but you’d still like a
$
3799
00
true art, a sound person with little or no mixing experience
everything may not be ideal will go a long way toward
balanced against the bass guitar and the bass drum. The lead
Powerful Features
professional wireless systems is responsible for shutting out out
perspective and get lost in knob turning, even though the goal
a
digital piano that’s right for your church. To help you zero in on the perfect keyboard for
handful of cutting-edge capabilities — maybe built-in drum patterns for
can still achieve good sonic clarity and deliver the message
easing the process for everyone. At least they will know
vocalist needs to be the loudest, with the background or
noise and radio interference. Digital wireless systems, which hich
has already been achieved.
More info on pg. 97
rehearsals and a lighter sequencer for a quick songwriting sketch pad —
with pleasant and effective audio. Here are some tips for
what to expect!
harmony vocals filling in behind.
your
needs, let’s take a look at the different kinds of keyboards available, as well as the
WIREL ES
reject noise and other nondigital signals out of hand, are re
there
are a number of options that fall somewhere in between the two
WIRELESS
saving the day with a quick, last-minute mix — whether
excellent cost-effective alternatives to traditional wireless ss
14.
Here’s a final tip.
important factors you’ll want to consider when making your decision.
categories we’ve already mentioned. Instead of choosing an 88-key option,
you are working the sound booth yourself or have the help
4.
Turn it on.
10.
Turn up the volume faders on the
systems.
which has the same number of keys as a full piano, you can select a 76-key
of a volunteer.
other instruments.
When in doubt, focus on making the vocals, whether spoken
Turn on the speakers or the amplifiers last; this prevents loud
When Less Is More
(or smaller) version. These instruments trade a slightly reduced range (many
Nord C2D
All professional wireless receivers are “true diversity”
or sung, clearly audible. The congregation is there to hear the
FIVE Main Features to Consider
thumps and pops from coming through the system.
One at a time, begin turning up the other instruments. Start
keyboardists never use the highest and lowest keys anyway) for lighter
Breaking Through the
receivers, which means that they use two independent
1.
Keep it simple.
message, which is contained in the words and lyrics. The music
Many church pianists we work with often feel overwhelmed by
the number of choices out there — and even more so by the
number of knobs, buttons, and controls on keyboards. “All I
need,” they tell us, “is an instrument that plays like an acoustic
piano and has a fantastic natural piano sound.”
Wirel
Wireless technology can be a little daunting at first. But don’t worry, wireless systems
ess technology can be a little dauntin g at first. But
$
3485
00
with the rest of the drums, then the guitars, the pianos, the
weight and a more portable form factor. You can still get fully weighted keys
Price/Performance Barrier
antennas. That way, if the wireless signal doesn’t reach one one
is inspiring and essential to a great service, but it plays just a
As you take a look at the keyboards featured on the next
Unfortunately, mix emergencies rarely occur when you have
5.
Reset the mixing board.
keyboards, and any other instruments; adjust the volume as
on
a 76-key piano, or you can choose a semi-weighted version that works well
are much easier to understand today than ever before. Most wireless systems set
are m
uch easier to understand today than
ever before.
antenna, it can still reach the other. Quality wireless receivers eivers
supporting role in the grand scheme of things. Ensure that the
More info on pg. 103
few pages, these five factors will help you start narrowing
loads of spare time to work on a solution — it
needed. Balance each one against the vocals, the bass drum,
down your decision:
if you perform a blend of classic and modern instrument sounds, rather than
have antennas that twist off, allowing you to mount them on
em
on
Begin by pulling all the volume sliders (faders) down to
vocals are heard, and the service will be a success!
themselves up for you, and once you’ve set them up, you don’t need to touch them
them
selves up for you, and once you’ve set them up, yo
almost always happens minutes before the service is
and the bass guitar. This is a place where you can err on the
strictly piano.
stands and spread them out. Separating your antennas vastly vastly
zero. (Usually these are found at the bottom of each
1. Action
supposed to start. While your sound booth may have racks
side of being conservative. The vocals are the main focus,
again
again. Here’s a simple overview of wireless microphone technology, how you can put
. Here’s a simple overview of wireless microphone
increases their effectiveness. Even spreading your antennas nas
channel on the mixer.) Set the channel gain to a mid
Do you want keys that are weighted to feel and play just
Increasing in popularity are keyboards that feature a built-in microphone
of processors and sophisticated 299 299 audio equipment, now is
and you want to ensure that they are clearly audible. Use the
If this sounds like you, you’ll want to select what’s called a stage
piano — and ideally one with a full set of 88 weighted keys
(also called weighted action). These keyboards actually mimic
the response of a grand piano’s keybed, where the lowest keys
require more force to strike, and the upper keys feel light and
airy beneath your fingertips. To nail the sound of an acoustic
piano, today’s top keyboard manufacturers have gone to great
lengths to record some of the finest grand pianos in the world,
putting these sounds right inside the instruments. Not only can
you get the sound of a classic Steinway, but on many you can
also push a single button to get the sound of a Bosendorfer, a
Yamaha C7, or a character-filled upright.
out just a few feet and moving them away from your other ther
>>
>>
Line 6
Line 6
$
$
99
99
position (Usually this knob is found at the top of each
like an acoustic piano’s? Or do you want keys that glide
input. These are perfect for the performing worship leader and great for
it to work in your church, and how to avoid some common pitfalls.
it to
work in your church, and how to avoid
some comm
not the time to experiment with effects or to randomly
other instruments to fill around the vocals, without obscuring
beneath your fingers so that you can easily play synth and
gear will vastly improve your system’s performance. Also, if
o,
if
XD-V35
XD-V35
channel on the mixer.) Next, reset all the equalization (tone)
scaled-down youth services. The vocal microphone goes right through the
start turning knobs. Focus on the bare minimum you
More info on pg. 19
More info on pg. 19
them. As you go, adjust the master volume fader to control
organ parts?
you have a multichannel wireless system, you may also need need
controls on the mixer to their center position, which is
keyboard’s output, so you’ll need to amplify only one signal. Better yet,
Yamaha S90 XS
There are two basic types of wireless transmitt
There are two basic types of wireless transmitters: handheld units and bodypacks.
need to get the job done. Leave the special effects for
An affordable digital wireless system such
An affordable digital wireless system such
the overall level.
an antenna distribution system, which will allow you to
essentially off. Turn the auxiliary or monitor sends off. Make
2. Sounds
there
are professional vocal effects built in, so you can refine the vocal sound
Handheld units combine a microphone and a wireless transmitter into one device.
Handheld units combine a m icrophone and a
as this one provides reliable performance.
as this one provides reliable performance.
another time.
Perfect Blend of Ease of
Do you primarily need an authentic acoustic piano sound, or
$
99
connect only a single pair of antennas to multiple receivers. vers.
sure that mute or solo buttons are disengaged. (Usually
without having to purchase an extra piece of gear.
Theyy are extremelyy convenie nt for worship lea
They are extremely convenient for worship leaders, and even some pastors prefer
2399
Use and Deep Features
11.
It’s time for the equalizers.
would you like to have other sounds such as strings, synths,
these buttons are off in the up position.) Set the master
them them because because you you can can move move a a handheld handheld microphone micro away from your mouth if you
Whether your future wireless system is a single-channel, ,
2.
Use what’s already there.
electric pianos, organs, and more?
More info on pg. 96
Don’t Forget About Realistic Organ Sounds
volume fader to about 50%.
Up to this point, we haven’t touched the equalizers (tone
nee need d to to cough. cough. Wire Wireless handheld microphones are also less
single-speaker setup or a larger system for the whole
3. Arranging/Recording Capabilities
Hopefully, your sound system is already set up, the cables and
controls) on the mixer. If you find that the sound is getting
su susceptible sceptible to to drop dropout, because the transmitter part of the
worship team, it should effectively and accurately spread the
d
the
The
organ is still a very popular instrument for worship services. And while
Will you be composing songs with your keyboard? If so,
the snake are run to the mixer, and the monitors are tuned
6.
Begin testing each sound source
too bassy or boomy, use the “low” or bass tone control to
unit unit naturally naturally poi points out toward the receiving antennas.
message. Unfortunately, many budget-priced wireless systems ystems
most
of the keyboards we carry feature a built-in organ sound, you can get
you may want to have a built-in sequencer, onboard drum
in to prevent feedback. Plug the mics into the mixer or snake
through the mains.
reduce the bass frequencies a small amount on instruments
may make it difficult and unpleasant for your congregation tion
sounds, and a direct-to-computer connection.
that
organ-playing experience — complete with drawbars — by choosing a
Bodypack Bodypack transm transmitters allow you to plug in a lavalier
in their usual positions. Try to use the same “old standby”
such as bass guitar, keyboards, and piano. Vocalists, especially
Casio Privia PX-830
to hear that message. If the number of quality wireless
dedicated instrument for the task.
Have the main vocalist speak or sing into his or her mic.
microphone microphone or or a a guitar cable, giving you both wireless and
4. Size and Portability
microphones and other gear you usually use — again, now is
male vocalists, may also need their bass reduced a small
systems you need is beyond your current budget, practice ce
The Look and Feel of an
Bring up the volume slider until you can hear the vocals in
Choosing a 76-key keyboard instead of a full-size 88-key
$
hands-free hands-free conve convenience. If you are going to use a lavalier
Have
more questions? Our Sales Engineers are here to help you choose the
999 99
not the time to experiment with new gear!
amount. To increase the clarity of a vocal or an instrument,
If you’re replacing an acoustic piano, you should consider
the importance of aesthetics to your church. If you have
more-traditional services or are seeking a really natural look
up on the platform, then you may want to choose a more
authentic-looking stage piano. We have options available with
wooden cabinets, in a variety of finishes, so you can choose an
instrument that matches the decor of your church.
Acoustic Upright Piano
wise stewardship and save your money until you can afford ford
>>
microphone, microphone, you you’ll most likely want to choose one with a
>> AKG
AKG
$
$
399
00
00
the main speakers. Turn up the auxiliary or monitor sends
instrument can be a great way to cut down on weight while
399
best
keyboard for your church’s goals. In fact, what you see in Worship Sound
add a small amount of treble or high frequencies by using the
More info on pg. 102
the system that your house of worship deserves. There are are
maintaining a first-class playing experience.
cardioid cardioid (unidirec (unidirectional) pickup pattern rather than one
DMS 70
DMS 70
until the vocalist can hear himself or herself in the monitors.
3.
Have a conversation with the worship team.
Pro is just a small sampling of the many keyboards we have available. Give us
More info on pg. 22
More info on pg. 22
tone controls on that mixer channel. Be careful with the tone
excellent single-channel wireless systems that you can start tart
As you verify that each mic or source works, pull its volume
5. Appearance
with with an an omnidire omnidirectional pattern. Cardioid lavaliers reject
a
call today at (800) 222–4700.
This inexpensive digital wireless system
This inexpensive digital wireless system
controls, as overuse can lead to feedback!
with and expand later. Your Sweetwater Sales Engineer will will
Explain to everyone that the regular sound person is not
fader back down to zero. You can leave the aux (monitor)
How important is it that your church’s keyboard resemble
sound sound that that doesn doesn’t enter them directly, making them less
is a real performer onstage!
is a real performer onstage!
be happy to help you find the right system for your church. rch.
available and that help is required to have the service go
an acoustic piano? Do you want an integrated stand,
sends turned up so that the singers can hear themselves. To
likely likely to to create create fe feedback. Just remember this: no matter
12.
.
Fine-tune the mix and the monitors.
.
well. This means guitarists need to turn down, drummers
or would you prefer to use a more portable stage-style
prevent feedback, don’t run the he stage stage monitors monitors too too loud. loud.
how how much much freedo freedom wireless microphones give you, you
keyboard stand?
need to control volume, and so on. Explain that the monitor
Adjust volume levels so that instruments and vocals are
Adjust volume levels so that instruments and vocals are
still still can’t can’t walk walk in in front of the loudspeakers without
balanced, balanced, and and adjust adjust the the bass bass and and the the treble treble controls controls on on
causing feedback
causing feedback.
>> PRESONUS
>>
PRESONUS
$ $
channels channels as as necessary necessary to to prevent prevent boominess, boominess, harshness, harshness, or or
3299 3299
95 95
STUDIOLIVE 24.4.2
STUDIOLIVE 24.4.2
More info on pg. 28
More info on pg. 28
Call us today at (800) 222–4700
Call to set up
Call us today at (800) 222–4700
>>
>> Shure
Shure
your custom
ULXD4
ULXD4
system!
We'll help you set up a system that fits
We'll help you set
your your church's church's needs nee perfectly!
Call us today at (800) 222–4700
Call us today at (800) 222–470
Online
Sweetwater.com/worship
101 Guides
With valuable advice on live mixing, miking
techniques, instruments, and more, our
informative guides give you the tips and tricks
you need to make your services sound better.
Practice, Rehearse, and Perform
NEW!
Here’s the best way to learn, rehearse, and perform today’s top
Christian music! Get complete backing tracks and practice mixes,
charts, and more.
News and Articles
Get useful, up-to-date editorials, reviews, and
information from experts in worship sound —
and stay current on the latest developments.
Try out Pro Worship Music for free — with no obligation!
Download “Before the Morning” for absolutely no charge.
This is a limited-time o er. Get your download now!
Sweetwater.com/worship
Check
out
Pro
Worship
Music
FREE!
Check out Pro Worship Music FREE! (800) 222–4700 • Sweetwater.com FREE Expert Advice •

