Pipework Design User Guide

AVEVA Solutions Ltd

Disclaimer
Information of a technical nature, and particulars of the product and its use, is given by AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries without warranty. AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries disclaim any and all warranties and conditions, expressed or implied, to the fullest extent permitted by law. Neither the author nor AVEVA Solutions Ltd, or any of its subsidiaries, shall be liable to any person or entity for any actions, claims, loss or damage arising from the use or possession of any information, particulars, or errors in this publication, or any incorrect use of the product, whatsoever.

Copyright
Copyright and all other intellectual property rights in this manual and the associated software, and every part of it (including source code, object code, any data contained in it, the manual and any other documentation supplied with it) belongs to AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries. All other rights are reserved to AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries. The information contained in this document is commercially sensitive, and shall not be copied, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd. Where such permission is granted, it expressly requires that this Disclaimer and Copyright notice is prominently displayed at the beginning of every copy that is made. The manual and associated documentation may not be adapted, reproduced, or copied, in any material or electronic form, without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd. The user may also not reverse engineer, decompile, copy, or adapt the associated software. Neither the whole, nor part of the product described in this publication may be incorporated into any third-party software, product, machine, or system without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd, save as permitted by law. Any such unauthorised action is strictly prohibited, and may give rise to civil liabilities and criminal prosecution. The AVEVA products described in this guide are to be installed and operated strictly in accordance with the terms and conditions of the respective licence agreements, and in accordance with the relevant User Documentation. Unauthorised or unlicensed use of the product is strictly prohibited. First published September 2007 © AVEVA Solutions Ltd, and its subsidiaries AVEVA Solutions Ltd, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HB, United Kingdom

Trademarks
AVEVA and Tribon are registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries. Unauthorised use of the AVEVA or Tribon trademarks is strictly forbidden. AVEVA product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries, registered in the UK, Europe and other countries (worldwide). The copyright, trade mark rights, or other intellectual property rights in any other product, its name or logo belongs to its respective owner.

Pipework Design User Guide

Pipework Design User Guide

Contents

Page

Pipework Design
Read this First . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1
Scope of this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1
Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assumptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the Tutorial Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Further Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1 1:1 1:1 1:1

How the Guide is Organised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1 Further Training in Using PDMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:3

Introducing AVEVA PDMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1
Introducing the Structure of PDMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1 Strengths of PDMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1 PDMS Piping Network Design Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:2

Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1
How PDMS Stores Design Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1
PDMS Design Data Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2

Logging In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:3 PDMS Startup Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:3 Creating some Administrative Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4

Creating Some Equipment Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1
How Equipment Items are Represented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1

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Basic Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1 Using Predefined Templates for Standard Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:2

Creating a Storage Tank to a Standard Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:3 Adding a Nozzle to the Storage Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 Viewing the Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:9
Defining what Appears in the View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:9 Manipulating the Displayed View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:11

Creating Some More Equipment Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:13
Creating a Vertical Vessel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Naming the Nozzle in the Base of the New Vessel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a Standard Design Pump. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the Orientation of an Equipment Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tidying Up Afterwards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:13 4:14 4:15 4:16 4:18

Routing a Sequence of Piping Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1
Design-to-Catalogue Cross-Referencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1 How Piping Networks are Represented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1
Pipes and Branches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 Piping Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2

Starting the Pipework Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 Setting a Default Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 Creating a Simple Pipework Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:4
Modifying Pipe Sequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:10

Creating a Second Pipework Sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:32 Quick Pipe Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:39
QPR Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cases of Ill-defined Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Entering and Leaving QPR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pipe Routing Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extend Route Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nudging the Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cardinal Direction Handles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Free Rotation Handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Direction and Rotation Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Popup Menus on the QPR Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hotkeys ............................................................. 5:39 5:40 5:40 5:41 5:41 5:43 5:44 5:44 5:45 5:52 5:55 5:59

Deleting Pipe Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:65

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Pipework Modification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1
Pipework Component Bore and Specification Modification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1
Modify Components Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:2 Component Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:3 Modifying Component Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5 Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:6 Highlighting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:7 Choosing a Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:8 Multiple Component Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:10 Modifying Component Bore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:10 Modifying Insulation and Tracing Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:13

Pipe Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:14
Multiple Mode Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Splitting Pipes with a Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single Mode Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component Picking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feature Picking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:16 6:18 6:24 6:25 6:27

Checking and Outputting Design Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1
Checking for Design Data Inconsistencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1
Design Tolerances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:2

Checking for Clashes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4
Obstruction Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4 Extent of Clashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4 Clash Detection Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:5

Generating a Data Output Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:6 Generating Isometric Plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7

Automatic Pipe Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1
Automatic Pipe Routing using PDMS Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1 Basic Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:9 Positioning and Locking Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:19 Creating and Using Routing Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:27 Using Routing Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:32 Creating and Using Routing Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:36 Creating and Using Pipe Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:44 Pipe Packing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:55 Importing a P&ID File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:57

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Automatic Pipe Routing Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59
Routing Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating and Editing Routing Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placing Pipes on Racks and Planes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Command Syntax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special Router Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59 8:75 8:81 8:92 8:99

Pipework Spooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1
Database Usage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3D Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Naming .............................................................. Spooling Volume Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drawing Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 9:1 9:2 9:2 9:2 9:2

Setting Up the Database Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2
Database Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Logging In to Start a SPOOLER Session. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Creating Some Administrative Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:4

Controlling the 3D View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:5
Setting up a 3D View Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:6 Manipulating the Displayed View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:8 Saving and Restoring a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:9

Preparing the Site for Spooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:10
Checking the Design Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inspecting the Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Measuring the Pipe Lengths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inserting Welds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Splitting a Tube with a Weld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pipework Spooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Spool Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Numbering the Spool Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selecting Adjacent Field Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the Spool Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selecting the Numbering Update Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the Shop/Field Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forcing a Spool Break at a Joint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:10 9:11 9:12 9:13 9:15 9:16 9:16 9:18 9:18 9:19 9:20 9:22 9:23

Spooling the Piping Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16

Advanced SPOOLER Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:19

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Outputting Spool Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24
Plotting the Spool Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Isometric Drawing Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:26 Drawing Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:27

Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:1
Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:1
Pipe Piece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:1 Pipe Spool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:1

Pipe Production Checks Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:2
Generating Spools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:4

Options on the Pipe Production Checks Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:7
Setting Up Production Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:9 Define Auto-Resolve Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:10 Define Auto-Naming Preferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:10 Define Stock Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:11 Running a Production Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:12

Renaming Spools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:21
Individual renaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:21 Group renaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:22

Automatic Flange Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:22

Pipe Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:1
Creating Pipe Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:1
How to Use the Pipe Sketches Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:3 Created Sketches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:6

Pipe Sketch Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:9
Drawing Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:9 Backing Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:10 Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:11 Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:14 Common Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:14 Log Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:15 How to Define Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:16 Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:17 Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:18 Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:19

Piping Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:1

v

12.0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A:1 SPOOLER Reference Information . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:11 Primary and Secondary Origins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:7 Creating the Hierarchy . 12:16 Bore Selection Rules . . . . . . . . . 12:14 STYPE Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:14 Position Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:17 Key Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:8 Non-Graphical Assemblies. . . . . . . . . . . . 12:16 Orientation Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:4 PML Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:1 Pipe Piece Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:1 PML Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:2 Pipe Piece Pseudo Attributes. . . . . . . B:4 Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:1 Pipe Piece Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Special Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:3 Pipe Spool Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B:1 Spool Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:1 Connection Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:8 Building an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:19 Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:1 Equipment and Piping DESIGN Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:1 Pipe Piece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:4 vi 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:5 Building and Maintaining Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide Creating Assemblies . . C:1 Functionality . . . . . B:3 Welds for OLETs . . . . . . . . C:4 Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:1 Assembly Hierarchy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:3 Leave Tubes of Welds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C:1 Pipe Piece Manager . . . . . B:3 Shop Flag Status . . . . . . . 12:13 Piping Assembly Component Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:1 Weld and Joint Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Types of Welds and Joints . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .Fabrication Machine . . . C:5 Pipe Spool Attributes . . . . . . . .E:1 PDMS Introductory Guides . D:6 BendActivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fabrication Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fabrication Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:6 Database Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:6 MTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:7 FMGRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Spool. . . . . . . D:7 FMBEND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:9 Connection Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:9 Welding Table . . .Fabrication Machine Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:10 New Datacon Warning Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E:1 AVEVA PDMS Reference Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:9 New Pseudo Attributes for Branch Members . . . . . . . . .Bending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:6 Pipe Spool Pseudo Attributes. .Fabrication Machine World Top Level Element . . . . . . . . . . . . D:8 FMWELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:8 FMBDIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:5 Pipe Spool Methods (not implemented) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:4 Pipe Spool Functionality. . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . C:10 Spool Extents/End Point. . . . C:4 Pipe Spool Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PTMI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:10 Other Relevant Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:4 WeldingMachineResult. . . . . . . .Fabrication Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E:1 vii 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:9 FMWSK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:1 BendingMachineResult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PTAX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D:1 Fabrication Machine Manager. . . . . .Fabrication Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bending . . . . . . . . D:5 BendingTable . . . D:7 FMBPLN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:9 New Attribute for PTCA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:7 FMWL . . . . . D:6 WeldingTable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fabrication Machine Welding . . . D:8 FMBSST . . . . . . . . . . . . .SKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . D:1 Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Springback/Stretch Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:6 Assembly Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D:9 Automatic Flange Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:10 Fabrication Machine Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:6 Bending Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C:6 Pipe Spool Reporting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PTPOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide General Guides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F:1 viii 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . E:2 Sample Plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

and you must have read/write access to the project databases. both on-shore and off-shore. Project SAM.3 About the Tutorial Exercises All the steps of the exercises are numbered throughout the guide. It is assumed that: • • • you know where to find PDMS on your computer system you know how to use the Windows operating system installed on your site you are familiar with the basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) features as described in the AVEVA document Getting Started with PDMS.1.Pipework Design User Guide Read this First 1 1.0 .4 Further Reading You can find a list of relevant AVEVA documentation in the appendices of this guide. you will gain practical experience of the ways in which you can use PDMS while learning about the powerful facilities it provides.1 Read this First Scope of this Guide This guide introduces some of the facilities provided by AVEVA Plant Design Management System (PDMS) for designing and documenting interconnected piping networks for a wide range of process and related Plant Design industries. who may or may not have prior knowledge of PDMS. 1.1.1 Intended Audience This guide has been written for engineers familiar with piping design practices. It explains the main concepts underlying PDMS and its supporting applications.2 Assumptions For you to use this guide. A number of the chapters of this guide take the form of hands-on tutorial exercises combined with frequent explanation of the underlying concepts. 1.1. as follows: 1:1 12. Contact your systems administrator if you need further help in either of these areas. 1. 1. the sample PDMS project.2 How the Guide is Organised This guide is divided into chapters and appendices. 1. As you work progressively through the exercises.1. must be correctly installed on your system. and shows how you can apply these to your own design projects.

0 . which begins in this chapter and concludes in Chapter 6. shows how to check your design for errors and inconsistencies. gives a general overview of the main design facilities provided within the pipework application. It concludes the first worked example. the steps described in this chapter introduce you to the ways in which the design applications work and result in some reference points between which to route pipe runs in later parts of the exercise. 1:2 12. Includes a number of worked examples to illustrate the concepts of routing. and how to generate reports and isometric plots directly from the design data.Pipework Design User Guide Read this First Read this First Introducing AVEVA PDMS Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy introduces this guide and summarises its scope. explains how pipework can be modified in terms of component specification and bore size. demonstrates the facility of automatically routing pipes and details the administrative aspects of the facility. shows how to carry out pipe piece and pipe spool production checks. Creating Some Equipment Items Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Checking and Outputting Design Data Pipework Modification Automatic Pipe Routing Pipework Spooling Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks Pipe Sketches Piping Assemblies Equipment and Piping DESIGN Database SPOOLER Reference Information Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data provides pipes piece and pipe spool data relevant to pipe production checks. Although not strictly part of the piping design process. A running example. explains how PDMS stores its design data and shows you how to organise your data. Includes a running worked example to illustrate the essential concepts of spooling. gives SPOOLER module reference information. summarises the database hierarchy which PDMS uses to store piping design data. illustrates the essential concepts of pipework design. and by pipe splitting. demonstrates how to create some simple items of equipment. explains how piping assemblies can be created from fixed configurations of components for reuse in a design. Also describes the logging in procedure and how to create some administrative elements. explains the key features of piping design using PDMS and shows you how to build up a piping sequence component by component. explains how pipework spooling is carried out using the SPOOLER module. explains the creation and administration of pipe sketches.

identifies other sources of information which supplement. the brief details given in this guide. contact your nearest AVEVA support office.Pipework Design User Guide Read this First Fabrication Machine Data Other Relevant Documentation Sample Plots details fabrication machine data for use in pipe production checks. covering all levels of expertise and all design disciplines. and to arrange course attendance.3 Further Training in Using PDMS This guide teaches you to about the key features of using PDMS for piping designs only. AVEVA provides a wide range of training courses. 1:3 12. contains some examples of the types of isometric plot. including material take-off lists. If you wish to learn more about the wide-ranging facilities of PDMS. which can be produced easily by using PDMS. and expand upon. For details of courses.0 . 1.

Pipework Design User Guide Read this First 1:4 12.0 .

because data consistency-checking is an integral • 2:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Introducing AVEVA PDMS 2 Introducing AVEVA PDMS This chapter introduces: • • • the structure of PDMS the strengths of PDMS PDMS piping network design features.2 Strengths of PDMS In PDMS. 2. The emphasis is on maximising both design consistency and design productivity: • The design modelling functions incorporate a degree of apparent intelligence that enables them to make sensible decisions about the consequential effects of many of your design choices. This guide covers the following modules: • • • DESIGN. analysing. designed by piping engineers for piping engineers. and documenting logically interconnected piping networks.1 Introducing the Structure of PDMS PDMS comprises the following functional parts: • • modules applications. which allows you to split the pipework design into logical sections (spools) ready for fabrication ISODRAFT.0 . You can switch quickly and easily between different parts of PDMS. for creating. A module is a subdivision of PDMS that you use to carry out specific types of operation. An application is supplementary program that has been tailored to provide easy control of operations that are specific to a particular discipline. This allows you to implement a sequence of related decisions with a minimum of effort. The applications you will use for piping design work in this guide are: • • Equipment Pipework. 2. which you use for creating the 3D design model SPOOLER. which you use for generating annotated and dimensioned isometric drawings of your design. you have a powerful suite of facilities. You can incorporate modifications into your design at any stage without fear of invalidating any of your prior work.

drawing and reporting operations are initiated by selecting choices from menus. For ease of use. to make it easy for you to position piping elements accurately within the design model. You can name piping elements in accordance with a predefined set of rules. therefore. and so on.3 PDMS Piping Network Design Features The PDMS pipework applications offer the following key benefits: • The applications are designed to use specification data when selecting piping components from the Catalogue database. so the chances of errors and inconsistencies reaching the final documented design are reduced to an exceptionally low level.Pipework Design User Guide Introducing AVEVA PDMS part of the product. such as 3D positioning grids. This includes on-line interdisciplinary clash detection. This can avoid a great deal of repetitive work when you carry out commonly-repeated design modifications. many common actions are also represented by pictorial icons. sorted in any way you require. material take-off reports. or you can design a one-off report format to suit special needs. so that design consistency and conformity to standards are ensured. • The applications let you check all aspects of your design as work progresses. This means that all design. you can create reports listing specified data from the current database. The applications incorporate a number of geometric design aids. especially when combined with the rule-based naming facility. The resultant output. In most cases you can specify the points at which design items are to be positioned using the pointer to pick the required points in a 3D model view. that the Piping Catalogue databases are properly maintained: a Specification Generator facility is provided to enable this to be achieved with a minimum of effort. At any stage of your work. This. to prevent errors from being introduced by transcribing information between different disciplines. It is important. You can create pointers to define the storage areas in which specific types of design element are to be held in the database hierarchy. and by entering data into on-screen forms. design pins and 2D routing planes. • • • • • 2:2 12. by reading all design data directly from a common set of databases. so you can derive lists of commonly-required information very quickly. so that their positions in the database hierarchy are always obvious without you having to enter specific texts during the design process. PDMS automatically manages drawing production. The applications are controlled from a GUI.0 . • 2. so that you can carry out a design operation on all elements within the list simultaneously. You can set up temporary lists of elements. minimises the amount of data which you have to enter explicitly as you build up your design model. can be either displayed on your screen or sent to a file (for storage and/or for printing). which can include data from any design discipline. You can specify a standard report template.

and only two. You will therefore learn how these other items are defined in PDMS as well as learning how to connect sequences of piping components between them. The data which defines the physical design of each equipment item is represented by a set of basic 3D shapes known as Primitives (Box. etc. points: Branch Head Branch Tail. The data which defines the physical design of the individual piping components is held below Branch level. but is usually used to group items with a common specification. Each Branch within a Pipe represents a single sequence of piping components running between two. you will learn: • • • • about the PDMS database hierarchy how PDMS stores design data how to login to PDMS and begin the first tutorial exercise how to create some administrative elements. equipment design data has only one administrative level below Zone: the Equipment (EQUI). 3.) held below Equipment level.1 How PDMS Stores Design Data All PDMS data is stored in the form of a hierarchy. Site and Zone. Connection points are represented by Nozzles (NOZZ). • • In the basic configuration. In this chapter you will look at the ways in which equipment data and piping design data is stored by PDMS. Cylinder. and you will create some administrative data elements to enable you to organise your detailed design in a logical way. World (usually represented by the symbolic name /*) two principal administrative sublevels.0 . in practice you will usually need to route your pipe runs between predefined design points such as equipment nozzles. Although this guide is about the design of piping networks. 3:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy 3 Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy In this chapter. A DESIGN database has: • • a top level. For piping design data. Each Pipe can represent any portion of the overall piping network. the lower administrative levels (and their PDMS abbreviations) are: • • Pipe (PIPE) Branch (BRAN). The names used to identify database levels below Zone depend on the specific engineering discipline for which the data is used.

1. completely define its properties. you can consider yourself to be positioned at a specific point within the hierarchy. valves. but it can have only one owner. others will be defined automatically by PDMS. these hierarchic levels give the following overall format: WORLD (/*) SITE SITE ZONE ZONE PIPE EQUIPMENT BRANCH Design data defining equipment shapes (primitives) and connection points (nozzles) Design data defining individual piping components (elbows. tees. the: • • • • element type element physical dimensions and technical specifications element physical location and orientation in the design model element connectivity. when you are creating new elements or changing the settings of their attributes). by following the owner-member links up and down the hierarchy.Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy Together. The Design Explorer displays this information continuously. optionally. Each element has a number of associated pieces of information which. You can navigate from any element to any other. In many cases. The element at this location is called the current element (usually abbreviated to CE). by a user-specified name.0 . thereby changing the current element. The vertical link between two elements on adjacent levels of the database hierarchy is defined as an owner-member relationship. The element on the upper level is the owner of those elements directly linked below it. so you must understand this concept and always be aware of your current position in the database hierarchy. These are known as its attributes.) 3. etc. bends. commands which you give for modifying the attributes of an element will assume that the changes are to be applied to the current element unless you specify otherwise. together. Every element is identified within the database structure by an automatically-allocated reference number and. 3:2 12. Additional items of information about an element which can be stored as attribute settings include. Each element can have many members. The lower level elements are members of their owning element. Some attribute settings must be defined by you when you create a new element. When you are modifying a database (for example.1 PDMS Design Data Definitions All data is represented in the database (DB) as follows: • • Each identifiable item of data is known as a PDMS element.

Give the part of the project Multiple Database (MDB) you want to work in: enter PIPE. 2. the form looks as shown: Click OK. Give your allocated Password: enter PIPE. Give your allocated Username: enter PIPE. 4.Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy 3.0 .2 Logging In This is the first step of the tutorial exercise Exercise begins: 1. Give the name of the Module you wish to use: select Design. Make sure that you leave the Read Only box unchecked. 3. so that you can modify the database as you work. In the PDMS Login form give the name of the Project in which you want to work: enter SAM. your screen looks as shown: 3:3 12. 5.3 PDMS Startup Display When PDMS has loaded. 3. When you have entered all the necessary details.

and its sub-application if applicable. On the displayed Create Site form. Make sure that you are at World level in the Design Explorer. 3:4 12. you click on the appropriate item in the list.has a number of icon buttons and drop-down lists that offer shortcuts to a selection common PDMS operations and standard settings. This window also has its own tool bar.4 Creating some Administrative Elements You are now ready to create some administrative elements at the top of the DESIGN database hierarchy.shows the current PDMS module. To move to a different point in the database.shows your current position in the PDMS database hierarchy.the window in which you display the design model graphically as you build it. Design Explorer . and press the Enter key to confirm the name.0 . enter PIPESITE in the Name text box. the display comprises the following: • • • • • Title Bar .displays information about the current status of your operations. A pop-up menu (which you access with the right-hand mouse button) enables you to control how the model is represented. 3. 3D Graphical View . • You can reposition or minimise these windows at any time using standard window management facilities. Main Menu Bar . then select Create>Site. Status Bar .the area you use to make menu selections.Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy As labelled above. Exercise continues: 6. The system automatically adds a / prefix to this name so that it conforms to the internal PDMS file naming conventions: /PIPESITE. as previously explained. Main Tool Bar .

Both are to be owned by PIPESITE. 8. 3:5 12. click on PIPESITE in the Design Explorer to make it the current element.0 . 9. in the same way as before. to give some reference points between which you can subsequently route your sample piping sequences. On the displayed Create Zone form. Now create a second Zone. You will now create two Zones named PIPEZONE (to hold piping data) and EQUIZONE (to hold equipment data). Your first new element appears in the Design Explorer as the current element. Click OK to create the Site element. Again. Now choose Create>Zone. Your top part of the Design Explorer will now look like this: Note: If you or other users have accessed this database before. EQUIZONE.Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy 7. 11. To create another Zone owned by PIPESITE (and not PIPEZONE). In the next chapter you will create some standard equipment items. 10. and you can see that it is owned by PIPESITE. Click OK to create the Zone element. enter PIPEZONE. the list may also contain other elements. the new element appears in the Design Explorer as the current element.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Setting Up the PDMS Database Hierarchy 3:6 12.

Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 4 Creating Some Equipment Items In this chapter you will: • • learn how equipment items are represented in PDMS create some simple equipment items. the E.N. for example. Y. and the relative positions of its component primitives are specified in terms of its origin. Up) coordinate system of the design model (more accurately. 4.1 4. Z axes of its primitives within the E. a simple storage vessel might be built up from the following primitives: • • • • a cylinder for the main body two dishes for the ends two boxes for the support legs a nozzle for the piping connection: Primitives: Dish x2 Cylinder x1 Box x2 Nozzle x1 The position of the equipment item as a whole.1. The primitives used for piping connections to equipment items are nozzles (which are standard components which you select from the PDMS catalogues). These will form the basis for routing your piping network. The orientation of the equipment item is specified by aligning the X. N. So. North.U coordinate system of the item owning Zone).0 . 4:1 12. U (East. These shapes are known as primitives.1 How Equipment Items are Represented Basic Principles Each equipment item is defined geometrically in PDMS as a collection of basic 3D shapes. to predefined designs.

2 Using Predefined Templates for Standard Equipment You do not have to build up each item of equipment from its component primitives because PDMS has range of predefined equipment types from which you can choose. some of which will have been supplied with the original application and some of which may have been added by your company. All the above are jointly referred to as the design element properties. 4. These standard equipment types.1.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items X Y Z Equipment Origin You will look in more detail at the principles of positioning and orientating items within the PDMS design model when you start to create piping components. needed to fully specify the equipment in the design are stored as Design Data (DDAT) elements below a Design Dataset (DDSE) owned by the template. In such situations an extended hierarchy is formed. To enable a template designer to reuse standard configurations of primitives within an equipment design. are stored as parameterised Design Templates (TMPL). When you select a design template for inclusion in your design: • • • a copy of the design template is created below the parent equipment element all primitives defining the template geometry are stored below the template copy any variable dimensions and so on. The master copies of these design templates are stored in a special part of the DESIGN database.0 . the Equipment element is sometimes subdivided into Sub equipment (SUBE) elements. An example of an extended hierarchy is as follows: 4:2 12.

select Design>Equipment from the Design General Application menu bar.2 Creating a Storage Tank to a Standard Design In this section you will create a storage tank using one of the standard designs supplied with PDMS. Make sure that EQUIZONE (the zone you created for storing equipment items) is your current element. you do not need to fully understand the implications of this alternative method of storing design data.0 . Display the Create Standard Equipment form in one of the following ways: • • Select Create>Standard from the menu bar Click on the toolbar button. 14. To start the Equipment application. When loading is complete. Exercise continues: 12.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items Note: For the purposes of the current exercise. The concepts have been introduced to enable you to recognise some of the new elements that will be added into your Design Explorer as you progress through the steps of the exercise 4. 4:3 12. the main menu bar and the tool bar (which now has a second row) show some extra options which give you access to the whole range of functions needed to create and position equipment items: 13.

In the Name text box of the Create Standard Equipment form enter tank1. 17. At each stage of the search. Select Vertical Vessels. while the lower list now shows three Vessel Type options. The Current Selection list shows the fully-specified equipment: 4:4 12. select Vessels. This selection is copied to the Current Selection list. The lower list title now says Selection complete and the list itself is now empty. Select VESS 001 . 19. From the Specification drop-down list.0 . 16. select CADC Advanced Equip. From the CADCENTRE Advanced list. you select from the options in the lower list (whose title changes to reflect its content) and the progress of the search is summarised in the Current Selection list. 20. The Specification Data area of the form enables you to narrow down your choice of standard equipment by a progressive question-and-answer sequence.Dished both Ends. Select Storage Vessel with Dished Top & Bottom. 18.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 15.

click the Properties… button to display a Modify Properties form listing all parameterised dimensions assigned to the equipment definition. To specify your own dimensions.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 21.0 . 4:5 12. At this stage. the equipment has the default dimensions defined by the template designer.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 22. Enter the following parameters: • • • • • Height: Diameter: Dish Height: Knuckle Radius: Support type: 3000 2800 300 100 NONE 4:6 12.

Click OK and then re-display the Modify Properties form to show the plot view. On the Explicit Position form that displays. 25. Dismiss the Explicit Position form. drag out a rectangle enclosing the region of interest. you would position the equipment relative to part of an existing plant structure. To zoom out. position the pointer over the centre of interest of the plot and click the middle mouse button. so you cannot pick any existing reference point. 24. which in turn owns some primitives and property-defining elements representing the equipment geometry. Dismiss the Create Standard Equipment form. You must therefore give an explicit position. select Display Plotfile. If you wish to zoom in so that you can read the text on the plot view. The tank is added into the 3D View. Note: If you cannot see the plot view. Alternatively. but the current view settings mean that you cannot see it in clear detail. Click the button on the Positioning Control form. The Design Explorer now shows an Equipment (EQUI) element. Click Apply. 26.0 . Click Apply on the Create Standard Equipment form. Click OK on the Modify Properties form. 4:7 12. You will rectify this a little later. enter the coordinates: • • • East: 7275 North: 2350 Up: 100 27. select Settings>Properties from the main menu bar and. At the moment your view is empty. in the resultant Properties Settings form. position the pointer in the plot area. 29. In a normal design situation. 23. and release the button.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items The dimensioned plot view in the lower part of the Modify Properties form shows the significance of the dimensions. click the Plotfile button on the Create Standard Equipment form or Modify Properties form to display the plot in a separate window at any time. which owns a Design Template (TMPL). hold down the middle mouse button. 28. The Positioning Control form now appears automatically: This is because you must specify the position of equipment before it can be added into the database.

Define the nozzle type by entering the following parameters in the displayed Nozzle Specification form: • • • Specification: Generic Type: Nominal Bore: #300. In this section.3 Adding a Nozzle to the Storage Tank The standard vessel design does not incorporate any nozzles. Click the Nozzle Type button. Click Apply. Ensure you have EQUI Tank-1 selected in the Design Explorer as the current element. and click Apply to accept the default details in the resultant form: 31. and then Dismiss. Exercise continues: 30.R. (The height of a nozzle is the length of its connecting tube).F Ansi_flanged 150 33. Select Create>Primitives. you will add a nozzle that you will later use to connect your pipework to the storage tank. 32. enter the following parameters: • • Name: Position: Tank-1-N1 West North Up • • Orientate P1 is: Height: W 300 1675 0 250 (Sets the direction of the nozzle flanged face).0 . 34. The settings on the Create Nozzle form now look as shown: 4:8 12. You will see in more detail how catalogues are used when you start to select piping components.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 4. On the Create Nozzle form displayed.

Dismiss any remaining forms involved in creating the nozzle. The Design Explorer will now look like this: 4:9 12. if you have not already done so.1 Defining what Appears in the View In this section you will identify your equipment zone as the contents of the graphical display. and learn how to manipulate this display.4. you will now display your current design in a 3D View window. 4.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items Click Apply and then. 4.4 Viewing the Design In order to see what your design looks like as you build it up. and to enable you to identify design items by simply pointing to them rather than by navigating to them in the Design Explorer. and view isometrically. Exercise continues: 35.0 .

Do this by clicking on EQUIZONE in the Design Explorer. right-click each one in turn and select Remove from the shortcut menu. You should get something like this: 37. Now click on EQUIZONE and select 3D View>Add from the shortcut menu. To remove the elements currently in the Draw List. select the option Display>Draw List from the main menu bar. You can see the list of elements that will appear in the View by looking at the Draw List.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 36. To view the Draw List.0 . To set the Draw List so that you can see each equipment item as you create it. 4:10 12. you need to select your equipment Zone. 38.

