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Information Use by Millennials vs.

Boomers

Running Head: MILLINNEALS USE OF INFORMATION VS. THE BABY-BOOMERS

Millennials Use of Information vs. The Baby-Boomers

Dr. Cherie Givens

LIBR200-23

Tim Trevathan

San Jose State University – M.L.I.S. Program

Fall 2008

Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 2

Abstract

Different generations have always presented different challenges in variables such as reference

of cultural importance, communication styles, values and acceptance of the world view of their

elders. Today’s generation has the access and ability to supplant these issues in ways that

empower them and mitigate the influence that past generations had over control, authority and

even at times, expertise. Knowledge as power and access to information to make decisions gives

inert ability to process forward movement in society, thus creating an acceleration of change.

This change has a de-stabilizing effect on politics, religion, social environments and societies as

a whole. This change also enables, empowers and re-aligns the world as we have known it since

the inception of history. The technology makes for some ‘game-changers’ and attitudes can shift

voluntarily or be eclipsed by the power and velocity of the change that is occurring. [Like it or

not…here it comes].

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Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 3

Introduction

My thesis [of sorts] is seeking to validate my perception that indicates that the 82 million

Baby-Boomers and the 80 million Millennials generation [of 181 million working tax-payers in

the U.S. – our ‘customers’] have very different orientations towards library services and

information access and usage. The resistance of older library system personnel and corporate

America illustrates the 'lag' between the two entities world view and technology orientation

differences. Boomers [the majority of] for example, have “no interest” in many of the

technologies and surrounding digital culture items that many millennials partake in. The disparity

of numbers often shows the divergence in the exposure to the technologies and following of

trends that come along with those technologies.

I am trying to not only chronicle this for academic purpose, but to allow SJSU to act as

the premier entity it is in advancing change, adapting to technology and being the trail-blazers in

innovation as Silicon Valley is known for. This is not a new or untested phenomenon, but people,

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some cultures will fight to maintain their ancient ways and customs. ascendancy and methods of the millennial generation growing up with tools that are ubiquitous 4 .com/Tim Trevathan)] then the survival and actual thriving of library systems as functional bridges between the needs of the two generations and their habits.com/watch?v=1TBWbNXbi9w) Literature Review Millennials as a topic have taken on significance in recent years as the generation gap created not only by time.com/Tim Trevathan)]. attitudes and ability to access information and library systems is assured.” “The pentagon’s new map” (http://www.youtube. Boomers 4 cultures [library and other]. but by technology. politics and global resource utilization.spartasocialnetworks. horizontal type ‘B’ Org. In chronicling this change. “It’s like globalization. Top-down Org. 'A' management [Beauracratic] vs. If the needs of library patrons are met with the needs of the community [see my SJSU SlisLife Blog "Funding Libraries is not Rocket Science” (http://slislife.spartasocialnetworks. But ultimately the world changes and how we react to that change defines our future and destiny (Tim Trevathan.Friedman "The World is Flat"] type information access behaviors are exhibited by the rapid change and impact to global geo-political structures of economics.0” at (http://slislife. The tools. Dec. anthropology issue and societal context need the balance of the 'pioneers & homesteaders' [see my SJSU SlisLife Blog Entry “Web 2. some will adapt. 2008). age groups. efficient online access tools and the threat that represent to brick & mortar libraries that need not exist.’s [ collaborative – ‘flat’ . Information Use by Millennials vs. the resistance to new. more adept. has created a new type of digital divide. some people will never ‘get it’.

This has been particularly prominent in the 5 . see Anthropology (disambiguation). Information Use by Millennials vs. p. from Greek ἄνθρωπος. Since the work of Franz Boas and Bronisław Malinowski in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. April 7–10. social science. the Baby Boomers 82 million] (Duck. and the importance it places on long-term. how they work and what methods they use to solve problems and illustrate talent. 2) and the social impact they are shaping in many areas of  society has been developed over the last decade. -λογία. law and social order. experiential immersion in the area of research. Boomers 5 in all environments. cross- cultural comparisons (socio-cultural anthropology is by nature a comparative discipline). anthrōpos. Anthropology portal Anthropology (/ˌænθɹəˈpɒlədʒi/. Millennials Rising. The root of their existence is often characterized by more isolated tendencies in face-to-face social behavior but fill that void with a tendency to be ‘always connected’ electronically. religion. Studies on millennials and their impact on society. This article is about the social science.(Howe & Strauss. and the humanities. anthropology has been distinguished from other social science disciplines by its emphasis on in-depth examination of context. Cultural anthropology in particular has emphasized cultural relativity and the use of findings to frame cultural critiques. -logia) is the study of humanity. anthropology. Anthropology has origins in the natural sciences. For other uses. both work and play. "human". in some senses defines who these people are. 2000) . Any bubble generation that represent large  numerical components will have a large impact on many if not most of the other factors of  society including politics. 2005. both numerically [80 million Millennials vs. often known as participant-observation.[1] Ethnography is both one of its primary methods and the text that is written as a result of the practice of anthropology and its elements.

retrieving and analyzing information. select. The illiterate of the year 2000. must be able to: • recognize the need for information to solve problems and develop ideas. act ethically. Our students need to be information literate. including how information is situated and produced.wikipedia. 6 . • locate relevant and appropriate information. plan for the future and prepare for change. legal. • pose important questions. lifelong learners. critically evaluate. will not be those who cannot read and write. through Margaret Mead's advocacy for gender equality and sexual liberation. processing. (http://en. accuracy and authenticity. Information Use by Millennials vs. 2001). to current criticisms of post-colonial oppression and promotion of multiculturalism. Boomers 6 United States. academic and social underpinnings is of great  consequence. According to the Association of Teacher- Librarians in Canada (ATLC). location and access methods. but those who cannot learn. Information literacy is the key to helping students use learning throughout their lives as a way to solve problems. Teaching Tools for the Information Age. create and communicate information in ways which lead to knowledge and wisdom" (Information Literacy and Equitable Access (ILEA): Draft Document. and relearn. • use a variety of information gathering strategies and research processes. to become lifelong learners. unlearn. • access information for quality. students. • use the practical and conceptual tools of information technology.gathering.org/wiki/Anthropology) How information and technology affect society as a whole and our future generations in  their learning styles. Information literacy is defined as "the ability to acquire. students must prepare themselves with the knowledge and skills they will need in tomorrow's world of work. according to Alvin Toffler. • understand form and format of information. To be successful in this information economy.  Futurists predict that within ten years almost half of the workforce will be employed in information-based occupations . Ministry of Education and Training. acclimation to the work­force and empowerment to lead and govern in all  environments from government. (Koechlin and Zwaan. 1995). authority. use. from Boas's arguments against 19th-century racial ideology.

the group is united by a hunger to use the latest technologies to communicate. 2008 (Computerworld) Like most generations before it. outdated curriculum and learning methods or allow a generation to teach itself what it can online without regard to focus or substance of knowledge and ‘connecting the dots’ outside of rote learning methods. gender. Information Use by Millennials vs. The technologically savvy vs. This divide will span across all demographics of race. Now that members of Generation Y are graduating from college and entering the workforce. the non-technologically savvy will determine job function and pay in most areas of job function at some level. Generation Y -. [The internet drive and public access ability did not start until 1992]. In this case. they're bringing with them a slew of technology demands. looking forward within the current generation and onto the next. In fact. Our road map can be graphed for success. These digital natives -. often simultaneously texting on a mobile device and instant-messaging on a PC without removing even one iPod ear bud [which sprouted closer to 1998 for IM and Oct 2001 for the first iPod].also known as millennials -. income and age.those born between roughly 1982 and 2002 -.Many of this generation can't conceive of communicating without an instant messaging system or social network. or we can continue to use “what has always worked” without modification and see the dismal results of both wrong headed experimentation. (http://www. the non-technologically competent digital divide will become as significant in work-place environments as the current age and view of technology and society is. they research the technology portfolios of potential employers before agreeing to schedule job interviews. 7 .are natural multi-taskers. Boomers 7 • format and publish in text and multimedia.has been stereotyped based on a cultural change identified with its era. adapting to emerging technologies. The rise of the technologically competent vs. initiatives to pass test [no child left behind]. 2008) That being the case. in many cases. September 22.com/action/positions/info_studies/html/intro. the conflicts in the digital divide will continue to escalate as another form of ‘have’ and ‘have nots’ develop.accessola.html accessed online Oct.

as should encouraging their creativity and initiative to find new ways to get tasks done.” (Massey. Many of them also entered the workplace in the early '80s. At the same time. The economy. born between 1965 and 1976. As a mentor. to the team they work with. they've redefined loyalty. They can move laterally. An effective mentoring relationship with them must be as hands-off as possible. Generation X feels strongly that "I don't need someone looking over my shoulder. 8 . Illustrates the factors that affect people as their world-view develops. but figures its part of the job. This led to traits of independence. say some experts who have studied Generation Y. Other traits include working well in multicultural settings. When…. Providing feedback on their performance should play a big part. resilience and adaptability. all affected the previous generation and its self-reliant attitudes and expectations of how they work. Even more so than Baby Boomers. working moms. desire for some fun in the workplace and a pragmatic approach to getting things done. Generation X saw their parents get laid off or face job insecurity. grew up in a very different world than previous generations. Divorce and working moms created "latch-key" kids out of many in this generation. this generation expects immediate and ongoing feedback. pop culture. There's a career lattice. Information Use by Millennials vs. The 51 million members of Generation X. 2007) The generation before the millennials is quite different. But for this generation there isn't a career ladder. their career is more fluid. and the boss they work for. For example. a Baby Boomer complains about his dissatisfaction with management. when the economy was in a downturn. (Alsop. members of Generation X dislike authority and rigid work requirements. when they work and what type of conditions they will work in or who they will work for are coming into focus. The classic film “You Are what you Were. you'll want Gen Xers to work with you. and is equally comfortable giving feedback to others. many companies are struggling to find ways to satisfy them. Generation X takes employability seriously. A Gen Xer doesn't waste time complaining-she sends her resume out and accepts the best offer she can find at another organization. Instead of remaining loyal to their company. not for you. music and culture. they have a commitment to their work. Businesses that don't may find themselves struggling to hire and keep the most talented young workers. Because of these factors." At the same time. stop and start. Boomers 8 Because this generation's demands are vastly different from those of earlier groups. 1978).