Editor’s Corner

Finding God on Easter Sunday on a Harley?

Editor’s Corner Finding God on Easter Sunday on a Harley? Features 8 Product Review By Mitch

Features

8

Product Review By Mitch Bohannon Tyler Variax JTV-59 by Line6

 

10

From the Drummer’s Perspective By Carl Albrecht Drum Miking For Worship Venues

12

Keyboard By Ed Kerr Consider the Kale

15

Bass By Gary Lunn All Kidding Aside

 

16

Vocals By Sheri Gould Vibrato

18

Tips for Tight Teams

The

Book

An Interview with Sandy Hoffman by Bruce Adolph

26

Songchart “Manifesto” by The City Harmonic

30

Record Reviews By Gerod Bass

 

Christy Nockels

Passion

Foursquare United Generation

Desperation Band

Fike

36

Ministry + Artistry = Profitability? Creating your MAP™ By Scott A. Shuford Social Media In Action: Every Man Ministries

 

38

Authentic Worship By Michael Gonzales Command Presence

 

40

Guitar Grab Bag By Doug Doppler Picking Your Axe

42

The Band By Tom Lane God’s Favor

43

Product Review By Michael Hodge Audio Plug-Ins for Pros:

VocAlign Pro

44

Camera By Craig Kelly There’s A Train A Coming

46

Worship Team Training By Branon Dempsey Know the Flow: Connecting Songs in Worship

49

Worship Musician 10th Anniversary PreSonus Give- Away

50

Mandolin By Martin Stillion Experiencing Technical Issues

54

A Few Moments With… By Dwayne Larring A Sunday Morning Experience

By Mitch Bohannon

Tyler Variax JTV-59

by Line6

What’s in a name? That which we call

a guitar, by any other name would still

sound as

?

No,

think even

Shakespeare would have to

agree that when it comes to guitars, the name is

I

quite important.

The

new name behind

the

Line 6 Variax stands for

itself. I have wanted to play a James Tyler

guitar for years, and after hearing that Line 6 teamed

up

it a try! Several years ago

I

Variax 700 and was very impressed and gained a

great understanding what a Variax could do.

As a worship leader,

a

of

reviewed the acoustic

with him, I had to give

high priority of mine is to

have

during a service. Normally,

I’ll play two guitars during

service…changing only

There

many I’ve played back to

times

that

have

during a break.

a

distraction

minimal

been

back songs where I have

I

have

e d

,

wished

could

c

h a n g

i

t

a but for sake

g

u

r s

the

of

preventing

distractions, I

to.

Keyboard

l a y e r s

the

benefit

chose not

p

have

I to. Keyboard l a y e r s the benefit chose not p have Radiance

Radiance Hex piezo pickup system, a 12-hour battery life with visual meter, and the ability to work seamlessly with the Line 6 POD HD multi-effect pedals. Top all that off with the fact that the guitar does not require you to play the Variax models, so

if you choose to play in bypass, you’re

playing a fantastic James Tyler guitar!!

The guitar itself: when I opened the case (fantastic grey Line 6 gigbag included),

I saw this stunning tobacco sunburst

flamed maple top… WOW! The 22- fret set-neck is very comfortable to play with a 24 9/16” scale length. It’s really a player’s guitar. Very comfortable neck, designed and shaped by James Tyler, provides easy access to the upper frets. Included in the packaging are all the accessories needed to use and take care of the Variax…the variax (CAT5) cable, battery, battery charger w/power supply, workbench connection, and USB cable.

One noticeable upgrade from previous Variax guitars… the 3-way pickup selector switch actually becomes a five- way switch (to respond like the 5-way switches on the other Variax guitars). To accomplish this feat on a 3-way switch, after pressing the “alternate tuning knob” one time, positions 1 and 3 respond as 2 and 4. The purpose behind these five selections goes way beyond pickup groupings…they actually change to a different guitar model. For instance, using the “T-Model”… positions 1 and 4 are based on the 1960 Fender Telecaster Custom; positions 3 and 5 are based on the 1968 Fender Telecaster Thinline; and position 2 is based on the 1968 Fender Telecaster. Wow! That’s a lot of guitars… and, I have not even discussed the tuning possibilities.

The first Variax dial can change the guitar model while the second Variax dial can adjust the tuning. Never again will you have to tune your guitar to anything but standard tuning, yet you can immediately

Continued on page 52

8 MAY/JUN 2012 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM
8
MAY/JUN 2012 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM
anything but standard tuning, yet you can immediately Continued on page 52 8 MAY/JUN 2012 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM
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Continued on page 48

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BASS By Gary Lunn All Kidding Aside Another important preparation is with your bass’s consistency

BASS

By Gary Lunn

All Kidding Aside

Another important preparation is with your bass’s consistency in string tone. By this I mean it’s important to notice when you have one string that sounds more “dead” than all of the others (no life, no sustain, etc.). When this happens, it’s time to change to a new set of strings. Or, if you save old strings (which I do), you possibly can keep your “used’ string tone by finding one that sounds like the others do. A lot of bass players do not like the bright sound of new strings. Older, used strings have a darker, more retro feel to them. This seems to be the sound that is “called for” in a lot of music these days. In fact I see the use of flat-wound strings, which have that older string sound, now more than I ever have before.

In a live setting where no headphones and amps/monitors are being used, try to be aware of your own volume level compared to the other musicians. If you’re the loudest guy on stage, it means that the house engineer has to mix everything (the rest of the band!) around you. If you are in a hall/church where overall volume is an issue, remember that the P.A. can only be as soft as the loudest guy on stage (I never want to be that guy!). Always ask the engineer if you’re playing too loud. If he/she says yes, be willing to accommodate them with a good attitude.

Try not to get too comfortable with where you are in your ability. In other words, always be willing to learn. Never let yourself feel like you are “good enough” to not need to practice or look for new inspiration. If you’re too busy with “life,” that’s one thing, but if your attitude is “I’m great,” you could be in big trouble. Recently while in a lesson with a student that I had not seen in awhile, the young man told me how good he felt about his playing. I said, “Well that’s good, I guess.

how good he felt about his playing. I said, “Well that’s good, I guess. WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM MAY/JUN

By Sheri Gould

Vibrato

Vibrato is often the subject of much speculation, misunderstanding, and concern. Why is this? How could

something so innocuous be such a source

of contention? I am going to venture into

this somewhat controversial subject and

try

to shed some light, as well as clear

up

some commonly misunderstood ideas

about vocal vibrato.

Why We Like It vs. Why We Don’t

We tend to like a natural vibrato because

it’s, well

working properly, without tension, a singer should naturally produce a vibrato

in their tone. A naturally occurring vibrato

is not overbearing or too prominent. It

actually sounds good. It seems to be a natural part of the rhythm of nature and so we like the feel of it.

Conversely, when there is NO vibrato,

it is the result of tension. Without tension, things would vibrate freely, but because there is a lack of control somewhere, tension often creeps in and kills any hope

of a natural vibrato. When a singer has

been properly trained, he or she can learn to relax in ways that will allow the various necessary parts of the body to vibrate. A properly trained singer has learned to use the correct muscles for support and tone, and therefore doesn’t inadvertently create unnecessary tension by using the wrong muscles. The end result is a naturally formed, comfortable to listen to –vibrato. Typically, we like it!