Plan. 4:11 12. 4. The three view manipulation modes are: • • • Rotate the view Pan the view across the display area Zoom in or out to magnify or reduce the view. Now.4. and Isometric. and is currently set to Rotate. 41. the Zone. click on the Limits CE button. to see different view directions. 42.2 Manipulating the Displayed View You can manipulate the displayed model view in a number of ways. in this case.0 . 40. The current manipulation mode is shown in the status line at the bottom of the 3D View window. Display horizontal and vertical border sliders by selecting View>Settings>Borders or press Function Key F9. as shown in the previous illustration. and then revert to Isometric>Iso 3. To set an isometric view direction. Experiment with the shortcut menu options Look. position the pointer in the 3D View window and select Isometric>Iso 3 from the shortcut menu. .Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 39. in the 3D View tool bar. This adjusts the scale of the view automatically such that it corresponds to a volume just large enough to hold the chosen element(s).

starting with a left or right movement causes the observer’s eye-point to move across the view. and then try dragging the sliders to new positions along the view borders. this time the observer’s eye-point appears to rotate up and down around the model. first press the F9 function key to display the horizontal and vertical sliders. from the shortcut menu available within the 3D view. 46. so that the displayed model appears to move in the opposite direction to the mouse. Note that the word Fast appears in the status line and that the rate of rotation is increased. or the function keys. 50.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items To change the view manipulation mode. 52. Repeat the rotation operations while holding down the Ctrl key. Exercise continues: 43. (note that this is the default state). Position the cursor in the view area and hold down the middle mouse button. You can rotate the model in this way at any time. For an alternative way of rotating the model. then move the mouse slowly from side to side while watching the effect on the displayed model. then move the mouse slowly up and down. hold it down again and move the mouse away from you and towards you. in effect. but this time hold down the Shift key. Position the cursor in the view area and hold down the middle mouse button. 49. Note: It is the observer’s eye-point which follows the mouse movement (while the viewing direction remains unchanged). or F5 You can also choose these view manipulation options. Select . 44. Note that the word Slow appears in the status line and that the rate of rotation is decreased. as follows: selects Zoom mode selects Pan mode or F3 selects Rotate mode. then move the mouse slowly in all directions. 51. 47. you move the mouse towards that part of the view which you want to see. Now release the mouse button. Repeat the pan operations while holding down first the Ctrl key (to increase the panning speed) and then the Shift key (to decrease the panning speed). Select . regardless of the current manipulation mode. 45. The initial direction of movement determines how the view appears to rotate. Repeat the rotation operations. 48. use the 3D View tool bar buttons. Select . 4:12 12.0 . or F2 Position the cursor in the view area and hold down the middle mouse button.

Click the Properties button. Position the cursor at the top of the tank and click (do not hold down) the middle mouse button. select Vessels This selection is copied to the Current Selection list.1 Creating a Vertical Vessel 56. Isometric>Iso 3 from the shortcut menu. Navigate to EQUIZONE and click • • • • • • In the Name text box enter Tank-2 From the Specification drop-down list. select CADC Advanced Equip From the CADCENTRE Advanced list. effectively reducing the view. make sure that your current element is EQUIZONE and click on the Limits CE button. and in the displayed Modify Properties form enter the following parameters: • • • • Height: Diameter: Dish Height: Radius: 2500 1500 250 75 4:13 12. Notice how the view changes so that the picked point is now at the centre of the view. effectively magnifying the view. 58. Exercise continues: 4. they do not change the observer’s eye-point or the view direction.Dished Top and Coned Bottom. You will find this a very useful technique when making small adjustments to the design. This design includes provision for one nozzle at the bottom of the conical base. 57. you reset the centre of interest. whatever the current manipulation mode. you will now create a different design of vertical storage vessel and a pump. On the displayed Create Standard Equipment form set the following: • Select VESS 002 .5. 55.5 Creating Some More Equipment Items You need to have several equipment items between which to route piping components. Repeat the zoom operations while holding down first the Ctrl key and then the Shift key. 54. and reselect 4. moving the mouse towards you (down) zooms out. Whenever you click the middle button. using similar procedures to those you used to create the first vessel. 53. Note that these operations work by changing the viewing angle (like changing the focal length of a camera lens). or select Create>Standard. To restore the original view when you have finished. so. while the lower list now shows three Vessel Type options Select Vertical Vessels Select Storage Hoppers .0 . in this section. Set the centre of interest to the face of the nozzle. then zoom in for a close-up view.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items Moving the mouse away from you (up) zooms in.

Click OK on the Modify Properties form.5. 64.F.R. and in the displayed Explicit Position form enter the coordinates: • • • East North Up 2600 7000 2600 62. and observe the relative positions and orientations of the two vessels in the graphical view. Select Modify>Name and name the nozzle Tank-2-N1. 63. Click Apply. so navigate to /EQUIZONE and click to reset the limits.2 Naming the Nozzle in the Base of the New Vessel 65. Navigate to the nozzle on /Tank-2 using the Design Explorer: 66. 4:14 12.0 . 61. EQUIZONE is now larger than when you last set the viewing scale. 150mm NS NONE 59. 60.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items • • • • Height: Nozzle Height: Nozzle Type: Support type: 750 250 #300. Dismiss the Explicit Position form. Click Apply. 4. Dismiss the Create Standard Equipment form. Click the button on the Positioning Control form. and then Dismiss. Click Apply on the Create Standard Equipment form.

3 Creating a Standard Design Pump 68. #300. You may need to rotate the view to see all of the nozzles simultaneously.R. 250 (The height of a nozzle is the length of its connecting tube). 4.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 67. Pump Type Specific Type: Selection: . Navigate back to Tank-2 and add a second nozzle using the same sequence as previously detailed and give it the following description: • • Name: Position: Tank-2-N2 East North Up • • • • • Orientate P1 is: Height: Specification Nozzle Type Nominal Bore 1000 0 2000 E (Sets the direction of the nozzle flanged face). Click on • • • • • Name: Specification: Pumps.Pump Centreline Mounted Tangential Outlet.5. Set the parameters as follows: • • • • • • • • Baseplate Length Baseplate Width: Distance Origin to Baseplate Distance to Suction Nozzle: Distance Bottom to Centreline Discharge Nozzle Height Suction Nozzle to Coupling Distance Discharge Nozzle 1600 510 175 240 340 180 700 135 4:15 12. and give the pump the following definition: /Pump-1 CADC Advanced Equip CADCENTRE Advanced Centrifugal Pumps Centreline Mounted Centrifugal Pumps PUMP 005 .0 .F ANSI-flanged 100 Note: This nozzle has a smaller bore than the other nozzles.

F. 4:16 12. To change the orientation of the pump so that it points West. click on the Model Editor button on the main toolbar or select Edit>Model Editor from the main menu bar.4 Changing the Orientation of an Equipment Item The orientation of the pump is as defined by the template default settings. Using the left-hand mouse button.R.5.N. On this form. select Cardinal Directions: An E. 72.F.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items • • Suction Nozzle Type Discharge Nozzle Type #300. 150mm NS #300.R. click on the pump to display the drag handles. Create the pump and position it at: • • • East North Up 4700 5000 350 4. 150mm NS.0 . The horizontal suction nozzle points north. 69.U axes symbol is displayed at the origin of the current element. Click on the button on the main tool bar to display the Define Axes form. 71. 70.

With the pointer over the horizontal rotation handle (see above).0 . The pump now points West. 4:17 12.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 73. press and hold down the left-hand mouse button and move the cursor (which changes shape) in an anticlockwise direction until the following pump orientation is achieved: 74. Click anywhere in the graphics area to remove the drag handles.

Click Apply. (Move the pump back its original orientation first by clicking on the Undo button ( again to leave Model Editor mode. either click on the button. To change the orientation of the pump so that it points West.0 . Other methods of changing orientation are explained below. The default axis is up. and is correct. 76. so just set Angle to 90: ) on the main toolbar. This leaves the axes symbol in the 3D View: you will find this useful for reference in the rest of the exercise. Click 77. through the origin. Check the layout of the three equipment items in the graphical view: 4:18 12.5 Tidying Up Afterwards 78. 4. and then Dismiss the Rotate form. Navigate to each pump nozzle in turn and rename: • • the horizontal nozzle: /Pump-1-SUCTION the vertical nozzle: /Pump-1-DISCHARGE. 79. or select Orientate>Rotate.5.Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 75. The Rotate form enables you to rotate the equipment through a specified angle about a defined axis. and select Close>Retain axes on the Define Axes form.

Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items In the next chapter. you will add to the design model by creating some piping components.0 . 4:19 12.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Creating Some Equipment Items 4:20 12.

Each of these is explained in turn below. 5:1 12. (ANSI flanged. with 150mm nominal bore. suitable for 300 pound working pressure. In each case. for the item in the DESIGN database.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5 Routing a Sequence of Piping Components In this chapter you will: • • • learn how some of the items which make up the design are represented and accessed in the PDMS databases.0 . route some pipes between the three items of equipment which currently make up your design model. so that a single catalogue entry can represent a whole family of design components which differ only in their dimensions.1 Design-to-Catalogue Cross-Referencing To ensure design consistency and conformity with predefined standards. When you add an item to your design model. position a selection of piping components within the pipe runs.2 How Piping Networks are Represented Piping networks are represented by the following: • • pipes and branches piping components. with raised face. This holds definitions of: • • all available configurations and materials for each type of piping component all types of nozzle for connecting pipe fittings to equipment items. orientation etc. the basic definitions of all items that you can use in the pipework design are held in a Catalogue database. you store the position. You have already used this concept when creating the equipment nozzles in the previous chapter. The dimensions of each item are defined in the catalogue by parameters whose values are set only at the design stage. • 5. you: • selected the required type of nozzle by setting its catalogue specification. 5. but you specify the physical properties of the item by setting up a cross-reference (Specification Reference or SpecRef) which points to an appropriate entry in the Catalogue database. for example) specified the length of the nozzle tube (defined in the catalogue as a parameterised dimension) by setting its Height attribute.

P2 etc. So. are called p-points (or Design Points).. a Tee component might be represented in the PDMS catalogue as follows: 5:2 12. while in normal pipe routing mode (Forwards mode) P1 is the same as p-arrive and P2 is the same as p-leave.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5. all principal points needed to define its position. and only two.2 Piping Components Each piping component is represented in the PDMS catalogue by three types of data: • • The physical shape of the component is defined by a set of geometric primitives (like the ones used to represent equipment items introduced in the previous chapter). must own at least two Branches to achieve the necessary three connection points. dotted lines represent part of Branch 2): 5. P1. • For example. while each Branch represents a single section of a Pipe which runs between two. The following configurations show two ways of achieving this (solid lines represent part of Branch 1. for example. while the principal inlet and outlet points for the logical flow direction through the component are identified as p-arrive and p-leave. points (the Branch Head and the Branch Tail). Each Pipe can represent any portion of the overall piping network. which have both position and direction. orientation and connectivity are identified by uniquely-numbered tags.2. So that the component can be manipulated and linked to adjacent piping items. a Pipe that incorporates a Tee.1 Pipes and Branches You have already learnt that the principal administrative elements of a Zone are Pipes and their subordinate Branches.2. These tags. The individual piping components (defined in terms of their catalogue specifications) are stored as Branch members. The settings of all variables needed to distinguish a component from others with the same geometry and p-point sets are defined by parameters. Each p-point is identified by a number of the format P0. The values of these are defined to suit the specific design requirements.0 . P0 always represents the component origin position.

The dimensions of the tee are represented in the catalogue by parameters whose values are determined by the nominal bore required to suit the design. the specifications which form part of the sample project within which you are working include: • • • A1A: ANSI Class 150 Carbon Steel A3B: ANSI Class 300 Carbon Steel F1C: ANSI Class 150 Stainless Steel For the purposes of your design exercise. P3. Exercise continues: 81. is described in the next section. 5. 5:3 12.3 Starting the Pipework Application Exercise continues: 80. As an example. On the Default Specifications form.4 Setting a Default Specification When you select components from the piping catalogue as described earlier in this chapter.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components where the two cylinder primitives form the component geometry set and the four p-points form its point set (the fourth p-point. select the Piping specification A3B. which is displayed automatically. you will use the A3B specification to select all components.0 . To avoid having to specify this data again for each component. Change from the Equipment application to the Pipework application. but the latter gives you access to options with specific relevance to creating and manipulating piping components. 5. This will be used automatically at lower levels unless you override it (the default specification is said to be cascaded down the hierarchy). by selecting Design>Pipework. The Default Specifications form. you can set a Default Specification at Pipe or Branch level. The menu bar for the Equipment application is replaced by that for the Pipework application. lets you specify the orientation of the side arm when you incorporate the tee into your design). you do so by stating which Specification the components must match. The menu bars for both applications are superficially similar.

The initial sequence will include a tee to which you will later connect another pipework sequence.5 Creating a Simple Pipework Sequence In the next part of the exercise you will create a sequence of piping components connected between the nozzles /Tank-1-N1 and /Pump-1-SUCTION. The project specifications include some choices for pipework Insulation. The configuration which you will create (with all components in a horizontal plane) is as shown: Nozzle (Pump) Nozzle /Pump-1-SUCTION /Tank-1-N1 (Tank) Gasket 1 Flange 1 Gasket 4 Flange 4 flow From second Branch L Valve 1 ( with h wheel) d flow Elbow 1 Tee 1 Flange 3 Gasket 3 Gasket 2 Flange 2 N E S W You will represent both this and the next sequence by a single Pipe element in the DESIGN database. so make sure that both of them are unselected. You do not want to use insulation or trace heating. You will define the branches as follows: 5:4 12. the current default specification is shown in the second row of the tool bar: 5.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 82. When you click OK.0 . but no trace heating specifications (as shown by the None Available entry in the Tracing option list). but you must subdivide this into two Branch elements to allow the flows into the pump to combine at the tee.

Note: The tubing running between the piping items (shown by the dotted lines in the diagram). It will consist of the following components. The Create Pipe form displays: 5:5 12. Navigate to /PIPEZONE in the Design Explorer and click the Pipe Creation icon in the Pipework toolbar: 84.0 . Exercise continues: 83. is added and adjusted automatically by PDMS to suit the positions and specifications of the components. it is referred to as implied tube. (remember that flow direction is always from head to tail). You do not have to create it explicitly. • Branch 2. which you will create in a later part of the exercise. will have its Head positioned at Nozzle /Tank-2/N1 and its Tail at the third arm of the tee (P2). Note that the flow through the tee will enter at P1 and leave at P3 (that is. p-arrive will be P1 and p-leave will be P3).Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components • • • • • • • • • • • • Branch 1 will have its Head at nozzle /Tank1-1-N1 and its Tail at nozzle /Pump-1SUCTION. listed in head-to-tail order: Gasket 1 Flange 1 Elbow 1 Flange 2 Gasket 2 Valve 1 (which includes flanges in its catalogue definition) Gasket 3 Flange 3 Tee 1 Flange 4 Gasket 4. Refer back to the sequence in the diagram when necessary to understand the logic of the following steps for creating this in the design model.

0 . For now. The Create Pipe form changes to allow you to access and modify the branch’s Head and Tail information. name the pipe Pipe-1. 5:6 12. and the Insulation to K. 86. set the Bore to 150.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components You can use this form to characterise the pipe you want to add to your design. Click on Apply to create the pipe. 85.

The form now displays as shown: 5:7 12. First. For this exercise. 87. To define them you click on the respective Change button and make the appropriate choices. Note also that the branch’s Head and Tail connections are undefined. you will connect both the head and tail of the branch to existing nozzles.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Note: how the new branch is named automatically from its owning pipe as Pipe-1/B1. click the Change button in the Head Connection part of the form.

Click the Pick button and use the cursor to select the Nozzle N1 on Tank-1 (named NOZZ Tank-1-N1). When you select the nozzle. but now the Head Detail has been filled in: 5:8 12. the form changes to reflect your choice: 89. The main Create Pipe form will once more be displayed.0 . click the Connect button. To confirm your selection and connect the head of the branch to the nozzle.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 88.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 90. Now click the Change button in the Tail Connection part of the form: A form displays that is virtually identical to the one you used to select the branch’s head: 5:9 12.

You will now build up the component sequence by creating individual piping items. As you have not yet introduced any components. Dismiss the Create Pipe form by clicking the cross. then you will also get the options that allow you to modify the branch. you get an error that looks like this: 5:10 12. Click the Pick button and use the cursor to select /Pump-1-SUCTION (the horizontal nozzle on the pump). As before. Click the Connect button to confirm your selection and connect the tail of the branch to the pump nozzle. Notice how the route of the branch is shown in the graphical view by a broken line.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 91. and click the Pipe Modification icon on the Pipework toolbar: The exact appearance of the form displayed depends on what you have selected. If you have selected an entire pipe you will get a form that allows you to modify the pipe as a whole. in the top right-hand 5. 92.1 Modifying Pipe Sequences If you want to modify a pipe component once you have created it. corner of the form. 93.0 . If you click the icon and you have not selected a valid pipe component. First. . this runs directly from the head to the tail. you can select the pipe in the graphical view or the Design Explorer.5. if you have selected a branch. the form changes to reflect your choice.

Make the Branch you created previously the current element by clicking on Pipe-1/B1 in the Design Explorer.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Exercise continues: 94. 95.0 . Click the Pipe Component Creation icon on the Pipework toolbar: The Component Creation form displays as shown: 5:11 12.

and both the Auto. This allows you to define the major components of the pipe route. You will see that the new Flange has been added to the branch and appears both in the Design Explorer and the graphical view. the system will try to create the appropriate adjacent gaskets and flanges.g. 5:12 12. The form changes in response: 97. when creating a valve. Ensure that the With Flow icon is selected. This appears in the Design Explorer but is too thin to show up in the graphical view. Click the Connect button.0 . From the Filter By drop-down list. with the system creating the secondary components automatically.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components The Component Creation form allows you create a component or component group that is either connected or positioned along the route of a pipe. e. 96. Create Adjacent and Skip Connected Comps checkboxes are both checked. 98. you will also notice that the Auto Create Adjacent facility has automatically created and added a Gasket between the Flange and the Nozzle. select type WN. The system will automatically try to create a set of predetermined adjacent component types when certain component types are created. From the Component Types list select Flange.

preserving its connections to adjoining components wherever possible.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 99.0 . You can modify a component once you have added it. First. select the Pipe Component Selection icon from the Pipework toolbar: The Component Selection form displays: 5:13 12.

and in some circumstances the component’s type. Clicking the Reconnection button will reconnect all the associated components. Dismiss the form using the cross in the top righthand corner and return to the Component Creation form. If you check the checkbox in the top-left of the form. Experiment with this form and see what effect it has on your design. 100. restore the original settings. You can also view any errors caused by doing so. the form will track the specification of the CE.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Using this form you can change the selected component’s specification. When you have finished. 5:14 12. Click on the Choose button to display the Component Types list and select the Elbow option. The next step is to add an Elbow to the pipe route.0 .

Create Adjacent and Skip Connected Comps checkboxes are both checked: 5:15 12.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 101.0 . and both the Auto. From the Filter By drop-down list. select type E. Ensure that the With Flow icon is selected.

0 . Click the Model Editor icon in the main toolbar: 104. 103. To change this you can use Component Modification in the Model Editor. the application has no way of knowing which way the p-leave of the elbow is to be directed. Immediately you select it. so it assumes the default direction as set in the catalogue.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 102. shown in magenta. Select the Elbow in the graphical view using the cursor. 5:16 12. The elbow will be added to the flange thus: You will notice that the elbow is both pointing the wrong way and positioned flush against the flange: E (Pump) N W Flange 1 Nozzle /Pump-1-SUCTION Nozzle S /Tank-1-N1 (Tank) Gasket 1 Elbow 1 While the auto-connect function positions and orientates the elbow so that its p-arrive points towards the preceding flange. Click the Connect button. the Elbow will be encircled by the Component Modification Handles.

Pipework Design User Guide
Routing a Sequence of Piping Components

These handles allow you to rotate and move the selected component or components. As you move the cursor over the handles, they change to indicate what actions you can perform on them. In addition, you can choose a number of context-dependent options from the right-click pop-up menu. 105. Rotate the view and zoom in on the Elbow until you are looking directly into the Nozzle Tank-1-N1. Hover the cursor over any part of the arc and two arrows will appear and the cursor changes to an arrowed-semicircle, indicating that you can left-click, drag the handle and rotate the Elbow:

Experiment for a few moments seeing how the Elbow rotates in response to your mouse movements. 106. When you have finished experimenting, rotate the Elbow fully 180 degrees so it is pointing the other way. The angle you have turned the Elbow through is clearly indicated as you drag the handle:

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Alternatively, right-click and select the Enter Value option from the pop-up menu.

This allows you to enter the value you want to rotate the Elbow by in degrees; you can also click the Preview button to see how it will look. If you click the Cancel button, the rotation is cancelled and the Elbow returns to its original orientation:

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107. You also want to position the elbow at a specified distance from Flange 1. To demonstrate a new feature, you will line it up with the lower nozzle on /Tank-2. To do this, zoom the view out again so you can see once more both the Elbow and the lower Nozzle on Tank-2. Although you can reposition the Elbow to any viewing angle, it is easier to see exactly what is happening if you rotate the view so you are looking at it from below. When you hover the cursor over the movement handle marked X, the handle will change indicating you can drag the Elbow to the West:

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108. Display the right-click pop-up menu with the following options:

Select the Align with Feature option. This will allow you to align the Elbow with an existing item that you identify by picking it with the cursor in the graphical view. Move the cursor so it is over the P1 direction of the Nozzle. Your display should be similar to that shown:

Note: the system moves the Elbow as a preview to how it will look if you click on the feature and accept the move. 109. Click on the P1 point of the Nozzle Tank-2-N1. The system moves the Elbow and inserts the appropriate length of implied tubing:

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The Elbow is repositioned as follows:
E (Pump) N W Nozzle
/Pump-1-SUCTION

Nozzle
/Tank-1-N1

(Tank)

S Gasket 1 Flange 1 Implied tube added automatically

P-leave aligned with nozzle /Tank-2/N1

Elbow 1

You will look in more detail at the ways of positioning and orientating items in some later parts of the exercise. Your design, in Iso 3 view, should now look as shown.

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110. Click the Pipe Component Creation icon on the Pipework toolbar to display the Component Creation form. Select the Valve option from the Component Types list:

111. Select the GATE option from the Filter By drop-down list and click the Connect button:

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112. From the drop-down list on the next part of the form, select the Flange WN option and click the Done button:

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113. Your design should now look as shown:

From the Design Explorer you will see that the system has added the Valve as a full assembly and has automatically included two Gaskets and Flanges:

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114. As before, you want to reposition the valve so it is better placed for pipe-routing. To do this, leave the Valve assembly selected, and click on the Model Editor icon on the main toolbar. 115. On the X axis, right-click and select the Enter Value option from the pop-up menu. In the displayed Move Selection form, type the value 1600 in the text box for the X value (note that the Y and Z boxes are disabled), and click the Preview button. The system shows you what the proposed move looks like:

116. Click the OK button and the system will complete the move and add a length of implied tubing between the Elbow and the Valve assembly:

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Note: that the handwheel on the Valve is pointing upwards by default; this is what is required for this design, but it could be easily changed by using the Model Editor and the Component Modification Handles in a similar manner to how they were used for rotating the Elbow. The piping network now looks like this:
E (Pump) N W Nozzle /Pump-1S Nozzle / Tank-1-N1 Gasket 1 Flange 1 (Tank)

Elbow 1

Flanged Valve Set

117. Now create a Tee. Click the Pipe Component Creation icon and select Tee from the list. On the form that appears next, select the T option from the drop-down list, and then in the filtered list below it, select the option with a Bore of 1. This represents an equal tee, where the bore of the P2 and P3 arms is set automatically to match that of the P1 arm (shown at the top of the form as 150 in this case). In the Connection Information section of the form, select the second of the three Config icons as shown:

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Selecting this option makes the Tee a “branch off” Tee, where the Tee outlet (p-leave) is P3 rather than P2. 118. Click the Connect button. Your Tee will be added to the Valve. It should look as shown:

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When created, the Tee is positioned and orientated as follows:
E (Pump) N W Nozzle /Pump-1P3 points Up S Nozzle /Tank-1-N1 Gasket 1 Flange 1 (Tank)

P-leave=P2 Tee 1 Valve 1 Flange 3 Gasket 3 Gasket 2 Flange 2

Elbow 1

119. To orientate the Tee, select the Tee in the Model Editor and rotate it in the same way you rotated the Elbow using the Component Modification Handles. Alternatively, you can select Modify>Component>General from the main menu and use the Orientate or Rotate option on the Piping Components form, rotating the Tee so its P3 direction is East:

Orientate options

Rotate options

Whichever method you use, the Tee should now look like this:

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120. The next thing you need to do is align the Tee’s branch off point with the Nozzle Pump1-SUCTION. The easiest way to do this is to use the Movement Handles. First, select the Tee in the Model Editor and hover the cursor over the X axis:

121. Right click and choose the Align with Feature option from the pop-up menu:

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122. Select the P1 point of the Pump-1-N2 feature:

123. Left-click to align the Tee. Note the system moves the Tee and inserts a length of implied tube to complete the connection:

124. You can also use one of the Position options on the Piping Components form to align the Tee with the pump nozzle:

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when prompted.0 . Select Thro Point and. pick the p-point at the centre of the nozzle flange. the resulting pipework layout now looks like this: 5:31 12. Whichever method you use. Use any one of the following: • • • Select Thro Tail or Thro Next (these are the same. since the tail is effectively the next item in the branch list). when prompted.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Position Options You can use the Position options in several ways. pick the nozzle in the graphical view. Select Thro ID Cursor and. 125.

you will now create a similar branch. 126. as follows: 5:32 12.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Note: A length of implied tube is now shown between the Tee outlet and the branch tail. The result should look like this: Schematically. Click the Piping Component Creation icon and select a WN Flange from the list. This confirms that the alignment and bore sizes of the Tee outlet and branch tail are compatible. Enter Pipe Component Modification mode and drag the newly added Flange and Gasket until they are against the Nozzle Pump-1-SUCTION. even though the final components have not yet been inserted.0 . also part of /Pipe-1. the piping now looks like this: E ( Pump) N W Branch Tail Nozzle /Pump-1-SUCTION flow flow S Nozzle /Tank-1-N1 Branch Head (Tank) 5.6 Creating a Second Pipework Sequence To allow you to practice and reinforce the techniques learned in creating the preceding pipework sequence. which runs from the nozzle /Tank-2/N1 to the open connection on the Tee of your existing branch. connected to the branch tail. Complete the branch by adding a weld-neck flange and gasket.

Navigate to /Pipe-1 and click on the Pipe Modification icon on the Pipework toolbar to display the Modify Pipe form: 5:33 12. Exercise continues: 127.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components (Tank) Nozzle /Tank-2/N1 (Pump) Branch 2 Head U N D flow E S N W S Branch 1 Tail Branch 2 Tail existing branch The broken line marks a change of view direction: • • components to the left are shown looking East (they lie in a vertical plane through the tank nozzle) components to the right are shown looking Down (they lie in the same horizontal plane as your existing Branch 1).

0 . /Pipe-1/B2. 5:34 12.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 128. Click the New Branch button to create a second branch.

Create a Gasket and Flange connected to the branch head: 5:35 12. you do not have to pick any particular point on the Tee when you connect the tail. 130.0 . and using a similar approach to the one outlined previously. connect its Head to Nozzle /Tank-2/N1 and connect its Tail to the Tee in Branch /Pipe-1/B1. Notice how the branch route goes automatically to the free connection on the Tee. Select the new Branch in the list as above.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 129.

Click the Piping Component Creation icon on the Pipework toolbar and add a WN Flange to the branch head.0 . Still using the Component Creation form. confirming that the alignment and connecting bore sizes are correct: 133. Using the same Component Creation form. Orientate and position the Elbow so its leave connection is aligned with the branch.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 131. 5:36 12. 132. Select Valve type GATE and Flange type WN. create a Valve and its associated Flanges and Gaskets. Implied tube is now shown between the Elbow and the Tee. create an Elbow of type E.

0 . and observe how the system shows you a preview of what it will look like if you accept the move. move it anywhere on the Tee. 5:37 12. In this case you can either move along the direction of the pipe route or rotate the Valve around the pipe route’s axis. you will see that the Movement Handles are slightly different from the ones seen before: This form of the Handles tells you that you can move or rotate the component in a set of prescribed directions. If you click on the Valve in the Model Editor. When the cursor changes.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Note: that the Valve is flush against the Elbow. 135. Select the Align with Feature option on the right-click pop-up menu. Using Pipe Component Modification handle. 134. move the Valve along the pipe route towards the Tee so it is flush against it.

Left-click to accept the change: 137. This completes the introduction to the basic pipe routing operations.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 136. Zoom in on the pipework to see your completed design model. In the following parts of the exercise you will look at some ways of checking the design model and outputting some design data derived from the database settings. 5:38 12.