making a bridge to understanding what makes working environments ‘work’ that enhance diversity. Information Use by Millennials vs. (Members of Generation X are eager to learn new skills because they want to stay employable. learning to adapt communication styles both verbally and technologically and change motivational methods accordingly becomes the charter to bridging the gap between three or more very different generations and the ways they interact. as a generation and not categorically labeling each other.) Gen Xers work best when they're given the desired outcome and then turned loose to figure out how to achieve it. Boomers 9 Start by informing them of your expectations and how you'll measure their progress and assure them that you're committed to helping them learn new skills. communication. 2004) Learning to overcome generational values and the ensuing conflicts that arise in the work place and the ensuing conflict that represents is in need of critical analysis. both in private and how that extends to the work place. motivation and inspiration. leadership. Just Get It!. (Massy. respectful workplace. we find out why we behave as we do and then see how we are the same. (Thielfoldt & Scheef. not just different. not step-by-step instructions. By doing training sessions. The theory and methodology being used today often does not encompass the differences or the will to change by any of the participants. management skills. understanding who we are as a people. This means a mentor should guide them with feedback and suggestions. 1994) Generation X Millennials Born 1965-1976 Born 1977 – 1998 51 million 75 million Accept diversity Celebrate diversity Pragmatic/practical Optimistic/realistic Self-reliant/individualistic Self-inventive/individualistic Reject rules Rewrite the rules Killer life Killer lifestyle Mistrust institutions Irrelevance of institutions 9 . teams and team- building. listening.

today that growth is exponential as the user base of the World Wide Web increase. friendly work · Structured. bureaucracy in the form 10 . collect and distribute information caused revolutionary changes described as cataclysmic in some ways. The Baby Boomers had a relatively late start at gaining access to technology in the home and in a 24 hour-a-day environment and the late start really began to evolve with the internet and Windows version 3. Billions of pages are literally accessed daily and almost the same amounts are created. Suddenly the richness of the internet and the content of the world was made open for all to explore. dis-information. Boomers 10 PC Internet Use technology Assume technology Multitask Multitask fast Latch-key kids Nurtured Friend-not family Friends = family Mentoring Do’s Mentoring Do’s · Casual. The advent of access became the boom of information dissemination. supportive work environment environment · Involvement · Personalized work · Flexibility and freedom · Interactive relationship · A place to learn · Be prepared for demands. How the generations access and use information is different as the time-frames. high expectations Source: The Learning Café and American Demographics enterprising museum 2003. Learning to discern viable and credible information became of utmost importance. This gold rush of information and the ability to digitize. but like usual. propaganda and sometimes outright fraud and lies. Information Use by Millennials vs.1 and the development of the Netscape browser in 1992 giving graphic information and navigation capability to web access over previous DOS text-only environments. but enabling in others. mis-information. stored and utilized. circumstances and technologies that they were exposed to. As literally millions of web pages were added daily at first.

music and pictures could be accessed and manipulated on a computer screen by all people across the world. they just simply went around the entities that tried to slow or block progress." • #4: Open sourcing: Communities uploading and collaborating on online projects.wikipedia. (8/9/1995). Now countries such as Malaysia. China's entrance in the WTO allowed for greater competition in the playing field. Friedman considers the phenomenon "the most disruptive force of all. Government was surprisingly quick at getting some information on the web while it still has a long way to go in other areas. Examples include open source software. it allowed people from other side of the wall to join the economic mainstream. Mexico." • #5: Outsourcing: Friedman argues that outsourcing has allowed companies to split service and manufacturing activities into components which can be subcontracted and performed in the most efficient. Boomers 11 of slow-to-change often got in the way of progress. 2005). The digitization that took place meant that everyday occurrences such as words. The Internet and its users did not wait.org/wiki/Post-Fordism) • #6: Offshoring: The internal relocation of a company's manufacturing or other processes to a foreign land in order to take advantage of less costly operations and labor costs there. blogs.Friedman Ten flatteners Friedman defines ten "flatteners" that he sees as leveling the global playing field: • #1: Collapse of Berlin Wall--11/'89: The event not only symbolized the end of the Cold war. This disruptor follows post-Fordist views of capitalism finding the lowest labor sources to fund the highest profit margins for Global Corporate Titans. YouTube and Wikipedia. Friedman believes these first three forces have become a "crude foundation of a whole new global platform for collaboration. used to Me. films. and Brazil must compete against China and each other to have 11 . Information Use by Millennials vs. (11/09/1989) • #2: Netscape: Netscape and the Web broadened the audience for the Internet from its roots as a communications medium used primarily by 'early adopters and geeks' to something that made the Internet accessible to everyone from five-year-olds to ninety-five-year olds. status and control often combated change instead of adapting to it. “The World is Flat” . My and Mine territorial budgets. cost-effective way anywhere in the world. files. (Friedman. Academia. ( http://en. • #3: Workflow software: The ability of machines to talk to other machines with no humans involved.

multiple functions such as e-mail. • #10: "The Steroids": Personal digital devices like mobile phones. the more one flattener developed. Countries like India have already begun Offshoring some of their work from the U. Friedman offers "the triple convergence. Horizontalization means companies and people collaborate with other departments or companies to add value creation or innovation. up from 150 million just three years ago". distribution. 12 . by UPS employees. 2. Instead of collaborating vertically (the top-down method of collaboration. Information Use by Millennials vs. "Never before in the history of the planet have so many people-on their own- had the ability to find so much information about so many things and about so many other people". While the flatteners alone were significant. • #9: In-forming: Google and other search engines are the prime example. for example take Google. writes Friedman. businesses needed to begin collaborating horizontally. copying and communicating were able to be done from one machine. UPS repairs Toshiba computers on behalf of Toshiba. However.) • #7: Supply chaining: Friedman compares the modern retail supply chain to a river. all the flatteners converged with one another. “My Fulbright Scholarship trip to Uruguay” . instant messaging. the more leveled the global playing field became. in which the company's employees perform services--beyond shipping--for another company. and points to Wal-Mart as the best example of a company using technology to streamline item sales. and shipping. printing. After the emergence of the ten flatteners. the ten flatteners were semi-independent from one another. where innovation comes from the top). in that each flattener enhanced the other flatteners.S.Colloquia. This convergence could be compared to complementary goods. flatter global playing field. iPods. • #8: Insourcing: Friedman uses UPS as a prime example for insourcing. When work-flow software and hardware converged. The work is done at the UPS hub. Boomers 12 businesses offshore to them. The growth of search engines is tremendous. Triple convergence In addition to the ten flatteners. personal digital assistants. An example of independence is the inability of one machine to perform multiple functions. fax. and voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). For example. Information Technology sector to lower paying labor forces in highly educated places like Uruguay. (SJSU Colloquia. in which Friedman states that it is "now processing roughly one billion searches per day. 1. around the year 2000." three additional components that acted on the flatteners to create a new. Up until the year 2000. Friedman's Convergence II occurs when horizontalization and the ten flatteners begin to reinforce each other and people understand the capability of the technologies available. a new business model was required to succeed. they would not enhance productivity without people being able to use them together.

Two-thirds of today’s graduating PhD’s are not American in origin. Boomers 13 3. Russia. In turn. Facebook. After the fall of the Berlin Wall. Friedman also believes there should be more inspiration for youth to be scientists. (Friedman. Information Use by Millennials vs.] began to take hold as ‘bureaucracy busters’. The social medium of the internet in the forms of email. China. He also suggests that the government should make it easier to switch jobs by making retirement benefits and health insurance less dependent on one's employer and by providing insurance that would partly cover a possible drop in income when changing jobs. engineers. instant messaging [IM] and other socially geared intermediary points [MySpace. and the nations of Eastern Europe. they added new brain power to the whole playing field and enhanced horizontal collaboration across the globe. and Central Asia—began to open up their economies to the world. Friedman argues. and mathematicians due to a decrease in the percentage of these professionals being American. When these new players converged with the rest of the globalized marketplace. This discovery compelled corporations at all sizes to function in a more stream-lined manner and created a new ‘value chain’ of requirements that 13 . Twitter etc. 2005) As a result of this ‘flattening’. These tools took on forms in every industry as time-savers and productivity enhancers and reduced the manual functions of many worker hours and gave employees the productivity levels of two or three previous workers abilities. Convergence III is the most important force shaping politics and economics in the early 21st century. authority. countries that had followed the Soviet economic model—including India. Proposed remedies Friedman believes in order to fight the quiet crisis of a flattening world the United States work force should keep updating its work skills. accountability or isolation of resources to be productive or collaborative. geography or localization of power. the vertical collaboration that previously existed within work-groups and in general interactions began to take on a more horizontal form. Latin America. will keep it more employable. No longer was ‘top-down’ accountability and work process required. Making the work force more adaptable. Workers no longer needed the process flow. Employee productivity and creativity value increased exponentially as tools became available to enhance workers abilities in the information age.