However, since so many people who

venture into the world of singing are NOT properly trained, the tension that often ensues makes a natural vibrato elusive.

.natural! When all things are

In

part because of this, many resort

to

finding other ways to manufacture

a

vibrato. Others, though, are often

simply impatient. Since vibrato tends to exemplify the mark of a trained voice, the average singer is, of course, looking for that vibrato in their own voice. When it doesn’t happen fast enough, many will

begin to employ techniques to create a

vibrato in a less natural way. THIS type

of

vibrato is typically more noticeable,

at

an unnatural pace, and generally

more annoying to listen to. It takes over the voice as the most prominent feature instead of the tone itself and therefore we tend to react more negatively to the sound of the singer’s voice (even though we may not initially realize why).

Natural versus Unnatural

A natural vibrato should come about as the result of air pulsating from the

diaphragm (a natural occurrence when

there is no tension) and therefore causing

a vibration as it strikes the vocal cords.

This vibrato is “air generated”. It is subtler, and does not change pitch (other than very slightly). It is more volume generated than pitch generated. It is such a natural sound because it comes simply from the air striking the cords, not from a change in position in the vocal cords (which is how various pitches are

attained). A well-played flute will exhibit

a natural diaphragmatic vibrato.

Although there are many ways to manipulate the voice to create a vibrato, probably the most common is the simple process of bending the pitch. Since pretty much any singer, experienced or not,

can change pitch, this puts vibrato within reach of even the most amateur of singers almost instantly. It can make a young singer sound instantly more “mature”.

This is a pitch-generated vibrato and can be seen on a scope as oscillating between two pitches. For this reason it

is much more prominent. Whereas while

a natural vibrato generated from air will

vary in volume slightly, it will NOT vary radically in pitch. Because the pitch stays the same, the tone remains prominent. In the unnatural, pitch generated vibrato, the change in pitch become the most obvious feature on the voice, not the tone itself. Therefore we tend to find ourselves annoyed by the unending changes in pitch we find in this type of vibrato.

Additionally, there is the variable of rate

with this type of vibrato, whereas with a

naturally formed vibrato the rate at which the air strikes the cords and causes a

vibration doesn’t vary much from singer to singer. Most healthy diaphragms will pulsate air at approximately the same rate. This makes blending with others possible and easy. However, when someone is contriving a vibrato through pitch change the rate is up to the individual, and it often

changes depending on circumstances.

For example, when a person is young and has nice tight strong muscles, there might be a lot of control over the changing of pitch. This control may be such that the vibrato can easily imitate the rate of a natural vibrato. However, over time as the muscles weaken, that control wanes and

thus we have the infamous “vibrato so big you can drive a truck through it”.

Regardless of the rate of vibration, a pitch-generated vibrato also has the dubious quality of…well…changing

pitch! That in itself is a problem if you are attempting any kind of blending with another person. A pitch-generated vibrato can be annoying to listen in a soloist, but it becomes menacing when in the context of a group. There is NO WAY to blend with a pitch-generated vibrato because the singer is constantly changing pitch! Unless every singer in the group can learn to bend their own individual pitch

at the same time, the one person with this strong, dominating type of vibrato will stick out. And can you imagine if everyone DID imitate the person with the pitch-bending vibrato? What kind of group sound would that produce? The thought is a bit overwhelming.

Contemporary Styles of Singing with No Vibrato

One of the things I hear frequently is worship leaders or producers asking their singers to “get rid” of their vibrato.

Some of the newer contemporary sounds

are often reflective of an untrained

youthful sounding voice (which might not have developed a healthy vibrato yet). There are certain styles where an over abundance of vibrato, and certainly a pitch generated vibrato, seem completely out of place. But it’s important to bear in mind that where there is no vibrato— there is tension. Tension over the long haul wreaks havoc on the voice. A naturally occurring vibrato is not to be scorned; it is rarely offensive. Sure, a little straightening of the tone here and there for effect can be really nice. But a steady diet of a straight (tense) tone is a recipe for vocal disaster down the road. Whenever possible, allow the voice to do what it was intended to do: freely flow and vibrate!

Hal Leonard Publishing has just released Sandy Hoffman’s new book, “Tips For

Tight Teams.” This is the second title in the “Worship Musician! Presents” series.

In it, Sandy explores worship team topics

ranging from meltdowns to missions, and modes to modulations. In fact, the goal of his “Tips for Tight Teams” book is “to raise the skill level of the worship team to the point where it is no longer a distraction to the very people it endeavors to lead into worship.” In this issue, WM!M publisher Bruce Adolph interviews Sandy about some of the “Ten Top Tips for Tight Teams!”

Sandy, you’ve been

writing for Worship Musician! Magazine for how many years now?

Sandy Hoffman: I think 7 or maybe

a little more

BA: That’s over forty articles that you’ve done in your column. How did you get started, first as a musician, and then get into actually leading worship?

SH: As a musician, I had an aunt who played the ukulele…

BA: No way! Ukes are very popular right now.

SH: Yeah, I was 5 years old. She started teaching me a song about a lady named “Mrs. Mazy.” I was sitting in the hallway playing C, D7 and G over and over. (laughs) Then the Beatles debuted on Ed Sullivan and that sewed it up!

BA: So you went from ukulele to guitar. Take it from there.

SH: When I was 8, I formed my first band. We were called “The Outlaws.” We were so tough, man! People moved out of the way when we came down the hall– in the 3 rd grade…(laughing). I pestered my teachers until the last day of school. They let us play in the amphitheater at the little elementary school in North Carolina where I grew up. I don’t know what songs we did, probably tunes like “Wild Thing” and “Hey There Little Red Riding Hood.” At seventeen, I began focusing on Christian music. A few years later, worship!

BA: And as far as when you actually saw the modern worship music movement growing, how’d that come about?

SH: I started leading worship in 1981. At the first church, it was so funny ‘cause

I hadn’t ever really led worship before. I

would get those little “Singspiration” or

Bruce Adolph:

“Scripture in Song” books and take all the bindings off, punch holes in ’em, and put them in a notebook in the order we were playing. Basically, I’d play and they would

worship and I would play and they would worship, until about 6 months in. I finally caught on to the flow of the Spirit and began to see what worship was about. That was how it started.

In 1991 I moved to Last Days Ministries and worked with Melody Green as the manager of their music department. I spent 5 years at Last Days, honing new skills and leading worship as many as 7 times a week. That’s when Paul Baloche and Ed Kerr began to encourage me to write worship songs. It was a creatively fertile time, and ideas for my first books,

“Beginning and Essential Worship Guitar”

and “Beginning and Essential Worship Keyboard” were born there too.

BA: What was your inspiration for the new “Tips for Tight Teams” book?

SH: The book started with Youth With A Mission (YWAM). I was getting invitations to teach in Schools of Worship, Schools of Music in Missions, and was working with Jimmy and Carol Owens in their School of Music Ministries International. This curriculum, “Ten Top Tips for Tight Teams,” was birthed over those years. It’s an answer to prayer, really, to see it develop and come together in a format that can be used as a textbook for worship teams and leaders.

BA: Let’s talk about a couple of chapters. The first one is “The Path to Practicing Praise: Team From the Top.”

SH: “Team From the Top” gives answers from square one: “How do I join a worship team? What if I’ve never even played before?” Of course we talk about the fun stuff like buying a new instrument, but then we address the more serious questions like, “How do I build relationships with the worship leader and team? How do I grow in my repertoire so I can be comfortable to serve with the team?” These seminal elements are covered in Team From the Top.

I think the meat of the book begins in Chapter 2, “Live the Life (through team mission based on Biblical principles).” One of my favorite clichés is: If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will

get you there.” We explore “the road” in Chapter 2.

BA: What’s neat about your book is that it’s not always covering matters of the heart, but also some very practical musicianship things to do and practice. You talk about maintaining discipline as a musician, but also having the freeform to be able to jam. How do you think jamming benefits the worship team?

SH: There’s a section called “Jammin’ to Gel!” The whole idea is you get into worship rehearsal and inevitably someone wanders off and begins noodling on some oldie or vamping on a chord progression. The next thing you know, you’re handing it off to one another, soloing and having a good time. If you can jam a bit like that in your rehearsals, you get comfortable with each other. Then when God inspires, your team is ready to flow.

BA: In Chapter 4, you talk about “Get Out of The Garage (remembering less is more).” I always liked that metaphor.

SH: We all know what a garage band is: everybody just gets together on Saturday night, turns all the amps up to 11,

and it’s, “Let ’er rip!” In order for our teams

to have a more professional presentation,

it’s often important not to sound like that garage band. We need to become a bit more intentional in our song arrangements.

There’s a band called “The Head and

The Heart.” I first heard them probably

a year and a half ago, just spinning the

channels on the radio here in Santa Fe. As soon as I heard them I thought, “Hmmm, that’s gonna go somewhere.” A couple of months back I saw them on Austin City Limits. When they were interviewed at the end of the show, they said, “Man a year ago, we were still doing birthday parties out in Kansas somewhere, and now look

at us!”

The point with them is that they know what ‘less is more’ means. They get it. Their song arrangements are incredible in terms of sparsity. They have a wonderful knack for going from one acoustic guitar, handing it off to the piano, suddenly the whole band, then back to one acoustic and three part vocal harmony. The style

is

so engaging! It’s pretty folky and kind

of

alternative–their approach–but it’s edgy

and interesting because they keep lots of holes in it, and you never know what’s coming next. They’re great at changing time signature, and even the entire feel of

Continued on page 52

In the New Testament book of Ephesians, the Apostle Paul talks about how we—the Church— are “being built together for a ”

dwelling place of God

a large part of the vision behind The City Harmonic, probably because it’s also a large part of where they’ve come from. Read more about this unique and creative band and what drives their music, from frontman Elias Dummer.