7. you can control: • • Orthogonal and non-orthogonal leg definition Positioning • • • Increment snapping Explicit positioning Feature highlighting: • • • • • Centre line Offsetting by OD of tube (including insulation) Automatic completion of route Where completion is predictable UNDO/REDO changes. Elbows or Bends (as specified) are automatically inserted where the route changes direction. Clicking on the dotted line brings up the Routing Handle: You can switch the Routing Handle to the other end of an ill-defined route by picking the End Route Handle. which is displayed as a dotted line (instead of implied tube) between two Components. 5. QPR would typically be used where the Head and Tail of a Branch have been defined but the route between them has not.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5. QPR is entered automatically when you click on an ill-defined route.7 Quick Pipe Routing Quick Pipe Routing (QPR) enables you to define graphically the route of a Pipe by using the mouse pointer to specify changes in direction of the route either in absolute terms or in relation to model features.1 QPR Facilities When defining a route. then there will be no End Route Handle.0 . 5:39 12. Where there is an ill-defined end.

the end is positioned at the last point defined. the Routing Access Handles are shown at the ends of the ill-defined route. This could be due to the current Design tolerance settings. selecting anything else takes you out of QPR.e.2 Cases of Ill-defined Routes In general terms an ill-defined route is where instead of cylinder being shown for implied tube. when the reference is set. A common case of this would be where the Head and Tail of a Branch have been defined but the route between them has not. i. by picking another item in the display. hence the end connection is unset. When a dashed line is selected. In the case of an ill-defined end of a route.e. 5.0 . For example. You exit QPR either by exiting Model Edit Mode or by changing the current selection set.3 Entering and Leaving QPR QPR is accessed via the selection of the dashed line (representing an ill-defined route) when in Model Editor Mode. the end can still to be set as ill-defined. You can access the point from where the route was abandoned to continue routing. The selection of an ill-defined route is mutually exclusive to any other element selected.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Where an extremity of a route is undefined. i. 5:40 12. 5.e. Where there is an ill-defined end (for example if the Pipe Head is defined but not the Pipe Tail) only one access handle is shown. the position is not coincident with the reference item or when the end reference is not set. a dashed line is shown. Bad Alignment Between Two Components This is where the leave direction and arrive direction of adjacent elements do not match. then you can assign the end to the last defined point within the route or to designate an appropriate element to connect the extremity to. offset. whereas an ill-defined end is where. i. even if you set the end connection to a permissible type.7. Other cases are detailed below. However. An “unset” end is where the Head or Tail has its attributes left in the default state. Arrive or Leave where Head or Tail is Undefined This is where the end directly adjacent to a Component is unset or ill-defined. Abandoned Routes A route can be abandoned at any time. you may with to abandon the route so you can continue routing it from the other end. angle and ratio.7.

the target. when in a special action mode. The menu displays the available options which relate to the drag and.7.allow you to direct interactively the Extend Route Handle.used to change the direction of routing to one of the cardinal directions for the current frame of reference. When dragging using the right-hand mouse button. 5:41 12. By default.5 Extend Route Handle This is used to change the position of the handle along the current route direction. The following operations can be performed on the handle. dragging with the left-hand mouse button held down causes features such as p-points or p-lines to be highlighted when the pointer moves across them. if applicable. feature highlighting). the Rotation Handles .used to extend the route in the direction indicated by the handle. i. Dragging The Extend Handle can be dragged by either using the left-hand or right-hand mouse buttons. if no special actions are active (e.0 . you are given the option to maintain the dragged extension or cancel the operation.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5. you are presented with a context sensitive popup menu on button up. the handle moves in multiples of the currently defined linear increment. 5. Highlighted features can then be ‘snapped' to. With Feature Highlighting ‘on’. i. By default.7.4 Pipe Routing Handle The Pipe Routing handle has three parts: • • • the Extend Route Handle .g. when no special actions are active. the Cardinal Direction Handles . and the handle returns to the previous position.e.e. Feature Highlighting Feature highlighting allows you to position the handle using other elements with the model. in the direction of or in the opposite direction to the extend direction.

you can offset the position by ½ OD of the tube (including insulation) to either side of the plane. until a feature is identified. where possible. the handle follows the pointer using the default increments. The P hotkey is used for this. If there is no solution point to the feature selection. When a feature is identified. However. An example of offsetting tube from steelwork is shown below: 5:42 12. built-in default behaviour is used to derive the initial position (see Distance from Origin).0 . Offsetting Where a position has been derived using feature highlighting. the system reverts to its default behaviour. Where there is more than one point that can be snapped to. The system reverts to its previous mode once a feature has been selected or the action aborted When feature highlighting is active. the handle moves to the derived intersection point. (see below). Subsequent feature identification within the same drag uses the last solution type to derive the point.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Feature highlighting can be activated either from the F ‘hotkey’ or via the Selection pulldown menu on the main menu bar. it is possible to cycle through the derived points (which are usually with respect to the intersection of the routing line and a plane) and choose the desired one.

i. you can finely adjust the positioning of the handle using ‘hotkeys’. clearance from surfaces.or right-hand mouse button.e. See Feedback for more details of feedback. the offset is performed by moving the pointer over the sphere corresponding to the side of the feature you want to offset. if the last position was offset behind a plane. i. using the arrow keys on the numeric keypad (or the numeric keypad 2 and 8 keys when Num Lock is ‘off’. subsequent identifications will also be offset behind the plane. then the offset value will be either positive or negative in the direction of movement.7.hotkeys. then dragging has no effect.6 Nudging the Handle Once a drag has been started using the left.) Note the feedback giving the position where the current selection is to be positioned relative to the steelwork Beam. (In the example above the pointer would be moved over the top sphere. 5. With a position that has been derived by the intersection of the route line and a feature. the fine adjustment uses the 2 and 8 keys on the numeric keypad. 5:43 12.e. To facilitate this a ‘fine nudge’ setting is available. You can ‘nudge’ the manipulation handle when dragging in a linear direction. and a fine value for accurate positioning. but the mouse button must still be held down. e. the nudge will offset the solution plane to derive a new position.0 . where the granularity of the movement is less than that of the current linear increments. Similar to the nudging using the + and .g. Subsequent feature identification within the same drag uses the last selected offset mechanism where possible. Once a nudge has been performed. Linear increments are controlled from the Set Increments form.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components When the offset handle (the symbol) appears near the pointer. This allows you to position a leg behind or in front of a feature. It is possible to cycle through the derived positions. Where a nudge is applied to a position which is not derived from a snap to feature. either side offset and back to the original centreline position. and then apply a clearance. in a similar manner to that for cycling through the intersection with a plane. When defining a route you may need to nudge the position of the handle by the default linear increment for major positioning.

7.or right-hand mouse button.7.8 Free Rotation Handles The free rotation handles allow you to rotate interactively the Extend Route Handle about the vertical axis and from the horizontal plane. 5:44 12. feedback is given showing the direction of the Extend Handle (see below). On dragging either of the Free Rotation Handles. Dragging The rotation handle can be dragged using either the left.or right-hand mouse button.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5.7 Cardinal Direction Handles These handles allow you to select quickly one of the cardinal directions for defining the next leg of the route. The same popup menu is available from a cardinal direction handle as is available from the Extend Route handle itself. and allows a full 360° rotation about the relevant axis of rotation. 5. The Extend Route Handle will not be enabled until you select a cardinal direction with either the left.

Explicit Offsets There two methods of performing a relative offset of the routing handle: • • Specifying a leg length Offsetting from the previous position of the handle 5:45 12. 5. but no feature is identified. relatively or by using other elements in the model to derive a position. which is the default method of positioning the handle. Dragging the handles with the right-hand mouse button is the same as using the left-hand button. Extend Route Handle You can position the change in direction freely. Nudging the Handle You can adjust the Handle by a derived angular offset using the currently defined angular increment using the + and . Changes which modify the direction of the handle cannot be undone/redone. if a direction is derived from an alignment with a feature. the handle rotates in multiples of the currently defined angular increments.9 Direction and Rotation Characteristics Note: All modifications to the length or direction of a route leg can be undone or redone using the UNDO/REDO buttons.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components If no special actions (e. When a feature is identified. feature highlighting) are active. dependent on the feature identified. The following are the various methods by which you can position the change in direction. the rotation uses the currently defined angular increment value. other than by ‘freehand’ dragging of the handle.7. Feature Highlighting When performing a free rotate. As with moving.hotkeys for the rotation handle. the handle is aligned in the appropriate manner.0 . but you are presented with a pop-up menu giving the available options which relate to the drag. Selecting a Free Rotation Handle using the right-hand mouse button presents you with a context sensitive menu which relates to the direction and rotation of the handle. if feature highlighting (see Feature Highlighting) is active. see Popup Menus on the QPR Handle.g. using the nudge increments the rotation from the derived direction.

you can also “preview” the effect of the specified value before committing the change.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components These options are accessed from the popup menu on the handle. In each case you are presented with a form which allows you to enter an appropriate length. A negative value positions the change in direction in the opposite direction to that of the extend arrow. Distance from Origin This method allows you to position the change in direction by a distance that the handle is to be offset from the position of the previous component in the leg. see Popup Menus on the QPR Handle. 5:46 12. Offset This method allows you to position the change in direction by a distance that the handle is to be offset from its current position.0 . Leg Length This method allows you to position the change in direction by specifying the length of the route leg. All offset distances are along the routing vector.

Offset by OD of Type By default when a feature is selected.0 . 5:47 12. i. it is possible to cycle through derived solutions using the (Shift) hotkey. All positions projected onto the routing vector are derived from a constructed plane. However. see Popup Menus on the QPR Handle and Hotkeys respectively. Feature highlighting options are available from the shortcut menu on the handle and from the ‘hotkeys’. including insulation. This offset will be applied normal to the solution plane that is currently active. see Hotkeys.e. the derived position is taken to be that of the centreline of the tube.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Feature Highlighting Feature highlighting allows you to position the handle using other elements within the model. By default the derived plane will be vertical or horizontal dependent on the approach routing vector. in front. behind or through the relevant solution plane using the ‘O’ hotkey. It is possible to cycle through the three possible solution planes for the offset. You can modify the derived position of the change in direction by ½ the OD of the tube.

The way in which the extension handle is oriented depends on the feature identified. Identification of a point feature directs the extension handle directly to the identified point feature. Identification of a linear feature rotates the Extension Handle about the vertical axis of the Routing Handle (maintaining the angle from the horizontal) and directing the Extension Handle at a projected point on the projected linear feature. see Popup Menus on the QPR Handle. This is selectable from an option on the popup menu available on the handle.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Orient to Feature It is possible to direct the route extension handle to an identified feature.0 . 5:48 12.

The Enter Direction For <direction> Axis form is displayed which allows you to specify the direction with respect to the current frame of reference. Alignment with Feature It is possible to direct the Route Extension Handle so that it is parallel with an identified linear feature. It is not possible to select a direction which is directly opposite to the leg preceding the Routing Handle. using the Explicit Direction… popup menu option on the handle. then the default direction is the flow direction of the Pipe. Explicit Direction The direction of the Extension Handle can be set to an explicit direction.0 . 5:49 12. or the feature produces a 180° change in direction. whether the one being defined or in another Pipe. When identifying a Branch leg.e. 180° changes in direction are not possible.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Where it is not possible to derive a direction from the identified feature. using the Align with Direction… popup menu option on the handle. It is possible to toggle (using the Shift key) between the initial derived direction of the identified feature and the opposite direction. i. then the feature is not displayed.

the Complete option will create a leg between the derived position of the alignment and the end of route. If the End Route Handle points out of the last leg. There are two possible ways in which you can define a connection for the free end of a route. if the End Route Handle is identified as a linear feature. Connect Where an end of the route is undefined.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components It is not possible to specify a direction which is opposite to that of the leg preceding the routing handle. as there is no illdefined pipe remaining in the route. For this reason the option of completing the route is only available when the handle is identified as a linear feature. When the leg being extended and the End Route Handle do not intersect. 5:50 12. Complete When using the right-hand mouse button to identify a feature. The End Route Handle can be interpreted as either a point or direction (linear feature). Where the End Route Handle is directed into the last leg. This is accessed by an option on the pop-up menu for the handle. you will remain in QPR. one being the shortest distance between the extend route and end route vector. you are given the option to complete the route. the other being from the End Route Handle and the mapped position on the end route vector. Where the leg being extended and the End Route Handle physically intersect. these are: Using the pointer .this allows you to identify a permissible connection without modifying the route. you can designate an appropriate element as the point the end is to be connected to. then QPR aborts. the Complete option will create two legs.

If a p-point is already connected to. etc. This means that when rotating using the “vertical” handle. Feature Highlighting Where feature highlighting is active. and which does not have a connection already associated with it. the system either tries to determine the appropriate p-point from the pick or highlights the p-point which can be connected to. see Popup Menus on the QPR Handle. The Rotation Handles have their own popup menus for direction.0 . the direction derived will be towards the identified feature. then it is handled as any other feature and the Connect option is not available. the projected direction of the Extend Route Handle on the horizontal plane is maintained and the angle from the horizontal will be derived. By default. 5:51 12.as this requires you to make a decision once an appropriate feature has been identified. However. When using the “horizontal” handle. Rotation Handles You can freely direct the Extend Route Handle about the vertical or horizontal using the Rotation Handles. but the angle from the horizontal is maintained.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Identifying an appropriate feature . e. you only need to identify elements which have a free Connection. the permissible connections are the p-points of Components which are unconnected. then the derived direction for the Extend Route Handle is constrained about the appropriate axis of rotation. where an element has more than one Connection. this option is only available when dragging the Extend Handle using the right-hand mouse button. Where the pointer is being used to identify a Connection.g. The appropriate point on the element to which the Connection is to be made is automatically determined. A permissible connection is defined as an element that can have a Branch Head or Tail connected to it. When in feature highlighting mode. CROSS. dragging either handle rotates the Extend Route Handle about the appropriate axis by the currently defined Angular Increments. PCOM.

‘Leg length 500. etc. the current direction of the handle will be displayed. then the offset from the original position is displayed adjacent to the handle.0 . the Extend Route Handle will highlight to differentiate it from the other components of the routing handle. adapting to variations on a theme depending on the position. any alphanumeric information relating to the operation (for example. which relate to the handles. the system displays only the stylised handle. Dragging When dragging the handle. Once the handle is moved from its original position. The Cardinal Direction and Free Rotation handles disappear.this uses a stylised version of the selected handle.used to inform you which handle is beneath the pointer.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5. Where the original position necessitates a change in direction. the length of the leg will also be displayed. These are: • Highlighting .0’ above) is presented to you. • • Extend Route Handle Highlighting Passing the pointer over the handle when not performing an action causes the pointer symbol to change and.10 Feedback There are several types of feedback. Its representation is a highlighted version of the dragging handle.7. 5:52 12.when performing a drag. which will be selected when picked. In addition. All routing handle sub-handles disappear while this handle is active Informational . Dragging . state.

Where the plane is offset. the system gives a representation of the offset applied: 5:53 12. the supplied feedback informs you of the type of solution plane and the derived position. Snapping When identifying a feature. horizontal. the feedback informs you of the type of plane used. The plane type is displayed as a text string at the mid-point between the pointer position on the feature and the derived position on the plane. i. Where a reference plane has been shown. feedback is given to inform you of any extra information used to derive the position.0 .e. or start of a Branch.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Where the original position does not result in a change in direction. vertical or normal along with any offset applied. then the length of the leg is shown half-way along the leg being extended. Information Feedback In addition to the feedback of the feature identified and the distances moved.

Where the focus is lost from the handle. an offset handle is displayed to enable you to modify the offset of the plane. will reposition the derived plane back to its original position. Losing focus on the handle. 5:54 12. from horizontal to vertical. The orientation of the handle is normal to the reference plane displayed. Cardinal Direction Handles Highlighting By default when the pointer passes over one of Cardinal Direction Handles when not performing an action. the cardinal direction is highlighted and the original Extend Route Handle disappears. Moving the cursor over the “blob” at the end of the handle offsets the plane to the relevant side of the original derived position.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Offsetting Planes On identifying a feature which displays a reference plane.0 . The highlighted feature and handle remain the same. therefore if the type of plane is changed. but the plane will be offset to the correct position.g. but returning to the original identified feature or moving over the joining line between the two blobs. then the original Extend Route Handle will reappear. then the handle is redisplayed at the pointer and in the correct orientation. The handle is shown at the pointer at the initial point on the feature when it is selected. e.

11 Popup Menus on the QPR Handle Extend Handle Before Drag The following options are available on the Extend Handle before a drag. 5:55 12. 5. Dragging When dragging the handle about the horizontal or vertical axes. The current direction of the handle is also displayed. Free Rotation Handles Highlighting When you pass the pointer over one of the handles when not performing an action.0 . the Routing Handle changes to suit the selected direction. all other handles are removed. the pointer changes and the handle is highlighted to show the rotation direction of the handle. only the Rotation Handle is displayed.7.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components On selecting the cardinal direction.

This can be set to either Offset (offset from the previous handle’s position). Allows you to identify features with which to align. Gives a form which lets you enter an absolute distance of the handle from the last previous change in the direction’s position. along the current route direction. Directs the handle either directly to a point feature or rotates about the vertical axis. The Component can be set to either Elbows or Bends. or From Origin (distance of the handle from the previous Component’s origin position).0 . Allows you to select the type of Component that is created by the Routing Handle when a change in direction occurs. maintaining horizontal offset. when a linear feature is identified. Displays a form which allows you to enter an absolute distance of the handle from the previous Component’s origin position. Leg Length (distance of the handle from the last previous change in direction’s position). Allows you to identify features with which the handle is to be aligned. Distance From Origin… Extend Through Feature… Orient to Point… Align with Direction… Explicit Direction… Component Choice > Distance Feedback > 5:56 12. Displays an input form which allows you to explicitly specify the direction of the handle. Allows you to select how the Routing Handle displays distance feedback.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Menu available where both ends of the ill defined route are well defined: Option Enter Offset… Enter Leg Length… Description Gives a form which lets you enter an offset from the current handle’s position in the current routing direction.

Establishes a connection to the identified item and completes the route and aborts the route mode when applicable.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Option Show Rotation Handles… Cancel Description Allows you to show/hide the rotation handles.0 . etc. a Nozzle with no connection reference set: Option Extend Connect Connect and Complete Cancel Description Leaves the handle at the shown position Leaves the handle at the shown position and connects the ill-defined end to the identified target. On Completion of a Drag The following options are available on the Extend Handle on completion of a drag. there is no End Route Handle displayed: Option Connect To… Description Allows you to use the pointer to select an element which the route end can be connected to.g.e. i. Tees. Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag The following options are only available where the end being routed to is ill-defined. e. Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag 5:57 12. unconnected Nozzles. when the secondary mouse button has been used to drag the handle. e. The following options are the defaults when no special actions are active: Option Extend Cancel Description Leaves the handle at the shown position Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag The following options are available when in “snap to feature mode” and the end being routed to is ill-defined or unconnected and the identified feature is a connectable p-point of an item to which an end can be connected.e. i. Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag The following options are available when in “snap to feature mode” and the end being routed to is well-defined and the identified feature is the End Route Handle: Option Extend Complete Cancel Description Leaves the handle at the shown position Completes the route and aborts the routing mode when applicable.g.

Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag Align with Direction… Explicit Direction… Component Choice Á Distance Feedback Á Show Rotation Handles… Cancel On Completion of a Drag 5:58 12. Leg Length (distance of the handle from the last previous change in direction’s position). Allows you to identify features with which the handle is to be aligned. This can be set to either Offset (offset from the previous handle’s position). when a linear feature is identified.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Free Rotation Handle Before Drag The following options are available on the Free Rotate Handles before a drag. Allows you to select the type of Component that is created by the Routing Handle when a change in direction occurs. maintaining horizontal offset. Directs the handle either directly to a point feature or rotates about the vertical axis. Allows you to show/hide the rotation handles. Option Enter Value… Orient to Point… Description Displays a form which allows you to enter an angle for the current Rotation Handle. or From Origin (distance of the handle from the previous Component’s origin position). The Component can be set to either Elbows or Bends. Gives a form which allows you to enter an explicit direction for the z-axis of the handle. Allows you to select how the Routing Handle displays distance feedback.0 .

12 Hotkeys The following ‘hotkey’ options are available for Routing Handle manipulation options: Hotkey Esc Handle All All D F All Description Aborts the current operation in the correct manner. Extend Route Exercise continues: 138. Increment linear offset or angular rotation by default increment setting. Cycles through derived directional alignments. 5. Cycles through Offset/Leg Length/From Origin distance feedback options. Returns the handle back to its original state before the drag. The differences are that the Explicit Position form should look like this: 5:59 12. (or All and when in Model Toggle switch for feature highlighting Edit mode Selection>Feature Highlighting). Cycles through the solutions for the derived position when aligning using feature highlighting. Decrement linear offset from current position by “fine linear increment” value. Increment linear offset from current position by “fine linear increment” value.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Option Rotate Cancel Description Leaves the extend handle at the shown direction. Add a third tank to the design using the same method as that used previously to create the first storage tank. Select Design>Equipment from the main menu.7. Decrement linear offset or angular rotation by default increment setting. O P + - Extend Route Extend Route All All Extend Route Cycles through the offsets when aligning with feature highlighting.0 .

Select Design>Pipework from the main menu. called Pipe-2. setting Pump-1-DISCHARGE as the Head and Tank-3-N1 as the tail: 5:60 12. create a new pipe. Using a similar process to that described previously.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components And on the Create Nozzle form your input data should be: • • Name: Position: Tank-3-N1 West North Up • • Orientate P1 is: Height: W 300 1675 0 2750 Your design should now look as shown: 139.0 . 140. You will now route a pipe between Nozzles Pump-1-DISCHARGE and Tank-3-N1. between Nozzles Pump-1-DISCHARGE and Tank-3-N1.

141. you will see the Routing Access Handles displayed at either end of the route: 5:61 12. 142.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components Note: The dotted line that represents the pipe route between the two nozzles. When you select the line. Select in the Design Explorer the Branch you have just created and add a Flange and associated Gasket.0 . Enter the Model Editor and click anywhere on the dotted line that represents the pipe route for Pipe-2.

0 . then the handles will switch about. Right-click on the West axis Quick Routing Handle at the Tail of the route and choose the Extend Through Feature option from the pop-up menu: This allows you to select a Feature that defines the plane to which the pipe extends: 144. Note that if you have an ill defined end there will be no End Route Handle. Click on point P2 of the Flange.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components If you select the End Route Handle. The system will extend the pipe to the defined plane and insert an Elbow with implied tubing attached: 5:62 12. 143.

Click on point P2 of the Flange.0 . Viewing from a different angle. you will see that the pipe has extended exactly the right amount to bring it level with the nozzle on the pump: 146. Right-click on the South axis of the Quick Routing Handle and choose the Extend Through Feature option from the pop-up menu.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 145. The system will extend the pipe to the defined point and insert an Elbow with implied tubing attached 5:63 12.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 147. Right-click on the Down axis of the Quick Routing Handle and choose the Extend Through Feature option from the pop-up menu. Click on point P2 of the Flange. When you have added the Flange. You can complete the route by adding a Flange to the Elbow nearest Tank-3 and ensuring the Skip Connected Comps checkbox on the Component Creation form is unchecked. Your final design should look as shown: 5:64 12. drag it to the Nozzle in the Model Editor. The system will extend the pipe to the defined point and insert an Elbow with implied tubing attached: 148.

Select the first component in the range you want to delete: 5:65 12.8 Deleting Pipe Routes It is possible to select graphically contiguous components of the same pipe or branch by the first and last component of the range and then delete them in one operation. Exercise continues: 149. Click the Delete Range of Piping Components icon on the Pipework toolbar: 150.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5.0 .

The system will highlight the components between the first and last ones and ask you to confirm you want them deleted: 5:66 12.Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 151. Select the last component on the range you want to delete.0 .

Click the Yes button and the system will delete the components you selected: 5:67 12.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 152.

Pipework Design User Guide Routing a Sequence of Piping Components 5:68 12.0 .

To display the Modify Components form. 6:1 12.Pipework Application navigate to the required pipe or one of its branches and select Modify>Pipe>Component bore/ Specification or Modify>Branch>Component bore/Specification from the main menu bar.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6 Pipework Modification This chapter shows how pipework components can be modified and the way in which pipes can be split. The utility does not modify the branch or pipe specifications. the utility also allows the setting of insulation and tracing specs. 6. in Design .1 Pipework Component Bore and Specification Modification This utility provides facilities for you to modify the bore or specifications of one or all of the components in a pipe or branch. In addition to these modifications. The same Modify Components form is used for modifying both component specification and bore.

accepts a group of components selected graphically and highlights them in the Component List.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6. Component List tab . Select from graphics button .with this selected the following are available: Current Element button . 6:2 12. When it first shown.1 Modify Components Form The Modify Component form is a multi function form able to change both specifications and bores.allows you to move to another pipe or branch and select its contents instead.1. the form contents are based on the contents of the current branch or pipe depending on which was selected from the menu.

Current specification of the component .The components in the selected branch or pipe .checking shows the tracing settings in a separate column on the form.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Insulation Spec check box . Clicking the Select from graphics button accepts the selection and highlights the components in the Component List.A description of the component .New specification of the component . The scrollable list panel has the following columns: • • • • • • • • Design Element Component Description ABORE LBORE PBORE Spec Component New Spec Component New Component Description . 6.The bore at the p-point where the flow leaves the component .The bore at any of the p-points regardless of the flow direction . Components can be added or removed by holding down the Control key and graphically selecting or deselecting individual elements.checking applies one component change to all like instances in the Component List.0 .1.2 Component Selection A series of components can be selected graphically using the fencing selection method. Tracing Spec check box .checking shows the insulation settings in a separate column on the form.A description of the new component Apply changes to like components check box .The bore at the p-point where the flow enters the component . 6:3 12.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Modification Options The options available are accessed by right clicking over a selected field to display a pop-up menu.0 . In each case the modify option applies only to the selected list highlighted on the form. 6:4 12.

0 . the Modify Specification option is selected from the pop-up menu.Deselects all the new specifications that have been selected for all components. The Select Piping Spec form displays.Modifies the specification of the components selected in the list .Modifies the bore of the components selected in the list .checking forces the selection process to look at all components regardless of their original specification.1. All 6. 6:5 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The options are: • • • • • Modify Specification Modify Bore Modify Insulation Spec Modify Tracing Spec Choose component Select All . Apply changes to out of spec check box .Modifies the tracing specification of the components selected in the list .3 Modifying Component Specification To modify the specification of a set of components.Modifies the insulation specification of the components selected in the list .Selects all of the components in the list • • Clear New Specifications Section Selected .Deselects all the new specifications that have been selected for only the components that are selected in the component list.Allows you to choose an equivalent component where the modification process fails to offer a component complying with the new specification or bore . . Note: Normally any items which are not in the same spec as the current branch are ignored by this process. prompting the user with a drop-down list of available specifications. This allows for items such as pipe supports and special components to remain untouched.

At this point the form only contains a suggestion of what the new components will be and it does not make any changes to the design. A300) is selected from the drop-down list and clicking OK actions the search process to find equivalent components in the selected specification.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification A new specification (e.g. The Component List is refreshed to show the new components. Any items which could not be found in the new specification are listed as having ‘No selection available’ and will not be changed if the other changes are applied.4 Error Messages With the Error Messages tab selected. A selection summary panel is displayed at the bottom of the form to show the results of the specification selection process. each selected item is scanned to find an equivalent in the 6:6 12. 6. The components with a selection available and with no selection available will be highlighted using the colour scheme which is defined in the highlighting tab. described in Choosing a Component. In the component list the components that are selected will be highlighted appropriately.1.0 . the Modify Components form lists the component selected for modification which produce an error in the selection process. When the selection process takes place.

an error is indicated with a description in the error list.5 Highlighting With the highlighting tab selected. when pressed will show the colour selection form.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification new specification. An example is shown: 6. Once a highlighting colour scheme has been defined this is restored upon re-entry into the application. Note: The highlighting colour's defined in the image above are the defaults that are loaded if no highlighting scheme can be retrieved upon entering the pipework application. and once set the button will change to that colour and the highlighting will be changed in the component list. The coloured buttons on the form. Where an item cannot be found. 6:7 12.1.0 . highlighting colour's used in the component list can be defined. From this form the desired highlighting colour can be set.

0 . 6.6 Choosing a Component For items where no selection is available. you may opt to choose the component by rightclicking over the component field and selecting the corresponding option available from the pop-up menu.1. The Restore to Defaults button will restore the highlighting colour's to that of the start of the session. This displays the CHOOSE OPTION form as shown: 6:8 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Specific highlighting can also be turned on and off using the radial buttons next to each highlighting colour button.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The Specs tab is selected first to set the new specification.0 . The Components tab is then selected so that an equivalent item can be chosen from a scrollable list of suitable components. The before and after graphical views are as shown: 6:9 12. clicking the Apply button changes the components for ones complying with the new specification. Clicking OK adds the selected equivalent component to the Component List on the Modify Components form. Once the selection is complete. These component changes are shown in the graphical view.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification If the changes are unacceptable.1. navigate to the required pipe or branch and invoke the Modify Components form from the main menu bar as previously described. 6. With this option applied component changes will automatically be applied to all elements in the list that have the same type as the one being changed via the above process. the Undo button reverts back to the original design.7 Multiple Component Changes You may wish to apply one component change to all like instances in the list where no alternate selection is available. To do this the 'Apply changes to like components' check box should be checked. 6:10 12. The form once again shows a Component List based on the selected pipe or branch. 6.1.8 Modifying Component Bore To modify the bore of a set of components.

0 . 6:11 12. with a drop-down list of available bore sizes. The Modify Bore option is selected from the right-click popup menu to display the Select Bore form. The required bore is selected from the list and clicking OK populates the Component List with the new bore size. which highlights them in the Component List as before.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The components required for bore change are selected graphically.

you can opt to choose the component using the same method as in modifying the Component Specification. Selecting the Choose component option form the right-click pop-up menu displays the CHOOSE OPTION form as shown. If the above process results in some items having no selection available. accepts the changes. Specs tab selected: Components tab selected: 6:12 12. Selecting the Error Messages tab will display a list showing any anomalies and these can the be corrected by inserting or deleting reducers. clicking the Apply button.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification If the results are satisfactory.0 .

6:13 12. When you wish to change an insulation or tracing specification.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6. there is no requirement to click the Apply button on the Modify Components form. To activate these and show the current values. Clicking OK automatically changes the spec and refreshes the Component List. In this case.0 . the Insulation Spec and Tracing Spec check boxes need to be selected. After clicking OK. Here there is no insulation on the visible components so '-' is inserted in the list. A list of available specs is shown in the displayed form and the required one is selected. the appropriate option is chosen from the right-click pop-up menu.1. the new Insulation spec list is as shown.9 Modifying Insulation and Tracing Specifications The insulation and tracing settings are not shown on the form by default because they are not the most commonly used functions.

Pipework Application select Utilities>Pipe Splitting. The split utility form displays as shown. At split points. new branches or new pipes.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6. Pipes may be split into segments within the same branch. in Design . couplings etc to be inserted. Multiple pipes may be split on single plane. 6:14 12.0 . To display the Split Pipe form. the system allows break components such as flanges sets.2 Pipe Splitting This utility allows pipes to be split at a defined point.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6:15 12.

the ID Selection button is clicked and then the mouse cursor used to identify pipes to add to the list. When you have finished selecting pipes to add. The selected pipes are then added to the splitting list by clicking the Add Selected button. ID Selection This method is similar to the above method. you can dynamically update the list by picking any pipe component. To add pipes to the list. the escape button is clicked to end selection. Add Selected Allows you to select a number of pipes in the graphical window by dragging a crossing window across the required pipes with the mouse cursor. 6:16 12. the system allows the user to collect a group of pipes in the graphics window using a variety of methods. however.1 Multiple Mode Splitting Elements to Split In multiple mode. These methods are only available when the user wants to split a group of pipes using a plane. Add CE Allows you to navigate to any element in the hierarchy and add it or any pipes underneath the current element to the splitting list.2.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 6.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Clear all Clicking this button empties the entire Elements to Split list. Split pipes into segments .0 . 6:17 12. Split pipes on a plane . This displays a Remove from list button. Split Pipe Options The next part of the form allows you to select what happens to the pipes when they are split. (selection of these points can be achieved by using either the feature picking or component picking option).split the pipe by inserting an assembly component at the plane intersection point 2. The splitting is defined between two points that are selected by you. Clicking the Remove from list button removes the pipe from the splitting list.split the pipe into a number of segments using user defined dimensions. Modifying the Splitting List Individual pipes can be removed from the splitting list by clicking the right mouse button over an element to be removed from the list. There are three options: 1.