0’ has created access points. Information Use by Millennials vs. This evolution of skills required that even the lowest levels of workers and administrators have skills that reflected the ability to interact with a computer on the lowest side of the equation to being able to use and enhance computer access skills. localized information access and created new ways to access information from the World Wide Web and through internet connections and a simple web browser. Marketing the Millennials. Students demanded the ability to have information delivered to their computer. Boomers 14 insisted workers be computer literate as well as technologically capable to ensure their competitiveness in the immediate work place function as well as remaining competitive in the new global work space. and then later the Mac Iphone. This access took on a new dimension in library systems as universities began to look for ways around cumbersome access methods that required in-house. 2005) 14 . The ability to access information anywhere anytime created a plethora of applications to create what was only envisioned 20 years ago as ‘space age’ Star Trek Next Generation technology evolved in a few short years. characterized by the label ‘Web 2. solution bases and problem solving capabilities that had never existed at the individual level before. whether at home or on the fly via the laptop portable computer. Universities like the University of Pittsburg began tying front-end interfaces to back-end library databases and the competition between historically isolated information sources and globally accessible information sources began. (Duck. The incessant need by millennials to remain connected at all waking hours and beyond began to shape the world and the access to information that we had known into a new tool as well as a new monster. This newest revision of the skills on the internet.

but localizing and consolidating useful information into groups on the internet like browser ASK. Data and information was everywhere. This information can be propagated. assimilated and disseminated without the prevue of academic control and the output can be more reliable in some cases.com and research source Questia.com became more prevalent and useful. the blogsosphere was declared 15 . manipulated.com are collaborated efforts. This lag provided a historical context and a look back at development. Since the earliest times of institutional foundations. but not seen as ‘peer-reviewed’ because of being outside of academia’s control or power. As an example. and less reliable in others. Information Use by Millennials vs. Academics required that with sometimes careless and inaccurate information existing on the internet. this exclusivity was the basis for the foundation for scholarly research to have its value and roots in academic. “aggregating” and consolidating data into portals like AOL had done in the early days of the internet took on a new meaning. but rarely captured current events or trends that emerged. The tenants of power and control that those resources represented was now being threatened by resources that may be more current. relevant and valid than research that typically has a 3-5 year lag on what is current or presently going on in the fields being studied. which had been a phenomenon for nearly five years as individual voices emerged on the internet as new ‘experts’ on isolated subjects and ideas. data and information needed to meet the rigors of academic study and the sources used to do research and support credible research and findings. industrial and government circles. Boomers 15 As a new term came onto the horizon. by the time research came out for blogs. Sources like Wikipedia. the ‘buffer’ of control is once again removed. “aggregation”. Since the funding sources of academia can lead to what can and cannot be researched or will be paid for ‘to’ research by government and private funding entities.

. For Boomer’s. Productivity faltered in some ways but improved in others. sponsorship and exclusive barriers to the few that had control over institutions that housed those information and research sources. 2004 (Computerworld) Since internet and technology statistics and studies show that men have a stronger orientation in almost all categories and age demographics to using technology and the internet (Horrigan. 12. I have seen young women under 18 using text messaging and 16 . (Boutin. Information Use by Millennials vs. Thomas. Xr’s. With the printing press and now digitization. Information overload in the form of emails to workers exploded and the phenomenon of email ‘junkies’ and addicts that could not step away from their work environment and ‘always on’ activities became compulsive in many social and work-related contexts. 2003). What had made blogs revolutionary had been overtaken by commercialization and major media outlets. Busters. this leaves females as librarians being represented as 80% of library workers at a disadvantage. the absolute permeation of data and information became and inclusive factor as well as an isolating factor. Personally. the de-centralization of power through release of information became eminent. This becomes another divider or disabler to women [as a whole] in keeping up in the digital divide.com Oct. Paul Wired. access to even get information required tuition. 2008) For many years. much like the Catholic Church shepherding the knowledge in the Bible but making it inaccessible to the public and its teaching for centuries. Jan. in the end there was a productivity lag but overall it has leveled out. Y’rs and Millennials. (Hoffman. Boomers 16 ‘dead’ and corrupted by corporate influence and being taken over and controlled by corporations by the end of a five year period.

these groups of Americans are bigger spenders on technology goods and services and more ardent information consumers.. lack of experience.org/pdfs/PIP_Info_Consumption. In fact. The average age for this group is 36 years. and even influenced the content of our messages. Although these ardent technophiles are a minority of the population. These high-end users are worthy of scrutiny by virtue of the intensity with which they crave information technology and exchange information with others. (http://www. Boomers 17 internet access as much or more than their male counterparts in work environments and personal usage. A large part of the analysis in this report focuses on the three most tech-intensive groups. and the Older Wired BabyBoomers. Americans’ love affair with technology is one of the defining characteristics of their culture. we take an inventory of the communications gadgets and services that American use and examine the variations within the population of technology users. Wired Generation Xers (GenXers) make up most of the technology elite (about 60%). but ‘across the board’ age demographics do not reveal the same trend. having the latest electronic gadget or experimenting with the newest tech fad is a habit they develop at an early age and never break.g. For many Americans. These are the true leaders when it comes to technology adoption.. relatively low levels of interest in information goods and services). In this report. The average age for this group is 22 years. Information Use by Millennials vs. As the table below shows. The Young Tech Elites make up one-fifth of the technology elite.pdf) 17 . and these have given us flexibility in how we communicate. their trendsetting ways often ripple widely in society. altered the patterns of how we stay in touch with others. lack of time. wind up following the technological trail cleared by these pioneers. The remaining two-thirds of the population are less intense in their use of technology for a variety of reasons (e. Older Wired Baby Boomers make up the remaining one-fifth of the technology elite. Americans have become steady adopters of devices and services that enable them to gather and distribute information. in time. the Wired GenXers. these three segments make up about one-third of the population. This elite comprises three distinct sub-groups of Americans who are the most voracious consumers of information goods and services in the United States. The average age for these baby boomers is 52. what we call the Young Tech Elites. Independent from their levels of income and education (which are above average). Many people.pewinternet.

devotion and idealism shocked even the most savvy pundits in the political arena. Although Howard Dean used this technology first in 2000 to harness the power of the internet for campaign contributions. even video games to reach and register young adults. no candidate in history has garnered the support of technology.A. race and youth as President-elect Barrack Obama has. Times. times Article “Final Push to Register Youth” (L. In the L. financial support and grass root efforts that had organic growth 18 . Boomers are still catching-up in the political arena as witnessed by the political contributions of John McCain and Barrack Obama in the 2008 election. Oct. The implications of data access to daily life and the functioning of society in the financial arena. the Web. Boomers 18 Social and Government Change Information access and retrieval has become a paramount issue in the evolution of society and the importance of government and politics as we enter in the new and sometimes dangerous era. the political arena and the socio-anthropological arena have become extensive. Information Use by Millennials vs. This article illustrates a mechanical difference in the usage of technology and the adaptation and adoption of technological tools used by the millennial generation. Rock the Vote and other youth-oriented voter organizations harnessed the power and prevalence of the millennial age groups exposure to social networks and online presence to create levels of event attendance. 2008) the sub-title reads: “They’re making a final push by using texting.A. strategic vision to supplement virtual efforts with volunteers on the street and the ‘feet on the street’ viability of using youth energy. The sheer deployment of volunteers.

bloggers and media-type pundits. (Linthicum. massive event attendance organized virtually online and empowered media attendance by younger and more liberal reporters. inserting the candidate’s message into their living spaces and the success of that proliferation is demonstrated by the 3. The cost for radio and television and the physical limitations of a candidate to be in more than one place at a time was supplemented with tools like YouTube videos. 9.entrepreneur. Boomers 19 in an ‘all states’ campaign that would have been impossible even a few years ago. 2008) http://www. K. Information Use by Millennials vs. Oct. The variety of methods used for getting the attention of voters. The nine percent increase of young people was double the increase of size of any other voting group in the primaries. L.html 19 .3 million voters registered in the last 15 months of the campaign which was twice as many people that were registered in 2004.com/hottrends/web. “Final Push to Register Youth Vote”. Times.A..

Boomers 20 This student registration drive is representative of the success garnered by millennial age groups in converting technology and communication advances into tangible advantages in the information equals power equation. and even if the respondent didn’t not act immediately. not as a contact on whole (Example usage: Do not contact me for this message vs. We Can” on YouTube with had over 3 million hits in the first few weeks of being posted [and 20 million hits ‘to date’] show the success of viral videos and internet technologies and the effect that youth voters have on technology involvement returns. “Youth voter groups ramp up efforts as deadlines approach” 10/09/08) Viral videos like “Yes. Students in turn forwarded that information in a snowball like manner. Times. the immediacy of contact and the ability to remind and cajole in some cases the results ends up being numerically effective. Rock The Vote began using online social networks like Facebook and MySpace to give free downloadable songs and free concerts by local acts to corral the youth vote as early as 1996.A. Information Use by Millennials vs. Kate. The database of contacts. The millennials social foundation for referral to friends instead of strangers adds a personal dimension to the text. emails and instant messages. 20 . (Linthicum. Bands are given rewards by being allowed to put their songs on the Rock The Vote website for youth to link to and their attendance at events goes along with the bans exposure goes up along with youth participation. the ability to reproduce and forward the content and allow for removal once contacted was available for each message in a granular way. do not contact me again [at all] due to spam or over contact on one message). By a simple task of texting. L. organizers were able to text and instant message students they had acquired by campus organization efforts. The instructions for registering to vote were issued so that a simple telephone number or web page links to online site or physical location to registration capabilities.

work values. but of access and a way of thinking and interacting with technology that supplants and supplements standard information access and enhances online leverage of time for relationships and behavior in such a way that the results demonstrate a new way of looking and dealing with information and information access. Boomers 21 By using cultural icons that are relevant to age. voter turnout and registration has taken a marketing approach to the task of voter registration and political outcomes. both how things are done ant the outcomes that are desired to be produced require tools of communication first. Information Use by Millennials vs. facilitate communication and discussion on the topic second. The past Karl Rove or ‘Rovian’ tactics of ‘divide and conquer’ by issue seems to have become as transparent as the methods of political smear and dirty campaigning at the end of campaigns to turn to the negative to bring out the worst of people’s emotions and fears instead of any optimistic engagement of issues. The over-riding goal of this paper is to bridge the gap in understanding first. ideology and thought that should prevail for a leader in any capacity. so the tools to facilitate the rationale response to change and information often lies with the attitudes and incentives given by the leaders in the boomer generation to the newer. gender. and to highlight the very real cause and effect relationships that exist in the forward movement and inter-dependence of these two groups 21 . The recognition and acknowledgement that the separation in work methods. Leadership in the workplace and all areas of interaction that intersect age disparity relations are affected between Millennials and Boomer generations. the tools of understanding second and the tools of technology enablement last. distribution and dissemination. Summary The digital divide is showing itself to not be an age. race or ability. younger professionals under their tutelage.