This is

Aimee Herd: Elias, you’re not afraid to journey out of the box with your music.
Aimee Herd: Elias, you’re not afraid
to journey out of the box with your music.
I find it refreshing. I’m going to ask you
about your album; but first, maybe you
could give a little background on the
band. I’d love to hear how The City
Harmonic came about.
Elias Dummer: We’re from Hamilton,
Ontario , which is just about an hour
south of Toronto . One of the things
about Hamilton is, it’s been traditionally
seen as a steel town. But over the years,
industry—like it has in many places—has
changed, and shrunk. It’s seen its fair
share of challenges; the poverty rate as
high as 25 percent. So the Church has
sort of had to respond. The thing to come
out of that is a movement of churches that
has come to be known as “TrueCity.” It’s
a partnership of local churches; they go
under the slogan of: “Churches together
for the good of the city.” It crosses
denominational lines, traditional lines
it’s just Christian churches getting together
to share resources, and do whatever they
can do to make a difference in the city.
That’s sort of been the story from which
we’ve come; The City Harmonic; came
from; three of us were part of a college-age
program that was affiliated with TrueCity.
We would get college students together to
worship and sing and then they’d go out
and worship by serving at one of the non-
profits around the city; a soup kitchen or
clothing banks and the like. So, when we
first made The City Harmonic about two
years ago, all four of us at the time were
about two years ago, all four of us at the time were by Aimee Herd 20

by Aimee Herd

all part of different churches that were part of different denominations. It may sound strange
all part of different churches that were part of different denominations. It may sound strange
all part of different churches that were
part of different denominations. It may
sound strange for a worship band, but it
didn’t really seem all that odd to us.
AH: No, it actually sounds wonderful!
ED: I guess the biggest difference is
that we’re not part of a “worship team”
that came out of a particular local church
worship expression. We’re more a group
of friends and brothers who grew up out
of a more collective worship experience.
So, maybe not every song [of ours] will
work for every church setting, but that’s
probably for the best anyway!
AH: You know, that whole vibe of
unity that (I now see) comes from the
Hamilton local churches coming together
with TrueCity, can really be sensed in
this recording. It’s kind of an underlying
theme throughout the album
ED: Well, one of the most profound
moments for me, so far in our ministry,
was before we got heavy into touring
we were asked to take a part in the
TrueCity conference—which is not huge,
it’s like 150-200 people. But, it represents
about two dozen different churches and
denominations from around our city
coming together to pool resources and to
figure out how to do ministry better.
So, what happened was, during one of
the keynotes, they asked us to come up
to the front and most of the conference
gathered up in the front and prayed for
us, to commission us in the ministry. I
found out later that it was something like

the city harmonic: by Aimee Herd

continued

the city harmonic: by Aimee Herd continued 24 different churches from over a dozen denominations—leaders,

24 different churches from over a dozen denominations—leaders, lay-leaders, pastors—just from around our city all praying to bless us as we headed out on the road. It was really profound.

AH: Wow, that must have been a very powerful moment.

ED: It really was. It blew me away.

AH: Have you seen that kind of unity in other places? It just seems like there’s not enough of that happening yet.

ED: Oh yeah, I certainly hear stories here and there as we travel. And we love to tell our story, obviously, because we find it encouraging. I do think there is some kind of a move like that happening but, that maybe two things are going on at once. On one hand, there is a well- intentioned group of people standing up for what they feel is hard truth regarding traditional and Christian orthodoxy— maybe at the expense of others. I think to look at the Church as a multi-faceted thing, we have to learn how to respectfully disagree. That’s been some of the challenges at TrueCity, and there are certainly some messy elements to it. But, to abandon the debate [is worse]; even Peter and Paul disagreed, but it’s a good thing they didn’t just stop there.

As a band, we really started out a little like Delirious did [with an element of performance to leading worship]. That has actually begun some lively discussions with people at times. I think sometimes we make leading worship “super spiritual” and the rest of life “less spiritual.” One of my favorite quotes is an old Celtic saying, “Milking the cow is holy.” Worship and worship leading—in my mind—is more of a reflection of the sum of who we are; our character and who we are on a day- to-day basis, than it is about whether I’m being led “by the Spirit” in the moment. We absolutely believe in being led by the

Spirit, it’s just that we want to make sure we’re living a worshipful life. When
Spirit, it’s just that
we want to make
sure we’re living a
worshipful life.
When
Jesus
was
asked what
the
greatest
c o m m a n d m e n t
was, He
said to
love
God and
to
love your neighbor.
order for
us
to
love God, we must
love our neighbor.
Yet,
as
worship
leaders,
we’re
so
often
encouraged
keep our eyes
closed and have
our own sort of moment “on the mountain”
on stage—and then encourage everyone
in the room to do the same. But, it seems
like maybe we’ve lost a great opportunity
to look each other eye to eye and “be the
Church” together. So, we go up there, and
yeah, we perform, worshipfully, and it’s
okay because people are able to engage
with that emotionally. The dichotomy isn’t
between worship and performance really,
it’s between performing selfishly and
performing self-LESS-ly.
AH: I can definitely see that, yes.
Focusing in on your music, I know people
have come to know The City Harmonic
through the song “Manifesto”, and that
music video that went viral. Your new
project came out this past fall, titled, I
Have A Dream, and I want to get specific
with a few of those songs because they’re
really striking.
When you listen to the album, you can’t
help but gravitate toward the title song,
but first backing up a few to the song
“Mountaintop,” it seems to almost lead
you up to the title song.
ED: “Mountaintop” is partly inspired
by the Martin Luther King Jr. speech,
albeit loosely, but even more so based
on Jesus taking the Disciples up on the
mountain [where He was transfigured].
The Martin Luther King speech helped to
give us the language to place that. So,
you’ve got the story of the Disciples up
on the mountaintop, and Jesus revealing
Himself to them. They did what any self-
respecting Jew would have done; they
basically said, “We can’t handle this, let’s
build You a house to live in, and we’ll live
over here, and we can stay here forever!”
So they were saying two things
that the
revealed nature of God belongs in a box,
and the second was that feeling we have
when experiencing these mountaintop
events—we want them to go on forever.

God the Father sort of rebukes them in

a way (gently), He told them this was

His Son and they could trust Him. And, immediately, instead of building respective houses, they go down the mountaintop. They go back to the valley and are faced once again with hand-to-hand ministry. There’s a sharp contrast of what Christian

culture often pushes-- “let’s go to this place and mountaintop experience where we will see God together, and let’s make that feel like it lasts forever.” Jesus corrects that. Peter says later, “So long as I am

in the tent of this body, I will tell of these

things.” Much later in life, Peter had learned that the reason we don’t need

a tent to live in on the mountaintop, is because we—the Church—ARE the tent.

AH: That’s really good

ED: That’s sort of where that song comes from; “We’ve been on the mountaintop, we’ve seen the glory of our God. He

is here in the valley below. He is here,

I feel it in my bones. We are the Body

of our God.” That’s what it’s about. In

the bridge, we take a little bit of a swipe

at some of what we’ve made out of that

idea; “we build our temples, we build our

are

the Temple of our God and we can’t hold Him in.”

And, like you said, it leads into “I have

a Dream” in a way, because “I Have a Dream” is about what happens after all

of that. That song is again; loosely taken

from that Martin Luther King speech, partly because he used such great eschatological language in almost every speech he gave. But, “I Have a Dream” is about not losing sight of the goal. I think often, we make Christianity into sort of an escapist thing that gets us out of our troubles. While that’s true and while that longing is okay, we also see so many examples of God and Jesus, in Scripture, going out of Their way to redeem Creation and make things right again. We have this longing in us— we write these songs of longing with these

things that say “things aren’t as they ought

to be.” The goal of Christianity isn’t to

walls, but they can’t hold Him in

we

escape those things, it’s for those things to be made right, until—us and God, together as the Church—we say “it feels like home.”

AH: Elias, what does the writing process within The City Harmonic look like? Is it

a collaborative effort, or do you bring

songs that are already mostly written for interpretation by the band?

I think it’s a “both, and” for us—

every song is a collaborative piece for sure. Every song has a different beginning; sometimes I’ll bring just the piano part and a vocal melody with no

ED:

the city harmonic: by Aimee Herd

continued

lyric at all, just a basic idea. Sometimes I’ll bring a song that’s much, much closer to being finished, and we’ll [fine tune] it in the studio before we hit ‘record’. Every song ends up being collaborative, but they all have different beginnings.

AH: Out of all the songs on the album is there one song, or maybe two, that really stand out in particular from the rest?

ED: I really enjoy the song “Holy Wedding Day”. It’s the second to last song on the album. If I bothered to listen back to the whole album, it’s probably one of the only ones that I’d still hit “repeat” on to listen again, and notice things that somebody did that I didn’t notice before. “Holy Wedding Day” brings a lot of the themes from the album to a point, and talks about that final moment, and the anticipation of the Bride. It’s coming before God and saying, “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God Almighty.” Something about that just gets me going.

we really like playing

“Mountaintop” live, because we get to whip out a big drum and terrify people a little while we slam on it! (Laughs) It just has a lot of energy and seems to really connect with people. Another song—that different people have talked about to us— is “Fell Apart.” It’s a song that contains a

good amount of humanity in it, and I love worship songs like that.

AH: Can you talk a little about the recording process—how it gelled you together as a band—and if there were any particularly special moments during the recording of this album?

ED: We sort of do a lot of our creativity in the studio—almost like a kettle that’s about to boil over. We’ll have moments of yelling at each other and arguing about what we’re doing, and then we’ll have moments of saying, “Oh my gosh, that’s amazing!” There are a couple

Another one

of

moments

like

that

in

particular—one when recording a song on the EP, “My God.” There’s just one

guitar thing that Aaron suddenly

did,

and we

all just stopped and said, “You

have to do that,

it’s

something

you

have to

do!”

There

have been a

few things like

that there as we work through it.

Once we’ve got the songs established, and we’re excited about them, it’s almost more something that happens on a take- by-take basis. Because we were all there

the whole time, sort of like a microcosm of the Church, we four musical brothers have

to figure out how to agree to disagree in

a musical context. Some of my favorite

moments were actually times when

emotions ran high and we’d gotten into

it, but then resolved it with a great result.

of iron

sharpening iron.

and

here

AH:

Another

example

ED: Exactly.

AH: A lot of bands or musicians are

choosing to do more of a “live” recording

in the studio as opposed to laying a lot

of different tracks down, how did you go

about recording this album?

ED: It was definitely “both-and.” We did some songs laying down tracks live

off the floor, and others—in the interest

of time—we went layer by layer. But we

did the whole album; start to finish, in 11 days.

AH: That’s pretty quick.