The first prompt is to identify the leg of any of the pipes to be split in the direction of the split. New Bran . The next prompt is to build the plane itself using the graphical interaction control to define the plane.components are inserted at the split position in the currently selected branch.0 . 6:18 12. Split pipe by moving Component .split the pipe at the split point and insert an assembly component at that point. Existing .2 Splitting Pipes with a Plane Plane definition Having decided how to deal with the split. the next phase is to create a split plane by clicking the Create Plane button. The remaining components in the branch will then be added to a new branch Component Creation Options When splitting a pipe there are a number of options for specifying where new components are created.Components are inserted into a new pipe in the hierarchy. All the standard pick operations are available.Components are inserted in a new branch under the current pipe hierarchy 6. This determines the direction of all of the other pipes cutting the plane. New Pipe . or intersections to define the intersection points of two objects or lines.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification 3. including Graphics to pick a surface. The following example uses the intersection of two steelwork members.2.

6:19 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification By default the plane is shown as a wireline representation centred around the defined plane origin.0 . the plane is increased in size and filled. In the example below. it can be increased in size and filled using the Plane Size and Fill options. To enable you to visualise the plane better.

The options are shown: In the example. 6:20 12.0 . the plane is moved in front of the original position by a distance of 500mm.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification After the plane has been defined it may be adjusted so that it is in front or behind the derived position by a given distance.

only one is available so when the split is performed. 6:21 12.0 . a flange set will be added at the split point.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Filter Assemblies By The items used to split the pipe are selected from the assembly list. In the example.

you need to determine whether to build to the primary or secondary origin of the assembly.0 . The primary and secondary origin points allow some control over where the assembly is positioned relative to the splitting point. 6:22 12. One of the most common types of assembly is likely to be a set of break flanges where the relevant points for positioning the assembly are on either flange face. In this case the primary origin point would be defined as the leave point (upstream flange face) and the secondary origin would be defined as being the arrive point (downstream flange face). A representation of the splitting procedure is as shown: Further information on Assembly creation and usage is provided in Piping Assemblies.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Assembly Build Origin The final option available for plane splitting is the assembly build point.

0 . you are free to start the pipe splitting process. There are two ways pipes can be split. The resulting split is shown: 6:23 12. clicking the Split button splits the pipes. If rejected.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Applying Splits When a suitable plane has been created. Using the List of Defined Elements When there is a defined list of pipes. At this point you are prompted to confirm if the split points are acceptable and the changes can be accepted or rejected. These are as follows. the process is restarted.

3 Single Mode Splitting In addition splitting on a plane. 6.2. a single branch may be split into segments of a given length. This option is selected in the Split Pipe Options panel and allows splitting to be done by either Component picking or Feature picking.0 . the branch list is greyed out and Plane definition panel is replaced by the Split Pipe Length panel as shown: 6:24 12. To do this click the ID Split button and then use the mouse cursor to select pipes that will be split relative to the existing plane. The Undo button enables you to undo any changes that have been made to the model. As a result of this.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification ID Splitting You can also split pipes using a defined plane by directly picking pipes using the mouse cursor.

the new items are given a default name based on the pipe name. You are then prompted to select a start and end component between which the pipe will be split. the start and end flanges are selected. Again the split is made by inserting split components into the branch.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Split Pipe Length This option allows pipes to be split into segments of a particular length between selected components or selected features that are adjacent to the pipe. In the above pipe. In this case.restricts the length of the final tube to the final length value. a new branch or a new pipe depending on the Move down-stream components to setting. enter the required split length and then click the Split button.0 .4 Component Picking To make a split. If a new branch or pipe is requested. the downstream components at each split may be inserted into the existing branch. If the final tube length is below this value.2. Minimum Final Tube Length . The result is shown: 6:25 12. the previous spools are adjusted to make the final length within its tolerance. 6.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification Accepting the splitting arrangement results in flanges being inserted at the split points as shown: 6:26 12.

0 .5 Feature Picking Feature picking is very similar to component picking except the start and end points of the splitting operation can be determined by reference to other parts of the model such as structural steelwork.2. Tube length around bends and elbows is calculated as the centreline length. 6.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The split length is defined as tube length (Segment Length) or spool length (Cut-pipe Length) so in this case. it is either the length from face to face of the flanges or the tube length between flanges. 6:27 12.

In this case the connecting flange on the equipment is picked.0 . A feature or component can be picked for either the start or end point of the splitting.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The user starts the splitting process in the same manner as for component picking. 6:28 12. you are then prompted to pick the branch that the splitting will be applied to. In this example splitting is to be done between the connecting flange from the mounted equipment to the neutral axis of steelwork A. This displays the starting point for the split and also gives an indication of current flow direction (it is possible to split from either end of a pipe). The process is started by clicking the Split button at the bottom of the Split Pipe form.

The neutral axis has been chosen for this piece and the selection is displayed in the upper left corner of the window above. It will be noticed that the display of the steelwork has changed to show the individual Plines that make up the profile shape of the member being selected. The splitting function will now prompt you to select the piece of tubing that the end point will intersect with.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The end position to split to can now be picked. Releasing the mouse button finalises the selection. This will be a feature on steelwork A so this steelwork is identified by hovering the mouse cursor over it and pressing (and holding) the mouse button. (In this case it is the horizontal section of tube that passes steelwork A) 6:29 12.0 .

6:30 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Modification The function will now insert an assembly at the intersection between the selected feature on the steelwork and the selected tube and will continue to split between the start and end point as per the component splitting method.0 .

7. so you can readily check and output data from any combination of DESIGN disciplines. Note: These facilities are available from all DESIGN applications.1 Checking for Design Data Inconsistencies The Data Consistency Checking Utility reports the following types of occurrence (and other similar errors) in the design: 7:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data 7 Checking and Outputting Design Data In this chapter you will learn about: • • • • methods of checking for errors and inconsistencies in the pipework layout checking for clashes (spatial interferences) between design elements how to output a design data report derived from the piping model how to generate an isometric plot.0 .

To check your design for data consistency errors. (You can specify different minimum lengths for different bores if you wish. The Data Consistency Check form displays as shown. 7:2 12. an error message will be displayed. select Utilities>Data Consistency. as well as minimum acceptable lengths of tube between components. p-arrive connect ng i t ube x = O FFSE T A N G LE p-leave y R A TIO = x/ = t A N G LE ) y an( You can specify maximum permissible values for any of these parameters.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data 7. Exercise continues: 153.1 Design Tolerances The misalignment between adjacent components can be measured using any of three parameters: • • • the offset distance between their p-arrive and p-leave axes the displacement angle between their p-arrive and p-leave axes the ratio of the offset to the projected distance between the p-arrive and p-leave ppoints (equivalent to the tangent of the angle parameter).1.0 .) If any part of the design falls outside the current limits.

155. 158. 157. View the default values for piping design tolerance settings by clicking the Parameters: Piping… button to display the Piping Consistency Check Options form. You will use the default values for all piping design tolerance settings. 7:3 12. You can send the error report either to your screen or to a file. The Check list lets you specify how much of the design model you want to check in a single operation. The result overwrites the preceding report. so select Branch from the list. so select the Output: Screen button.0 . typically before you choose Design>Save Work. but ignore these. It is good practice to run a data consistency check whenever you have created or modified any significant amount of the design. You will check each branch separately. You will view it on screen.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data 154. so have a look at them then Cancel the form. Navigate to the branch /Pipe-1/B1 and click Apply to initiate the data checking process. There may be messages about unknown SKEYs. The resulting diagnosis is shown in the scrollable text area at the bottom of the form. Repeat the check as described for branch /Pipe-1/B2. 156.

These categories are: • • A physical clash: the primitive volumes overlap by more than a specified amount. such as a steel beam or a plant vessel. a clearance is reported If the items are separated by more than 8mm.2. A touch: the primitives either overlap by less than the amount needed to cause a clash or are separated at their closest point by less than a specified distance. no interference is found • These three classes are illustrated below for the clash specifications: • • • • • • • so that the following criteria apply: 7:4 12. depending on how far the two primitives intrude on each other’s allocated space. the checking utility recognises three categories of clash between them. Any primitive with OBST=0 represents a freely accessible volume and is ignored for clash checking purposes. otherwise you could get some very confusing results. A clearance: the primitives are separated at their closest point by more than the amount necessary to constitute a touch but less than a specified clearance distance.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data It is particularly important for your design to be free from data consistency errors before you generate isometric plots for fabrication and/or erection purposes. Touch limits: 5mm overlap to 2mm gap Clearance limit: 8mm If the items overlap by more than 5mm. 7. which you may want to investigate. a touch is reported If the items are separated by more than 2mm but less than 8mm.1 Obstruction Levels All design primitives and all catalogue primitives have an obstruction attribute (OBST) which defines the physical type of obstruction which the primitive represents: • • • A hard obstruction (OBST=2) represents a rigid and impenetrable object.0 . This usually means that a definite interference exists. a clash is reported If the items overlap by less than 5mm. This represents a near miss. This may simply mean that one item is resting upon another as intended. A soft obstruction (OBST=1) represents a volume which is not solid but which needs to be kept clear for access.2 Checking for Clashes The types of clash identified depend on two factors: • • The obstruction levels of the clashing elements The current touch and clearance tolerances 7.2. a touch is reported If the items do not overlap but are separated by less than 2mm. or it may indicate a problem.2 Extent of Clashing As well as distinguishing between hard and soft clashing items. 7.

Items which are not in the obstruction list are ignored during the clash checking operations. This can slow down progress when you are adding many new elements.3 Clash Detection Process Each element which is to be checked for clashes has its own geometry checked against that of all other elements which are specified by a current obstruction list. 7:5 12. each new element that you create is checked immediately for clashes as the design is built up. Think about the meaning of each setting shown (refer to the preceding introduction). so that each element to be clash checked is tested against every other element. Navigate to the piping zone which you want to check and select Utilities>Clashes.0 . The Clash Display form appears. To highlight the locations where clashes are found. The default obstruction list (all elements in the current DESIGN database) includes both piping and equipment items (/ PIPESITE). 160.2.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data overlap > 5mm a physical clash overlap < 5mm gap < 2mm touches 2mm < gap < 8mm a clearance 7. By default. Exercise continues: 159. The left-hand side of this form controls the clash checking process. To see what these are. then Cancel the form. study the Clash List which shows any clashes found. the clashing and obstruction items are shown in contrasting colours in the graphical view (two shades of red. when completed. • • • Select All in the Obstruction List and click Remove Select EQUIZONE in the hierarchy and click Add To close the form select Control>Close 161. select Settings>Clasher>Defaults to display the Clash Defaults form. by default). Remove all current entries and then Add the equipment zone. the whole of /PIPEZONE) for clashes against the three equipment items (in /EQUIZONE). Select Control>Check CE from the form menu bar to run the clash checking process and. To control the amount of checking carried out in a large database. This displays the Add/Remove Obstruction Items form. Note: If the Auto Clash button (in the main toolbar) is in the ‘On’ state. the obstruction list includes all elements in the database. Check all of your piping components (that is. To edit this. Use the default values for all clash checking settings. you can restrict the obstruction list to a few specific elements and/or you can specify a 3D volume (the clash limits) within which the clash checking is to be confined. the right-hand side consists of a 3D view in which you can look in detail at any clashes diagnosed. In your case this should simply say None. select Settings>Clasher> Obstruction>List. but is very useful when you want to add a few new items to an existing design which has already been checked for clashes.

The Report Details form that displays requires you to specify: • • where the report is to appear what part of the database hierarchy is to be read when extracting the required types of data. including tubing. its specification can be saved for future use in the form of a report template file. In the Hierarchy text box. which has been designed to produce a material take-off report listing all components. Once such a report has been designed. but you will look at the results of the process by using a pre-prepared template which outputs a material take-off list showing the length of tube needed to build your design. etc. The ways in which you define how a given report is to be generated and presented are beyond the scope of this exercise. The selection criteria which define which data settings are to be included in the report. column headings. enter /PIPESITE (this lists the tubing requirement for the whole of the piping design model). in which case this is the method you would normally use in practice.tmp.3 Generating a Data Output Report The reporting utility lets you read selected information from the database and present the output in a tabulated format. in the piping design.tmp suffix are report templates. Click OK on the File Browser.0 . The page layout. including number and positions of columns. This displays File Browser listing all files in the current reporting directory (specified by your System Administrator as part of the project set-up procedure). Select pipe_mto. Navigate to the \REPORTS\TEMPLATES directory by clicking on it in the Subdirectories window. Any headers and footers which are to appear at the top and bottom of each page. Each report can be customised by specifying some or all of the following: • • • • • • Where the output is to appear (on the screen or in a file ready for printing). 165. The page length (if the report is to be paginated). All files with a . Complete the Report Details form as follows: • • • 7:6 12.) Exercise continues: 162. 164. A tabulated report output is displayed in a Command Output window which is opened automatically.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data 7. Click OK to run the report. Any introductory header which is to appear at the beginning of the report. Leave the Filename text box empty (this sends the report automatically to the screen). 166. Select Utilities>Reports>Run to initiate the reporting process. (You will probably use your company standard templates for most reports anyway. 163.

with a very high degree of user control over the output format. with associated parts lists and annotation. this wording is written into the template simply as an example of the type of heading which you might want to use.) 7. ISODRAFT then loads and the screen changes to show the ISODRAFT menu bar. an Explorer window and an empty 2D View window. You will use just a small part of this power to produce a plot of your design using the default settings only. select Click YES to confirm that the database is to be updated to save any design changes. (Do not worry if part of the heading seems inappropriate for your project.0 . Exercise continues: 167.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data This report shows the number of each type of component used in the design and the total length of tube needed to interconnect them. 7:7 12. module (called ISODRAFT) .4 Generating Isometric Plots The isometric plotting module of PDMS provides very powerful facilities for generating any specified isometric view of all or part of the pipework design. To change to the isometric plotting Design>Modules>Isodraft>Macro Files. you must have carried out the data consistency checks specified previously and achieved an error-free report. Note: Before you proceed further.

both branches) using default settings for all options. 7:8 12.0 . For the purposes of this exercise.e. you will simply generate a standard isometric for the whole pipe (i. 168. Select Standard iso option: BASIC.MET.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data This menu bar gives you access to a wide range of facilities for generating customised isometric plots to suit all likely purposes. Navigate to /Pipe-1 in the Explorer and then select Isometrics>Standard. The Standard Isometric form displays which lets you specify which parts of the piping design are to be detailed in the plot and which of the standard drawing formats is to be used.

thus: • Display Isometric consists of a 2D graphical view showing the plot currently selected in the Display List. the dimensioning annotations are calculated. and the material take-off report is compiled. so it is selected for display automatically. including reports of any potential problems encountered: • Display List shows all isometric plots which have been created so far and which are available for display. the following new windows are displayed: • Isodraft Messages shows a log of the detailing process. The current display should look like this: 7:9 12. but with your very simple model it should take only seconds. In your case there is only one.0 . Click Apply to initiate the isometric plotting process. detailing in progress while the isometric view is composed. The status bar displays the message Please wait. On a large process plant model this could take a few minutes.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data 169. When processing is complete.

where x is incremented from 1 in this case plot001 170. generate separate isometric plots for each of the branches /Pipe-1/B1 and /Pipe-1/B2. Compare the information on each of these with the overall plot of /Pipe-1. ready to be sent to a plotter if a hardcopy version is required. 7:10 12. Such files are named by default with a sequential number of the format plot00x.Pipework Design User Guide Checking and Outputting Design Data The same data is also sent automatically to a file in your current operating system directory.0 . Using the same standard layout. Note: Printed plots of all three isometrics are in Sample Plots.

1 Automatic Pipe Routing Automatic Pipe Routing using PDMS Router Introduction PDMS Router is a rule-based tool which enables you to route pipe networks automatically and to position piping components. flanges. you must create the Pipes you need. gaskets and welds.i k o o o n Wr i o p k 8:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8 8. PDMS Router will then begin routing the pipe from the end of the flange. Add elbows. as shown in Figure 8:1. providing they are available in the catalogue.0 . For example. These are the points where a route begins and ends. then PDMS Router will automatically add a gasket and a flange. PDMS Router positions work-points at a distance from the branch head or tail which allows for any connection components that are required. You can include non-orthogonal sections of pipe manually.: Example of a work-point. Position piping components such as valves. and connect or position their Heads and Tails. • • Work-points When you add a pipe to PDMS Router. e b e u d i T a f i d c i e f p n s e OO C e l b a t Wr n p t . if the head of a branch is a flanged nozzle.1. Before you can start to use the PDMS Router. The flow direction is always forwards (from Head to Tail). PDMS Router will automatically: • Create clash-free orthogonal routes which use the minimum length of pipe and as few elbows and bends as possible. PDMS Router begins routing from the head of a pipe and ends the route at the pipe’s tail. it is given a head and tail work-point.1 8. When you route a pipe. reducers.

The algorithm has three modes of operation. Level One routes 8:2 12. D A PT E C PH Box 2 If PDMS Router cannot find a route using the routes shown on box one. a search is made using Level 2 mode. described as Level 1. PDMS Router first searches for a route using Level 1 mode. and ADE uses four bends.: Level One routes shows examples of the routes available in level one mode. PDMS Router will attempt the routes shown on box three. where both routes use four bends.0 . PDMS Router will try route ADE which uses three bends. If this route is blocked. The details of the three levels are explained in the following sections. it will attempt the routes shown on box two. If no clash-free Level 1 route is found. PDMS Router searches for an orthogonal route between the head and tail work-points of a pipe. using the minimum number of bends or elbows.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:1. D E C PT A PH Figure 8:2. as this requires only two bends. Box 1 The default route is ABC. Level 2 and Level 3 modes. Figure 8:2. Example of a work-point How PDMS Router Finds a Route The PDMS Router creates a route using an algorithm which minimises material cost while avoiding clashes with other objects. E D T P C A PH E D PT C A PH Box 3 Finally. if it is still unsuccessful in finding a route. where route ABC uses three bends. and if no Level 2 route is found Level 3 mode is used. Level One Mode In level one mode.

An example of a level two route is shown. In second level mode. Figure 8:3. 8:3 12. PDMS Router will withdraw the route into the box by a distance which enables the pipe to bypass the obstruction. Figure 8:4. In third level mode. PDMS Router then attempts the same routing patterns as those used in level one mode. PDMS Router will attempt to find second level routes.: Example of a Level Three route. it will attempt to find a third level route.0 .: Example of a Level One route shows a level one route in which the head workpoint is facing up. Example of a Level One route Level Two Mode If all first level routes are blocked. An example of a level three route is shown in Figure 8:5. PDMS Router extends the box outwards until it bypasses the obstruction and then attempts to route the pipe using level one routing principles. Example of a Level Two route Level Three Mode If PDMS Router cannot find a clash-free route using first and second level routes.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:3.

Insertion of Reducers at Bore Changes Before PDMS Router positions any components on a Branch. it constructs the Branch by adding whatever Elbows (or Bends) are needed. You can specify components in a Branch before routing. Example of a Level Three route Adding Components to a Route Once PDMS Router has worked out a route. then you must use one of the techniques described in Constraining a Route. If there are particular constraints that must be placed on a Branch. PDMS Router imposes a low upper limit on the number of Elbows it will add to a Branch: it does not attempt to be a maze solver. by selecting Modify>Branch and creating the components in the normal way. for example. See Locked Components for more information about using locked components. PDMS Router will add Flanges.0 . Note: To be efficient. Only the principal piping components need to be added. then by default the PDMS Router will select the first suitable Reducer that it finds in the catalogue. even if the Branch is re-routed. lap joint stub ends and Welds as necessary. Gaskets. Components can be locked into a given position. If one is found. regardless of whether it is concentric or eccentric. for example. You can also modify a routed Branch by adding other components.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Blocked vector is moved outwards to bypass the obstruction Figure 8:5. in which case they will not be moved. it checks the Branch to see if it contains any components whose bore is different from the preceding component. passing through a given point or plane. for example by importing a P&ID file as described in Importing a P&ID File. 8:4 12. Valves or Instruments. using the COCO (Connection Compatibility) tables to create the correct types.

for example. using a routing point. 8:5 12. It will then check the leave-bore and connect-bore. • The Tee must be symmetric about a plane through P-arrive. if the Tail is not connected to another Branch or you have not specifically defined the Tail position. then the Tee is treated the same as any other component. See Creating and Using Routing Points for information about routing rules. Balanced Tees PDMS Router will try to position a Tee to achieve balanced flow. that is. In all other cases. this may be a Tee. How PDMS Router Routes to Free Tails If a Branch has a free Tail. How the PDMS Router Positions Tees PDMS Router checks each Branch for connections to other Branches. PDMS Router will then position the elbow in a direction that results in a clash-free route. Note: PDMS Router treats bores as being equal if they are the same within 5mm. then it will select the route closest to the other end of the connecting Branch. If the Branch does not have any constraints.0 . In general. • • You can control the position of a Tee by locking it in position. Tail direction: Note that the TDIR attribute for a free tail is never set if the last constraint is a plane or a rack. Often. the first Tee in the Branch will influence the route taken. Tees which can be balanced will then be positioned. The PDMS Router will change the arrive p-point to achieve this if the bores on the p-points are equal. If the bores are equal then PDMS Router will assume that the Tee is T-shaped. In all other cases. Where a Branch contains more than one Tee. See Balanced Tees. Routing points are described in Creating and Using Routing Points. If this fails. or by constraining the route. and which satisfies component positioning and orientation rules. the Tee will influence the route taken by the original Branch. PDMS Router will select the closest route to any constraints in the connecting Branch. that is it looks for Tees or other components which have a CREF or CRFA attribute set. then it will introduce an Elbow after the constraint. If there are none. because there is a clash or a component positioning rule cannot be satisfied. PDMS Router will position any subsequent Tees as close as possible to the next constraint. • • If the Branch which connects to the Tee has a free Tail. the position of the Tail depends on the position and orientation of the Branch Head. TDIR is taken from the direction of the last component. PDMS Router will automatically position the Tail once it has positioned all of the components in the Branch and applied all constraints.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing You can set rules to specify whether concentric or eccentric Reducers are used. Tee positioning is explained in the next section. before the first component. or the other end of the connecting branch.

• If there are multiway components in the Branches after the Tee. Must be unconstrained Must have free tails • The Tail positions of /B1 and /B2 must be equal in two of the three orthogonal coordinates: 8:6 12. nor any after the Tee on branch / B1.0 . the Branches connected to them: • • • Must have equivalent lists of component specifications.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing B ranch B 1 P1 P2 B ranch B 2 P3 = PA B ranch B 1 • The Tail directions of /B1 and /B2 must either be equal and not in the axial direction between the Tail positions of the branches or opposite and in the axial direction between the Tail positions of the branches: • There must be no locked components on branch /B2.

PDMS Router will try moving the Tee back along the arrive direction (or forward along the leave direction). This is most likely to happen when routing from a line of Vessels. • The Tee will be positioned so that: • • • The Tee is clash-free There is enough room for all components between the Tee and the end of the Branch This position does not result in a route to the Tee with an elbow close to the Tee.0 . • If any of these conditions are not satisfied. The best route for the current Branch may take the Pipe straight in front of other Nozzles.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • The specifications of the positionable components after the Tee on /B1 must be the same as the specifications of the components on branch /B2. It can be avoided by: 8:7 12. Covered Nozzles When the PDMS Router is routing a Branch there may be several others waiting to be routed.

0 . You can use routing rules to control the selection. Elbows). For information about creating your own rules. You will then need to modify the route to obtain a clash-free route. see Creating and Using Routing Points. For further information about using Rules. and the direction in which a pipe arrives at and leaves a routing point. and described in detail in later sections. position and orientation of piping components. Locked Components A locked component is a component whose position has been fixed before routing takes place. locking them and re-routing. PDMS Router will route the Branch through the component. in which case it will put in the simplest clashing route and inform you about the clash. The Branch connected to the Nozzle will ignore this clash and successfully route onto the Nozzle. can be moved and locked. Routing Rules One of the principal features of PDMS Router is its built-in rule engine. Routing Planes Routing planes are orthogonal planes which attract pipes to them and then guide the pipes in the direction of the plane. see Using Routing Rules. where you want to 8:8 12. You can specify the position of a routing point. Note: The obstruction volumes should be defined in the Catalogue: defining them in DESIGN may result in less satisfactory routes. Constraining a Route Except in very simple cases. see Changing the Order in which Pipes are Routed. and to control how pipes use routing planes and pipe racks. In cluttered areas. You can constrain a route using the following: • • • • • Locked components Routing Points Routing Rules Routing Planes Pipe Racks These constraints are described briefly in the following sections.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • • Changing the order for routing Pipes. Routing Points Routing Points are points through which a pipe must pass. by moving components away from clashes. Ensuring that the Nozzles or Equipment owning them have obstruction volumes extending beyond their Nozzles. This prevents other Pipes crossing in front of the Nozzle. Locked components can be used to manually modify the route taken. Both principal Piping components and Router-created components (for example. For further information. you will probably find that you need to give PDMS Router more information about the route required to achieve a satisfactory route. Routing planes are useful. see Automatic Pipe Routing Administration. PDMS Router may not be able to find a clash-free route. for example.

2 Basic Routing In this section. you must ensure that the following are set. The tutorials use the sample project SAM supplied with AVEVA PDMS. see Covered Nozzles. see Creating and Using Pipe Racks. see Importing a P&ID File. see Creating and Using Routing Planes. for example. For further information. For further information. you will need to perform the following tasks: • • Set up the Catalogues and Specifications you want to use. • • • • • Branches and Component Attributes Before you can use PDMS Router. which you are going to route. You may find the second method useful when you are working on a conceptual design and do not want to spend time creating steelwork structures. as the width of the default Flange will be used in calculating the spacing. If you are going to allow for flanges when packing Pipes on routing planes and Pipe Racks. you must ensure that there is a default Flange set in the catalogue. you can use routing rule to specify how different sorts of pipe run on the rack. but the Tail bore must be set. a pipe rack is composed of a group of routing planes which enables you to model the route used on a physical pipe rack. You can create pipe racks on existing steelwork structures or model them simply as a group of planes. Before You Start Using PDMS Router Before you start using PDMS Router with one of your own projects. see Automatic Pipe Routing Administration.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing group pipes together. Create the Branches. without any components added. • 8. either by connecting it or by setting the Head position. you can load a P&ID file from within PDMS Router. Caution: Do not use design parameters for components that PDMS Router automatically creates. bends and elbows. If the Branch contains components. Define any obstruction volume required to avoid covered Nozzles. Define all the equipment and other obstructions used in your design. • • Define the starting position of each Branch you are going to route. Set up routing rules. Pipe Racks In PDMS Router. Ensure that you have specified which components you want PDMS Router to choose by default. You can route to a free tail. perhaps along a wall or ceiling. orientation and bore. For information about importing P&ID files into PDMS Router. or by setting the Tail position. these must be selected. either by connecting the Tail. For further information.1. You must have default Leave-side Tubes (LSTU). direction and bore. 8:9 12. Alternatively. You will usually want to define where the Branch is going to. Once you have created a pipe rack. There are two ways in which you can create a pipe rack.0 . You must specify the default bends and elbows. you will learn how to: • • define the head and tail of pipes route the pipes using PDMS Router.

You can save and load default settings using the options under File on the menu. and select the Pipework application. You can work through the tutorials using the supplied defaults. You are going to route Pipes between the Equipment at the South-West corner of the Site. Project: Username: Password: MDB: Module: enter SAM enter PIPE enter PIPE enter PIPE select Design Enter DESIGN. login to AVEVA PDMS as follows: • • • • • 2. 3. which are accessed from the PDMS Router Defaults form. select Settings>Defaults.0 . For the purpose of running the tutorials in this section of the guide. as shown. This section explains the defaults. 8:10 12. Go to the Site /ROUTERSITE. and add the Zones to the Drawlist. and vessels VESS-1 and VESS-2.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Starting to Use PDMS Router Exercise begins: 1. When you are prompted to select a piping specification. The PDMS Router Defaults form is displayed. to display the PDMS Router form: 4. PDMS Router Defaults PDMS Router is supplied with defaults which you can change if you wish. select A1A. To access PDMS Router select Utilities>PDMS Router. 5. that is the Pumps PMP-1 and PMP-2. From the PDMS Router form.

Pause . Click on the Overwrite/Append option button and select Overwrite if you want new error messages to overwrite those currently in the file or. Enter the name of the message file in the Filename field.Stops all further routing. Append if you want PDMS Router to add each new message to the end of the file. 8. Continue .0 .Displays an alert box which you must acknowledge before PDMS Router can continue routing. even if an error occurs 9. To specify the action taken by PDMS Router in the event of an error occurring. select an option from the Change direction using button: 8:11 12. select one of the following from the Action on error option button: • • • Stop .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 6. To specify the method used to change the direction of pipes. 10. Enter the path of the directory where you want to store the message file in the Directory field.Continues routing. 7.

You can also specify in the Pipe gap rounding field the extent to which the gap size will be rounded. see Using Routing Rules. Exercise begins 1. Start by defining the head and tail of the pipe between the pump PMP-1 and the vessel VESS-1. Defining the Head and Tail of a Pipe In this section. Enter the name P1 in the Name textbox. PDMS Router can automatically associate routing planes and pipe racks with a branch to route the pipe on. You must create the rule as described in Using Routing Rules. 3. which can help minimise construction errors. you can specify the minimum Pipe gap between pipes on racks (and other planes). 11. The rule set or rule world will be automatically assigned as a low priority rule set. For more information.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • • Bend Elbow • Rule If you set the Rule option. PDMS Router will only automatically use a routing plane or pipe rack to route a pipe if the distance that it will travel along the plane or rack is greater than a minimum travel distance. If there is a set of company-wide rules you could enter the name here. Select Create>Pipe from the Pipework Application main menu bar. in the Minimum Travel Distance field. Navigate to the Zone ROUTERSITE/PIPES. To do this it searches for routing planes and pipe racks between the branch head and tail. In the Pipe Rack Spacing area of the form. PDMS Router will look for a rule which defines which type of component to use. you will define the heads and tails of two pipes which you will later route. 12. The Create Pipe form should now look as shown: 8:12 12. The Create Pipe form is displayed. You can set a default rule set for all Branches by entering the name of the Rules set in the Default rule set world text box. Enter the minimum distance. 13. 2.0 . You can ask PDMS Router to extend the search outside this volume by entering the distances in the In Z Direction (vertical) and In X/Y Directions (horizontal) fields.

Set the Head/Tail Setting to Connect.0 . 5. This will enable you to connect both head and tail of the branch to existing nozzles. thus: 8:13 12. The Create Branch form should now look as shown: 6. The Create Branch form will be shown. 7. Click OK to create the branch.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 4. The Connect Branch form is displayed. Click OK on the Create Pipe form. Set the Connect Branch form to show that you want to connect the Head to a Nozzle.