2005 22 .edu/~pmd1/acrl/millennial. Appendix ‘A’ www.ppt Marketing the Millennials: What They Expect From Their Library Experience Patricia M. Duck and Randi Koeske University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg April 8. 2000).pitt. Boomers 22 in steadying the foundation of the ‘old’ and the movement and advancement of the ‘new’ and seeing how the collision of these two entities evolve to the benefit and efficiency of the overall goals of society (Goman. Information Use by Millennials vs.

html BRAINIAC'S GUIDE TO AMERICA'S RECENT GENERATIONS 1904-13: The Greatest Generation Partisans 1914-23: The Greatest Generation The New Gods 1924-33: The Silent Generation postmodern Generation 1934-43: The Silent Generation Anti-Anti-Utopian Generation 1944-53: Baby Boomers 1954-63: Baby Boomers OGX (Original Generation X) 1964-73: Generation X PC Generation 1974-83: Generation Y Net Generation 1984-93: Millennials Please credit Brainiac/Joshua Glenn whenever you use this guide. < Back to Front Page Text size – + Final words on Generations X and Y Email|Link|Comments (6) Posted by Joshua Glenn April 17. Xer.boston. Yer. or different generational name suggestions? Leave a comment on this post or email me. Everything will be explained. Got a beef with my periodization. And there's a handy chart at the end of this post! 23 . or Millennial? Here's a handy guide. Boomers 23 Appendix ‘B’ http://www. Information Use by Millennials vs. Born between 1954 and 1993 and still unsure about whether you're a Boomer. 2008 11:28 AM Were you born between 1954 and 1993? Confused about what generation you belong to? Read on.com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/01/pc_generation.

GENERATION X & TWENTYSOMETHINGS But what of the Generation X we heard so much about in the 1990s? In 1990. Barrack Obama (b. My own periodic table of American generations -. In the early 1990s. But many Americans born from 1954 through the early 1960s don't feel like Boomers. in my reckoning) tend to agree that they're Boomers. Meredith Bagby. the zinester Candi Strecker claimed that Americans who. 1961) didn't feel like Boomers. "Generation X" (1991). Jonathan Pontell offered a new name for this lost generation. influential. however. many of them actively resent and/or scorn the Boomers. both members of the lost generation in question.1944. Douglas Coupland published his first novel. in fact.which is eccentric. For example. and anti-Boomer cohort the "Original Generation X" (OGXers). 1961) has become the spokesman for this lost generation. but off by a few years on the end date. the title of which seemed to suggest that North Americans more or less the same age as the author (b. she was referring to the 1984 cult movie directed by Alex Cox (1954) and starring Emilio Estevez (1962). though others would set the start date at 1946 (Census Bureau) or 1943 (Howe and Strauss) -. That doesn't mean.and the early 1950s (1953. Around the same time. like herself. Americans who were born between the mid-1940s -. because of his insistence that his generation's worldview and politics aren't a Baby Boomer's. were born between the mid-1950s and early 1960s were members of the "Repo Man" generation. Boomers 24 A LOST GENERATION Despite the social-scientific-sounding claims made by journalists and marketing consultants (or. some unholy combination of the two). whose members he claimed were born between 1954 and 1965: "Generation Jones. in my reckoning. In the early 2000s.indicates that the lost generation in question was born between 1954 and 1963. Fine! No problem there. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. I've called this impressive. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. that you can arbitrarily select two dates and name everyone born between them a member of a generation. and Jonathan Pontell. in the case of pop demographers like Neil Howe and William Strauss. Pontell was close. then something is wrong with your theory. not to mention political advocacy groups like Third Millennium. Mr. Neil 24 . and in 1997. Coupland. Information Use by Millennials vs." In the past year or so. if it doesn't feel like a good fit to most of those people. In honor of Mr. a generation isn't a sociological fact. and therefore 100 percent correct -. inflexible.

which she defined as those born between 1965-76.") In 1993. "Rational Exuberance: The Influence of Generation X on the New Economy. i. following Howe and Strauss. GENERATION Y & MILLENNIALS Who. and Newsweek was close with the end date. Especially now that we've learned that an entire generation -. Bagby is not a member of the over determined generation in question. in their 1997 book "The Fourth Turning. There never was a Generation Y. the shiny-happy. its experiences wider and its culture more splintery. (However. it was a placeholder label that lumped together young Americans who were actually members of discrete generations. rejuvenile generation that I've called Generation PC (PCers)." Howe and Strauss confessed that the members of this so-called generation didn't buy into it: "Compared to any other generation born in this century. Boomers 25 Howe and William Strauss's bestselling books "Generations" (1991) and "13th-Gen" (1993) claimed that the post-baby-boom "13ers" (aka Gen X) were born between 1961-81. It was just a placeholder label. though Howe and Strauss came close with the start date." Howe and Strauss claimed that Millennials were born between 1982 and 2002. has described the Millennials as those born between 1977-94. According to my periodization scheme.ever identified as an Xer. the first Millennials were born in 1978.) All of these guesstimates are off.went missing for decades.e. [the 13th generation] is less cohesive." a young economist named Meredith Bagby (b. its leaders claimed that the cohort in question was born between 1961 and 1981. And in her 1998 book. announced that it had formed to represent the concerns of those Americans who'd been dubbed "twentysomethings" or "Generation X". are these Millennials and Generation Yers that we've heard so much about? According to the consumer research outfit Iconoculture. meanwhile. Millennials are those Americans who were 29 and under in 2007. According to my inflexible periodization scheme. Why so much confusion? Because there never was a Generation X. Americans born between 1964 and 1973 are members of an ambivalent (not apathetic). like Generation X. 1974) said she was proud to be a member of Generation X.the OGXers -. Ironically.. and others. but good-hearted Millennials were born between 1984 and 1993. marketing consultants. fragment- brooding. and those born from 1978-98. the political advocacy group Third Millennium. which allows the first-born of their cohort to graduate in the year 2000. Information Use by Millennials vs. (The nice thing about a flexible generational periodization scheme is that you can neatly peg the Millennials to 1982. lifted from Douglas Coupland by journalists. The New York Times has called "Generation Y" those born from 1976-90. No wonder that nobody -- except Meredith Bagby -. and applied to anyone and everyone born from the mid-1960s on. In their 2000 bestseller "Millennials Rising. and 25 . then. But wait! All this confusion about Generation Y should make us suspicious. Newsweek.

we did. unscrupulous marketers.e. In other words.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). However.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). The Net Generation." while the younger Netters were lumped in with older Millennials and called "Generation Y. Boomers 26 that some members of another generation -. Information Use by Millennials vs. as I call these Web-savvy. i. the older Netters were lumped in with younger PCers and called "Generation X. Boomers). (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. OK? *** Still feel confused about which generation you belong to. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. I've located the lost generation and they're safe and sound. Let's not lose track of them again. 1954-60: OGXers 1954: You're an OGXer.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). by misguided journalists. and might identify with the previous generation (in this case. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. and which generations you've been accused of belonging to.the PCers -." What a drag. 1955: You're an OGXer.. What about the rest of this so-called Generation X. consult the following chart. boss-flustering. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. 1956: You're an OGXer. those Americans born from the mid-1970s through. 1981 (the end fate of Howe and Strauss's 13th Generation)? And what about the so-called Gen Yers and Millennials who were born before 1984? Did we lose another post-Boomer generation? ONE OF OUR GENERATIONS IS MISSING! Yes. 26 .were mistakenly called Generation X. NB: You were born in a cusp year. heavily tattooed Americans. were born between 1974 and 1983. They're a great bunch of young people. say. and others? If you were born between 1954 and 1993. thanks to my inflexible and therefore completely accurate periodization scheme.

Third Millennium. 1961-1965: A confusion of OGXers and PCers 1961: You're an OGXer. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65).) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). But you were lumped in with the Boomers. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. Boomers 27 1957: You're an OGXer. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. 1959: You're an OGXer. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. But you were lumped in with the Boomers.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). 1958: You're an OGXer.) William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). following Howe and Strauss.) Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). In 1990. Information Use by Millennials vs. Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. PCers). Third Millennium. following Howe and Strauss. and might identify with the next generation (in this case. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65).) William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). 1964: You're a PCer. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). NB: You were born in a cusp year. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. In 1990. 1963: You're an OGXer. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964.) William Strauss and Neil 27 . But you were lumped in with the Boomers. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. 1962: You're an OGXer> But you were lumped in with the Boomers. But you were lumped in with the Boomers. Third Millennium. 1960: You're an OGXer.) William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). following Howe and Strauss. (The Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. In 1990. claim you're Generation X (1961-81).

Third Millennium. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). in 1997. in 1997. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. 1968: You're a PCer. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. In 1990. Information Use by Millennials vs. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). In 1990. 28 . Third Millennium. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). following Howe and Strauss. and might identify with the previous generation (in this case. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). in 1997. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). in 1997. following Howe and Strauss. In 1990. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. 1966-1971: PCers 1966: You're a PCer. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Third Millennium. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. following Howe and Strauss. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). NB: You were born in a cusp year. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. Third Millennium. Boomers 28 Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). 1969: You're a PCer. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). In 1990. following Howe and Strauss. in 1997. following Howe and Strauss. following Howe and Strauss. In 1990. Third Millennium. OGXers). In 1990. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. 1967: You're a PCer. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. 1965: You're a PCer. Jonathan Pontell claims you're a member of "Generation Jones" (1954-65). Third Millennium. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77.

Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). following Howe and Strauss. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Third Millennium. in 1997. In 1990. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. Third Millennium. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). In a 2000 story. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). 1971: You're a PCer. following Howe and Strauss. NB: You were born in a cusp year. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Third Millennium. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). following Howe and Strauss. 1973: You're a PCer. following Howe and Strauss. 1974: You're a Netter. in 1997. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). NB: You were born in a cusp year. Third Millennium. 1975: You're a Netter. In 1990. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. Netters). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Information Use by Millennials vs. in 1997. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). in 1997. in 1997. The New 29 . in 1997. following Howe and Strauss. Third Millennium. 1976: You're a Netter. 1972-76: A confusion of PCers and Netters 1972: You're a PCer. PCers). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). in 1997. Third Millennium. Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. Third Millennium. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). In 1990. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). Time Magazine claimed that the "twentysomething" generation was born between 1961-72. and might identify with the next generation (in this case. Meredith Bagby claims you're Generation X (1965-76). Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). and might identify with the previous generation (in this case. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965-77. following Howe and Strauss. Boomers 29 1970: You're a PCer. following Howe and Strauss.

The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". 1979: You're a Netter. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. Boomers 30 York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". 1978: You're a Netter. Third Millennium. following Howe and Strauss. following Howe and Strauss. Third Millennium. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1982-1990: A confusion of Netters and Millennials 30 . But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. In a 2000 story. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. following Howe and Strauss. In a 2000 story. In a 2000 story. following Howe and Strauss. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). claim you're Generation X (1961-81). Information Use by Millennials vs. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Third Millennium. Time claimed that "Generation X" was born between 1965- 77. In a 2000 story. Third Millennium. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). In 1997. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Thirteenth Generation" (1961-81). Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1980: You're a Netter. claim you're Generation X (1961-81). this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. 1981: You're a Netter. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". claim you're Generation X (1961-81). this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1977-81: Netters 1977: You're a Netter. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976-90. following Howe and Strauss. Third Millennium. In a 2000 story.

William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". The New York Times described "Generation 31 . 1985: You're a Millennial. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). Millennials). The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. Boomers 31 1982: You're a Netter. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). and might identify with the next generation (in this case. 1988: You're a Millennial. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). NB: You were born in a cusp year. 1987: You're a Millennial. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. In a 2000 story. In a 2000 story. Netters). Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). In a 2000 story. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1984: You're a Millennial. 1983: You're a Netter. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. In a 2000 story. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. 1986: You're a Millennial. In a 2000 story. and might identify with the previous generation (in this case. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). NB: You were born in a cusp year. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". In a 2000 story. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. Information Use by Millennials vs. In a 2000 story. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994.

William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. In a 2000 story. 32 . Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1992: You're a Millennial. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. Information Use by Millennials vs. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. 1993: You're a Millennial. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. 1994-2003: An unnamed generation 1994: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. and might identify with the previous generation (in this case. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). NB: You were born in a cusp year. The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". Millennials). and might identify with the next generation (in this case. Boomers 32 Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). The New York Times described "Generation Y" as "the young people between 10 and 24". 1990: You're a Millennial. an unnamed one). But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). In a 2000 story. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. Newsweek has described the "Millennials" as those Americans born between 1977 and 1994. 1989: You're a Millennial. But a 1999 Times story describes Yers as having been born from 1978-98. 1991-1993: Millennials 1991: You're a Millennial. NB: You were born in a cusp year. this suggests that Yers were born from 1976- 90.

2002: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). 2001: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. 1999: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. 33 . Information Use by Millennials vs. 2003: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). 1998: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. A 1999 Times story describes members of "Generation Y" as having been born from 1978-98. William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). William Strauss and Neil Howe placed you in their "Millennial Generation" (1982-2002). 2000: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. Boomers 33 1995: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. 1997: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way. 1996: You're a member of a generation that's too young to characterize in any remotely meaningful way.

" a Brainiac post (and Ideas column) about "the Original Generation X" that appeared this past December.com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/03/follow_the_leader. readers. on February 17. over a dozen readers urged me to take a look at "In the Eye of the Beholder: When a Boom Begins." a story by Jenny Lyn Bader that appeared on the "Ideas & Trends" page of the Time’s popular Week in Review section." If this sort of thing sounds familiar. Boomers 34 http://www. notes Bader." Despite the fact that the Census Bureau defines the baby boom as births during the years 1946 to 1964. depending on how you figure it. You may have read about it again in "Obama: boomer or post-boomer. Life is short! One other little bit of Times-bashing. "Or. it's because you read about "Generation Obama vs.on Obama's own insistence that he isn't a 34 . Mr. Information Use by Millennials vs. To be honest. for alerting me whenever you spot a New York Times story about something that was covered in Brainiac weeks earlier. the Boomers" in Brainiac (and in the Ideas section) almost exactly one year to the day before Bader's ideas/trend story appeared. who picked up -." Bader announces. 2008 11:18 AM Thanks. My original post was sparked by a column written by the Globe's Peter Canellos. could be the third boomer in chief. I delete most of these emails without even looking up the Times stories in question.boston.html Local Search Site Search < Back to Front Page Text size – + Follow the leader Email|Link|Comments (0) Posted by Joshua Glenn March 10. following Presidents Clinton and Bush. "Barrack Obama could be the first Generation X president.early -. and then we'll forget all about that newspaper for a while. "the practice of defining generations is more complicated than the theory. last month. born in 1961. Obama. OK? While I was away on vacation.

there's no reason to be puzzled: McCain is actually a member of the outspoken. Having already muddied the waters by calling Obama both an Xer and a member of Generation Jones. that John McCain. born between 1934 and 1943. born in 1936." Obama said -. Clinton is a Boomer. Jonesers." Very flattering! But I prefer the term PC Generation. 35 . "I thank the Moses Generation. "doesn't seem especially Silent. Bader compounds the problem by quoting the influential pop demographers Neil Howe and William Strauss. with some puzzlement.and then noting.. though. The point I've made in Brainiac is that Americans born between 1954 and 1963 (Pontell and I are roughly in agreement about these dates) are Original Generation Xers. If she had. and McCain is an Anti-Anti-Utopian. Information Use by Millennials vs. and that his politics are post-boomer politics. Xers. Particularly the Boomers. Boomers 35 boomer. Pontell places Obama in the generation that he claims was born between 1954 and 1965." As I've argued in Brainiac. The more recent post was inspired by an Atlantic Monthly essay on Obama. not the Boomers. I've been rethinking the post-boomer generations since 1992. though conflicted Anti-Anti-Utopian Generation. she would have understood that Obama was slyly referring to me in a speech that she quotes at the end of her essay. "We're going to leave it to the Joshua Generation to make sure [progressive social change] happens. Got it? Bader should have consulted BRAINIAC'S GUIDE TO AMERICA'S RECENT GENERATIONS before writing about Boomers.referring to the Anti- Anti-Utopians. who argued that Americans born from 1925 through 1942 were the "Silent Generation" -. Obama is an OGXer." as an authority. because Bader has described Obama as an Xer. if you ask me. However. and Silents. This is confusing. while the point of Pontell's "Generation Jones" conceit is that Americans born between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s don't identify either as boomers as Xers.. coiner of the phrase "Generation Jones. and that part of what defines an OGXer is a visceral disdain for being labeled a member of any generation. Bader goes on to quote "generation-spotter" Jonathan Pontell.

DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project. Information Use by Millennials vs. 2003. Source: Horrigan. John B. Consumption of Information Goods and Services in the United States. • As information technology users. November 23. Boomers 36 Appendix C Consumption of Information Goods and Services in the United States: Summary of Findings at a Glance • Americans’ love affair with technology is one of the defining characteristics of our culture. and they are a fairly • diverse crowd. 36 . Americans sort into eight distinct groups of information technology • users. • The Internet and computer are the media of choice for many Americans. • The technology his elites fall into three distinct sub-groups of Americans who are the most • voracious consumers of information goods and services in the United States. especially the young. • Technology elites. have a very hands-on approach to managing their • technology experiences. • Most people – 69% of the population – are not part of the technological elite. Washington.

com/cgi-bin/bookhome/117356987/ Next Generation Business Handbook Published Online: 5 Dec 2007 Editor(s): Subir Chowdhury Print ISBN: 9780471669968 Online ISBN: 9780470172223 10. Tichy Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 56K) Part none: Section I: Leadership – Part One: Leadership and the Business Environment Chapter 1: The Effective Leader (p 5-21) Subir Chowdhury Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 107K) Chapter 2: Using Organizational Culture as a Leadership Tool (p 22-38) Jennifer A.interscience.wiley.1002/9780470172223 Copyright © 2004 Subir Chowdhury • Recommend to Your Librarian • Save Title to My Profile • How to get Online Access • Purchase a Print Copy Book Home Product Information | For Authors Frontmatter (p i-xxiv) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 3399K) Part none: Section I: Leadership Part none: Part Introduction (p 1-4) Noel M. Sandra E. Boomers 37 Appendix ‘D’ http://www3. Information Use by Millennials vs. Cha Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 118K) Chapter 3: Leadership and Innovation (p 39-55) Joaquim Vilà Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 106K) 37 . Chatman.