ED: It was breakneck pace. We would record all day (usually a 15 hour day), and then Jared [Fox], our co-producer would go and do edits for a couple hours before he went to bed , then we’d be in the next morning to do it all over again.

You mentioned you’re all from

different churches; are you each a worship leader in your church?

ED: At one point we would have all been involved in the worship at our church, but at this point, we’re touring so much, it’s more of a relational thing with the churches back home. Most of us are part of a shared home church now. That’s been refreshing, to go back and

AH:

fellowship with people who really don’t care that we’re in a band. (Laughs)

Let me ask you about gear; I

noticed that you always seem to prefer an acoustic piano over a keyboard

ED: Actually (trade secret) we use an empty piano box with a controller in it that runs into a laptop with Reason that fits inside the piano. It’s actually a relatively cheap fully weighted 88 key controller permanently installed in a wooden box.

AH:

AH: That’s pretty interesting.

ED: Yeah, we do that because our sounds are piano sounds, I don’t really play a lot of synthy type of stuff. And, we thought it would be the best visual too.

Well, I love it, of course piano is

my favorite instrument.

ED: Yeah, I love it too; in fact I have a hard time writing on a keyboard. I find it much easier to write on an acoustic piano because of the dynamics, overtones, and the way it sustains. There are some things a keyboard can’t do in terms of creating

emotion.

AH: True. Elias, I know right now you’re busy touring. But, do you have

any songs for a future album already in the works—do you normally write while touring or no?

ED: Oh yeah, we’re always writing and working on things here and there. One thing we’ve had to sort of wrestle through this year, though, is Eric our bass player

was diagnosed just before the beginning

of this tour with leukemia. So, we’ve actually had some friends out with us, playing bass on this tour, while he’s been getting treatment. We’re just praying that his treatment goes well and that we get him back soon, and in the meantime,

we’re trying to write. …And to figure out what the next step is for us, for our next album—doing it in a practical way.

Well, I’m sure everyone reading

this will be praying for Eric, as we will too.

AH:

AH:

ED: Thank you.

The City Harmonic is made up of:

vocalist/songwriter and pianist Elias Dummer, bassist Eric Fusilier, guitarist Aaron Powell and drummer Josh Vanderlaan. For more information on them, music, media and blogs, log onto: www. thecityharmonic.com

To find out more about the innovative church movement TrueCity, visit:

Chorus F♯ Manifesto A The City Harmonic (Dummer, Fusilier, Powell, Vanderlaan) – men B Verse
Chorus
F♯
Manifesto
A
The City Harmonic (Dummer, Fusilier, Powell, Vanderlaan)
– men
B
Verse 1
BF
We believe in the One True God
A
A
A
- men, yeah
G♯m
C♯
– men
B
- men, yeah
F♯
B
We believe in Father, Spirit, Son
D♯m
C
F♯ ♭5 /C
good
B
Bridge
B
A♯sus4
D♯m
F♯/C♯
B ♭5
We believe that
has won
Pre-Chorus
B
B ♭5
Our father who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name
B5
C♯sus
C♯
F♯5
D♯m
B ♭5
B add3
F♯ no5
F♯/C♯A
♯sus4
D♯m
And all
Chorus
of
the
peo
-
ple of
God
sang
along
Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven
B
B ♭5
Give us our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses
F♯
♯sus4A
A
A
– men
B
As we forgive those who have trespassed against us
D♯m
F♯/C♯
B
B ♭5
- men, yeah
Lord lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil
A♯sus4
D♯m
Verse 2
For thine is the Kingdom, power, and the glory forever
♯/C♯F
We are free, He died and lives again
We will be a people freed from sin
We’ll be free, a Kingdom with no end
Pre-Chorus
We’re singing’
Chorus
F♯
And all of the People of God sang along
A
A
A
– men
B
- men, yeah
C♯G♯
m
– men
B
A
- men, yeah
© 2010 Thankyou Music (PRS) (adm. worldwide at EMICMGPublishing.com excluding Europe which is adm. by
kingswaysongs.com) All rights reserved. Used by permission.
Christy Nockles Into the Glorious 1. * Ever Lifting 2. For Your Splendor 3. Wonderful

Christy Nockles Into the Glorious

1.

*Ever Lifting

2.

For Your Splendor

3.

Wonderful

4.

Into the Glorious

5. Be Loved

6.

Waiting Here for You

7.

Sing Along

8.

Love Can Build a Bridge

9.

You Love is Moving

Another one of my favorite tracks on Into

the Glorious is “Be Loved”. In this song we are encouraged to just let ourselves be loved by God by resting in His arms. It

a wonderful message to every believer

that when we rest in the truth of Christ, we rise up singing and can truly rejoice in the freedom He gives us.

Probably the best known song on this collection is a new, more stripped down recording of “Waiting Here For You” which

was first heard on the 2011 Passion album, Here For You. This is the best pure worship song on the album and is quickly making

its way into church worship services around

the world.

Other album highlights include Christy’s rendition of the Judds classic “Love Can Build a Bridge,” as well as beautiful worship songs such as “For Your Splendor” and “Wonderful.”

I was very impressed with this release and any hint of a sophomore slump from Christy Nockles as a solo artist was quickly put to rest once I pressed the play button. This album is

full of scripture-rich lyrics, incredible vocals, and even a few little surprises. I enjoyed the differences in style that were offered and overall, this is a really great release with

a good mix of performance and worship

songs for both personal listening as well as for use in a congregational worship setting.

Passion

10. Healing is in Your Hands

11. Already I Need

12. How I Love You]

Into the Glorious is Christy Nockles’ 2 nd full length release following her critically acclaimed first solo album: LifeLight Up. Completely produced by her husband, Nathan, this albums foundation rests on Christy’s unmatched vocal talent and wonderful songwriting ability.

The central theme of Into the Glorious is how our God’s love turns the ordinary into extraordinary. This idea is immediately given to the listener by the first track, “Ever lifting” which is a fun acoustic-pop song that points us to a God who comes into our lives, reveals Himself and lifts us up to where He is.

The title track, “Into the Glorious”, is a beautiful piano-led performance piece reminding the listener that we were created for more than this life by a God who longs for a deeper relationship with us. We are invited into the glorious by a God who can take us from ordinary to extraordinary by His love.

Christy Nockles has been known as a “singer’s singer”, and as a vocalist myself, I am continually blown away by her amazing vocal control and the way she is able to use inflection and authenticity in her singing to help the listener connect on an emotional level with each song. This artistry is found throughout this album, but I noticed it the most on one of my favorite tracks, “Healing is in Your Hands”. Her vocal paints the picture of a fragile human race that can only be healed by the scarred hands of a loving Father. Previously released on the Passion album Awakening in 2010, this version is much more acoustic and raw. The acoustic guitar and old school piano on this track made me feel as if I was at an intimate worship service in her living room. This track was simply a wonderfully authentic moment on the album that I really appreciated.

authentic moment on the album that I really appreciated. White Flag 1. Not Ashamed (Kristian Stanfill)

White Flag

1. Not Ashamed (Kristian

Stanfill)

2. White Flag (Chris

Tomlin)

3.

Christy Nockels)

4. How I Love You Jesus (Christy Nockels)

5. All This Glory (David

Crowder*Band)

6. Lay Me Down (Chris Tomlin & Matt

Redman)

7. You Revive Me (Christy

Nockels)

8. One Thing Remains (Kristian Stanfill)

9. Yahweh (Chris Tomlin)

Jesus Son of God (Chris Tomlin &

10. Sing Along (Christy Nockels

11. The Only One (Chris Tomlin)

12. Mystery (Charlie Hall)

13. 10,000 Reasons (Matt

*Gerod’s Personal Picks in bold.

 

Overall impression

Average church congregation could learn/participate on the first hear

 

Can be learned/adapted by a band of average skill

 

Lyrical creativity and integrity

 

Christy Nockels Into the Glorious

Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious
Christy Nockels Into the Glorious

Passion White Flag

Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag
Passion White Flag

Foursquare United Generation On the Rise

Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise
Foursquare United Generation On the Rise

Desperation Band Center of it All

Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All
Desperation Band Center of it All

Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For

Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
Fike The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For

highest marks

 
highest marks  
highest marks  
highest marks  
highest marks  
Continued on page 48

Continued on page 48

Instruments | Sound Systems | Audio Equipment | LED Walls | LED Fixtures | Projectors
Instruments | Sound Systems | Audio Equipment | LED Walls | LED Fixtures | Projectors
Video Equipment | Truss | Rigging | Conventional & Moving Lights | Lighting Equipment
“We help Christian musicians and bands with all of their instrument and concert needs.”
“We help Christian musicians and bands with all of their instrument and concert needs.”
“For me, there are two words that describe Focus, ‘Ministry Minded.’ That’s one of the
“For me, there are two words that describe Focus, ‘Ministry Minded.’ That’s one of the
rst
things I noticed about this group. They have a true desire to help the Church
they really
helped us get a great sound system in our sanctuary and they did so, working with our
budget
‘Thanks for all of your help and assistance throughout this entire journey.’”
-Keith Moorman | Worship Pastor @ Neighborhood Chapel
Call Us Today | (425) 422-5904 | www.focus-worship.com
Call Us Today | (425) 422-5904 | www.focus-worship.com

33

By Doug Gould

Sometimes it’s Not the Sound Guy’s Fault!

Over the last ten years I have presented workshops to hundreds of worship and technical teams offering practical, common sense solutions to the problems we are having in our churches as they relate to music and sound. It was one of our presidents who said, “The problem with common sense is that it’s not too common.” He was right, whoever he was. Common sense, everyday practices that every professional musician and tech apply at every gig are virtually unknown in the church. Why? Because those serving on their worship and tech teams are volunteers and have never done this professionally outside of church. The ones serving on our teams are salesman, schoolteachers, housewives, cops, etc., and don’t have any real-world experience in what it takes to make it work. “Everything I learned about Church Sound, I learned in my Bar band.”

This will be the name of a book I’ll write someday book someday. (I am taking orders now if you’re interested) In it I will demonstrate all the things that we had to learn by doing it the wrong way so many times. The advantage we had was that we were playing together all the time: Five to six nights a week. and rehearsing in our spare time. When you’re playing together as a unit things really start to gel. You start listening more and getting to know the people that you’re playing with; their strengths and their weaknesses; what works and what doesn’t. What did we do before we had monitors? I was playing in rock bands in the sixties. This is before musicians had monitors. (Think Beatles - Shea Stadium). In those days, we had to listen to each other. This is a concept that is foreign to a majority of worship teams. We had to hear ourselves in the space or the environment that we were playing in and respond to it accordingly. Our worship teams only hear themselves through a monitor. They don’t hear their neighbor standing next to them because if they did, they would ask the sound tech to give them “More Me!” They don’t hear the room either.