Routing Pipes In this section. Set the Connect Branch form to show that you want to connect the Tail to a Nozzle. 9. connect the head of the pipe to the vertical nozzle on the pump and the tail to the vertical nozzle on the vessel. then click Apply. you will add the pipes which you have created in Defining the Head and Tail of a Pipe to the PDMS Router form.0 . select the Add : CE option to add the pipe to the PDMS Router form. In this exercise. or which are dependent on it. When you are prompted to select a nozzle. Click Apply. you will add the pipes individually. You can add pipes individually or in groups. 13. This is explained further in Changing the Order in which Pipes are Routed. select the vertical nozzle on top of the pump PMP-1. Dismiss the Connect Branch form. the PDMS Router routes pipes in the order in which you add them to the PDMS Router form. Exercise continues: 11. 12. Name the pipe /P2. Note that the Network option under Add loads the selected branch and any other branches on which the branch is dependent.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8. Again. When prompted. The PDMS Router form should now look as shown: 8:14 12. Repeat the two previous steps for the pipe /P2. select the vertical nozzle on the top of the vessel VESS-1. Note: By default. 10. Create a pipe between the pump PMP-2 and the vessel VESS-2. The routing order can have an effect on the route taken by pipes. and then route the pipes. From the Explorer select the pipe /P1. From the PDMS Router form.

Automatically Routed Pipes P1 and P2 8:15 12. From the PDMS Router form. gaskets and flanges. adding elbows.: Automatically Routed Pipes P1 and P2. P2 P1 Figure 8:6. /P1 and /P2. PDMS Router routes the selected pipes. The routes created by PDMS Router are shown in Figure 8:6. as required. pressing the Cancel button will stop the process after the next Branch has been routed. It will not stop the process in the middle of routing a Branch.0 . select the pipes or branches you want to route. Note: A small form with a Cancel button is displayed: if you are routing several Branches. and realise that you have made a mistake. in this instance. then select the Route : Selected option.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 14.

The route obtained is shown in Figure 8:7. back to the last save work. The Status Summary form is displayed. Exercise continues: 15.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Checking the Status of a Branch Select Display>Status Summary from the menu on the PDMS Router form. select P1 in the Reorder text pane. Note: The Undo and Redo buttons at the bottom of the PDMS Router form can be used to undo or redo a series of routing operations. On the PDMS Router . changing settings as required.Reorder Pipes form. You are working with pipes that are in close proximity to one another or where pipes cross paths. Select Modify>Routing Order >Manual>Pipes from the PDMS Router form. PDMS Router first routed the pipe P2. Reselect Pipes and click Selected. The routing order is changed using the options under Modify>Routing Order from the PDMS Router form. set the option button to After. and select P2 in the right-hand window. which has had to take a more complex route.: Result of changing the routing order (P2 routed before P1). 8:16 12. Click Apply. The route taken by P2 has blocked the most practical route for the pipe P1.0 . Changing the Order in which Pipes are Routed PDMS Router routes pipes in the order in which you add them to the PDMS Router form. showing that two Branches have been routed successfully. In this instance. You may need to change the routing order of particular pipes if: • • You want to ensure that PDMS Router routes your most expensive pipes first.

using the Reorder by Attribute form.enables you to reorder pipes according to particular attributes. Manual>Branches . if a pipe is dependent on another pipe. Select this option. Result of changing the routing order (P2 routed before P1) The other options under Modify>Routing Order are as follows: • Auto . • • • Manual>Pipes .0 .enables you to manually specify the order in which the PDMS Router routes each branch.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing P2 P1 Figure 8:7. using the Reorder Branches form. after you reorder by bore.enables you to manually specify the order in which the PDMS Router routes each pipe. 8:17 12.automatically reorders branches according to routing dependencies. for example. using the Reorder Pipes form. that is. By Attribute . then that pipe will be routed first. Note: This option only affects piping networks: It will have no effect on unconnected Pipes.

as shown. 8:18 12. To view routing messages. reorder pipes so that all PDMS Router displays all pipes which use the specification A150 in descending order of their head bore. You can use this option in conjunction with the attribute radio buttons.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The Reorder by Attribute form.Select this button if you want to specify an alternative attribute to those available on the form.0 . Routing Messages As PDMS Router routes a pipe. it examines each branch and generates a message about any routing errors that it finds. providing you have set up a file in which to store the messages. The form will be empty if PDMS Router routes all pipes without any errors. This reorders the pipes so that they are displayed in alphabetical order of their specification names. select the Group by specification check box. and so on. These messages can help you understand and correct errors. for example. The Routing Messages form is displayed. followed by all B150 specification pipes. for example. has the following option buttons: • • • • Head Bore Tail Bore Temperature Other . select Display>Routing Messages. You can view these messages both during and after pipe routing. followed by all pipes which use the specification B150. You may. as described previously. all pipes which use the specification A150. To reorder pipes according to their specification.

For example. is displayed as shown: The information on this form is discussed in Positioning and Locking Components.3 Positioning and Locking Components In this section you will learn how to: • • add components to Branches after they have been routed control where the components are positioned. From this form. All of these facilities are explained in later sections.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The Branch Detail Form PDMS Router enables you to view details of the components and constraints in a branch. create routing points and add routing planes and pipe racks to the constraint list. using the Branch Detail form. you can select options which enable you to constrain the route taken by a branch. you can lock components in position. To display the Branch Detail form. select one of the routed Branches from the PDMS Router form and click the Branch Detail button. The Branch Detail form.1. 8. 8:19 12.0 . which contains details of the selected branch.

Positionable and Locked Components PDMS Router sees all piping components as deletable. you will see that all the components are listed as deletable.0 . and then re-route it. Select it in the list on the Branch Detail form. If you reroute the Branch. Head and Tail Work-points Each Branch has a Head Work-point and a Tail Work-point. If a component is tail relative. rather than deletable. select it in the list on the Branch Detail form. You can change the head/tail relative property of any positionable component. and so will their order relative to any constraints in the Branch. and then select one of the options under the Modify menu on the form. If you display the Branch Detail form for a Branch that has been routed by the PDMS Router. for example. and these are described in Using Routing Rules. PDMS Router will delete all the components that it has created and re-create them. • If a component is head relative. For example. Toggle Head Lock. • PDMS Router routes a pipe from head to tail and so all components are initially created head relative. You may wish to make changes to a Branch. which can be used. Head W-P. You can keep some or all of the components that PDMS Router has added by making them positionable. these components will not be deleted. the Valve will not be moved past the Tee. Positioning Relative to the Head or Tail Each component in a branch is positioned relative to the head or tail of the branch. 8:20 12. positionable or locked. Deletable. even if the Branch is re-routed. The choices are: Constraint. Make Positionable.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The effect that positioning and locking components will have when a Branch is re-routed is also considered. Note that you can set up rules to control the selection. allowing for other components and any constraints. if you add a Valve before a Locked Tee. Toggle Head/Tail Relative. then PDMS Router will place that component as close as possible to the head of the branch. Make Deletable. After a Branch has been routed. Positionable components can be locked into a given position. You can insert components between the Head (or Tail) and its work-point. and then select Modify>Toggle Head/Tail Relative. To change the status of a component. Lock Position. in which case they will not be moved. then that component is positioned as close as possible to the tail of the branch. Toggle Tail Lock. to position a Valve directly onto a Nozzle. but they may be moved to fit on the new route. These components are described as Positionable. You can also lock them. • • The order of Positionable components in the Branch Members list will be maintained. positioning and orientation of components. and Tail W-P. If you re-route the Branch. • The components that PDMS Router creates in a Branch are described as Deletable. you can add components manually in the normal way: make sure that you are in the correct place in the Members list and select Create>Component.

Exercise begins: 1. PDMS Router re-routes the Pipe and positions the Valve close to the Tail of the Pipe. On the PDMS Router form.: Head-relative Valve position.: Tail-relative Valve position. Head-relative Valve position 2. 8:21 12. Select VALV 1 from the list of Components/Constraints.0 . you will learn how to position piping components relative to the head or tail of a branch. then select Modify>Toggle Head/Tail Relative. Figure 8:8. Notice that the valve is positioned close to the head of the pipe. select the Route : Selected option. Your view should look like Figure 8:8. select the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Detail form. From the PDMS Router form. 4. Create a valve on the pipe /P2. as shown in Figure 8:9. 3.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Positioning a Component Close to the Head or Tail In this exercise.

then re-route the Pipe without affecting the position of the Valve. Exercise begins: 1.0 .: The Valve positioned at the Head of P1: 8:22 12.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:9. or. Create a Valve on the pipe /P1. you will add a Valve to the Pipe /P1 and then position the Tail Work-point of the Branch before the Valve. Tail-relative Valve position Moving the Head or Tail Work-point You can position the Head W-P after a particular component in a Branch. In this exercise. This will enable you to position the Valve directly onto the Nozzle of vessel /VESS-1. Your view should now look like Figure 8:10. you can position the Tail W-P before a particular component.

From the Modify Tail W-P form. PDMS Router re-routes the Pipe from the Head Work-point to the Tail Work-point. select the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Detail form. select VALVE 1. which is now positioned before VALV 1. 5. 4. select Modify>Tail W-P. as shown below. From the Branch Detail form. The Valve positioned at the Head of P1 2. then click OK. From the PDMS Router form. select the Route : Selected option. The Modify Tail W-P form is displayed.0 . 8:23 12. From the PDMS Router form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:10. 3.

You may need to do this. Select Modify>Lock Position. display the Branch Detail form for the branch. or Modify>Make Deletable for PDMS Router generated components. To unlock a locked component. even if you re-route the branch.0 . for example. to ensure that a branch component remains in its current position. The details should now look as shown: Note: The Tail Work-point is now positioned after VALVE 1 Locking and Unlocking a Component PDMS Router enables you to lock piping components in position. select Modify>Make Positionable for main piping components. 8:24 12. select the component that you want to lock in position. 2. From the Branch Detail form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Valve is positioned before the Tail Work-point To check the position of the valve. To lock a component in position: 1. then scroll to the bottom of the Components/Constraints list.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Manually Routing Non-orthogonal Sections PDMS Router is an orthogonal router. only orthogonal routes between them will be considered. non-orthogonal routes clash. Non-aligned components will still give an orthogonal route. This is the default orthogonal route between the pump and the vessel. Non-aligned non-orthogonal components • If non-orthogonal components are not aligned. • Using aligned and locked elbows to give a non-orthogonal route. only orthogonal routes will be considered to avoid the clash.0 . 8:25 12. locked. Aligned. PDMS Router will use this route. and so if you want non-orthogonal sections of pipe in a branch you will have to route these sections by hand. You can then lock all the components in this section (including the start and end bend or elbow) and route the remainder of the pipes using PDMS Router. • In all other cases PDMS Router will try to insert a bend or elbow to turn into an orthogonal direction as close as possible to the component. with no intervening components. so that a straight piece of tube can run between them without clashing. non-orthogonal components • If two locked components with non-orthogonal arrive and/or leave direction are aligned. This will also happen if the first component is aligned with the head or the last component is aligned with the tail. If the straight.

the valve must be locked: if it is positionable PDMS Router will route orthogonally between the elbows. The route achieved with the Tee Locked. PDMS Router will then not route any part of the Branch between the elbows. providing that straight pipe does not clash. which has caused PDMS Router to revert to an orthogonal route. but note that no bore change (which would require the addition of a reducer) will be permitted. orthogonal routing will be used. components between non-orthogonal locked components. and it will add any necessary connection components to the valve.0 . you can lock two 45 degree elbows to give a non-orthogonal section of pipe and place a locked valve on this section of pipe. using additional Elbows Detail of the area close to the Tee. 8:26 12. positionable. However. For example. Example 1 You can lock several non-orthogonal components in a row. Router may add connection components on to the locked components. A positionable Tee has been inserted in the Branch.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Non-orthogonal sections with unlocked components If there are other.

3.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Example 2 It may be better to continue in a non-orthogonal direction from a nozzle until a route has passed an obstruction. because this might give a shorter route with fewer elbows. Exercise Begins: To create the routing point: 1. The Branch Detail form is displayed. You must create routing points at the correct position in the sequence of constraints. Select Create>Routing Point. which you routed previously.0 . The routing point will ensure that PDMS Router routes the pipe so that it is parallel with pipe /P2. 8:27 12. relative to an existing element. 8. Select the branch /P2/B1. In this exercise. You can use the Upstream and Downstream Rules provided with PDMS Router to specify minimum lengths of Tube. which are similar to the normal PDMS positioning options.4 Creating and Using Routing Points In this section you will learn how to use Routing Points to constrain a route. You can define the coordinates of a point and the direction in which a branch arrives at and leaves a point.1. You would lock the elbow at ‘A’ to give this route: Using Rules for Minimum Tube Length You may find that components such as Olets and Stub-in Tees will be positioned immediately next to another component. Routing points are points through which a branch will pass. See Using Routing Rules for more information about using rules. Creating a Routing Point You will now add a routing point to the pipe /P2. then select the Branch Detail button. You can add as many routing points as you want. if your COCO tables allow. Add the pipes /P1 and /P2 to the PDMS Router form. 2. you will create a routing point. if you have not already done so. You can simply enter the coordinates on the Create Routing Point form or use the options on the menu. The Create Routing Point form is displayed.

you will specify the position of the routing point relative to an existing component. 8:28 12.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 4. then pick elbow 3 of the pipe /P1/B1. For this exercise. You can only position routing points after positionable or locked components. Select Cursor>Element. as shown in the illustration.

6.0 . you will define the direction in which pipe /P2 arrives at and leaves the routing point. the arrive direction should point to the head. From the Create Routing Point form. In common with DESIGN. You can lock the point at the specified positions using the Lock check boxes on the Create Routing Point form. select the Arrive/Leave option button. 7. The Move Point form is displayed. Enter N (North) in the Arrive direction field and S (South) in the Leave direction field. and the leave to the tail. PDMS Router creates a routing point at the position of the elbow. Ensure that the After option button is set to Head W-P. Click Apply to confirm the move. 8:29 12. select Move>Distance. You will now move the routing point so that it is 1000mm west of the elbow. To ensure that pipe /P2 travels parallel with pipe /P1. Enter 1000 mm in the Distance field. From the Create Routing Point form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Select elbow 3 using Cursor > Element 5. Enter W (West) in the Direction field. The form settings should now look as shown. if required. then Dismiss the form.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing When you click OK.0 . PDMS Router creates the routing point at the position shown. Position of routing point U N E 8:30 12.

select the Through Direction and specify the direction that you would like the pipe to take at that point. Select Modify>Constraint. If you do not want a change of direction. PDMS Router routes the pipe via the routing point. Moving a Routing Point You can modify the position of a routing point. select the branch you want to modify. 8:31 12.0 . at any time.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing When you route the Pipe again. 5. 3. 2. Select the routing point you want to modify from the Components/Constraints list. Branch /P1/B1 should have the Datum as the last constraint and a Free Tail. If you want to use a Datum where two branches meet. The Branch Detail form is displayed. Select one of the following options. depending on the type of modification you want to make: • Move>Distance to move a routing point a distance in a specified direction either from the current location. Position of routing point By specifying a different arrive and leave direction. If you leave the direction unset. you will cause a bend or elbow to be inserted at the position of the routing point. To do this: 1. PDMS Router will select the best direction to minimise the number of bends or elbows used. as shown. Branch / P1/B1 ends at a Battery Limit and Branch P2/B1 connects to its Tail. For example. The Modify Routing Point form is displayed. Click the Branch Detail button. Using DATUMs as Routing Points There is an option on the Create Routing Point form which allows you to use an existing DATUM point as a routing point. or relative to another element which you can identify using the cursor or another method. From the PDMS Router form. Two branches should not use the same Datum point as a constraint since they would then clash. 4. just one of the branches should have the point as a constraint. The Head of Branch /P2/B1 will be positioned at the Tail of /P1/B1. if you have not already done so.

ABOR. The examples in this chapter should give you a starting point for writing the expressions needed for routing rules. you can use the standard AVEVA PDMS positioning options to modify its position. ALL. For example. If you have used a DATUM as a routing point. as required. BRAN. This also includes OWNER and MEMBER. otherwise a very convoluted route may be obtained. zone.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • Move>Towards to move the point a specified distance towards another element.0 . the next element in the branch. AVEVA PDMS expressions consist of the following: • • • PDMS element types. Note: Make sure that the routing point is still in a sensible position in the list of constraints.1. by specifying a named element or. HDIR. 8:32 12. UP. VALV. positioned and orientated as Branches are routed. There are a wide variety of keywords. How Pipes are packed on Pipe Racks and Routing Planes. WITH. Keywords. In this section you will learn how to use the sample routing rules supplied with the PDMS Router. Note: For more general information about defining rules for setting attributes. For example. You can also apply rules to individual components and remove rules from individual components. PDMS expressions are described in detail in the Software Customisation Guide. which may be the head. which you can identify using the cursor. tail or. see the Software Customisation Guide. Expressions A routing rule consists of AVEVA PDMS expressions. You can also define your own routing rules as described in Automatic Pipe Routing Administration. The operators available are • • • • • • • EQ equal to NE not equal to GE greater than or equal to GT greater than LE less than or equal to LT less than For a list of AVEVA PDMS attributes. see the DESIGN Reference Manual. or pipe. For example. You can apply routing rules to individual branches or all branches within a particular site.5 Using Routing Rules Routing Rules are special AVEVA PDMS rules which are used to control: • • How components are selected. Logical operators. IS. 8. illustrated in the rest of this chapter. PDMS attributes and pseudo-attributes. TEE.

If there are none then PDMS Router checks if there are any rules that will apply in the low priority rule sets. Note: The Settings>Apply Rules options on the PDMS Router form allow you to apply the rule sets to a site.0 . 8. select Settings>Apply Rules>To Branch. PDMS Router first checks to see if there are any rules that will apply to a component from the high priority rule sets. Click the Add HIGH button to add the rule set to the High Priority Sets list or the Add LOW button to add the rule set to the Low Priority Sets list. From the Members List form. select the branch with which you want to associate a rule set. In these cases all branches which are below them in the hierarchy will also have the rule sets applied. 2. The rules will then take effect on the components in the branch. 7. 4. To do this: 1. Select the rule set that you wish to apply in the Rule sets available in current world list. unless they have rule sets specifically applied. Select the rule world which contains the rule sets you want to apply to the branch from the RULE WORLD option list. 5. You can add the rule set as high priority or low priority. The Apply Rules form is displayed. Click Apply. Route the branch to apply the rules. From the PDMS Router form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Applying a Rule Set to a Branch Once you have created a rule set. zone or pipe. you can apply it to a branch. Note that the Apply to list contains all the Branches selected on the PDMS Router form. 8:33 12. 3. 6.

Click on the Component Rules button on the Branch Detail form. Select Settings>Apply Rules>To Branch.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Important: If you apply rules to an element which contains many Branches. or add one from another rule set. however. select the branches you want to apply the rule to. 4. From the Members List form. The Apply Rules form is displayed. From the PDMS Router form. By default. You can. PDMS Router will check every Branch to see if the rules apply. 2. Site or Zone. If a Rule Set has applied to a Pipe. then click on the Remove HIGH or Remove LOW button as appropriate. This may take some time. Removing a Rule Set To remove a rule set: 1. providing they are appropriate. Click on the Branch Detail button. a Zone. Including a Rule from another Rule Set or World If you would like to apply a rule to a component from another rule world or rule set: 1. 3. Select the rule set you want to remove. remove a rule from a particular component in a branch. then each time you route a Branch. 8:34 12. 2. or from another rule world.0 . PDMS Router applies all the rules in the specified sets to a branch. 3. Site or Zone. The Component Rules form is displayed which you can use to add additional rules from the available rule sets. select the branch from which you want to remove a rule set. it will be removed from all Branches in that Pipe. Click Apply. for example.

From the Rules available list. select the component from which you want to exclude the rule. The Component Rules form is displayed. PDMS Router places an asterisk (*) to the left of the rule description to indicate that the rule is now excluded from being used. If you want to re-enable a disabled rule. From the list of rules that apply to the current component. 4. 5. select the rule.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 4. The rule is added to the list of rules which apply to the component. 6. From the Branch Detail form. 3. select the branch with which you want to work. Click Dismiss. Click on the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Detail form. select the component that the rule will be applied to. From the Current Component option list. then select the Enable button. 2. From the PDMS Router form. Disabling a Rule from a Component To prevent PDMS Router from applying a rule to a particular component in a branch: 1.0 . Click on the Component Rules button. select the rule you want to disable from the component. The letter that precedes the rule description in the Rules applying to current component list shows where the rule was originally applied. select the rule you want to apply to the selected component. then click on the Include button. The letters used are: • • • • B Branch PPipe Z Zone S Site 5. then click on the Disable button. 8:35 12.

: Example of using routing planes shows an example of how you could use two routing planes. Figure 8:11. 8. Querying Rules You can query which rules are applied to a Branch. and the result is not what you expect. and then type: Q ROBRRU This command is only valid if the current element is a Pipe. Display the command line by selecting Display>Command Line from the main Pipework Application menu. Example of using routing planes You can use one or more single routing planes. How PDMS Router Uses a Plane PDMS Router will ensure that pipes take the best route available from the previous constraint to the routing plane. a Branch or a Branch Member. one above the other. PDMS Router will select an alternative route which ensures that the pipe enters the plane at the earliest 8:36 12. to group all north/south pipes together and all east/west pipes together. Note that a Pipe Rack is defined as a group of routing planes for PDMS Router. You will find routing planes useful. which you may find useful if you are using many rules.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The rule will now appear in the Rules applying to current component list.0 . If the most direct route to the plane is blocked. in routing groups of pipes along a wall or ceiling. Pipe Racks are described in the next section.6 Creating and Using Routing Planes In this section you will learn how to: • • create a routing plane use a routing plane to route branches Introduction to Routing Planes Routing planes are rectangular planes which are used to guide pipes along their length. preceded by a plus sign (+) indicating that it has been included. for example. or simply to group pipes close together. Figure 8:11.1.

Select the pipes. Create the pipes shown in the following illustration: VESS-3 PMP-3 ROUTE-3 PMP-4 VESS-4 VESS-5 ROUTE-4 PMP-5 ROUTE-5 2. Using More Than One Plane to Route a Branch You can use more than one routing plane to route a branch. Note that you can also make allowance for shoe heights using a SHOE rule. followed by ROUTE-4 and finally. For turns in the same plane. top or bottom of pipes will be aligned on the routing plane. However: • You should have routing points or locked components between the planes. 1. corner to corner. See Automatic Pipe Routing Administration. You should not use two adjacent planes with the same travel direction and no perpendicular offset between them. ROUTE-5. If the most direct route to the next constraint is blocked. Creating Some Pipes for the Exercise Exercise begins: Before you create and use a routing plane. then select the Route : Selected option. you need to create the pipes which you will later route via the plane. within 100cm. Add the pipes to the PDMS Router form in the order ROUTE-3. • Pipes are routed along the length of a routing plane. This will enable you to see the effect that the routing plane has on the route taken by the pipes. You can set whether the centre. To do this: 3. but not overlap. the pipe will exit from the plane just before the obstruction.0 . If you do not do this. If a pipe is insulated. How you do this is described in Creating and Using Pipe Racks. the plane will automatically take the insulation into account by positioning the pipe at a height which allows for the insulation. which is usually just after the obstruction. You may like to route the pipes before you create and add the routing plane. planes should touch. • • You can use groups of routing planes to create Pipe Racks.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing opportunity. The route taken should look as shown: 8:37 12. PDMS Router may encounter difficulties in deciding when to leave one plane and enter another. The pipe will exit from the plane at the point which enables it to take the most direct route to the next constraint.

or in front of vertical routing planes adjusting for any insulation 8:38 12.0 . 7. in the Description field. Navigate to the zone ROUTERSITE/STRU. From the PDMS Router form. The Create Routing Plane form is displayed. 5. Set the Pipe Positioning option list to Centre of pipe. Enter a description of the routing plane. 6. but you may find it useful for keeping a record of the plane’s purpose for future reference. This text is not used elsewhere in AVEVA PDMS. 6. This is the name that is displayed in the Members List and the Branch Detail form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Creating a Routing Plane Exercise continues: To create a routing plane: 4. The other options available and their actions are: • Top of pipe Positions the top of the pipe on horizontal routing planes. This will position the centre of the pipe along the routing plane. select Create>Routing Plane. Enter the name Plane-1 in the Name field.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • Bottom of pipe Positions the side of the pipe below horizontal routing planes. Enter 15500mm in the Length field. centre and corner. See Pipe Packing.0 . Set the Anchor option list to Centre. The Routing Plane Dimensions form is displayed. The Pipe to Pipe Gap and Packing Method options control how Pipes are packed on the plane. This will cause pipes to be routed along the east/west direction of the plane. adjusting for any insulation Note: Top is the Z direction of the Plane which is shown with an arrow. The Routing Planes Dimensions form should now look as shown. 8. or behind vertical routing planes. 9. 11. then set the Dir option button to the left of the field to N (north). Enter 1200mm in the Width field. Click OK. Set the coordinates to: East 45000mm North 300mm Up 1100mm 10. then set the Dir option to the left of the field to E (east). 8:39 12. 12. The anchor is the position from which the routing plane takes its dimensions. There are two options available.

Click Apply to create the plane.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 7. From the PDMS Router form. The up/front direction of the plane will be indicated by a construction arrow in the graphical view which is drawn perpendicular to the plane. The scrollable list displays the available planes. you must add the routing plane to the constraint list for the branch. select the branch /ROUTE-3/B1. Note: You can create a vertical routing plane by setting one of the Dir fields to be U or D (up or down). To reverse the direction. To do this: 13. then click on the Branch Detail button.0 . reverse either of the length or width directions. The Add Routing Plane form is displayed. The Branch Detail form is displayed which contains details of the branch /ROUTE-3/B1. 14. Using a Routing Plane to Route Branches Exercise continues: To route a branch via a routing plane. 8:40 12. for instance from E to W. Select Add>Routing Plane>Selection.

Adding Routing Planes Automatically PDMS Router provides facilities to automatically add pre-defined routing planes to a branch. and all east/west pipes at another. From the Plane list. 18. using the PDMS Router form. select the plane that you created in the previous exercise. Ensure that the Insert After list is set to Head W-P. 8:41 12. The routing plane is added to the constraint list for the branch. PDMS Router routes the branches via the routing plane. Click OK. Route the branches. Repeat the procedure for the branches /P4/B1 and /P5/B1. 16.0 . The Last on Plane toggle allows you to specify that positionable components will be placed on the plane. 19.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 15. The route taken by the branches should now look as shown. 17. This could be useful if for instance you wish to run all north/south running pipes at one elevation.

Select Add>Routing Plane>Automatically. Names appear in the Command Input & Output window but not on the Status bar. Reducers are not permitted as positionable or locked components on a plane. the neighbouring list will show all the positionable and locked components in the Branch: select the one required: all the positionable and locked components after the Plane. These must be reachable directly from the tail and will be added to the Components/ Constraints list as the last constraints before the tail. Components on Planes The Last on Plane toggle on the Add Routing Plane form (and the Last on Rack toggle on the Add Pipe Rack form) allows you to specify that positionable and locked components will be placed on the plane. 3. You can also have more than one locked component on a rack providing they are aligned. The planes must be able to be reached directly from the head for them to be included. • • • You can have several positionable components on a plane or rack. If there is more than one locked component for a branch on a plane or rack. an additional two horizontal or one vertical plane will be searched for at the tail of the branch. 8:42 12. You must have sufficiently wide gaps on the plane to fit in any component required. all of these components must lie in the same slot. The Components/Constraints list on the Branch Detail form will be updated with the selected routing planes. for example. Planes will be searched for in a box defined by the head and tail of the branch. The routing planes will be added at the head of the branch. This could be achieved. The box will be extended by the values specified in the PDMS Router Defaults form. Only pipes that travel along routing planes a distance greater than the Minimum Travel Distance will be considered. From the PDMS Router form. but note the following conditions: • Locked components will define the slot on the plane for the Branch. 2. or locked components. The arrive and leave directions must be along the travel direction. If there are more planes than are required. such as routing points. When it is switched on. Hence there can be at most one entry bend/elbow and one exit bend/elbow. up to and including the component given as Last on Plane. then click on the Branch Detail button. the closest ones to the head will be chosen. • • Locked Bends and Elbows Since locked bends or elbows define the start or end of the slot: • Locked bends and elbows will define the start or end of the slot on the travel plane as well as the slot itself. To add routing planes automatically: 1. providing the horizontal planes are oriented perpendicular to one another. will be positioned on the plane. select the branch that you wish to add routing planes to. or two horizontal planes. If there are constraints in the branch.0 . by using a large enough basic gap. Locked Straight-through Components You can place locked components on planes. or using WF / FF spacing with large enough flange widths.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing PDMS Router can add either one vertical plane.

Create a Branch. 4.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • For a locked bend or elbow used to enter the travel plane from the entry plane. specifying the Tee as Last on Plane. with its Head connected to the Tee and its Tail connected to NOZZ1 of VESS-3. Exercise begins: 1. with its Head connected to NOZZ1 of PMP-3 and its Tail connected to NOZZ1 of VESS-4. the arrive direction must be along the travel plane and the leave-direction must be to the exit plane. the arrive-direction must be from the entry-plane and the leave-direction along the travel plane For a locked bend or elbow used to leave the travel plane. 2. • If there are no rules about choosing entry/exit planes. Route both the Branches. Create a Branch. Create a Tee in Branch B1. and you will see the result shown below. is as shown: 8:43 12. Create a Pipe. B2. 5. PDMS Router will use the entry and exit bend/elbow to help it to choose suitable entry/exit planes. 3. B1. P99. The constraints list on the Branch Detail form.0 . Add the Plane PLANE-1 to the constraints list for Branch B1.