Jean-Louis Barsoux Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 140K) Chapter 9: Managing Leadership Images (p 142-156) Juan-Carlos Pastor. Barsade. Margarita Mayo. Boomers 38 Chapter 4: Leadership and Destructive Self-Confidence (p 56-71) Sydney Finkelstein Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 115K) Part none: Section I: Leadership – Part Two: Leadership and Learning Chapter 5: Leading by Analogy (p 73-90) Leigh Thompson. Information Use by Millennials vs. Spreitzer Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 175K) Chapter 11: Leadership in a Branded World (p 174-185) Miriam Salzer-Mörling. Ashleigh Shelby Rosette Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 123K) Chapter 6: Career Imprinting and Leadership Development (p 91-105) Monica C. Stefan Meisiek Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 114K) Chapter 8: Leadership to Improve Performance (p 124-141) Jean-François Manzoni. James R. Meindl Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 860K) Part none: Section I: Leadership – Part Four: Leadership and the Workplace Chapter 10: Leadership in the Virtual Workplace (p 157-173) Gretchen M. Higgins Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 102K) Part none: Section I: Leadership – Part Three: Leadership and Employees Chapter 7: Leading by Doing (p 107-123) Sigal G. Lars Strannegård Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 91K) 38 .

Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 39

Chapter 12:
Managing a Self-Managed Team (p 186-199)
Marja Flory
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 102K)

Chapter 13:
The Merchandising of Leadership (p 200-219)
Jack Denfeld Wood, Gianpiero Petriglieri
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 131K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy

Part none:
Part Introduction (p 221-226)
Christopher A. Bartlett
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 65K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy – Part One: Strategies for Competitive Advantage

Chapter 14:
Quality Strategy (p 227-247)
Subir Chowdhury
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 142K)

Chapter 15:
Competing on Social Capabilities (p 248-271)
Piero Morosini
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 440K)

Chapter 16:
Dynamics of Competitive Interaction (p 272-293)
Joel A. C. Baum
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 777K)

Chapter 17:
Strategic Advantage and the Dynamics of Organizational Competence (p 294-312)
Rebecca Henderson
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 342K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy – Part Two: Strategic Planning and Renewal

Chapter 18:
To Plan or Not to Plan? (p 313-332)
Jeanne M. Liedtka
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 130K)

39

Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 40

Chapter 19:
Mastering Strategic Renewal (p 333-357)
Henk W. Volberda
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 188K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy – Part Three: Strategies for the Networked Economy

Chapter 20:
Value Creation in the Networked Economy (p 359-376)
Nicolai J. Foss
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 119K)

Chapter 21:
Global Strategy in an Internet Era (p 377-390)
Subramanian Rangan
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 101K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy – Part Four: Strategies for Business Expansion

Chapter 22:
Symbiosis or Parasitism? (p 391-413)
Jaideep Anand
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 157K)

Chapter 23:
Globalization and Management Attention (p 414-429)
Allen J. Morrison, John C. Beck, Cyril Bouquet
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 116K)

Part none: Section II: Strategy – Part Five: Strategies for Nonprofit Organizations

Chapter 24:
Strategy Dynamics for Nonprofit Organizations (p 431-449)
Kim Warren
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 445K)

Part none: Section III: Customer Management

Part none:
Part Introduction (p 451-455)
Philip Kotler
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 63K)

Part none: Section III: Customer Management – Part One: Relating to the Customer

Chapter 25:
Understanding Customer Needs (p 457-472)

40

Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 41

Subir Chowdhury
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 7764K)

Chapter 26:
Strengthening Customer Relationships (p 473-491)
Prashant Malaviya, Sarah Spargo
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 127K)

Chapter 27:
Building Customer Interface (p 492-506)
Niraj Dawar, Mark Vandenbosch
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 219K)

Chapter 28:
Avoiding Traps in Customer Relations (p 507-522)
Jacques Horovitz
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 134K)

Chapter 29:
Customer Relations Online (p 523-536)
Ravi Dhar
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 99K)

Part none: Section III: Customer Management – Part Two: Experience with the Customer

Chapter 30:
Customer Experience (p 537-552)
Bernd Schmitt
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 116K)

Chapter 31:
Coping with Critical Criticism (p 553-568)
Gil McWilliam
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 123K)

Chapter 32:
Growing Pains (p 569-583)
Michael D. Johnson
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 119K)

Chapter 33:
Persuading with Emotions (p 584-595)
Patti Williams
Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 91K)

Part none: Section III: Customer Management – Part Three: Managing the Customer

41

David J. Julian Birkinshaw Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 123K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship Part none: Part Introduction (p 645-654) Mark P. Rice. Toulan. John Roberts Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 103K) Chapter 36: Managing Global Customers (p 630-644) Omar N. Arnold. Peng Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 104K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship – Part Two: Entrepreneurship and Finance Chapter 40: New-Venture Finance (p 695-711) Michael Horvath Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 338K) 42 . Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 42 Chapter 34: Strategic Customer Management (p 597-615) Alexander Chernev Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 127K) Chapter 35: Designing Supply and Distribution Channels (p 616-629) Duncan Simester. Philip Anderson Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 82K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship – Part One: Entrepreneurial Behavior Chapter 37: The Effective Entrepreneur (p 655-665) Subir Chowdhury Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 82K) Chapter 38: Entrepreneurial Opportunities (p 666-679) Sankaran Venkataraman Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 121K) Chapter 39: Nature of Entrepreneurship (p 680-694) Mike W.

Leleux. Shepherd Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 134K) Part none: Section V: People Management Part none: Part Introduction (p 831-835) Marshall Goldsmith Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 59K) 43 . Hiatt Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 95K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship – Part Four: Entrepreneurial Management Chapter 45: Entrepreneurial Mind-Set in Multinational Corporations (p 773-792) Julian Birkinshaw Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 130K) Chapter 46: Sustaining Rapid Growth (p 793-808) Charlene L. Thomas A. Dean A. Benoît F. Boomers 43 Chapter 41: Untangling Service-for-Equity Arrangements (p 712-725) James E. Nicholls-Nixon Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 128K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship – Part Five: Entrepreneurship and Economics Chapter 47: Income Disparity and Entrepreneurship (p 809-829) Andrew Zacharakis. Henderson. Ian White Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 178K) Chapter 42: Business Planning (p 726-741) Fernando Alvarez Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 117K) Part none: Section IV: Entrepreneurship – Part Three: Entrepreneurship and Strategy Chapter 43: Playing Entrepreneurial Judo (p 743-759) Javier Gimeno Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 113K) Chapter 44: Success for New Ventures (p 760-771) Todd Saxton. Information Use by Millennials vs.

Gibson Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 116K) Chapter 52: Change Management and HR Practices (p 903-919) Gerard H. Information Use by Millennials vs. Sánchez-Runde Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 94K) Part none: Section V: People Management – Part Two: HR Management Chapter 51: Returning Human to HR Management (p 885-902) Donald E. Seijts. Victoria Aldworth Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 117K) Chapter 53: What Really Matters in HR Management? (p 920-937) Veronica Hope Hailey Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 118K) Part none: Section V: People Management – Part Three: People and the Organization Chapter 54: The Four Thrusts Driving Corporate Renewal (p 939-955) Quy Nguyen Huy Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 114K) Chapter 55: Creating the Family-Friendly Organization (p 956-970) Lynn Perry Wooten Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 121K) 44 . Boomers 44 Part none: Section V: People Management – Part One: People-Management Strategy Chapter 48: Talent-Management System (p 837-859) Subir Chowdhury Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 2072K) Chapter 49: Living Strategy (p 860-871) Lynda Gratton Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 92K) Chapter 50: Changing Foundations of People Management (p 872-883) Carlos J.

Vollmann Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 271K) Chapter 63: Digital Networked Business (p 1090-1102) 45 . Rosenzweig Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 109K) Part none: Section VI: Networked Business Part none: Part Introduction (p 1021-1027) Don Tapscott Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 72K) Part none: Section VI: Networked Business – Part One: Organizations in the Networked ERA Chapter 59: The Power of Networked Business (p 1029-1038) Subir Chowdhury Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 80K) Chapter 60: Managing Networked Organizations (p 1039-1059) Ben M. Information Use by Millennials vs. Lawrence Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 148K) Chapter 58: Tomorrow's Global Workforce (p 1007-1020) Philip M. Thomas E. Tucci Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 125K) Chapter 62: From Extended Enterprise to Orchestrating a Team of Companies (p 1076-1089) Carlos Cordón. Ellingson Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 104K) Chapter 57: How Old You Are May Depend on Where You Work (p 986-1006) Barbara S. Bensaou Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 144K) Chapter 61: Beyond Synergies (p 1060-1075) Christopher L. Boomers 45 Chapter 56: Transforming the Process of Staffing toward Innovation (p 971-985) Jill E.

Venkatraman Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 159K) Chapter 65: Technological Mediation as Strategy (p 1128-1156) Shane Greenstein Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 4958K) Chapter 66: Seamless IT Alignment (p 1157-1168) Carol V. Boomers 46 Kim Viborg Andersen. Ann M. Brown Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 92K) Chapter 67: Seizing the Value of Online Auctions (p 1169-1182) Eric van Heck Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 169K) Chapter 68: Building a Platform for E-Business (p 1183-1198) Chris Sauer. Fogelgren Pedersen. Upkar Varshney Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 130K) Part none: Section VI: Networked Business – Part Two: Network Strategy Chapter 64: Strategic Connections (p 1103-1127) N. Leslie Willcocks Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 131K) Notes (p 1199-1262) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 328K) About the Leader (p 1263-1264) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 37K) About the Next Generation Business Thinkers (p 1265-1299) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 189K) Author Index (p 1301-1310) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 82K) 46 . Information Use by Millennials vs.