More!

Arrangement! Music is just as much about listening as it is playing. One thing that will definitely improve the quality of your worship service

Play

Less,

Listen

is when the musicians have more time to

gel and listen to each other and to the space that they’re in, and stop playing all the time at the same time. It would be so refreshing to see a musician on a stage, at a service, actually laying out (not playing). This is called arrangement.

As a sound guy, if I have eight musicians

all playing at the same time, at the same

dynamic level, with all the same patterns; background vocalists all singing unison, three guitar players playing Les Pauls ( a

popular electric guitar made by Gibson)

in the same fret position, with no new

sounds appearing or fading away; I

can tell you, without exception, that this

is impossible to mix or to make sound musical.

A band that is arranged mixes itself.

Worship leaders: Take time to arrange the band. Give them direction where and how you want them to play. Do not leave this to chance. Start by mimicking

the songs you’re covering as close to the original as possible. Even if you don’t want to do it that way for worship, it’s

a useful practice to learn how to play together.

One of the reasons are platforms are so loud is because we aren’t listening to our surroundings. Arrangement will go a long way to helping reduce the levels, and here’s another common sense approach that will help:

If you can’t hear something, Move!

At your next rehearsal, have the band

turn off the monitors and just try to play

by hearing yourselves in the room through

the main house system. This will be a very strange experience at first and will definitely take some getting used to. (Just the rhythm section is fine for now, no vocals are necessary yet). After a ten-minute fun-filled jam, ask yourselves, “What couldn’t we hear?”

You might say, “I couldn’t hear the

acoustic guitar, or the hi-hats” Before I turn the monitors on and start adjusting, I will

try to move musicians closer to the things

that they CAN’T HEAR and farther away

from the things that are too loud. Isn’t that what we do in life? We move in to the things that are hard to hear and shy away from the loud noises. It’s no different here.

It’s common sense.

Put in the monitors what you

can’t hear acoustically! Once you’ve moved everything as much as possible, it’s now time to turn on the monitors. Now, what do we start putting in the monitors? What you can’t hear acoustically. That’s it! What I can’t hear next to me or in the room is what I need in the monitor.

I had a worship leader standing right in

font of a kick drum. It was literally shaking his pants leg. You know what he was asking for in his floor monitor? Guess!

said, “Whoa! Wait a

minute. Are you serious? You can’t feel the kick drum? He said, “Yes, I can feel it and hear it.” I replied, ”So why do

you want it in your monitor? He said,

”Because I always have I guess.” Old habits die-hard. This will take some practice, but if you apply some common sense practices, you’ll solve a boatload of

problems and save a lot of money spent

on technology that may not be necessary. What elements are necessary

for a good monitor mix? What do musician’s require in their

monitor mix in order to perform well? It’s not what you may think. It’s not a CD mix. You don’t have time to give them one either. You need to give them what they need, not what they want. Randy Weitzel, a dear friend who happens to be one of the best monitor engineers on the planet, gives us a recipe

for what’s necessary in a musician/ vocalist monitor mix:

STP: Self – Time - Pitch You need to hear yourself. You need to hear a tempo reference, snare, and kick; sometimes it’s just an acoustic guitar You need to hear a pitch reference, so that you can play and sing in tune.

That’s it. Keep it simple. Use common sense. Practice, practice, and practice. Until next time.

Yep!

Kick!

I

in tune. That’s it. Keep it simple. Use common sense. Practice, practice, and practice. Until next

34 MAY/JUN 2012 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

sense. Practice, practice, and practice. Until next time. Yep! Kick! I 34 MAY/JUN 2012 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

By Scott A. Shuford

Social Media In Action: Every Man Ministries

Over the last two columns, we have addressed where you should start and what you should share. Now let’s take a look at a real world case study.

Every Man Ministries (EMM) was founded in 2000 by Kenny Luck, the Men’s pastor at Saddleback Church. They have a “simple” goal: to revolutionize men’s ministry, free men spiritually, and ignite spiritual health worldwide.

With a passion to reach, relate to, and re-ignite men to become God’s men living out God’s purposes, Every Man Ministries engaged us here at FrontGate Media to bolster social media engagement.

There are two Target Audiences:

1. Man to Man Movement (M2M

EMM connects men across generations, ethnicities, and socio-economic groups to spiritually impact the world and to fulfill the Great Commandment and Great Commission in this generation. Through its men’s conferences, EMM offers life and leader development pathways to mobilize men to flex their spiritual muscles and empower them to obtain spiritual health. The challenge with the M2M is in developing and executing a social media campaign that identifies, leverages, and targets the most searched and pressing issues facing men.

2. Church to Church Movement

(C2C)

EMM provides a living, breathing church-based model that is fully developed, easily launched, well resourced, accessible, affordable, and serviceable at every level. The challenge with C2C is ensuring the EMM church model is synonymous with intelligent and

intentional men’s ministry.

The Social Media Campaign We set out to bolster awareness of Every Man Ministries and to find strategic ways to improve search engine rankings, to create new online communities on Facebook and Twitter, and to search out existing communities that tie into Every Man Ministries. We also assisted in created compelling stories that position EMM as a visionary movement in men’s ministry, which inspired others to spread the word about the organization.

What did we share? Our content buckets included things like Kenny Luck:

the Men’s Expert, EMM Appearances, Documenting the Movement, Pastor

Training, Book Excerpts, Videos, and several more, including the Questions bucket I outlined in my previous column. We focused on the ministry, but also on Kenny as a regular guy.

What might the typical buckets look like for you as a Worship Leader? Scripture that is impacting you right now, church events, weekly set lists, church leadership, problems you’ve overcome (tactfully stated,) favorite songs, song histories, mission/vision/values, your personal passions (family, sports, tech, comic books, whatever) and more. Remember to have your Questions bucket!

Highly successful, strategic video solutions delivered via YouTube were at the heart of this particular campaign. After researching the scope and effectiveness of EMM’s social media presence, we developed a targeted plan to provide new channels for content delivery through Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube and developed and maintained an integrated

core following on each of these channels.

Results are ongoing, but at the time I’m writing this, we have seen:

• Increased Twitter following by more than 900%.

• Increased Facebook following by

690%.

• Uploaded more than 430 practical

leadership advice videos to YouTube with a return of more than 41,000 views combined. We scheduled a gradual rollout that will take 2 years to complete.

• Developed and executed over 1550 content updates for Twitter and Facebook.

• Uploaded more than 100 practical

leadership advice videos to GodTube with a return of more than 9,800 views combined.

Send me your Social Media questions and I’ll try to answer the most popular topics as we explore this topic together.

SEPTEMBER 13-15 Bayside Church - Roseville, CA One-Day Intensives Sept 13 OCTOBER 5-6 Grace Chapel
SEPTEMBER 13-15 Bayside Church - Roseville, CA One-Day Intensives Sept 13 OCTOBER 5-6 Grace Chapel
Bayside Church - Roseville, CA One-Day Intensives Sept 13 OCTOBER 5-6 Grace Chapel - Franklin, TN
Bayside Church - Roseville, CA One-Day Intensives Sept 13 OCTOBER 5-6 Grace Chapel - Franklin, TN
5-6 Grace Chapel - Franklin, TN One-Day Intensives Oct 4 NOVEMBER 9-10 Overlake - Redmond, WA
5-6 Grace Chapel - Franklin, TN One-Day Intensives Oct 4 NOVEMBER 9-10 Overlake - Redmond, WA
Nov 8 THREE GREAT CONFERENCES COMING YOUR WAY IN 2012 LINCOLN DAVID PAUL ONE SONIC SOCIETY
Nov 8 THREE GREAT CONFERENCES COMING YOUR WAY IN 2012 LINCOLN DAVID PAUL ONE SONIC SOCIETY
WORSHIP REPUBLIC KEAGGY www.ChristianMusicianSummit.com 16 Workshops, 2 Keynotes, plus Special Behind the Scenes

Command presence is the way a person presents themselves to the public. The way to measure command presence is by the reaction of your audience. When you speak, do others get a sense of your self- confidence? Politicians are one group of people who demonstrate a great deal of command presence. When an official enters the room to face the media on important matters there is usually a sense of “awe” in not only what the person is saying, but also how that person conducts himself. Another person with command presence is a drill instructor, but I do not recommend that you run your group with that kind of authoritarian style of leadership.

What about the person who has been in a worship team for a while? Let’s say everyone knew Rob since he was in the Jr.

What about the person who has been in a worship team for a while? Let’s say
Doug Doppler is signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Nations label and is currently in production

Doug Doppler is signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Nations label and is currently in production on the Get Killer Tone DVD series. He and his

signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Nations label and is currently in production on the Get Killer
signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Nations label and is currently in production on the Get Killer

wife Melissa live to serve the Kingdom and are members of Cornerstone Fellowship in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Improving Musicianship | Inspiring Talent Randy Williams Tim Hughes David Alan Big Tent’s Revival Seeing
Improving Musicianship | Inspiring Talent Randy Williams Tim Hughes David Alan Big Tent’s Revival Seeing
Improving Musicianship | Inspiring Talent Randy Williams Tim Hughes David Alan Big Tent’s Revival Seeing
Improving Musicianship | Inspiring Talent
Randy Williams
Tim Hughes
David Alan
Big Tent’s Revival
Seeing Love
Shine Through
the Art of Re-Assembling a Band
PAUL BALOCHE
New Seasons
New Songs
Same Love
Convention Report:
5 Cool Things I Saw at NAMM
Steve Wiggins
Product Reviews
TC Electronic ‘Tone Print’ Guitar Effect Pedals
Product Review
Product Review
& Morgan Amps
TC-Helicon VoiceLive Play
ESP LTD
B-335
Bass
Guitar
The Great Commission
Worship Musician:
Musicianary
Product Review
Spence Smith
RainSong’s H-WS1000N2
Acoustic-Electric Cutaway Guitar
Steve Dale
MAR/APR 2012
MAY/JUNE 2011
MAR/APR 2012
Volume 10, Issue 2
Selective Hearing
Volume 9, Issue 3
Record Reviews
Volume 17, Issue 2
0 3
0 5
Jill Phillips • Jesus Music Again • Randy Stonehill
One Sonic Society l Don Moen l Shane & Shane l
0 3
Paul Baloche
Oats • Andrew Greer • Audrey Assad • Tanya Godsey
l
Jeremy Horn
0
74470 58440
7
0
74470
95962
5
14 Ideas For Improving Your Playing •
Developing Your Inner Clock
US $5.95 Can $6.95
Songchart ‘The Same Love’
l
10th Anniversary PreSonus Give-Away
US $5.95 Can $6.95
good to great in no time. I tried it on a horn section and lined

good to great in no time. I tried it on a horn section and lined up the players to the lead trumpet. If you have good isolation between players it works even better.

are VocAlign. Project 3, and Pro 4.