For each level of a pipe rack. the term pipe rack is used to describe a group of routing planes which enable you to automatically model the routing patterns used on a physical pipe rack. You can create pipe racks with several levels.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8. The planes represent travel planes and entry/exit planes. The entry and exit planes must be: • • • At least as long (in the X direction) as the travel Plane(s) Wider (in the Y direction) than the travel planes At least twice the bend length. you must create a travel plane to control the direction in which pipes travel along the rack and at least one entry/exit plane to ensure that pipes enter onto and exit from the rack perpendicularly. A pipe rack may have an upper entry/exit plane. In this section. The overhang ensures that the vertical legs of pipes which enter and exit the rack are clear of the pipe rack structure.7 Creating and Using Pipe Racks In PDMS Router. an entry/exit plane can be used by more than one level. you must specify the distance by which they overhang the travel planes.: Examples of Routing Plane Groups. a lower entry/exit or both. When you create entry/exit planes. Each pipe rack must have at least one travel plane and at least one entry/exit plane. In a pipe rack that has several levels.0 . • The direction of travel is the X direction (length) for travel planes and the Y direction (width) for entry and exit planes.1. depending on the way in which you want pipes to enter and exit a pipe rack. you will learn how to: • • Create pipe racks Route pipes via a pipe rack Introduction to Pipe Racks A pipe rack is made up of routing planes (RPLAs) created within a routing plane group (RPLG). either from above or below. An example is shown in Figure 8:12. that is several travel planes. PDMS Router assumes that the RPLAs in an RPLG have their centres on a vertical line. 8:44 12.

Pipe Head Extended search volume Default search volume Pipe Tail Figure 8:13. whose direction will take the pipe closer to the tail. The default search volume is the volume between the head and tail of a pipe.: Search Volume for Automatic Pipe Racks. as shown in Figure 8:13. the pipe will travel on the rack for longer than the Minimum Travel Distance as defined on the PDMS Router Defaults form. and providing that when using it. and it can be extended as specified on the PDMS Router Defaults form. Examples of Routing Plane Groups You can manually associate a pipe rack with individual branches or you can tell PDMS Router to automatically search for and make use of any pipe racks which exist within the search volume of a branch or branches. Search Volume for Automatic Pipe Racks PDMS Router will select the closest pipe rack to the head in the search volume.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:12. 8:45 12.

8:46 12.0 . Example User-A is responsible for one area of a plant and User-B is responsible for an adjacent area. the Pipe will enter from below the plane. Pipe Rack entry plane selection Use this rule to specify the way in which pipes enter onto a rack. and specifies the tail direction and that the tail is free. A branch /P100/B1 runs out of the User-A's area on a pipe-rack. For more information about how Pipes are packed on Planes and Racks. PDMS Router will pack the pipe onto the rack and run it to the end of the rack. PDMS Router will run pipes along Routing planes with the wall-to-wall Pipe Gap. It will travel in the direction implied by the tail direction until it reaches the edge of the plane or rack. This will then become the tail position. see Pipe Packing. a branch may run out of the first area on a pipe rack. A free tail can be specified immediately after a pipe-rack or plane. User-B must ensure that the position of the head of branch /P200/B1 is initially unset. When a branch has a plane or rack as its last constraint and a free tail. User-B connects the head of a Pipe /P200/B1 to the tail of /P100/B1 and begins routing from this point. with any rounding factor for the positioning. If the Head is below the plane. the entry plane will be used. you must set up an attribute which defines the pipe’s contents. you must set up an attribute which defines the pipe’s contents. Exit from the plane is similarly controlled by the position of the Tail relative to the plane. A branch has a free tail when the tail is either not connected or is directly connected to another branch. In order to use this rule. exit or travel planes on pipe racks. In order to use this rule. User-A puts the rack in the constraint list with the end of the travel plane at the limits. and the tail is not locked.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Rack or Plane as Last Constraint If you are responsible for one area of a plant and a different designer is responsible for an adjacent area. PDMS Router will use the Branch Lock so that the head /P200/B1moves if the connected tail moves. If no rule exists. as given on the PDMS Router Defaults form. You can do this using the free tail option from the branch details. based on the contents of the pipe. Pipe Rack exit plane selection Use this rule to specify the way in which pipes exit from a rack. PDMS Router will route the branch onto the plane or rack. the Pipe will enter from above the plane. If the pipe starts by travelling along an extension of the rack in UserA's area then User-B has a rack with its starting edge at the limit to represent this. • • Pipe Packing Defaults By default. You want to put the rack in the constraint list and run the branch to your limits. There are three routing rules which enable you to set which planes are used as entry. PDMS Router avoids pockets by first finding the travel plane. If the Head is above the plane. for example vapour or liquid. The rules are: • Pipe rack travel plane selection Use this rule to specify which level of a multi-level pipe rack you want to use to route a particular type of branch. How Pipes are Routed on a Pipe Rack By default. based on the contents of the pipe.

Create the pipes shown in the illustration below. The route taken by the pipes should look similar to this: 8:47 12.0 . 1. using elements of a steelwork structure as reference points to position the planes. using the steelwork FRMW ROUTERSITE/PR1. you need to create some pipes to route via the pipe rack. you will learn how to create a pipe rack. You will create the pipe rack. using elements of the steelwork as reference points for the position and dimensions of the planes. If you can not remember how to do this. You may like to route the pipes before you create and add the pipe rack. this is referred to as a conceptual pipe rack. See Creating a Conceptual Pipe Rack. then select the Route : Selected option. as described in Defining the Head and Tail of a Pipe.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Methods for Creating Pipe Racks You can create a pipe rack using either of the following methods: • • Convert an existing steelwork structure into a pipe rack. Select the pipes. Connect the heads of the pipes at the pump nozzles and the tails to the vessel nozzles. Converting a Steelwork Structure to a Pipe Rack In this section. 3. To do this: 2. Create the routing planes which model the behaviour of a pipe rack and then add the steelwork later. Add the pipes to the PDMS Router form. This will allow you to see the effect of the routing plane on the route taken by the pipes. once you are satisfied with the route. see Basic Routing. Creating Some Pipes for the Exercise Exercise begins: Before you create a pipe rack. In PDMS Router.

The Create Pipe Rack form is displayed.0 . and so the current element must be a STRU. Note that you can only create routing plane groups inside a STRU element. Navigate to the STRU element ROUTERSITE/PRACK1.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Creating the Pipe Rack To create the pipe rack: 4. 8:48 12. FRMW or SBFR. 5. select Create>Pipe Rack Planes. From the PDMS Router form.

Pick an element in the steelwork in response to the prompt. enter the name PR-1. The Positioning Control form is displayed to help you control which element is picked if necessary. The other thing that happens when you click Convert is that the Pipe Rack Definition form is displayed: 7.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 6. Click on the Convert button. 8. in the Name field.0 . For the purpose of this exercise. Enter a name for the pipe rack. 8:49 12. Note that the name of the STRU element which owns the pipe rack elements is shown under the Name.

You can control the degree of transparency on the Drawlist.0 . The Create Pipe Rack form now appears as shown: 8:50 12. You can set any Options you want to apply to all planes in the Rack. Click OK on the Pipe Rack Definition form. the following parameters have been derived from the existing structure and you cannot change them at this point: • • • • Elevation of Anchor Plane Elevation between planes Number of Travel Planes Number of Entry/Exit Planes Note: The Anchor Plane is the lowest travel plane in the rack. For more information on Pipe to Pipe Gap and Packing Method.: Examples of Routing Plane Groups.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing This form allows you to define values which apply to all the planes in the Rack. Note: Routing planes are added with transparency. When you are creating a pipe rack in this way. see Pipe Packing. The default value is set on the PDMS Router Defaults form. You can change the Overhang of Entry/Exit planes: see Figure 8:12.

You can edit the Plane Attributes for individual planes by changing the values in the form and then clicking Include to create a new plane or Replace to replace the plane selected in the list. Automatically Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch To tell PDMS Router to automatically make use of pipe racks. you will route the pipes you created previously via the pipe rack PR-1. You can do this either from the PDMS Router form or from the Branch Detail form. The Plane attributes area of the form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 9. You can: • • Manually add a pipe rack to the list of constraints for a branch. Adding a Pipe Rack to a Branch In this section. Tell PDMS Router to automatically make use of any pipe racks that exist within a certain area between the head and tail of a branch. There are two ways in which you can associate branches with a pipe rack. the values shown are those for the plane selected in the Planes list. select the branches /ROUTE6/B1. 8:51 12. The details of the Planes will be shown in the list of Planes at the bottom of the form.0 . PDMS Router has automatically filled in the Rack Direction. /ROUTE7/B1 and /ROUTE8/B1 from the PDMS Router form and then select Modify>Branch>Add Pipe Rack>Automatically. and the Dimensions of the rack.

then select the Modify>Branch>Add Pipe Rack>Selection. Select the rack that you created in the previous exercise. The Add Pipe Rack form is displayed which contains a list of the pipe racks that are available for selection.0 . 2.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The status line tells you which rack is being added to the constraints lists for the selected branches. using the PDMS Router form. The route taken by the pipes should look like this: 8:52 12. From the PDMS Router form. 3. Click OK to add the rack to the constraint list for the selected branch. This form is very similar to the Add Routing Plane form. Route all of the branches. 4. Manually Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch To manually add a pipe rack to the list of constraints for a branch: 1. select the branch /P9/B1.

Note: You can use routing rules to achieve a better route: see Automatic Pipe Routing Administration. 8:53 12. Create the pipes shown in the illustration below. Connect the heads of the pipes to the pump nozzles and the tails to the vessel nozzles. see Basic Routing. you will learn how to create a conceptual pipe rack. The steelwork can be added later. you need to create some pipes to route via the rack. a pipe rack without any associated steelwork. If you cannot remember how to do this. that is. Creating Some Pipes for the Exercise Exercise begins: Before you create a conceptual pipe rack.0 . By default. PDMS Router routes all pipes that you associate with a pipe rack along the first travel plane that it finds in the routing plane group (RPLG).Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The default route creates pockets in three of the Pipes. Creating a Conceptual Pipe Rack In this section.

Navigate to the zone ROUTERSITE/STRU. 6. 4. The Name Structure for RPLG form is displayed. Enter the name PR-2 for the pipe rack in the Name field. select Create>Pipe Rack Planes. Enter the name PRS-2 for the structure in the Name field. The Create Pipe Rack form is displayed. This will allow you to see the effect of the routing plane on the route taken by the pipes. Note that the Length of Rack and Width of Travel Planes are calculated automatically.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing PMP-10 PMP-11 VESS-7 VESS-8 You may like to route the pipes before you add the pipe rack. then click OK. then enter 63500mm East. 8:54 12. select Create>Structure for Planes. then enter 60000mm East and 6000mm South. From the PDMS Router form. To create a conceptual pipe rack: 1. 16000mm North and 6000mm Up. 7. Define the Dimensions of the plane Select Corner 1 from the drop-down list.0 . 5. From the PDMS Router form. 2. 3. Creating the Pipe Rack You can only create routing plane groups inside a STRU element. Select Corner 2 from the drop-down list. Set the Rack Direction option to North/South.

In this case all the options on this form will be active.8 Pipe Packing In this section you will learn how to specify the gaps between Pipes on Routing Planes. Click OK on the Pipe Rack Definition form.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8. • • Enter -1000mm in the Elevation between planes box: this will create the Entry/Exit plane 1000mm below the Anchor (travel) plane. which includes Routing Planes defining Pipe Racks. 8:55 12. 9. Keep the default of 0mm in the Elevation of Anchor Plane box: this value is defined relative to the Pipe Rack. Very small pipes will not be packed under the edge of very large diameter pipes.0 .1. PDMS Router will run pipes along Routing planes with the wall-to-wall Pipe gap given on the PDMS Router Defaults form. This section only deals with setting values for pipe packing using the PDMS Router forms. etc. This enables you to check whether the plane is how you want it to be. Gaps will always be the sideways displacement: any vertical difference between the centrelines of pipes will not affect packing. Pipe Packing Defaults By default. and route the pipes The route taken by the pipes will look as shown: 8. • • Gaps only apply to pipes on planes or racks. Add the pipe rack to the Branches. You can also control pipe packing by means of Rules. The other options can be left at their default values. The Create Multiple planes button will now be active: Click it to display the Pipe Rack Definition form. PDMS Router creates an outline of all the planes for the rack and displays an arrow on the travel planes to indicate the travel direction of the rack. which are described in Automatic Pipe Routing Administration. You should use obstruction volumes to model clearance of pipes from columns.

5).Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The Pipe Gap is calculated as follows: With a 50mm wall-to-wall gap. PDMS Router obtains values from the OD (for the current Pipe) or the geometry (for adjacent Pipes). If no rounding is required. This option ensures that the centres of pipe are positioned at rounded coordinates relative to the edge of the routing plane.5 which will be rounded up to 210. The centre-to-centre distance will be: 72. the centre of a branch of OD 200mm will be placed 225mm from the centre of an adjacent branch of OD 150mm. If the rounding factor is set to 10. Coordinates are always rounded up. 225 200 50 150 The PDMS Router Defaults form also has a Pipe gap rounding option. and assume that these are consistent.0 .5 + 100 + 30 = 202. Hence the centre of the second Pipe will be placed at 290: 80 210 145 60 8:56 12. the centre of the first Pipe will be placed at 80 (rather than 72. leave this value as 0. For example. consider two Pipes. OD 145mm and 60mm. on a plane for which the gap is 100mm.

You can also change the settings for an existing routing plane on the RPLA Specification form. you can load your P&ID file into PDMS Router. From the PDMS Router form. the greater of the flange widths for the current pipe and the adjacent pipe will be added to the wall-to-wall spacing.0 . 8. The Flange spacing options can be set in the following ways: • For single routing planes set the options on the Create Routing Plane form. The spacing is controlled by the PLWW attribute of the RPLA. The size of flanges is found using the Flange Width (FLWI) rule. WF or FF. • • When wall-to-flange spacing is used. 8:57 12. When flange-to-flange spacing is used. displayed when you select Modify>Routing Plane>Specification on the PDMS Router form. For pipe racks set the options on the Pipe Rack Definition form. which is applied to the default flange for each branch at its current bore. select Create>Add New Pipes from P&ID. The default is wall-to-wall (WW) spacing. displayed when you select Modify>Pipe Rack on the PDMS Router form. even if there are other flanges on the pipe rack. you can specify that the gap value will be applied as a wall-to-flange (WF) gap.e. Navigate to the site or zone where you want to load the pipes from your P&ID. or as a flange-to-flange (FF) gap. See Automatic Pipe Routing Administration for more information about routing rules. displayed when you click OK on the Create Pipe Rack form.9 Importing a P&ID File If your P&ID system is configured so that it is capable of outputting data for use in AVEVA PDMS. The Import P&ID form is displayed.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Flanges on Routing Planes If you need to run sections of Pipes which include Flanges along routing planes. If necessary you can change the spacing using the additional pipe-specific gap on the PDMS Router Defaults form. the flange which is obtained with a SELECT command) for the branches at their current bore. PLWW can be set to WW. See Importing Data from P&ID Files for information about configuring P&ID output so that it is suitable for input to PDMS Router. You can also change the settings for an existing Pipe Rack on the Modify Pipe Rack form. if the flanges can be staggered.1. Notes: The flange width is taken as 0 if: • • No rule is applied. displayed when you select Create>Routing Plane on the PDMS Router form menu. If you try to specify WF or FF spacing between branches either of which does not have a default flange. • The flange width is the width of the default flange (i. if the flanges are side-by-side on the plane. the flange width of both pipes will be added to the wall-to-wall gap. Exercise begins: 1.

enter a file name in the Log File text box. The log file can be displayed later using the Display>Log file option on the menu at the top of the form. If you do not select this option you will be prompted to decide whether to modify the element or not. Enter the directory and file name of the P&ID file that you want to load in the Import File text box. Minor elements (Valves. The Modified Pipes & Branches list will show any existing Pipes and Branches that have been modified when the P&ID was read in. select the Browse button to display the File Browser which contains a list of the available files. a macro is created to generate all the components. As far as possible. Select the Run Import button. Unname tees after import. However. but if you select this option it will be kept. Do NOT delete generated macro. Tees etc. Design Manager will try to find the name in PEGS. • • • 5. elements will be deleted and re-created in PDMS. Normally this file is deleted after import. 4. PDMS Router will modify Pipes and Branches which are in both the existing model and the P&ID file. and so each Tee found will generate an error if this option is not selected. Alternatively. PDMS Router will try and keep any attributes that have already been set in the model.) will be made unnamed if they already exist. resulting in attribute settings and constraint associations to be lost. Tees do not exist in PEGS. If you would like to keep a copy of the log file produced during import. do not ask. Show log file after import Displays the log file. If you select this option. 3. 8:58 12. Alternatively. Set the Options you require: • Modify Elements. select the Browse button to display the File Browser which contains a list of the available files.0 . If an element has a name in DESIGN. and any constraints that have been added to Branches. During import. if the P&ID file requires components to be re-ordered. then select the file that you require. whether this button is on or off. then select the file that you require.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 2.

The import process will remove the Valve from the branches that have the component set as a TREF. for example. and with a short description. and unlike other elements in AVEVA PDMS. The import file is processed in two passes: • Pass 1 will look for any components that appear more than once. how PDMS Router selects. and also how Pipes are packed on Pipe Racks and Routing Planes. For example. or pipe. You can apply routing rules to individual branches or all branches within a particular site. The purpose is set to a four-letter code. as required.2. leaving it as a member of the main branch only. The log contains messages relating to the progress of the import operation. you cannot create different. and any errors or warnings. but it is sometimes shown as a more descriptive text on the PDMS Router forms. If there is no Piping specification set in the P&ID file.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Messages generated are also output to the Command Input & Output window. Pre-processing PRPR Selection BEND REDU Bend or elbow selection: controls whether a bend or elbow is used for changing the direction of a pipe Reducer type: specified when concentric or eccentric reducers are used All rules with this Purpose will be executed before a Branch is routed. PDMS Router will use the default Piping specification set in the Default Specification form. • • 8. selected from the Pipework Application main menu bar.1 Automatic Pipe Routing Administration Routing Rules Routing Rules are special AVEVA PDMS rules which are used to control. in PEGS. How each rule is applied is described in detail in How Routing Rules are Applied.0 . zone. which are used for different controls on the route. a three-way valve will appear on three branches. see the DESIGN Reference Manual. user-defined purposes for routing rules. Routing Rule Purposes There are different types of routing rules. if the HREF is not set. In particular. you must position the Branch Head. 8:59 12. Note: For more general information about defining rules for setting attributes. Pass 2 will generate the macro to create the elements. identified by their PURP attribute. You can also apply rules to individual components and remove rules from individual components. Rules are identified by their Purpose (PURP) attribute.2 8. positions and orientates components as Branches are routed. The routing rules available are listed below. if it is displayed.

Pipe Rack travel plane selection: controls which pipe rack travel plane is used to route a particular type of branch Pipe Rack entry plane selection: controls which pipe rack entry plane is used to route a particular type of branch Pipe Rack exit plane selection: controls which pipe rack exit plane is used to route a particular type of branch Shoe height requirement Identify heavy pipe Extra gap required on plane or rack Flange width on plane or rack How Routing Rules are Constructed Routing rules consist of PDMS expressions which define: • • Selection: the elements to which the rule applies. For example. A Logical test which evaluates to TRUE or FALSE. (ATTRIB ADIR EQ D) specifies that the arrive direction is down.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Positioning DNSM UPSM ELEV LOCA Orientation MAJO MINO Clash exclusion CLEX These rules are used to allow specified types of element to clash. 8:60 12. Orientate on minor axis: such as the orientation of a handwheel Downstream pipe requirement: the length of pipe required downstream to the next component Upstream pipe requirement: the length of pipe required upstream from the previous component Component elevation: absolute or relative elevation of a component Component location: 3D position of a component Pipe racks (and routing planes) TRAV ENTR EXIT SHOE WEIG ADGP FLWI Post-processing POPR All rules with this Purpose will be executed after a Branch has been routed.0 . All rules must have a selection expression. Orientate on major axis: positioning on vertical or horizontal pipe segment.

a message is output. • • Logical rules may or may not have actions. This file will contain the object definition.) The method which is applied. If not. This allows you to define much more complex logical tests and actions than can be done using simple expressions. and the rule fails. Upstream pipe requirement Downstream pipe requirement Pre-processing Post-processing Of the logical rules.0 . (Logical parts of rules only. If the logical expression still evaluates to False. (AXES PP 3 IS N) orientates a valve so that the P3 axis is in the north direction. If no action is specified. the action will be applied. (Clash exclusion rule only). Location. and the rule has an action. then the default action is taken. and the rule fails. the following use actions: If you do not define an action for these rules. the Action will be reversed.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Rules which use logical expressions are called logical rules. The actions for logical rules will be carried out if the Logical test evaluates to False. Examples of calling PML functions are given in the following sections: Pre-processing rules Minor Axis orientation Clash exclusion Post-processing rules See Pre-processing See Orientation See Clash Exclusion See Post-processing 8:61 12. For example. A Rule which does not have a logical expression is called a real rule. If no action is specified. a message is output. Using PML Functions in Routing Rules The Logical and Action expressions in Routing rules can call PML functions. that is. • • • • • • • Minor axis Elevation. followed by a method definition. A function is called by setting the rule action to a text string which is the name of the . if the logical expression evaluates to False.pmlobj file. which depends on the rule. The returned boolean result. PDMS Router will then re-test the component. • The Action which AVEVA PDMS will carry out. The DBREF of the Element clashing with the Branch. Actions The Logical expression in a rule tests whether or not the component satisfies the rule. because its action (see below) is a real expression. Real rules must always have actions. The function must be defined using fixed names for the following elements: CEREF RESULT RULEMETHOD OBSREF The DBREF of the element the rule applies to.

The Action will normally be a PML function. Select a Rule Set. To see the expressions in the rule. the RLOC attribute is set to 0 (Locked). and the Rule Attributes form will be displayed. select Modify. Pre-processing Pre-processing (PRPR) Logical. Note that at the end of the positioning and orientating commands. To build templates for parts of branches. To see more examples.CEREF. A suitable PML function is shown following. for example. you could identify Valves which will require control loops by setting a UDA to a certain value. The Selection part of the rule will identify a key component: for example.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing How Routing Rules are Applied The following sections describe in detail which expressions are required by each type of rule. Most of the examples are taken from Rules supplied with the product. select Settings>Routing Rules from the PDMS Router form menu.0 . which will display the Routing Rules form. For example: • • To build pipes of fixed geometry using a single rule to position and orientate all the components.owner.phdir. which must have been defined before the rule is applied. The PML function will then create.CEREF ori pa is w pos polar e dist 350 from prev tee rloc 0 next tee ori pa is w and p3 is n pos polar e dist 250 from pl of $!THIS.CEREF rloc 0 valv 1 of cref ori pa is w and p3 is up at w 500 wrt $!THIS.CEREF is DBREF endobject define method . then select a Rule from the list. position and orientate the components and finally set the head working point attribute to the last component covered by the rule. define object PREPROCESS member . and how the rules are applied. a control loop at the start of a branch. PDMS Router will then take over and route the Branch. and then setting the selection expression to select all the Valves with the given attribute value. position and orientate several components rather than have individual rules.RULEMETHOD() if ( !THIS. This type of rule will typically be used where it s simpler to have a single rule to create. will have Action All rules with this Purpose will be executed before a Branch is routed.CEREF rloc 0 8:62 12.east gt 0 ) then prev tee ori and p3 is n dist 200 rloc 0 $!THIS.

owner.CEREF rloc 0 valv 1 of cref ori pa is n and p3 is up at w 500 wrt $!THIS.phdir.CEREF.CEREF.east lt 0 ) then prev tee ori and p3 is s dist 200 rloc 0 $!THIS.CEREF ori pa is n pos polar s dist 350 from prev tee rloc 0 next tee ori pa is n and p3 is e pos polar s dist 250 from pl of $!THIS.CEREF rloc 0 elseif ( !THIS.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing elseif ( !THIS.CEREF ori pa is e pos polar w dist 350 from prev tee rloc 0 next tee ori pa is e and p3 is s pos polar w dist 250 from pl of $!THIS.CEREF rloc 0 elseif ( !THIS.CEREF ori pa is s pos polar n dist 350 from prev tee rloc 0 next tee ori pa is s and p3 is w pos polar n dist 250 from pl of $!THIS.phdir.CEREF rloc 0 valv 1 of cref ori pa is e and p3 is up at w 600 wrt $!THIS.owner.phdir.CEREF rloc 0 endif endmethod The input to PDMS Router would be Pipes with a main Branch with the following sequence of components defined: • Tee 8:63 12.north gt 0 ) then prev tee ori and p3 is w dist 200 rloc 0 $!THIS.owner.CEREF rloc 0 valv 1 of cref ori pa is s and p3 is up at w 500 wrt $!THIS.CEREF.north lt 0 ) then prev tee ori and p3 is e dist 200 rloc 0 $!THIS.0 .

0 . so that they cannot be moved by any rules which are subsequently applied. The rule to call the function could be defined as shown: The rule is applied to the elements required in the normal way. no Action 8:64 12. with the Branch Head and Tail connected to the two Tees in the main Branch. which will form the control loop. Selection Bend or elbow selection (BEND) Logical.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • • Valve with Stype CH Tee There would also be a second Branch. owning a Valve. Note: PDMS Router will lock the Tees and the Valves in position. An example of the control loop created is shown in the following picture.

For example. Reducer Selection (REDU) Logical.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing This rule will choose the type of component used to change direction. no Action This rule will specify whether concentric or eccentric reducers are selected. is using Elbows. and you want concentric reducers in vertical sections of pipe but eccentric reducers in horizontal sections.0 . the Selection expression in the rule could be: ALL REDU WITH ( ATTRIB ADIR EQ U AND ATTRIB ADIR EQ D ) The logical expression to specify eccentric reducers in all the selected cases would be: ( ATTRIB STYP EQ ‘CON’ ) 8:65 12. set on the PDMS Router Defaults form. The default method of changing direction. if the default reducers in a specification are eccentric. The rule specifies that small bore pipes change direction using Bends Note: This rule will only be applied if you set the Change direction using option on the PDMS Router Defaults form to Rule. The default method of changing direction. the selection expression could be: ALL BRAN MEM WITH ATTRIB ABORE LE 65 and the logical: ( ATTRIB TYPE EQ ’BEND’ ) This will ensure that all Branches with bores less than or equal to 65 will use Bends rather than Elbows. For example. is using a Rule. set on the PDMS Router Defaults form.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The default reducer in the Specification is eccentric. VFWA.) Logical. TEE and CROSS. the component will be moved 2/3 the distance along the leg. and then re-tested. If component positioning is tail relative. if it exists. (Any connection components such as flanges or gaskets are ignored. For example: Selection ALL TEE WITH ( ATTRIB APOS EQ ATTRIB LPOS ) Logical ( ATTRIB STLE GT ATTRIB ABORE * 10 ) You can omit the action by setting the Action field on the form to unset. the action. FILT. and component positioning is head relative. PCOM. The lengths are measured from the component up to one of the following: • • • • A change of direction A change of bore The start or end of the branch One of the following components: VALV. will be applied. VTWA. particularly if other rules are being applied.0 . If no action exists. can have Action Downstream pipe requirement (DNSM) This rule controls the length of straight pipe which is downstream from the previous component. and it is not recommended. If the rule logical fails. The action should be an expression that moves the component a distance from the previous to ensure a straight length of pipe. is the length of straight tube after the component. the preceding component will be moved if necessary when it is positioned. 8:66 12. Positioning The rule specifies that reducers on vertical legs are concentric There are two pseudo-attributes which are particularly useful in positioning expressions: STAP STLE is the length of straight tube before the component. but the result may be unpredictable.

can have Action 8:67 12. the component will be moved 1/3 of the upstream distance. You can omit the action by setting the Action field on the form to unset.0 . Selection ALL TEE WITH ( ATTRIB APOS EQ ATTRIB LPOS ) Logical ATTRIB STAP GT ATTRIB ABORE * 10 An example of an action is: POLAR AXES PREVPP DIST 4 IN FROM PREVPP where the POLAR AXES keywords are used to specify a position in terms of a distance in a given direction from a point. can have Action This rule controls the length of straight pipe which is upstream from the next component. and it is not recommended. If component positioning is head relative. and then re-tested. Elevation (ELEV) Logical. and component positioning is tail relative. If no action exists. but the result may be unpredictable. particularly if other rules are being applied. the following component will be moved if necessary when it is positioned.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing A Tee is positioned by default. The rule is applied and the Tee is moved 2/3 of the distance along the leg between the Elbow and the Routing Plane Upstream pipe requirement (UPSM) Logical. and PREVPP is the previous p-point.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing This rule controls the elevation of a component. The corresponding action expression would be: ATTRIB PPOS 4 OF HREF OF OWNER This will position the component at p-point 4 of the connecting component in the owning branch. the component will be moved to each leg in turn until one is found that passes. If it fails again. No action is allowed. a message is output. Orientation Major axis Logical. If the logical test is False. For example: ATTRIB P3 DIR EQ D 8:68 12. which is the arrive/leave axis. If no position on the existing pipe can be found. the action will be applied with the position adjusted to minimise the use of bends or elbows. Frequently this axis is the direction of a valve handwheel. no Action This rule controls the major orientation of the component. which is the axis perpendicular to the arrive/leave axis. Location (LOCA) Logical. The following example is a test for a component in a sub-branch being positioned at p-point 4 of the connecting component in the owning branch: ATTRIB APOS EQ ATTRIB PPOS 4 OF HREF OF OWNER If the logical test fails. Selection ALL BRANCH MEMBERS Logical ATTRIB UP WRT CLOSEST EQUI WITH ( PURP EQ ’FLOO’ ) DOWN GE .61m vertically above an EQUI whose purpose is FLOO. can have Action This rule controls the minor orientation of a component. Minor axis Logical. the action will be applied and the test repeated. For example: ATTRIB ADIR EQ D If this fails. The following example uses the CLOSEST keyword in the logical expression to specify that components must be positioned at a height greater or equal to 0. any action set will be applied.61M A position on the closest vertical segment of pipe equal to the required elevation will be found. can have Action This rule is used to position a component at a given location.

RESULT = ( !THIS. . the component will be rotated in increments of 90 degrees to find a nonclashing orientation which passes the rule.PDIR[3].up eq 0.CEREF. the component will be moved along the leg and retried.east gt 0 ) . If there is no action. the Logical expression will be set to ( 'minological' ).CEREF is DBREF endobject define method . and re-tested.RESULT = ( !THIS.CEREF. the action will be applied. that is.north lt 0 ) elseif ( !THIS. If after four attempts it still fails.RULEMETHOD() if ( !THIS.CEREF is DBREF member .CEREF. if P3 does not have the specified orientation. . the component will be moved to the next leg and the procedure repeated. .CEREF.ADIR. which orientates the P3 direction of the component: define object MINOACTION member .CEREF.RESULT = false if ( !THIS. endif endmethod If the Logical test evaluates to False.CEREF. which will call the following PML function: define object MINOLOGICAL member .707107 and !THIS.north ne 0 ) then ORI and p3 is e 45 d endif endmethod Clash Exclusion Clash Exclusion (CLEX) Logical 8:69 12.ADIR. Examples using PML Functions The following example shows how you could call PML functions from the Logical and Action expressions in a Minor Axis rule for positioning a Valve at and angle of 45 degrees.up eq 0.707107 and !THIS. .CEREF. First.east ne 0 ) then !THIS. If the component clashes.ADIR.RESULT is BOOLEAN endobject define method .0 .ADIR.PDIR[3]. The Action expression is set to ( 'minoaction' ).east ne 0 ) then ORI and p3 is s 45 d elseif ( !THIS. it will be moved along the leg and then re-tested.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing If the rule logical fails.PDIR[3]. If the logical then fails. . the Action will be carried out.PDIR[3]. the component will be moved to another leg. If no suitable positions are found on the leg.CEREF.north ne 0 ) then !THIS.RULEMETHOD() !THIS.