Boomers 47 Subject Index (p 1311-1320) Summary | Full Text: PDF (Size: 78K) 47 . Information Use by Millennials vs.

said that many recent entrants into the workforce face a culture shock from Day One. Diane & Scheef. and craft mentoring initiatives that work. American Association of collegiate registrars and admissions officers and life course associates. 3. New York: Vintage Books. (2002). and Gen Yers to Work Together and Achieve More).thelearning-cafe. Judith. (2003). “The ‘Net Generation’: Characteristics of traditional-aged college students and implications for academic information services. due out next month. author of Bridging the Generation Gap: How to Get Radio Babies. Alsop's book. Kate. Chicago: ALA. Boomers 48 Bibliography References Howe. Information Use by Millennials vs. Millennials go to college. Career Press.0 and other emerging technologies.ala. Gravett. Devon are the co-founders of The Learning Café. Manuel. The visible librarian: Asserting your value with marketing and advocacy. www. Alsop. They collaborate with clients to make peace with multiple workplace generations. www.” College & Undergraduate Libraries 9 (2): 25–42 Seiss.Millennials rising: The next great generation. (2003). Boomers. 2. Neil & Strauss. “Teaching information literacy to generation Y.” Journal of Library Administration 36:195–217. (2002). William. Ron a columnist for The Wall Street Journal and author of The Trophy Kids Grow Up. Gen Xers. looks at how the new generation is already shaking up the workplace. Thielfoldt.org 1. create leadership development initiatives. Sheesley. D.com 48 . noted that the millennials she interviewed were clearly reluctant to work for companies lacking Web 2. Linda (2007).

adapt communication styles and change motivational methods. Learn how to analyze values. published by John Wiley & Sons Inc. In Just Get It!.abanet. They are the co-authors of Mentoring: A How-To Guide published by the American Society for Training & Development.html November 2005 Their work on generational issues is featured in the thought-leadership compendium Human Resources in the 21st Century. Morris Morris Massey has been called frank. you'll learn how to overcome generational value conflicts that arise in the workplace. Information Use by Millennials vs. JUST GET IT! Massey. and their popular Talks on Talent have provided practical guidance on making mentoring work to thousands of business people worldwide 4. He's also a bestselling authority on workplace issues. direct and irreverent. Their breakthrough advice on generations in the workplace is featured in Love ‘Em or Lose ‘Em: Getting Good People to Stay.org/lpm/lpt/articles/mgt08044. Just Get It! combines theory and methodology to help us unlock the mystery of why people behave as they do. KEY LEARNING POINTS Understand generational differences and value clashes Integrate the values of each generation Improve relationships at work and at home Learn to think differently USES • Diversity • Communication • Leadership • Listening • Management Skills 49 . Boomers 49 http://www.

) is a producer of training videos. Austin.1: What You Are Is Where You Were When  The Original Massey Tapes . he received four awards for teaching excellence. 50 .3: What You Are Is  The Original Massey Tapes . and non-profit agencies on this program. VIDEO PROGRAMS  What You Are Is Where You Were When. please call us at 1-800-423-6021 or 617-354-0017. Dr Massey was honored with the W.D.M. 1988) he was cited as one of the 27 most influential workplace experts of the time. Boomers 50 • Motivation and Inspiration • Respectful Workplace • Teams and Teambuilding Package includes the video and a workbook. Information Use by Millennials vs.A. at the University of Colorado at Boulder. McFeely award presented by the International Management Council for "significant contribution to the field of management and human relations.B. His undergraduate and M.4: What You Are Is Where You See  What You Are Is What You Choose…So Don't Screw It Up  Dancing With The Bogeyman  The Massey Triad Program 1: What You Are Is Where You Were When  The Massey Triad Program 2: What You Are is Not What You Have To Be  The Massey Triad Program 3: What You Are Is Where You See Enterprise Media offers discounted pricing for education. AGAIN!  Just Get It!  Flashpoint: When Values Collide  The Original Massey Tapes . During the late 1960s through the 1970s.. degrees are from the University of Texas. in business is from Louisiana State University. government. Morris Massey (1939." During the 1980s and 90s he was the #1 ranked resource for the Young Presidents Organization International.. as an Associate Dean and Professor of Marketing. In What Works At Work (Lakewood Publications. and his Ph. For information on these discounts or for multiple copy pricing.

2004 (Computerworld) -.boston. One problem with most IT productivity research is that it's based on quarterly or annual comparisons.library.10801.html 8." notes Howard Rubin. 2008 from the World Wide Web: http://www.boston.com/managementtopics/roi/story/0. Marketing the Millennials (April 7–10.com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/04/final_words_on. (2005) The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century ISBN: 0374292884 5.pitt. http://www.00.edu/ [Zoom! By Subject] 6. Some economists and researchers maintain that the massive investments companies made in IT during the go-go days of the late 1990s are just beginning to blossom and are being borne out in today's productivity figures.5% before then." says MIT professor Erik Brynjolfsson. http://www. Thomas. Minnesota) 7. Boomers 51 He retired in 1995 from the consulting/speaking circuit and now lives with his wife in Sedona. UPG Library Experiences. Final words on Generations ‘X’ and ‘Y’ Retrieved October 15. executive vice president at Meta Group Inc. whereas some productivity gains aren't immediately realized because "some IT investments have more of a long-term effect.html SIDEBAR: IT PRODUCTIVITY: THE LAG EFFECT Thomas Hoffman Today’s Top Stories or Other Management Stories January 12. J. Arizona Friedman. after rising 2.6% per year from 1996 to 2000 and about 1. Minneapolis. Glenn. (2008). has chugged along at an annual rate of more than 4% since early 2001. http://www. 2005.88885.. Information Use by Millennials vs. Figure 1.computerworld.Growth in productivity. which is generally defined as output per unit of worker input.html 51 .com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/01/pc_generation. "The reason we're having such strong productivity growth now is that firms laid the foundation for this growth five years ago with the IT investments they made then.

org/pdfs/PIP_Info_Consumption. J. President.Barrack Obama Music Video Congratulations.pdf (Horrigan. Mr. -Lyrics.youtube. K.. New York: Wiley.It was a creed written into the founding documents that declared the destiny of .pewinternet.questia. New Hampshire on the night of the primary... 52 . Goman.888 viewsWeCan08 13:09 Barrack Obama: Yes We Can Barrack Obama speaks in Nashua. (2000). The Human Side of High-Tech: Lessons from the Technology Frontier. 2008.314.org/ 12. Consumption of information goods and services in the United States PEW INTERNET & AMERICAN LIFE PROJECT 1100 CONNECTICUT AVENUE. Boomers 52 9.qst?a=o&d=114034368 10. Highlight footage from the past week in New .pewinternet. D.com/PM. http://www.com 04:30 Yes We Can .C. Retrieved October 16.. B. 10 months ago 14. www. 20036 202-296-0019 http://www. from Questia database: http://www. (2003). C. Information Use by Millennials vs. NW – SUITE 710 WASHINGTON.

youbama.148.am I was sitting in my recording studio watching the debates.Music Video Barrack Obama VOTE BARACK '08.. 10 months ago 1.i...i.. Torn between the candidates I was never really big on . Yes We Can! ¡Sí...012 viewsYouBamaVideos 04:25 Barrack Obama .059. 53 .205.062 viewsBarackObamadotcom 04:30 Yes We Can Obama Song by will.am.Yes We Can music video Black Eyed Peas' will.am's music video inspired by Barrack Obama's message of hope.. Boomers 53 11 months ago 2.230 viewsillwilly 04:29 YES WE CAN . founding member and frontman of Black .i. YES WE CAN! Check out: www.com According to will.. 10 months ago 6. Se Puede! If you . Information Use by Millennials vs.

is Will.am totally stole this idea from us.php?topic=75521. The Pentagon's New Map (PNM) Esquire Thomas P.966 views 1. Blueprint for Action: A Future Worth Creating by Thomas .amazon. Information Use by Millennials vs. Boomers 54 10 months ago 1.i. the sequel to his influential previous book The Pentagon's New Map.Similar pages - 54 ...com/Pentagons-New-Map-Twenty-First-Century/dp/0399151753 .. This item: The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas P.348k -Cached ... .com/published/pentagonsnewmap.S.M.com/Blueprint-Action-Future-Worth-Creating/dp/0399153128 .370k -Cached ..124.Last post: May 19 "The Pentagon's New Map" and "A Blueprint for Action" by Thomas PM Barnett.thomaspmbarnett. www...com: Blueprint for Action: A Future Worth Creating: Thomas . Barnett maps out a sweeping new vision for the U. 9 months ago 2..com: The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty ..0 .46k -Cached .M.842 viewsIrvineKinneas509 01:39 john.... military in Blueprint for Action. www. Barnett. Amazon.Similar pages - More results from www.com » 3.amazon.org/FORUM/index.378..43k -Cached .uselectionatlas. we've been thinking for a long time that earnest people reacting to a . www. "The Pentagon's New Map" and "A Blueprint for Action" by Thomas . This month.amazon.he.Similar pages - 4.. Amazon.. Barnett Pentagon's New Map | Blueprint for Action .Similar pages - 2. www.5 authors . Barnett delivers the same briefing to you in "The Pentagon's New Map (page .. 5 posts .htm ..