Project 3 sells for $325.00, ($289.00 street) and is probably fine for most applications. Pro 4 sells for $585.00 and is going to be somewhat higher in quality do to increased alignment accuracy. Pro 4 has a more sophisticated algorithm and can align up to 5 minutes of audio at a time vs. 2 minutes with Project 3. Most people won’t hear the difference, especially in a BGV stack. I recommend getting the Project 3 if you are on a budget, and upgrading later on as you grow.

of

PRICE:

There

several

versions

VocAlign is an amazing “must have” plug-in that will take your productions to the next level. I do recommend you take the time to study the manual. It’s always nice to KNOW what all those extra buttons and features actually do! You can find more info about VocAlign and Synchro Arts’ other products and demos at:

WISH LIST: Not much. VocAlign does what it claims and expertly well. The manuals cover a lot of technical instruction that could be included in video form. That would be nice.

that could be included in video form. That would be nice. Michael Hodge is a producer,

Michael Hodge is a producer, engineer and recording artist. He’s a guitar player on staff at Lakewood Church in Houston TX. He and his amazing wife Carrie

Mcdowell Hodge record and lead worship together at conferences internationally. Their passion is for the nations and to stir up the next generation of worship leaders both singers and musicians . Michael is in constant pursuit of great tones and great gear!

is in constant pursuit of great tones and great gear! By Michael Hodge Audio Plug-Ins for

By Michael Hodge

Audio Plug-Ins for Pros

If you are passionate about writing and recording If you are really serious about a career in music If you want your recordings to sound professional It’s time to invest in some Professional Plug- ins! This month I’m going to look at some plugs that can revolutionize your mixes and get you down the road to excellence in your craft. It reminds me of an old song “Why should the Devil have all the good music?”

VocAlign Pro Have you ever wondered how these big producers like Dr Luke get Katy Perry’s vocals so tight? Here’s your answer:

Synchro Arts’ VocAlign Pro.

I was excited to review this plug-in since

I love tight vocals & BGV’s. I’ve spent countless hours editing and aligning BGV vocal parts. It’s tedious work no matter how much you love the artist! I’ve been using VocAlign for months now and can’t imagine producing without it.

What Melodyne and Autotune do for Vocal Tuning, VocAlign does for Vocal Timing. VocAlign is a long time staple in the Film world. It is “the” go to plug-in for dialog replacement. It grabs the peaks and transients of the overdub and aligns them exactly to the original. Top producers have also been using it for tightening Lead, Rap, and BG vocals, as well as Horn parts.

(QUOTE) “Do not set the Display Units in Pro Tools to Bar Beats - there is a bug which may result in the aligned audio being sent to the wrong position”. Note: the PT folks claim to have fixed this issue in an upcoming release.

APPLICATION: In daily use VocAlign is somewhat similar to Melodyne in how you import audio etc. In Cubase, Nuendo, and Logic, the actual process of Aligning vocals etc. is very much the same. In PT 10 it is slightly different because it’s treated as an Audio Suite plug-in. There is also a standalone version available.

For Logic and Nuendo/Cubase versions aligning requires several steps. Now before

I share them, if you are new to using sends, auxs & side chains, don’t be intimidated. There are several steps that you must take to use VocAlign. It’s more than just adding an effect like a compressor on an audio track in your mixer. I do promise though, that the by third track you align, it will be second nature! Also, once you learn how to use a side chain, all kinds of creative engineering tricks will be at your fingertips! These are basic techniques and tools you need to learn anyway.

So here goes step by step for Cubase:

First open an AUX/EFX channel with VocAlign. Now, find the “target” Vocal track (the one you want to align with your original), and add VocAlign as an INSERT plug-in. Next, in VocAlign, enable the Side Chain input button on the top, and it will turn orange. Now take your original master vocal and assign one of its SENDS to the VocAlign SIDE CHAIN. Make sure it is enabled and has good level. Next you let Vocalign import the original vocal in real time by clicking the Capture button and hitting play at the beginning of the

section. Once the tracks are imported into VocAlign, Stop the transport, and simply hit the edit button, and you’re done! FYI:

There is also a helpful video tutorial on the website.

The pitch is not changed, the timing is nailed and you will love the results.

I had great results with lead doubles and BGV’s. I tried it on a pair of electric guitar doubles that were close but not exact. Vocalign turned them into super tight doubles that could have taken an hour or so to edit by hand. The process and results were the same in all three DAWs. This amazing plug takes your BGV vocals from

So let’s dive in!

VocAlign comes in digital format only. Downloading is painless, and authorization requires the infamous iLok key. You can buy an iLok key on Ebay or at Guitar Center. Caution… don’t ever drop it, step on it, or lose it.

Authorizing on both MAC & PC is straightforward. Synchro Arts sends the

info to iLok.com and then you download it

to your permissions chain on your key.The

first time is somewhat confusing, but after that it’s cake.

DAW

compatibility chart on the website;

For this review we used Pro Tools 10 Native, Nuendo 5, and Cubase on PC /MAC. They all found the VST/RTAS/ AudioSuite plugs right away. Logic Pro on MAC was just as happy. On Pro Tools 10 there are some helpful notes on the VocAlign website regarding a small bug.

INSTALLATION:

There

is

a

CAMERA By Craig Kelly There’s A Train A Coming I’m sure that no one thinks

CAMERA

By Craig Kelly

There’s A Train A Coming

I’m sure that no one thinks of a church service as a show, production, or an event; but the same professional commitment and dedication that the pros have in their work should always be brought to your position as a volunteer. If you give 110% in your outside job, then you should at least give 200% in your efforts and work ethic at church, right?

As a thirty-five year veteran in television production, it is ingrained into my brain that no one, outside of the crew, should ever know that there are problems along the way of producing a TV show or production (when possible). I think that the past is riddled with stories of heroic efforts to save the production or event from unforeseen failure – especially a live event. I also think that the people involved in those event-saving stories had probably prepared themselves, at least mentally, for anything to happen and what to do if it did happen. Do you prepare? Do you check, double check, and triple check your gear, equipment, and station surroundings before each and every live production? Of course, not everything can be thought through. If your legs give out while operating a camera for example; but you can plan on a making sure you are safe at all times. Perhaps you are a bit complacent because nothing has ever happened on your watch. I like to remember that everything in my production world is man- made and electronic – both ingredients for failure. As for God’s plans – I can’t help you there.

You have all heard of the saying “The show must go on”, right? In the secular world, that generally means that as a crew, team, production member, or staff that, no matter what, we have to do whatever is humanly possible to finish the event so that the end viewer, attendee, client, customer, parishioner, congregation member, audience member, or crowd never has a clue that something has gone sideways. In reality, there are enough possibilities of system or human error in presentations involving production gear of any type that it’s always best to back up everything where possible. The pros do it, why wouldn’t you do it at

church? Maybe you can’t double up on everything you do, but maybe you can do

things that would make the least impact. How about running an extra camera cable or intercom cable into the room,

so if there is a failure the new cable can easily be connected? How about having

a standby microphone nearby, just in

case? OK, these are probably obvious choices, but have you thought through as many failure scenarios as possible, and what you would do if it happened to you? I’m not a pilot, but I was told once that an airplane pilot doesn’t practice crashing they practice recovering. How about you? Are you ready?

So, I’ve mentioned before that I manage a free LinkedIn group called TV Camera Operators. This is a great global networking and informational site available to all industry participants and is intended for camera operators to share information with me as I research writing these articles. Recently, I posted the challenge of - Tell me an example of “The show must go on” that you were involved in. Although these examples are not from church productions, they will give you some great examples of going above and beyond in the world of TV. These are just for your enjoyment. I do not recommend that anyone risk their lives for TV. You may not run into any of these scenarios at church, but I hope you enjoy a few behind-the-scenes, global TV stories.

Doug M • During a live broadcast of our morning show “The Good Life”, I tilted the camera upward for a mirror shot and ended up catching the camera, weight box, and monitor - basically the

entire upper assembly. It was noisy, but the talent and guest didn’t blink and I stood there holding this assembly until the next commercial. Engineering forgot

to bolt everything down after some

work had been done. You’re welcome gentlemen.

Loy N • I was on zone crew on the Amazing Race in Geneva, Switzerland. Just before contestants arrived, some local kids threw the clue box into the lake. I jumped in, plucked it out, and

luckily got the arrivals. Most people rarely know what challenges we all go through.

Jim C • As for anecdotes more

specifically about superhuman effort, a few years ago, I inexplicably collapsed

during the 1st few minutes of Fox Championship Rodeo - a production I worked for 7-10 yrs. I came-to a few minutes later to find that my producer/ director had summoned the onsite paramedics (who are there to attend to gored bullriders & trampled cowboys) while he ran my camera. I sat out the remainder of the 1st half (VIOLENTLY ill and barely outside radio signal), but clambered up to the position in time for the 1st bucking shoot to open at the outset of the 2nd half.

Carmelo O • This happened during a live show about a singing competition. The jib operator and the engineer were trying to level the jib when suddenly one of the weights of about 50 pounds fell from the jib, landing right where the participants were sitting (since the jib was on the second floor for the full shots). Thankfully, no one was hurt, but I was very scared just knowing what could happen. After that the weights were tied and secured.