CEREF is DBREF member .name eq '/ROUTE2-1' and !THIS.owner. Example using a PML Function If a more complicated solution is needed. A use for this is specifying that only non hazardous pipes are allowed in certain areas.RESULT = true endif endmethod Pipe Racks and Routing Planes Automatic routing along Pipe Racks is described in Creating and Using Pipe Racks.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing A Clash Exclusion rule allows certain clashes to be approved in advance. PDMS Router sees a Pipe Rack as a group of routing planes. The rule allows all Branches whose PURP is not set to RADI to pass through all human zones: Selection ALL BRAN MEM WITH ( PURP OF BRAN NEQ ‘RADI’ ) Logical ( PURP OF ZONE EQ ‘HUMA’ ) The selection part of the rule is used to identify the Branch or Branch member which is clashing and the logical applies to the obstruction clashing with the Branches.RESULT = false if ( !THIS. In this case. use a PML function. Branches carrying radioactive material have their PURP attribute set to RADI.RULEMETHOD() !THIS. All Zones which are safe for humans to enter have their PURP set to HUMA.name eq '/OBSTR42' ) then !THIS. so that you can identify which Branches should be routed along a given plane. Each plane will have its FUNCTION attribute set. no Action This rule will control which travel plane of a pipe rack is used to carry a particular branch. the selection expression selects Branches. Example using Expressions For example.CEREF. Note: In these rules.0 . which would apply the rule to all Branches to with Purpose set to COOLING.RESULT is BOOLEAN endobject define method . is: 8:70 12. In summary. A simple example is define object CLASH member . the following rule can be used where two groups of elements are always allowed to clash. Clash exclusion rules can use expressions or functions.OBSREF is DBREF member . for example to UTIL for planes which are going to route utilities pipes. You should also ensure that Branches which will be routed along Pipe Racks have their PURPOSE attribute set appropriately. The logical test is applied to the Planes on the Pipe Rack.OBSREF. An example of the selection expression. Travel Plane Selection Logical.owner.

An example of the selection might be: ALL BRAN WITH ( PURP EQ ’COOLING’ AND :CONT EQ ’GAS’) Note that both the PURPOSE and :CONTENT attributes would need to be set on the branch for the rule selection to take effect.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing ALL BRAN WITH ( PURP EQ ’COOLING’) An example of the logical test.0 . An example of the selection might be: ALL BRAN WITH ( PURP EQ ’COOLING’ AND :CONT EQ ’GAS’) Note that both the PURPOSE and :CONTENT attributes would need to be set on the branch for the rule selection to take effect. This would cause pipes containing gas for cooling to use the upper entry/exit plane to get to/ from the UTIL travel plane. For example: Selection: ( ALL BRAN ALL BRAN MEM ) WITH ( ISPEC OF BRAN NE NULREF ) Action: (PH OD * 0. The shoe-height is specified using rules with PURPose SHOE. Normally there will be one above and one below. to allow for branches with both liquid and vapour contents to use the rack. to allow for branches with both liquid and vapour contents to use the rack. no Action This rule will determine which exit plane is used to control a branch as it exits a pipe rack. An example of the test could be: FUNCTION EQ ’UTIL’ This would cause pipes containing gas for cooling to use the upper entry/exit plane to get to/ from the UTIL travel plane. Note: It is important to use the FUNCTION attribute in rule writing for the rule logical since the PURPOSE attribute is used internally. Normally there will be one above and one below. An example of the test could be: FUNCTION EQ ’UTIL’. Shoe Height Real Branches routed via planes or pipe-racks can be offset by a user-specified distance from the plane to allow for shoe-heights. which will route the selected Branches along the Plane with its Function set to UTIL would be: FUNCTION EQ ’UTIL’ Note: It is important to use the FUNCTION attribute in rule writing for the rule logical since the PURPOSE attribute is used internally. Exit Plane Selection Logical. no Action This rule will determine which entry plane is used to control a branch as it enters a pipe rack. Entry Plane Selection Logical.25 ) 8:71 12.

2 times the arrive bore of the component: Selection: ALL BRAN MEM WITH ( TEMP OF OWNER GE 500 ) Action: ( ATTRIB ABOR * 0. Extra Gap Real This rule allows you to specify an additional gap between some pipes. The logical expression will evaluate to False if the pipe is to be placed at the edge of the rack. The rule is applied to the default Flange for the Pipe. The gap can be calculated in several ways. the following rule will give an additional gap of 0. Example 1 Selection: ALL FLAN Action: ( 0.25 * ATTRIB ABORE ) 8:72 12. Flange Width (FLWI) Real Flange width rules are used to set the gap between Pipes on Routing Planes and Pipe Racks when the Pipe run on the plane includes Flanges. for example. the PLPM attribute of the plane will be set to WEIG. When you choose this packing method.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Note: The Action specifies the distance from the Pipe OD. for branches with temperature greater than 500 degrees. For example. See Packing Methods for more details of Pipe packing methods. Heavy Pipe Logical. and PDMS Router will look for a weight rule to determine whether pipes are light or heavy.0 .2) For more details of additional gaps. For example: Selection: ALL BRAN MEM Logical: ( ATTRIB ABOR LT 300 MM) All Pipes with Bore greater than 300mm will be placed at the edge of the rack. very hot pipes. Subtract the insulation thickness if the shoe height if measured from the bottom of the Pipe. no Action You can specify that heavy pipes are placed at the edges of routing planes and light ones at the centre. see Additional Gaps. Additional gaps are determined by rules applied to the default bend or elbow of a branch.

see Flanges on Routing Planes.CEREF is DBREF endobject define method .RULEMETHOD() exit 8:73 12.0 .SET Description Flange width Property DKEY FLWI Ptype BORE Pproperty ( ATTRIB ABOR * 1. They can be used to add extra details to a Branch such as Drains and Vents or slope the line. which would be specified in a dataset as follows: Owner /FLANGE. which must have been defined before the rule is applied. The Action will normally be a PML function.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Example 2 Uses flange parameters: Selection: ALL FLAN Action: ACTION ( CPARA[2] + CPARA[3] ) Example 3 The next example uses a property of the Flange. will have Action All rules with this Purpose will be executed after a Branch has been successfully routed.DATA. The following example creates an expansion loop: define object POSTPROCESS member .5 ) Dproperty 0 Purpose unset Number 0 Dtitle unset Punits mm Ruse 0 The rule could then be: Selection: ALL FLAN WITH ( PSPE EQ /A150) Action: ACTION ( PROP FLWI ) For more detailed information about how Flange widths are calculated. Post-processing Post-processing (POPR) Logical.

CEREF.LDIR The following illustrations show a Branch.CEREF. Figure 8:14.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing $!THIS.0 .CEREF new elbo select ori and pl is dist 1000 rloc 2 new elbo select ori and pl is dist 300 rloc 2 new elbo select ori and pl is dist 300 rloc 2 new elbo select ori and pl is dist 300 rloc 2 router endmethod up $!THIS.LDIR d $!THIS. The Branch without Post-processing 8:74 12. with and without the Post-processing Rule applied.

To create a rule set: 1. 3. The Routing Rules form is displayed. By default. There are two administrative elements within the hierarchy: • • Rule World. 2. However. Select Create > Rule World. zone or pipe. 8.2 Creating and Editing Routing Rules PDMS stores rules within a hierarchy. within a rule set. whose type is RLWL Rule Set. When you create a new rule. whose type is RLST PDMS stores routing rules. The Create Rule World form is displayed. or apply rules from other rule sets. Enter a name for the world in the Name field. select Settings > Routing Rules. Ensure that you are currently at the level of the Rule World in which you want to create the rule set. 8:75 12. The rules in the rule sets are examples which you can use to build your own set.0 . Then you can apply the rule to individual branches or all the branches in a particular site. then click OK. The Branch after Post-processing. and do not necessarily represent good engineering practise. with expansion loops inserted. and it owns several rule sets. to any individual component. you define the type of rule you want by selecting the correct purpose. you can also disable any of the rules. whose type is GRUL. You can now create a rule set within the rule world.2. all rules in the rule sets applied to a branch will be considered to be applied to each component in the branch. A sample set of rules is provided with PDMS Router in the Sample Project. The rule world is created and is displayed in the Members List. You then create the rule by defining the expressions within it.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Figure 8:15. The Rule World is named /PIPES-RULES. From the PDMS Router form. Exercise begins: To create a rule world: 1.

You can now create routing rules and store them within the rule set. 2. 4. 5.0 . Select where the rule is to be stored by first selecting the rule world from the Current Rule World option list. The Rule Attributes form is displayed. you will continue to create a new rule. then select Create > Rule > Copy. 3.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 2. Enter a name for the rule in the Name field. You will notice that there is a Copy option available from the Create Rule menu. 1. The Create Rule Set form is displayed. and then the rule set from the Current Rule Set option list. 3. From the PDMS Router form. select Create > Rule Set. in the Function field. 5. select Settings > Routing Rules. From the Routing Rules form. This is the name of the rule element (GRUL) that will be displayed in the Members List. 8:76 12. as shown. You do not want to do this in this exercise. You can then modify the details to suit your purpose. To create a copy rule. Click OK. Click OK. Select Create > Rule > New to create a new rule. This option enables you to select an existing rule and use its details as the starting point for a new rule. Enter a name for the set in the Name field. Enter the function of the rule set. 4. you will create a rule to ensure that the default orientation of all gate valves is North. The Create Rule form is displayed. you simply select the rule you want to copy. Creating a Routing Rule Exercise begins: In the following procedure. The set is displayed in the Members List. The Routing Rules form is displayed. The function is simply a descriptive term which enables you and other users to identify the purpose of the rules contained within the rule set. Instead.

Set the Purpose option list to Orientate on minor axes.0 . and make the leave direction the same as for the previous component. If it is. 7. You can now apply the rule to a Branch in the usual way. the Rule Attributes form is displayed. filled in with the details of the copied rule. PDMS Router creates the routing rule. Enter the expression ( ATTRIB PDIR 3 EQ N ). This expression checks whether or not the direction of P3 on each gate valve is set to north. then PDMS Router performs the action expression described in the next step. 8. Enter the expression (AXES PP 3 IS N AND AXES PL IS AXES PL OF PREV). in the Logical field. that is. This expression tells PDMS Router to change the direction of P3 to north. Enter the expression ALL VALV WITH (ATTRIB STYP EQ ‘GATE’). 10. Enter a description of the rule in the field at the top of the form. 11. all gates valves. 8:77 12. If the direction of P3 is not north. in the Action field.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Note: When you create a copy of a rule. You can then simply edit the details of the rule. Click Apply. 9. in the Selection field. This expression tells PDMS Router that the rule is applicable to all valves that have their attribute STYP set to GATE. The Rule Attributes form should now look as shown. The description will be displayed in the Routing Rules form. then the gate valve meets the criteria of the rule and no action is taken. 6.

The Routing Rules form is displayed. For example. you will edit the example pipe rack rules that are supplied with PDMS Router and apply them to avoid the pockets created by the default route. The Rules available are supplied in the sample project. From the PDMS Router form. 2. Exercise begins: 1. You may. then perform the logical test for each component selected. select a rule in the list and then select Modify > Rule on the Routing Rules form. The rules are modified to give a better route for the pipe rack example in Creating and Using Pipe Racks. 8:78 12. you can specify the way in which pipes enter onto and exit from a particular level. Using Rules to Specify How Pipes Use a Pipe Rack You can specify the type of pipes you want to route on each level of a pipe rack. you can tell PDMS Router to place all process pipes on the bottom level of a rack and all utility pipes on the top level of a rack. using routing rules. You can test the rule before you use it. for example. If you have more than one entry/exit plane. There are three Rules supplied: a Travel Plane Rule.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 12. have all liquid utility pipes climbing onto a travel plane and all gas utility pipes dropping onto the same travel plane. select Settings > Routing Rules. In this exercise. The display for the Travel Rule as shown. using as an example the sample rules suppied in the rule set TRAVEL-RULES. an Entry Plane rule and an Exit Plane rule. Make sure that the Current Rule World is set to PIPE-RULES and the Current Rule Set is TRAVEL-RULES. and report which components passed and which failed.0 . You will see the Rule Attribute form. Set the Test Rule drop-down list to the extent of the test. To see the expressions in the rules. Modifying a Routing Rule This section describes how to edit a routing rule. This will perform the selection operation defined for the rule.

Before you can test the rules. 3. When the Global Attribute Change form is displayed: • • • Select Purpose from the list of attributes Set the All attribute data option button Enter PROC into the with text box. Change the Logical expression to be: ( ATTRIB FUNC EQ 'EXIT' ) 4.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing On this form. note that: • The Selection text box contains the expression ALL BRAN WITH ( ATTRIB PURP OF OWNER EQ PROC ) This means that the Rule can be applied to all Branches owned by Pipes whose PURP attribute is set to PROC. • • To see the expressions in other rules. • • • Make Pipe 2001 the Current Element Select Modify > Attributes Global from the Pipework Application main menu bar. • The Logical text box contains the expression: ( ATTRIB FUNC EQ 'PROCESS' ) This means that the Travel Planes must have their FUNC attribute set to PROCESS.0 . select the rule in the list on the Routing Rules form and click Current Rule on the Rule Attributes form. Select the Exit rule in the list on the Routing Rules form and click Current Rule on the Rule Attributes form. The Entry and Exit Plane rules as supplied both have their Logical expressions set to: ( ATTRIB FUNC EQ 'ENTRY' ) The next step is to change the Logical expression for the Exit Rule. you must set the Pipe PURP attribute to PROC. 8:79 12.

On the Modify Pipe Rack form. for example. the exit plane rule. Click Apply on the Global Attribute Change form. On the Branch Rules form. Deleting a Rule World. Rule Set or Routing Rule To delete a rule world. rule set. select the rule you wish to delete from the routing rules list. Select Delete > Rule World. Set the Test Rule option button to Pipe. Navigate to the rule world and rule set you want to delete from the Current Rule World and Current Rule Set drop-down lists. and the rule will be added to the form. Now back to the Rule Attributes form to test. 8:80 12. You can also use the Delete options on the Pipework Application main menu bar. The Rule Testing form will be displayed. No Planes have been selected because there are no Planes with Function set to EXIT. 7.0 . Select Settings > Branch Rules from the menu on the PDMS Router form. Select the Branch 2001/B1 on the Routing Rules form. Select HIGH. A more satisfactory route will be obtained. If you are deleting a rule. which should tell you that 1 Branch has been selected for the rule but 0 Plane. Make the Pipe Rack the current element and select Modify > Pipe Rack from the PDMS Router form menu. change the Function of the planes as follows: Level 1 Upper Entry/Exit Plane: Level 1 Travel Plane: Level 1 Lower Entry/Exit Plane: EXIT PROC ENTRY 6. Now re-route the Pipe. Delete > Rule Set or Delete > Rule. Associate the Rule with the Branches required. Modify the Functions of the Planes in the Pipe Rack as follows. set Apply rule sets to All Selected Branches. or routing rule: 1. 2.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • 5. as required. 3. Select the exit Plane rule in the list and make sure that Pipe 2001 is the Current Element.

See Automatic Pipe Routing using PDMS Router for details. If WW or WF spacing is specified.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8. which is applied to the default flange (i. Note: The flange width taken as 0 if: • • No flange width rule is applied. The size of flange is found using the Flange Width (FLWI) rule. or as a flange-to-flange (FF) gap.3 Placing Pipes on Racks and Planes This section describes how to set up rules which control: • • • How spacing between Pipes on pipe racks and routing planes is calculated from Flanges on the Pipes. PLWW can be set to WW. Then the centre of an insulated branch of OD 200mm. 8:81 12. Example of Wall-to-Flange Spacing If a rule is used. How the weight of a Pipe can affect Pipe Rack Packing. the flange which is obtained with an AVEVA PDMS SELECT) for each branch at its current bore. bore 100mm would be placed 435mm from the centre of an adjacent branch of OD 150mm. • • When wall-to-flange spacing is used.e.5 x bore. if the flanges can be staggered. so that the flange width is set to 1.0 . the flange width of both pipes will be added to the wall-to-wall gap. If you need to run sections of Pipes which include Flanges along routing planes. Shoe Height. Either branch does not have a default flange. then wall-to-flange spacing is calculated as follows. the PDMS Router will look for rules of type FLWI and apply them. bore 140mm. Flanges on Routing Planes By default. The default is wall-to-wall (WW) spacing. the greater of the flange widths for the current pipe and the adjacent pipe will be added to the wall-to-wall spacing. When flange-to-flange spacing is used. The spacing is controlled by the PLWW attribute of the RPLA. If necessary you can also specify an additional pipe-specific gap.2. if the flanges are side-by-side on the plane. for example. even if there are other flanges on the pipe rack. you can specify that the gap value will be applied as a wall-to-flange (WF) gap. PDMS Router will run pipes along Routing planes with the wall-to-wall Pipe Gap given on the PDMS Router Defaults form. WF or FF. The constant gap is set to 50mm. for very hot pipes.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Example of Flange-to-Flange Spacing If the rule sets the flange width to 1. then flange-to-flange spacing is calculated as follows: ½ OD Pipe A Flange width Pipe A Gap Flange width Pipe B ½ OD Pipe B Total 100 150 50 210 75 585 8:82 12.5 x bore.

If you select the By Weight method. If the weight-related packing method is used then. (PURP set to WEIG). For heavy pipes PDMS Router will search upwards from the bottom edge of the plane. Router will then search in both directions outwards looking for a free slot and use the closer to the centre.0 . for light pipes.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Packing Methods There are two packing methods available. and PDMS Router will look for a weight rule. Vertical Routing Planes The weight-related packing method can also be applied to vertical routing planes with a horizontal travel direction. For light pipes Router will first look in the middle of the plane or rack to see if this slot is free. for heavy pipes PDMS Router will search inwards from both edges looking for a free slot with a large enough gap between it and any adjacent pipe. It can be set for the Travel Plane of pipe-racks and for individual planes. the PLPM (Plane Packing Method) attribute of the plane will be set to WEIG. to determine whether pipes are light or heavy. PDMS Router will either place a pipe on a plane as near as possible to the edge of the plane. or pack heavy pipes at the edges of racks and light ones at the centre. The packing method is an attribute of the Routing Plane. 8:83 12. The heavy pipe will be placed closest to whichever edge a slot is found. Pipes for which no rule exists will be treated as light pipes and placed in the centre of the rack or plane. You can use weight rules to determine whether pipes are packed at the top or bottom of vertical planes Horizontal Routing Planes In the weight-related packing method on horizontal planes. PDMS Router will search downwards from the top edge of the routing plane edges looking for a free slot with a large enough gap between it and any adjacent pipe. Pipes for which no rule exists will be treated as light pipes.

Example Assume WF spacing is used.0 . or pipes which will need tracing where the tracing has not been represented by the insulation. extra gap 20mm would be placed 465mm from the centre of an adjacent branch of OD 150mm. with a rule that that the flange-width is 1. The size of any additional space required can be found using an additional gap rule (Purpose ADGP) applied to the default bend or elbow of each branch at its current bore. bore 140mm extra gap 10mm.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • You cannot use weight-related packing for a vertical plane with a vertical travel direction.5 x bore and that the user has a constant 50mm gap. Example of Weight-related Packing If the third and sixth pipes to be packed on a rack are ‘heavy’ and the others are light. Extra-hot pipes. Then the centre of an insulated branch of OD 200mm. bore 100mm. 8:84 12. the placement of pipes will be: 3 6 5 2 1 4 7 Additional Gaps Sometimes certain pipes need to be placed further than others from their neighbours. should have wider gaps beside them. Process pipes might need to be separated more than utility pipes.

However. of the bottom of the insulation. Their action is a real expression giving the shoe height. The Rules should have PURPose ‘SHOE’. you may wish to specify a shoe height (H) with respect to the bottom of the pipe itself.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Shoe Heights Branches routed via planes or pipe-racks can be offset by a user-specified distance from the plane to allow for shoe-heights. above a rack or plane. The user specifies the shoe-height using rules. Rules with purpose ‘SHOE’ do not have a logical part. This is shown in the following diagram: 8:85 12. Note: The Shoe Height is calculated from the bottom of the pipe not the insulation The real value (h) returned from a shoe height rule is used to specify the height.0 .

you can load your P&ID file into PDMS Router.0. and also the P&ID file format. you can specify the shoe height as the expression: h = H .0 .5 * ATTRIB IPAR[1] ) Importing Data from P&ID Files If your P&ID system is configured so that it is capable of outputting data for use in AVEVA PDMS. This section describes which attributes must be set before the P&ID data can be imported. Note: The P&ID file is imported by selecting Create > Add New Pipes From P&ID. Attribute Settings You must ensure that the following branch and component attributes are set. The P&ID Import form is displayed.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Insulation Pipe ½ ( Insulation parameter[1] ) Shoe H h Rack or Plane Using the shoe height rule.½ ( Insulation parameter[1]) Example Rule with shoe height H of 200mm: Selection: ( ALL BRANCH ALL BRANCH MEMBERS ) WITH ( IPAR[1] ) ) Action: NOT UNSET ( ATTRIB ( 200mm . 8:86 12.

Direction of the head. Component Attributes You must set the Spref attribute. except for names of elements. The bore of the tail.0 . Position of tail The direction of the tail. Tdir. set: Hbor Hcon Lhead Hpos Hdir The bore of the head.indicates that Hpos is a valid position. set: Ltail Tpos Tdir TRUE .indicates that Lpos is a valid position. be aware of the following points: • • All characters must be in upper case. All comments take up one line and have two hyphens and a space as the first three characters. and any component and tube rules that apply. PDMS Router will calculate the position based upon the components in the branch. If the tail is unconnected (Tref is unset). TRUE . Before you attempt to create a neutral flat file. set: Tref The name of the element to which the tail connects. Alternatively. which can be standard AVEVA PDMS format (/Pipe-1-B2). set: Href Name of the element to which the head connects. set the following attributes: Tcon Tbor Connection type of the tail. If a tail is unconnected. Connection type of the head. and Tpos unset. 8:87 12. You can then use the file to recreate the P&ID in AVEVA PDMS for use with PDMS Router. If the tail connects to another branch. In this case. The position of the head. The Neutral Description Language This Section describes a neutral description language which you can use to extract an intermediate ASCII file from your P&ID system. then you do not need to set its position. If the tail’s position is fixed.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Branch Attributes: Pspec Ispec Piping Specification to use Insulation Specification to use If the head connects to another branch. you can leave both Ltail. If the head is unconnected (Href is unset).

8:88 12.. START PIPE /Pipe2 PSPEC /DDD BORE 200 ISPEC /A1D START BRANCH /branch-1 HREF /PUMP1/N1 TREF /VESS1/NOZZ2 BORE 150 TEE /TEE3 80 VALV /VALVE2 GLOBE END END Before you perform an import. Each pipe must have one or more branches. END END Where element can be one of the following types: CAP INST REDU TEE VALV VENT OLET For example: -. This enables the pipes to set the HREF and TREF on the nozzles of the equipment.elements. The general format of the file is as follows: START PIPE /pipe_name.Here is a simple example of a neutral flat file. The following figure shows a simple P&ID.elements. You can use the space bar and tab to create space between fields and commands. you must create the equipment that you require.0 . END START BRANCH /branch_name. Each file must contain one or more pipes. if required. When you create a pipe or branch...... It is up to the P&ID system to decide what is a branch and what is a pipe. .. START BRANCH /branch_name.. It is assumed that the nozzle names are the same in both the P&ID and AVEVA PDMS. the first command you must enter is START.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • • You can insert blank lines. ..... which enters set-up mode. Any elements that you create while you are in set-up mode belong to the significant element specified in the last START command...

--------.pipe_spec -------| | | |.attribute -.tracing_spec ----| | | |. | | ‘. PipeB.value ------------| | | |.INSU -.value -------| .ISPEC -.PRES -. | | |.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing Pump 1 A B Vessel 1 Vessel 3 C D Vessel 2 The diagram could be represented as: • or • Pipe1/B1 (A).nl -*.TSPEC -.value ------------| | | |.PSPEC -.0 . PipeA.BORE value +--cont continued >--+.END -> Positive or negative real number Positive integer TRUE or FALSE New line 8:89 12. Pipe1/B3 (C) and Pipe1/B4 (D). Pipe 1/B2 (B). | | / | ‘----------------------------+.branch -+. PipeC and PipeD Command Syntax for P&ID Neutral Flat Files Anything in lower case is one of the following: value integer logical nl PIPE >-START PIPE /pipe_name -+------------------.insulation_spec . | | ‘-PSPEC pipe_spec -+-------------.

TREF /name ----------------’ | | | .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing where branch attribute INSU value is the syntax to define a branch.TSPEC tracing_spec --------| | | |.PSPEC pipe_spec -----------| | | |.ISPEC insulation_spec -----| | | |.nl -.START BRANCH /branch_name HREF /name ---> continued continued ---+-----------------------------.-------<-------.0 . see below is any Pipe attribute is the thickness of the insulation. For example. BRANCH >-.PRES -.element ----' | ‘---------------.attribute -. |/ | *---. | | |.BORE integer --------------| | | |.value -------------| | | |. a Tee could be specified by either: TEE /tee-1 T-Type 200 or TEE /tee-1 200 8:90 12.END -> where element is any of the following: CAP REDU TEE VALV VENT INST OLET Note • /pipe_name/cap_name /pipe_name/reducer_name /pipe_name/tee_name /pipe_name/valve_name /pipe_name/vent_name /pipe_name/inst_name /pipe_name/olet_name stype stype stype stype stype stype stype value value The STYPE set for each element can be omitted if a default STYP is set in the specification.INSU insulation thickness -| | | |.value --------| | | |.

its PBORE0 can be set.0 . In each case. and the P3 bore for a Tee. PDMS Router will insert a reducer automatically when routing the pipe. 8:91 12. element can optionally be followed by options from one or both of the following: >----+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| ‘-->----+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| ‘--PBOre integer ---------.value --| | | ‘-.word ---+---> • value is the new bore of the pipe for a Reducer (or enlarger). For example: START PIPE /P-1 BORE 200 START BRANCH /B-1 BORE 100 REDU /R-1 BORE 50 END END • • The bores at P1. For example: TEE /T-1 PBORE1 100 PBORE2 50 PBORE3 50 If a component is at a different bore to the rest of the pipe. a reducing valve. Any change in bore along a branch can be specified by the BORE keyword. It is recommended that specifications are set up with default STYPs so if the STYP is missing in the flat file a valid component will still be selected and Router can route it. | ANgle -----------------| | RAdius ----------------| | ABOre -----------------| | ISPEC insulation_spec -| | TSPEC tracing_spec ----| | LBOre -----------------| | PREssure --------------| | TEMperature -----------| | RATing ----------------+--. An example of this syntax is: BRANCH /B-1 HREF /NOZZ-1 BORE 100 VALV /V-1 GATE PBORE0 50 END If the PBORE0 is set on a REDU along with the BORE. for example.word --.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing if the default STYP is set to T-Type. | word ------------------+-. P2 and P3 can be set individually.uval --> STYpe -----------------. it will be ignored. | TYpe ------------------| | ACOnn -----------------| | LCOnn -----------------| | PCOnn integer ---------+--.