Video Stats : http://www.Wikipedia. Thomas P. Information Use by Millennials vs. Putnam Publishing Group. Blueprint for Action.Similar pages – 6.wikipedia.M. The Pentagon's New Map . 2008 .html References 55 . the free encyclopedia Nov 12..Cached .. en. ISBN 0-399-15175-3.com/hottrends/web.21k . Boomers 55 5. . The Pentagon's New Map.entrepreneur. Barnett (October 20.org/wiki/The_Pentagon's_New_Map ... 2005).

and consumers. The Futurist. 118. Alvermann. 2008. and in some cases. A. E. How the media advances learning and tools for literacy like games that build literacy. Boomers 56 Alfred. Retrieved October 16.qst?a=o&d=5000892912 Literacy and popular media go hand-in-hand in current youth culture. R.questia. accelerate.com/PM. from Questia database: http://www. 42. March/April). from Questia database: http://www. Trends shaping tomorrow's world: forecasts and implications for business. 45(2). text messaging and online learning environments that stimulate activity that is non-traditional in style but accomplishes traditional results that meet with methods that youth can be engaged in and relate to for future education extension is of utmost urgency and importance. L. D. (2008. Managing the big picture in colleges and universities: from tactics to strategy. Interactivity and technology play a large part in today’s youth college experience. Literacy identity work: playing to learn with popular media. Information and future Library system methods for reaching future patrons as well as bridging the gap to technology for new patrons.questia. O. J. J. Information Use by Millennials vs. H.qst?a=o&d=113184518 This resource speaks to the teaching and learning challenges in college today and in general how technology impacts everything from attention span to student’s ability to learn in traditional ways of teaching. 2008. Succession planning and generational 56 . teaching methods that use similar technologies are being implemented and extended to reach this generation of college students. from Questia database: http://www.questia. 2008.qst?a=o&d=5025610166 We ignore looking into future trends and developments to our detriment. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. M. interactive tools like web chat.. M. & Davies. CT: American Council on Education/Praeger.com/PM. The trends do not stop. (2007). These forward thinkers see emerging trends and the societal impacts they indicate with general swaths of direction barring many variables that can and do disrupt futures and trends. (2001). government. Crumpacker. Retrieved October 16..com/PM.. Knowing how to teach the Millennials and how they learn become imperative to understanding Libraries. 35+. & Crumpacker. but slow and consolidate. Westport. primarily economic in this case. (2006). Cetron. Retrieved October 16. & Heron. M.

September).qst?a=o&d=5025535746 This resource asks the question but gives the standard answer of “We’ll See”. 349+. 2008 from the Web Title www. Retrieved October 16. but can be blended with new and old requirements to ensure accuracy.com/PM. Using old methods is purposeful in eliminating digital mis-information. 2008. but often how change morphs its successors into the past instead of the present or future. they often are just working ‘smarter’ not ‘harder’. J.qst?a=o&d=5001163562 This resource take the obvious swipe at the generation gap in all generations and reduces the differences to workable solutions to managing. Younger folks are not ‘lazier’ than their predecessors. from Questia database: http://www. Retrieved October 16. 57 .questia. 8. but change always happens. 11. Not an effective strategy for survival or thriving. Boomers 57 stereotypes: should HR consider age-based values and attitudes a relevant factor or a passing fad? Public Personnel Management. (2005.questia.ala. no matter who resists it. C. December). The lag is the usual 3-5 years. The American Enterprise. P. Duck. propaganda and manipulation of data. Retrieved October 15. sometimes more relevant by current exploration and historical dissemination.com/PM. labor and innovative capabilities to remain competitive.M. That irks the technologically obsolete understanding of less technological familiar teachers and organizational leaders and creates a chasm between the understanding of efficiency and reliability of information. Information Use by Millennials vs. Marketing to the millennials: What they expect from their library experience. (2000. 2008. (2007.org – This is the American Library Association Web Site This Power Point presentation does an excellent job of illustrating why change has to occur in library and information system environments. Don't write off the next generation. September). It indicates the usual slowness of business to adapt to changes but they are eventually forced by circumstances to conform to win talent. historical context and assurance of facts. Geraci. sometimes less. Learning from youth marketers: adapting to the schoolhouse. interacting and motivating the next work force into being more like the employers so employers can understand the new world by making it look like the old world. from Questia database: http://www. 36(4). It just determines how fast you get behind or lose your competitive advantage. dis-information.

Giancola. from Questia database: http://www.qst?a=o&d=114034368 This source speaks to privacy.questia. this source addresses how the relevance of marketing in schools and for future consumption and usage of that model benefits everyone. 32+.com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/04/final_words_on. 2008.boston. Retrieved October 16. 2008. The naivety’ of this generation about the power and long-lasting impact of being ‘labeled’ like the red scare of early days in Hollywood and the black-listing of people based on erroneous labeling. New York: Wiley.qst?a=o&d=5011049257 Marketing and sales are at the heart of everything we do as Americans and in American society. To the end that they do or don’t and how to change perception and business models to begin accommodating this change. 29(4). (2006).com/PM. K.. The generation gap: more myth than reality. Glenn.com/PM. information privacy. mis-characterization by government bodies and classification of threat levels based on 58 . Information Use by Millennials vs. but exposed themselves to personal information gathering to be profiled.questia.qst?a=o&d=5018817611 More hyperbole on whether business is willing to adapt or adopt the new frontier. from Questia database: http://www. 2008. from Questia database: http://www. School Administrator. F. C. Being that 70-90% of our economy and the world’s economy depends on our consumption model occurring and continuing. Retrieved October 16. (2000).html A better understanding and generalization of the ‘when’ of people’s birth date coinciding with the ‘why’ of how technology and social events affect the outcome of the generation’s ways. including college recruitment and retention of this new entity of tech savvy employees. 2008 from the World Wide Web: http://www.com/PM. social networks and their impact on the work-place and how Millennials interpret this new world of public exposure and ways they have broken-down barriers to social isolation. Boomers 58 What business already knows about the millennials. Retrieved October 16. Goman. (2008).questia. identified and cataloged more efficiently for global tracking purposes. Final words on generations ‘X’ and ‘Y’ Retrieved October 15. Human Resource Planning. 62. J. The human side of high-tech: Lessons from the technology frontier. 24+.

Havenstein. H. Guidance may be several drafts of the project steps. M. Leadership issues in the information literate school community. 59 . C. Retrieved October 16. tell them a time-frame that the requirement needs to be completed in and get out of the way and let them produce the results.com/PM. Hovecamp. but the outcomes are often better than expected. 2008. (2003). CT: Libraries Unlimited. This resource gives the foundation for understanding what is defined as the ‘millennials’ and how perceptions of this generation affect how they work and why they work to fulfill their own objectives and their employers or teachers desires. more technologically savvy generations of workers today. & Asselin. J. http://www. (2006). (Eds.qst?a=o&d=113180281 How and why leadership is applied is examined and the differences of how to lead as well as effective tools for leading a widely dispersed employee bases are some of the topics this resource addresses. It is important to have a healthy level of suspicion and involvement in government to ensure that 9/11 and Iraq war proposals are in fact authentic. Who are the Millennials”. Henri. The world according to Y: Inside the new adult generation. Retrieved October 15. 2008 . Crows Nest. from Questia database: http://www.html. ( 2008) Computerworld September. Companies are increasingly forced to bend to Generation Y to get the best young talent. maintaining and retaining talent from the newer. Boomers 59 ethnicity. Huntley. creed or color have chilling 1984 Orwellian implications that have been completely lost to a generation of no-history interest or relevance to their lives. Westport.). not perceived needs of our nation.boston. 22. race.computerworld. Millennials demand changes in IT strategy (2008).com/action/article. harness the resourcefulness that they have and the best way to mentor and release their skill in your working environment. Give them and outcome. 2008 from the World Wide Web: http://www. (2005). The way they work. the reason they work and the best ways to develop their skills.com/bostonglobe/ideas/brainiac/2008/04/final_words_on. necessary and grounded in real. R.questia. Information Use by Millennials vs.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId =326407 This source speaks to the challenges of recruiting.

questia. 2008.. The outcomes are still tenuous at best.. schooling. M.qst?a=o&d=110024273 Understanding how media impacts how people perceive the world is of utmost significance in understanding their ‘world’ and why they act as they do and how that affects you as an employer or teachers when interacting with them in that arena. .com/PM. from Questia database: http://www. Information studies retrieved October 15. S. 31(1). Ontario Library Association (OLA -2004).questia. response strategies.com/action/positions/info_studies/html/intro. Mahwah. 60 . (2004). J. from Questia database: http://www. The useful insight into how we learn and what we are going to need to know and how that information and learning process will change the world we live in is of major interest to me..qst?a=o&d=5006016882 The desired goal of this resource is to examine where schools and student challenges collide. 2008 from the Web: http://www. L. Nichols. C.S. Information Use by Millennials vs. T. Hagie. and study skills of contemporary undergraduates. Retrieved October 16. America's teenagers--myths and realities: media images. Journal of Instructional Psychology. & Miller.W. Kuo. 60+. Retrieved October 16. Retrieved October 16. L. Some of the resultant ideas require both to change. 2008.qst?a=o&d=113653466 The age disparity of twenty-something’s vs.: Allen & Unwin. and the social costs of careless indifference.questia.html This study was the reason I began moving into the idea of Library Systems. from Questia database: http://www. Encouraging college student success: The instructional challenges. T. (2004). NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. thirty something’s has some valid key factors but little difference in technology orientation. 2008. but suggestions for strategies are given.accessola.com/PM. Those and some sociological factors are discussed and evaluated for the reader. Boomers 60 N.com/PM. & Good.

from Questia database: Magazine article by Patrick Tucker. 40.com/PM.).qst?a=o&d=108759049 How information and globalization affect global governance is a topic that shows how all of this ‘connects the dots’ on our world and how it is ultimately run and governed.questia. May-June 2006 (P. Information Use by Millennials vs. New York: Routledge. Environmental values in a globalising world: Nature. 61 . justice. Cooperation. Senate. P. The Futurist. J. The Futurist. & Lowe. Vol. not tribalism is required and anthropology is an important aspect of created and sustaining change for future generations. May/June). They are significantly different than the previous hundred years. Tucker. Congress and the President are required to see the dawn of a new day and accommodate rules and regulation to anticipate the slowness of hierarchy to respond to that change. from Questia database: http://www. 40. I. http://www.qst?a=o&d=5014938252 The ‘big picture’. Boomers 61 Paavola. Teaching the millennial generation. Retrieved October 16. (Eds. 2008. 7. This gives global insight without reflecting the vast change and immensity of speed in which it is occurring.com/PM. We can barely keep up in laws and rules governing the last hundred years. Retrieved October 16. 7). 2008. (2006. (2005). and governance.questia.