There you have it – a few behind the scenes stories from the TV Camera Operator group on LinkedIn. Please feel to join the group, check out my blog at craigjkelly.com, make comments, ask questions, invite your friends, poke fun, at or just say hello at zoomit.cam@ craigjkelly.com and please – think safety!

craigjkelly.com and please – t h in k sa f ety! Television director Craig Kelly’s career

Television director Craig

please – t h in k sa f ety! Television director Craig Kelly’s career has included

Kelly’s career has included over 3,500 live shows, events and concerts in broadcasting, corporate television, events

and sports production since 1977. He is also involved in ministry based events and concerts, and has produced or directed internationally distributed DVDs. With a background as an international free- lance cameraman, he has shot national and local level sports and corporate video for over twenty years. These days he is often involved in speaking, workshops, writing and talking about Television camera operators and directing.

Drew Bodine – Songwriter, Lead Vocal and Guitar Drew Bodine Band, www.drewbodineband.com “The M-48’s are
Drew Bodine – Songwriter, Lead Vocal and Guitar
Drew Bodine Band, www.drewbodineband.com
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mixing system that I have used. I sing better
because the built-in reverb makes my voice
feel live through my in-ear monitors.”
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jacks, separate balanced outputs and auxiliary input. Connect the M-48 Personal Mixing System to any popular
recording solution such as the SONAR REAC Recording System. Phone: 800.380.2580 Digital Snakes + Digital Console
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Recording
Recording

By Branon Dempsey

Know the Flow

Connecting Songs in Worship

Another trick is to end the final chord on the tune “Forever Reign,” using a

keyboard synth patch to slowly fade into

a C2 chord (omit the 3 rd ) to begin the

verse of “How He Loves.” You can also use the electric lead to outline the chorus by few notes as a companion to the strings. Ideas are endless, just pick one or two and practice to build familiarity.

Once you’ve worked out the kinks and your team is comfortable, try one of your ideas out in a service. Remember the simple things as well: brief passage of a

related Scripture verse, key line of the next song’s Chorus or a short meaningful prayer (not a sermon). Final encouragement:

have fun! Now that you’ve done all to prepare and rehearse your parts, test your wings and see how it flies. Connect with the music and the moment, as each song completes the musical landscape. Enjoy the flow of worship, unhindered, as people continuously lift up sung prayers

to God.

Worship Team Training

- Branon Dempsey

sung prayers to God. Worship Team Training - Branon Dempsey Branon Dempsey is the CEO/ Founder

Branon Dempsey is the CEO/ Founder and Training Director of Worship Team Training® (www.worshipteamtraining. com) a ministry providing live workshops and online

resources for local worship ministries. Branon is called to lead worship teams, leaders and artists in becoming authentic worship-followers of Jesus Christ, serving 40+ churches per year. He holds an MA in Worship and BM in Music Composition/Performance. Featured WTT Radio Show Host on Creator Leadership Network to 70k listeners, Instructor/Speaker at Christian Musician Summit, New Column Writer for Worship Musician Magazine and TCMR iLevite Magazine and CCLITV Video Training Contributor. Worship Team Training® is sponsored by Creator Leadership Network, Christian Musician / Worship Musician Magazine / Christian Musician Summit, Sibelius USA and G3 Music Publishing; endorsed by Promark Drumsticks and Jim Hewett Guitars.

endorsed by Promark Drumsticks and Jim Hewett Guitars. Copyright 2012 Branon Dempsey | Worship Team Training

Copyright 2012 Branon Dempsey | Worship Team Training | Administered by For His Music. All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Visit: www.worshipteamtraining.com

available all the time, anywhere in the world. Precision Modeling Technology XD-V handheld systems offer up
you have the right sound for your voice or instrument. 4th-Generation Platform The Line 6 digital
Channel Lock), ensuring signal integrity at all times. Interchangeable Components Line 6 digital wireless systems
are compatible with standard third-party microphones. One-step Setup, Worldwide Choose a channel on the
2011 data supplied by MI SalesTrak ® line6.com/xd-v75 ©2012 Line 6, Inc. Line 6 ® ,
DRUMMER’S PERSPECTIVE Continued from page 10 of get as little hi-hat sound in the snare

DRUMMER’S PERSPECTIVE

Continued from page 10

of

get as little hi-hat sound in the snare mikes as possible. The hi-hat mike is as far away from the snare drums as possible and about six inches high off of the “closed” hat. I prefer pointing it half way between the edge and the bell of the top hat.

Tom miking should be approached the same way as the snare drums. A 45 degree angle and about two to three inches off of the head just on the edge of the drum. ***See photo #4 (pg.10)*** As an exception to the “dynamic” mike on drums rule, I like to use the Shure Beta 98’s on my toms. (Mini-condensers) They have great response to the high-end snap I like to hear from toms, but still reproduce the low tones. These mikes don’t look like they could do that, but they do! On a budget I would be happy to use Shure SM57’s on all the drums and a PG series of mikes for the condensers. (PG81) You would save a lot of money without losing that much quality. In fact in many large studios the SM57 is still a drum standard.

Start with a basic miking set up if you’re not doing anything at this time. The kick microphone plus an overhead is a great launch into drum miking. Remember, you are

miking the kit for clarity, not to overpower the rest of the band. And, as a drummer, you have to control your dynamics. Adjust to the room you’re playing in, whether it’s

a small chapel, choir room, home meeting,

or mega-church. Smaller sticks, hot rods, or brushes may become necessary tools for

your situation. In fact I just came back from

a tour with Paul Wilbur where I had to use

hot rods for one of the venues… and a small stick for side stick sounds.

the microphones towards the hi-hat so you

Let me know how it works in your situation. You can contact me at my website – www. carlalbrecht.com -- I also have a DVD about drum sound at my website called “Drum Miking Made Easy.” Check it out if you want to dive in deeper.

Blessings on your drum mix,

Carl

you want to dive in deeper. Blessings on your drum mix, Carl Carl Albrecht has been

Carl

Albrecht

has

been

a

professional

drummer

&

percussionist

for

over

25

years.

He

has

played

on

over

70

Integrity

Music

He has played on over 70 Integrity Music projects; Maranatha Praise Band recordings & numerous

projects; Maranatha Praise Band recordings & numerous other Christian, Pop, Country, Jazz & commercial projects. He currently lives in Nashville doing recording sessions, producing, writing and continuing to do various tours & seminar events. Visit his website: www.carlalbrecht.com or send an e-mail to: lmalbrecht@aol.com.

RECORD REVIEWS Continued from page 32 sing and is one that I am sure will
RECORD REVIEWS
Continued from page 32
sing and is one that I am sure will find its place
in churches around the world.
Another of my favorites found on Center of
it All is the anthemic worship offering, “You
Are the Glory”. A humble and emotional
prayer to God, this song has some really nice
moments as the song progresses going from
quiet, contemplative verses to a solid, robust
praise chorus. I couldn’t help but lean back,
turn up my speakers and sing along. Great
song of worship!
and honest acoustically driven number called
“Grace”. His vocal is a bit more on the raw
side with a gritty, bluesy quality, and is a nice
contrast from Dana’s. The two of them together
produce a rich, warm vocal as they weave
their way through this straightforward rock-
Gospel tune. A lovely Gospel choir adds to the
integrity of this track, and I could almost swear I
was I was in a Southern Gospel church praising
the Lord with the community.
“Wait” is a fun catchy pop-acoustic kind of
As a worship album, Center of It All has
it where it counts; memorable choruses,
honest and sincere Biblically based lyrics, a
significantly relevant theme and wonderful
instrumental moments. Jon Egan’s emotionally
charged vocals only add to what is going to
be one of the great worship albums of 2012.
song that reminded me of some of Caedmon’s
Call’s early coffeehouse-stlye music. At first
listen this song may seem lyrically simple
and fun; but the message contained within is
actually surprisingly deep as we get what is
almost a little parable about the importance
of
patience in the life of believers, and that in
every circumstance God is still in control.
Fike
The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For
1. The Moment We’ve Been Waiting
For
In stark musical contrast to “Wait” is the deeply
moving and vertical worship song “Glorious
You Are”. Adorned with a gorgeous string
section and piano backing, this song is a very
intimate prayer both proclaiming the wonder of
God, and examining the need for believers to
2. Grace
stay close to His heart. This one is one of my
3. Jehovah
personal favorites.
4. Wait
5. Song of Sacrifice
really appreciate it when songwriters find
6. Glorious You Are
7. Behold Our God
8. My Savior Lord
ways to write worship songs about stuff that
mainstream writers sometimes forget. “In This
House” is a perfect example of a song that fills
9. In This House
“gap” as songwriter Brian Doerksen puts it.
10. Be Still
This is a great worship song about the church
11. Outshout the Lies
earth, and how God wants us to worship
12. Chosen
13. That’s Why I Praise
and return to Him daily in His house. Way to
find the “gap” Fike! I know our church will be
singing this very soon.
Dana and Richie Fike have been leading
worship and writing as a husband and wife
duo since 1999, and have been serving
the local church as the Worship Pastors at
Vanguard Church in Colorado Springs since
2002.
Their first indie album, Make a Noise
received critical notoriety and featured the song,
“Outshout the Lies” is a very upbeat rock tune
about how the truth of Christ has overcome
the world, while “Chosen” is a very eclectic
acoustic guitar piece that speaks of the
conquering power of God and how He
chooses us as dearly loved children.
“Ascend to Heaven” which was nominated for
a
GMA Dove Award in 2009. Now signed
by Integrity, the duo have released their first full-
length major label debut; The Moment We’ve
Been Waiting For.
“The Moment We’ve Been Waiting For” is
indeed a hidden gem among the big name,
guitar driven, synth heavy world of modern
Strong vocals, intricate harmonies, and a fresh
writing style greeted me right away with the first
track, and as I got deeper into the release, I
knew I had found something special.
worship music. Each song is lyrically rich and
steeped in scripture, and the vocal contrast
between Richie and Dana is exceptional
throughout. The songs are diverse and God-
honoring, and I really appreciated the lyrical
pictures that were painted within. Overall, I
was very impressed by this duo and I can’t wait
The best overall song is the title track where
Dana’s voice shines and takes us on a worship
journey that paints a beautiful picture of what
to
hear more from them on future releases.
the day of Christ’s return is going to look like.
The lyrical content is rich and meaty and the
melody is memorable. What I loved the most
about this song is that we don’t get the title
phrase until the final bridge and it is a gem of
a
lyric… ‘And with the parting of clouds, His
eyes are on His bride. The restoration is now,
for she is lily-white. All of creation will shout,