These commands can only be used in ROUTER mode. It is assumed /V-1 is an inline component for /B-2.<TEXT> Incorrect Router Library version. For most users.4 Command Syntax This section describes the syntax used in PDMS Router.701) (71.792) Cannot open router DSO due to:.791) (61. especially batch input. and to adapt the standard Applicationware. (61.2.792) (61.File to test import from P&ID to PDMS Design —. -.702) (61. Example of a Neutral Flat File Below is an example of a typical neutral flat file.0 . To switch from standard DESIGN to Router. Branch /B-1 has its TREF set to /V-1 so the valve will not appear in /B-1. give the command: ROUTER The following errors will result if Router is not available. Its purpose is to allow customers to build Router into their own systems.Pipes from Sheet X START PIPE /PIPE1 PSPEC /A3B BORE 300 ISPEC /XXX INSU 100 START BRANCH /first_branch HREF VESSEL1/NOZZ1/ TREF PUMP1/NOZZ1 VALV /VALVE1 GATE REDU /REDU1 200 TEE /TEE 200 TEE /Tee-2 PBORE3 200 VALV /VALVE2 GLOBE CAP /CAP1 OPEN END START BRANCH /second_branch HREF VESSEL1/NOZZ2 TSPEC /t-spec VALV /GATE_VALVE GATE REDU /REDU2 CONC 200 ISPEC /I-spec TSPEC /T-spec END END START PIPE /PIPE2 PSPE /A1D BORE 200 ISPEC /DDD INSU 50 START BRANCH /branch-1 HREF /NOZZ3 TREF PUMP1/NOZZ3 BORE 150 TEE /Tee3 TEE-TYPE PBORE3 50 END START BRANCH /branch-2 HREF VESSEL1/NOZZ4 TREF PUMP1/NOZZ4 VALV /Valve-safety1 GLOBE REDU /R-1-1 BORE 100 END END 8.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing • • The tracing and insulation specifications can be set with the syntax: element TSPEC /tspec-1 ISPEC /ispec-1 Elements that appear in more than one branch will only be created once. this should not be necessary as all important functionality is available via Applicationware. It is <INT> but should be <INT> No licences available for Piperouter Piperouter security error <INT> Piperouter security error 8:92 12. Different style layouts are shown for each pipe. For example: Valve /V-1 is included in branch /B-1 and /B-2.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing To return to DESIGN. • Commands are shown in a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters. commands may be entered in any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters. For example: >----+--. where the capital letters indicate the minimum abbreviation. the command ICONSTraint can be input in any of the following forms: • ICONST ICONSTR ICONSTRA ICONSTRAI ICONSTRAIN ICONSTRAINT • • Commands shown in all uppercase letters cannot be abbreviated. Command arguments are shown in lowercase letters. it can result in an invalid reference.ABC -----.PQR -----| | | ‘-------------+---> • • means you can type in ABC or PQR or just press Enter to get the default option. Points marked with a plus sign (+) are option junctions which allow you to input any one of the commands to the right of the junction. These are just descriptions of what you need to enter. Conventions Used in the Syntax Graphs The commands described in this chapter are presented in the form of syntax graphs.ABC -----.0 .) For example. > is the name of another syntax graph.<dia> ---| 8:93 12. is reached. For example: >----+--. This convention is used for syntax which occurs in many places. • • If a reference is output and then re-input. you enter: CLEAR 3 Syntax graphs are read from top left to bottom right. Text in angle brackets <. For example: CLEAR n • • • means that to remove the constraint number 3 . Avoid referring to Elbows using “ELBO n of /B1”: PDMS Router re-creates Elbows every time a Branch is re-routed. and the numbering can easily get changed. | | |--. and you can follow any path through the graph until the exit point. . The graphs referred to are described at the end of this section. | | |--. give the command: EXIT Note on element identifiers You should try to use AVEVA PDMS names as element identifiers.PQR -----| | | |--. (Note: This convention does not mean that the second part of the command must be typed in lowercase letters. . shown by >. The start point is shown by >.

option3 ---+---> • • means that you can enter any combination of option1 and/or option2 and/or option3. | | ‘-------------+--> and then VAR <VARNAME> Can give the following error ROUTE ORDer (61. or command arguments.723) Could not order <REF> for routing The ORDER command returns a collection of branch references sorted so that the main branches are first. Points marked with an asterisk (*) are loop back junctions. Ordering and Routing Branches Ordering is required when routing a number of branches so that the main branches are routed first before sub-branches such as drains and vents. The simplified format: . refer to the AVEVA DESIGN Reference Manual. / | >---*--.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing | | ‘-------------+---> • • means you can type in ABC or PQR or any command allowed by the syntax given in diagram <dia> or just press Enter to get the default option.-----<-------. For example: . standard syntax graphs which are widely used throughout AVEVA DESIGN. A network of branches for a given branch can also be found with the command: VAR <VARNAME> ROUTE NETwork name And then to route the branches: 8:94 12. / | >---*--. Command options following these may be repeated as required.name ----+---> • means that you may type in a list of AVEVA PDMS names.0 . References to standard syntax graphs are shown in angle brackets: <example> For more information. This requires two commands: ORDER---<SELATT>-+--<SELATT>---.option1 ---| | | |--. where the options can be commands. separated by at least one space.----<------. Standard Syntax Graphs Some graphs contain references to other. other syntax diagrams.option2 ---| | | ‘--.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing ROUTE --. the direction of travel is fixed as the X direction for single planes and travel planes and Y direction for entry and exit planes. | | ‘---ALL ----+--> To move one constraint after another in the branch list.563) Wrong element type Branch constraints A route can be constrained to pass through points. The current element must be a Branch. along planes or to use pipe racks with the following syntax.n ---+--AFTER--. | | ‘----------------+--> A plane should be defined by referencing a RPLA . REORDer -. | | ‘--BEFORE--+--<INT> -> To move a constraint to after a different component in the branch list. EDIT -. Q ICONSTraint TYPE <INT> will return the type for a given constraint. For a rack the first name should be an RPLG which owns at least one RPLA with PURP PREX (that is. Points NEW POINT -+. | | | | | ‘.LAST name ---. | | |--DIRection --------------------------| | | 8:95 12. To remove a constraint use: CLEAR -+---.AT <DOPE>-+-DIRection <DOPE>-+-LEAVedir <DOPE>-+-AFTER name -. an entry/exit plane) and at least one RPLA with PURP not set to PREX (the travel plane).n ---+--AFTER---.name -----+------------------+-----------------+-------------+--> This creates a point in space with optional arrive and leave directions after either the head of the bran or one of its members. | | ‘-------------+--> If no branches or pipes are in the selection you get the following error: (2. Q ICONSTraint POINt <INT>-+--POSition ---------------------------.0 .<SELATT>-+--<SELATT>---. When using a RPLA. Planes and Racks NEW PLANE name AFTER name --+-.n ----.name -> To query constraints: Q ICONSTraint NUMBer will return the number of point and plane constraints for a branch.

| | | | | | |--DIRection-----| | | | | | | ‘--LEAVdirection-+-WRT name -| | | | | ‘--------------------------------------+-> This allows the component parts of a point constraint to be queried.DIRection ----------------------------| | | |-.COMPonent ----------------------------| | | |-.0 . Note: RELATION and FIXED need not be queried as they are always respectively AFTER and FIXED. its dimensions are found by exiting from Router and querying its attributes in the normal manner. It has the following syntax: CONFiguration -+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ERROR <WORD> ------| | DIRection <WORD> --| | PRSP <REAL> -------| | PRRO <REAL> -------| | ORDER <WORD> ------| | 8:96 12.STARt --------------------------------.RELAtion -----------------------------| | | |-. its position can be found by exiting from Router and querying its attributes in the normal manner. | | | | | | |--FINIsh --+-.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing |--LEAVdirection ----------------------| | | |--COMPonent --------------------------| | | |--RELAtion ---------------------------| | | |--ACTUal-+--POSition------.LAStconent ---------------------------| | | |-. If a DATUm is used as a point constraint.RPLAne -------------------------------| | | |-.FIXed --------------------------------| | | ‘-----------------------------------------+--> Since a plane is defined using a RPLA.FINIsh -------------------------------| | | |-.ACTUal -+--STARt ---. | | |-. Configuration This allows the behaviour of Router to be modified.WRT name -. the ACTUAL command returns the calculated values.ACTUal -------------------------------| | | |-. Q ICONSTraint PLANe n ---+-. | | | | | | ‘--DIRection -------------+---| | | |-. As the position and directions can be stored as expressions.

but can be used for the appware. MODE and ITERATION are not currently used in core PDMS Router.PRRO --------| | | |-. | | ‘--STOREd--+--> To SET rules: 8:97 12.ITERation ---| | | ‘----------------+--> General Rule Setting The following syntax is for setting the SELECTION.n -----+--> ERROR can be set to MESS.MODE <WORD> -------| | | ‘-.DIRection ---| | | |-.ORDER -------| | | |-. PRRO is the gap rounding value for pipe-rack spacing.MODE --------| | | |-. The current element must be a GRULE. which means that the same GRULES will be used in future routing.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing |-. which means that a selection of GRULEs are set and then used in subsequent routing during the design session.PRSP --------| | | |-. | | |-.ITERation-. Alternatively. GENEral RULEs SELEction <SELATT> GENEral RULEs LOGIcal <EXPZL> GENEral RULEs ACTIon <EXPRG> GENEral RULEs ACTIon To query the attributes set: UNSET Q GENEral RULEs SELEction Q GENEral RULEs LOGIcal Q GENEral RULEs ACTIon Rules can be used for routing in two ways. To specify which: GENEral RULEs USE --+--SET-----. They can be SET.ERROR -------. PRSP is the basic gap for pipe-rack spacing. in which case extra diagnostic messages are output during routing. use: Q CONFiguration -+-.0 . rules can be STORED. DIRECTION can be set to BEND. To query configuration setting. thus maintaining design intent. ORDER. ELBO or RULE and allows the change of direction elements to be specified. LOGICAL and ACTION attributes of GRULES.

Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing GENEral RULEs SET -+-HIGH-. MINO etc. the program navigates up until it finds some rules to apply.SET ------------------------+--> The defaults are LOW priority and OVERWRITE. | | | ‘----------+----------+-> The defaults are LOW priority and OVERWRITE. GENEral RULEs SAVE -+-HIGH-. all rules are tested. and if not specified. Zone or Site. Rules can then be UNSET with the following syntax. GENEral RULEs UNSET --<SELATT>--+--<SELATT>---. To query the rules saved: Q GENEral RULEs SAVED To remove the saved rules for a particular element: GENEral RULEs UNSAVE Rule Testing As writing rules is not always straightforward. | | ‘-----------+--> The word is the type of rule to be tested. when determining which rules to use. | | |-LOW--| | | |------+-<SELATT>-+-OVERWrite --. | | |-LOW--| | | ‘------+-APPEnd------. | | ‘-------------+--> To query the set rules. the following syntax will return an array of GRULE references and their priority. Thus. However. | | |-OVERWrite---| | | ‘-------------+-<SELATT>-+-<SELATT>-. The stored rules will then apply to branches owned by that element. MAJO. VAR <VARNAME> GRULEs SET To STORE rules. Pipe. | | | | |--APPEnd ----| | | | | ‘-------------| | | ‘-. the following functionality is provided to provide feedback. 8:98 12.0 . then only the Zone rules will be used. To test a branch member to see what rules apply to it and whether it passes them: VAR <VARNAME> GRULEs TEST --+--<WORD>---. the current element must be either a Bran. if rules have been saved for Zone and Site say.

it is better to unset BRLO and then set LHEAD and LTAIL as appropriate. then no action is carried out. These are described below. If the HREF is unset then the head must be positioned (LHEAD true) and the head of the branch is fixed.2. Determines if component should be placed as near to Head as possible (TRUE) or as close to Tail as possible (FALSE). Indicates whether the head and /or tail of branch is fixed or free. Logical. Router Banner PDMS Router has its own banner which can be queried (in Router mode) with the command: Q BANNer 8. The returned results are the travel. but if the head is not fixed the head of this branch will be positioned at the tail of the connected branch.0 . If the head is fixed the tail of the connected branch will be positioned where the head of this branch is. If a component is tailrelative it will force all components between it and the next locked component or constraint towards the Tail. RLOC = -1 RLOC = 0 RLOC = 1 RLOC = 2 HREL Attribute of branch members.Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing To test plane rules the current element needs to be the branch to be tested. The default is TRUE. VAR <VARNAME> GRULEs PLANE name where the GID is the RPLG to be tested. Users should not normally set BRLO. MINO etc. If the head / tail is connected to a nozzle or a piping component the value of BRLO is ignored. RLOC Attribute of branch members. BRLO Attribute of branch set and used by PDMS Router. Unset Non-deletable and positionable. MAJO. entry and exit planes. Note if the element passes the rule already. Locked Deletable 8:99 12.5 Special Router Attributes There are a number of special attributes used by PDMS Router. Thus the head lock is only relevant when the head is connected to the tail of another branch. If you are routing a branch which has already been positioned. Determines whether element is to be deleted or repositioned by Router. A branch member can also be tested by applying the action part of a rule to it with: GENEral RULEs APPLY WORD The word is the type of rule to be tested.

PLPP = ABOV PLPP = BELO PLPP = CENT place above the plane place below the plane place at the centre of the plane Not Routed Routed successfully All routes clash .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing If TREF is unset the tail can be positioned and the tail of the branch fixed.Using default Clash using route Route breaks rule Routed ignoring invalid constraint list Cannot find required component . Router will use LHEAD / LTAIL to calculate BRLO if necessary free head and free tail fixed head and free tail free head and fixed tail fixed head and fixed tail If BRLO is not set before calling Router. BRSTATUS The setting of the BRSTATUS (Branch Status) attribute shows the routed status of the Branch. Router does not consider the possibility of branches connected head-to-head or tailto-tail) BRLO = 0 BRLO = 4 BRLO = 5 BRLO = 6 BRLO = 7 unset.0 . LHEAD. ( N.Unable to route branch Error whilst routing branch Route violates minimum tube length 8:100 12. then HREF. When the tail is connected to the head of another branch it will be positioned where the head of that branch is unless the tail is fixed. Shows where on a plane to place branches. TREF and LTAIL attributes are used to set to a suitable value.B. The values are as follows: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 PLPP Attribute of RPLA. or the tail can be free -when Router will calculate a position for it. These values can be used in Autocolour rules so that Branches can be displayed in different colours according to whether they have been routed successfully or not.Unable to route branch Serious data error .Datacon will fail System error .

0 . PURP . indicates which are entry/exit planes.(GRUL) The PURP attribute of a GRULE indicates the type of rule.Entry/exit plane If not set to PREX.(RPLA) For pipe racks. then it is assumed to be a travel plane. PURP . PURP = PREX .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing The default is CENT. 8:101 12.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Automatic Pipe Routing 8:102 12.

a spool break will be enforced at any change at the corresponding element level. including standard orthogonal and isometric views. Spool Drawings contain a number of complete Spool and Field elements. which are created by selecting an interconnected network of piping components to be added to the drawing. 9. only being allowed to change attributes relevant to the fabrication of the pipework (e. SPOOLER has full read/write access to the Fabrication database but has only limited access to the DESIGN database. ZONE or SITE. It allows you to split the pipework design into logical sections (spools) ready for fabrication. when the application detects a change in the status of the Shop Flag (where the Shop Flag indicates whether the component will be included in a fabricated assembly (SHOP) or fitted during the erection phase (FIELD)). in the design. The spool data can then be output as isometric drawings using ISODRAFT.1 Database Usage SPOOLER uses two databases: • • Fabrication database . and add Welds.1 Pipework Spooling Introduction SPOOLER is the pipework spooling module for AVEVA PDMS.This contains all your spooling data. The windows can be set 9:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 9 9.g.2 3D Graphics The pipework design or spooling models can be viewed at any angle or scale. You can also force spool breaks manually. at joints where the Shop Flags are the same on all sides.1.This contains all the design data for the project. divided by Spool Breaks. For additional information on some important aspects of the SPOOLER module see SPOOLER Reference Information. where a SPOOL is defined as a run of piping components and tube that will be connected during fabrication and a FIELD is an individual or group of piping components that will be connected on-site during the erection phase.1.0 . By setting the SFLimit (Spool/Field Limit) attribute for a SPLDRG to either BRAN. in the 3D View windows. SPOOLER works with Spool Drawings (SPLDRGs). Spool Breaks are normally defined by the software. to split pipes. 9. Spools cannot be split across Spool Drawings. DESIGN database . the application checks that your selections form a valid piping network. Once you have selected the elements. specifying Field Welds). PIPE.

4 Naming Database elements can be given unique names using the Autonaming facility.1. Design mode makes use of the Event Driven Graphics (EDG) mode. fields.1. which allows cursor picks to be used interactively as part of an operation. you can automatically number: parts. SPOOLER uses two databases: • • Fabrication database. you can produce them as isometric plots. and to name existing elements.5 Spooling Volume Calculation SPOOLER can calculate the shipping volume of a spool for you. SPOOLER has only limited access to the DESIGN database.0 .1. so that you will understand the terminology which you will encounter in the tutorial.2 Setting Up the Database Hierarchy In this section. 9. You can use this facility to both name new elements. bends and non-welded joints. spools.6 Drawing Output Once you have defined your spool drawings. This could be used to check that a spool is not going to be too large for the fabrication plant or transportation. allowing you to move around the displayed model and select elements. 9. Whereas. from the Main Menu options.1. The numbering always starts from one of the end spools. retrospectively.3 Numbering Once you have defined the contents of your drawings. 9. which holds all the design data for the project. which stores all the spooling data DESIGN database. This recognises sets of rules which can be set up by a system administrator. as you create them. 9. 9.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling to navigation only mode. 9:2 12. SPOOLER has full access to the Fabrication database allowing you to set-up the hierarchy and add or delete elements at will. the start point can be changed using the Reorder facility. rather than just for navigation and element selection. using ISODRAFT. or Design mode. to carry out actions on the model. enabling you to easily check its size. to make changes that are relevant to the fabrication of the piping. you will learn: • • • • about the databases used by SPOOLER about the database hierarchies how to login and start the tutorial exercise how to create some administrative elements Before you start to create any spool data. welds. Part numbers can be created either across a complete spool drawing or to individual spools. it is important that you know how such data is stored and accessed in the PDMS Databases.

Give your allocated Username: enter PIPE. The database level below Registry (and its PDMS abbreviation) is the Spool Drawing (SPLDRG). Each Spool Drawing can represent a continuous network of piping components and tube within the overall piping design The Spools and Fields that make up the Spool Drawing are held directly below it in the database hierarchy. these hierarchic levels give the following overall format: Design Database WORLD (/*) Isodraft Database WORLD (/*) SITE DEPARTMENT (ISODEP) ZONE REGISTRY (ISOREG) PIPE SPOOL DRAWING (SPLDRG) BRANCH Spool data defining individual spools and fields Design data defining individual piping components Figure 9:1.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 9. The DESIGN database also descends from the World level.1 Database Structure The Fabrication database structure descends from the World level (usually represented by the symbolic name /*). Database Hierarchies 9. The tutorial is based on the sample project. 2. In the PDMS Login form give the name of the Project in which you want to work: enter SAM. The first step of the tutorial exercise starts with the logging in procedure. the lower administrative levels (and their PDMS abbreviations) are Pipe (PIPE) and Branch (BRAN). You can go directly to SPOOLER when you first start PDMS or you can switch to it from another PDMS module.2 Logging In to Start a SPOOLER Session In this section you will begin a hands-on tutorial exercise which gives a step-by-step practical introduction to the ways in which you might use the SPOOLER module. In the case of piping design data.2. supplied with AVEVA PDMS. This is the main operational unit of the database.2. The method used to start PDMS depends on your operating system. 9:3 12. below which are the administrative sub-levels Site and Zone.0 . The administrative levels below this (and their PDMS abbreviations) are Department (ISODEP) and Registry (ISOREG). Together. SAM. Exercise Begins: 1.

Click OK to start SPOOLER.3 Creating Some Administrative Elements You will now create some administrative elements at the top of the Fabrication database hierarchy. When SPOOLER has loaded. as previously explained. 5.2. 8. Figure 9:2. your screen looks as shown. Give the part of the project Multiple Database (MDB) you want to work in: enter PIPE. . Give the name of the Module you wish to use: select SPOOLER. Application Screen 9. Make sure that you leave the Read Only box unchecked. Exercise continues: 7. so that you can modify the database as you work. Select Department from the drop-down list on the left of the SPOOLER tool bar and click the Create button database element.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 3. allowing you to name the Note: This function can also be carried out by selecting Create>Department from the main menu bar.0 . The Create form is displayed. 4. 6. On the Create form: 9:4 12. Give your allocated Password: enter PIPE.

9. You will now create two Registries. Note: That the new element appears in the Fabrication Explorer as the current element. Figure 9:3. Create another Registry and name it ‘condensor_network’. which navigates to it in the database making it the current element (CE). 9:5 12. More than one 3D View window can be displayed at any time. which should now look as shown: 10. allowing you to have different views of the model. by clicking on it in the Fabrication Explorer. These windows are contained within the application window. or use the cursor picks as part of an Event Driven Graphics (EDG) routine. Database Hierarchy 9. Click OK to create the element. by selecting Registry from the drop-down list and clicking on the Create button. Navigate back to department1.3 Controlling the 3D View In this section you will learn how to: • • set up a 3D View window manipulate the 3D View 3D View windows can be used to display all or part of the design model.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling • • In the Name text box enter “department1” and press the Return/Enter key. and allow you to select an element by simply clicking on it. under department1. to confirm the name. The views can be controlled individually using the menu and button options on the forms or more than one view can be changed simultaneously from the View Control form.0 . Name this registry ‘condensate_pumps’ on the Create form.

3. on 9:6 12. Select the required option from the 3D View shortcut menu. This involves setting up 3 functions of the view: View Function View contents View limits Type of view Menu Option Drawlist Limits Look or Iso The following sections describe how to set up these functions. 3D View Window 9.0 . You must set it up to show the elements and view you wish to see. Select the required element in the Explorer and then click the Add CE button the main tool bar. to display the Drawlist form and then add the required elements. the display window is empty. This can be done as follows: • • • Select Display>Drawlist from the main menu bar. View Contents The elements that are displayed in a 3D View window must first be added to the Drawlist.1 Setting up a 3D View Window When you first start SPOOLER or when you create a new 3D View.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:4.

and select it to make it the CE. for all 3D View windows. top row. by entering the co-ordinates of two opposite corners. Alternatively.g. Click on ‘ZONE SPOOLER-CIVIL’ to make it the CE and then select 3D View>Add. on the 12. Click on the Limits CE button on the left of the view window. These can be set up by your system administrator. Now add the structures to the Drawlist using a different colour. to set the view limits to enclose the complete site. This can be done by either clicking the Colour button on the Drawlist form or by selecting Drawlist>Add CE with colour. to display the Drawlist form. You will now set-up a view of the complete design model. This allows you to make structures semi-transparent. so that you can see items inside or behind them. • • • Navigate to ‘ZONE SPOOLER-STRUC’. Alternatively the limits can be set to the current element by clicking on the ‘CE Limits’ button left of the 3D View window. You will now add the base of the site to the Drawlist and display it. This switches you to the World (*) level in the DESIGN database. View Limits How much of the Drawlist contents are actually shown in that window can be controlled by setting the view limits. This can be done by selecting the required degree of transparency from the drop-down list beside the Colour button on the Drawlist form. you can add elements using specific colours. This displays a standard colour selection form allowing you to select the required colour. orthogonal or isometric. • • 13. Select ‘SITE SPOOLER-SITE’ in the Design Explorer. and set a degree of transparency so that you can see other elements under and behind the structures. to help differentiate between the types of element. • • • Select Display>Design Explorer from the main menu bar. The elements are normally added to the Drawlist and displayed in the colour defined by the ‘Autocolour’ rules. fourth from right) by clicking on it. These allow you to select from a wide range of orthogonal and isometric views or define a particular view. Select Display>Drawlist from the main menu bar. As the Fabrication database is empty at this time you need to switch to the DESIGN database to add elements to the Drawlist.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Note: Only one Drawlist can be defined. Type of View The type of view for that window. The base appears in the view window in the default colour and orthogonal view. You can select anything from a single element up to the complete Drawlist or explicitly define a 3D box. Exercise continues: 11. from the shortcut menu. Additionally. Click on the Colour button to display a colour selection form and select a suitable colour (e. you can apply a transparency factor to elements you are adding from the Drawlist form. Select Iso>Two from the 3D View menu to set the required viewing direction. 9:7 12. Dark Grey. can be selected from the Look or ISO options on the 3D View shortcut menu. This can be set from the Limits options on the 3D View shortcut menu.0 .

Isometric View of SPOOLER Sample Project 9.3.: Isometric View of SPOOLER Sample Project. which has the main equipment annotated. to show it from a better angle: 9:8 12. So these colours should be avoided when adding elements. Pan and Rotate modes see Manipulating the Displayed View. 14. panning and rotating the model. Using the Rotate mode. to show exactly the view you require at any time. rotate the model. For information on using the Zoom.0 . You are going to manipulate the view so that this network fills the window. using the mouse (either by itself or in combination with the function keys). The complete site is now displayed in isometric view.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Note: By default. Click the Add CE button. Centre the outlet network in the view using the Pan mode. Zoom in so the model fills the display window. giving a much better view of it. 17. Close Drawlist form. 16. to add the structures to the display with the selected settings. This includes tools for: zooming. The 3D View should now look something like Figure 9:5. The condensate pumps piping network is located at the left side of the model. • • • Set the transparency level by clicking on the drop-down list beside the Colour button and selecting 50%.2 Manipulating the Displayed View When a 3D View has been set-up it can be easily manipulated. respectively. Heat Exchanger Surface Condensor Condensate Pumps Surge Tank Centre Line Mounted Pumps Figure 9:5. You can now add the equipment (ZONE SPOOLER-STRUC) and pipes (ZONE SPOOLER-PIPE) to the display in different colours. as you now see it. SPOOLER uses Cyan and Green to represent Spools and fields. Exercise continues: 15.

0 . 9:9 12. Condensate Pumps Piping Network 9. at this point it is not possible to see the complete piping network clearly. Manipulate the view so that you can clearly see the required parts of the piping network. The view should now look something like Figure 9:7. because the pipe rack is in the way.: Condensate Pumps Piping Network. This shows the model from the opposite direction to Iso 2. This makes it easier to see the inlet to the pumps and the outlet from the heat exchanger. You will now save two views of the model and then restore the view to its current setting.3 Saving and Restoring a View PDMS allows you to save up to four views of the model. The 3D View should now look something like Figure 9:6. To save the current 3D view as View 1: • • Right click on the Restore view 1 button to the left of the display.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 18. To remove the pipe rack from the view: Right click on ZONE SPOOLER-STRUC in the Drawlist and select 3D View>Remove from the shortcut menu. You will now change the view so that you can see the Condensate pumps piping network from the other direction. The current view is now saved as View 1. which can then be restored by simply clicking on the appropriate view control button to the left of the display. 20.3. • • Select Iso>Four from the 3D View menu. so that it is highlighted and then release the mouse button.: Iso 4 View. Exercise continues: 19. Condensate Pumps Inlet Pipe • Heat Exchanger Outlet Pipe Heat Exchanger Condensate Pumps Outlet Pipes Header Condensate Pumps Outlet Pipes Figure 9:6. Having obtained the required view. Move the mouse over the Save 1 pop-up.

g.1 Checking the Design Data The consistency of the data should have been checked before the model was sent for spooling.4.0 . The main window will show the progress of the check. Select Zone from the Check: scrollable list box and click Apply.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Heat Exchanger Outlet Pipe Condensate Pumps Inlet Pipe Figure 9:7. It is also worth making any changes to the design model (e. you can also check it in SPOOLER.4 Preparing the Site for Spooling In this section you will learn • • • about inspecting a site how to measure pipe lengths how to insert welds Before you begin spooling a site you should always check that the design data in the design model is consistent. to save work later. 9. To check the data: • • • Navigate to the ZONE SPOOLER-PIPE zone in the Design Explorer. SPOOLER will not run properly if there are errors in the consistency check. including any errors or warnings. Restore the view to the previously saved settings by clicking (with the left mouse button) on the Restore view 1 button. 21. This displays the Data Consistency Check form. from the main menu bar. Exercise continues: 22. inserting shop or field welds) that will obviously be needed. Iso 4 View • Save this view of the model as View 2. 9:10 12. Select Utilities>Data Consistency. But. Warnings will not affect the operation of SPOOLER. 9.

see Figure 9:8. it makes sense to try and make any changes to the model before spooling it. from the Iso 2 direction. explained in the next section.2 Inspecting the Site If you spool the site and then make changes to the model (e. You will now do a check of the condensate pumps piping network and insert any welds that are obviously necessary. shows that: The heat exchanger outlet pipe (Pipe 2007) appears to be to larger than our maximum shipping size.g. very long pipes or complex networks) and for any parts you know will be wanted separately. The easiest way of doing this is to do a visual check of the site looking for any possible problems (e.4. Also. The length of the supplied pipe is 6 metres. You can then insert any required welds and spool breaks before spooling the network. As the spools are completely assembled before they are shipped to the erection site. Note: The measurements of these pipes can be checked using the Measure facility. some of which may then not be in order.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 9. they must be small enough to be transported. thus reducing the work involved. for test purposes.g. inserting field welds) you then have to update the numbering. To carry out a visual check of the site: • Restore the view so that you can see the complete site. Exercise continues: 23. Outlet Pipes Header Heat Exchanger Outlet Pipe Long Pipe Figure 9:8. so any lengths greater than this in one spool will have to be joined with a Shop weld.0 . 9:11 12. Visual Check of Spooling Site • • • A quick visual inspection of the network. So.: Visual Check of Spooling Site. the length of the bottom section of the heat exchanger outlet pipe appears to be too long to be constructed from a single length of pipe (6 metres).5 metres.5 x 2. The maximum acceptable size for this exercise is 12 x 2.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling It is also known that the high pressure Outlet Pipes Header. You will start by checking the length of the bottom length of pipe. will require testing as a separate unit before any other pipes are added to it.4. Restore saved View 2. • • • Manipulate the view so that the lower pipe is clearly visible. 26.3 Measuring the Pipe Lengths The visual check of the condensate pumps piping network showed the probability that the heat exchanger outlet pipe (Pipe 2007) was: • • Too large to be shipped as a single spool. To measure the complete outlet pipe (Pipe 2007): 9:12 12. Picking the Start Measurement Point • • Pick P2 of Elbow 3. Confirming that it is too long to be fabricated from a single length of tube. A message showing the selected start point is displayed in the 3D View and the EDG prompt changes. Exercise continues: 24. The cursor changes to a small square.: Picking the Start Measurement Point. This displays the Measure and Positioning Control forms and an EDG prompt is displayed instructing you to pick the start point for the measurement. Set the Type field. see Figure 9:9. instructing you to pick the end point for the measurement. Pick point P1 of Elbow 4. Figure 9:9. Click the Measure button . to p-point and the Option field to Snap. 25. The software calculates the distance and displays it in the 3D View and in the Measure form.: Condensate Pumps Piping Network. see Figure 9:6. This shows the length of the tube to be 7415. to activate the measure facility.9 mm. The bottom length of pipe between elbows 3 & 4 was too long to be created from a single length of tube. so that you have a clear view of the heat exchanger outlet pipe. To check these assumptions and work out where to insert welds you need to measure the pipe. 9. in the Positioning Control form.

9. Welds can be inserted to break a piping network at a p-point of a particular component or at some defined point along a length of a pipe. pick point P2 of Elbow 1. welds should be inserted at a p-point (Design Point) of a welded component. Selecting the End of the Outlet Pipe 27.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling • • • Zoom out so that you can see the whole of the pipe. allowing you to select any graphical element The cursor in the 3D View changes to a standard arrow. Shop welds can be used to separate parts or assemblies that need to be fabricated and tested before being attached to other parts of the spool. will divide the pipe into two manageable spools. Field welds can be used to cut a pipe into shorter lengths or break up a network where there are no convenient joints. Inserting a Weld at a Design Point Where possible. Comparing the two measurements you made shows that splitting the bottom tube. Pick the very end of the outlet pipe. Change the Type setting in the Positioning Control form to Graphics. these welds will be made at the erection site.4 Inserting Welds SPOOLER allows you to insert Shop and Field welds to split up the piping network. along with the lengths in the X. The distance between the two points is shown in the view and on the Measure form.4. at the end nearest the heat exchanger. as shown in Figure 9:10. Using the same settings as for the previous measurement. Note: Any welds you create are added to the DESIGN database. • • Figure 9:10.: Selecting the End of the Outlet Pipe. because the component is attached to the pipe by a weld anyway. so it is not 9:13 12.0 . Y and Z directions.

It will then be connected to its inlet pipes from the condensate pumps at the erection site. This displays the Create Weld form.0 . To insert a Field weld between the header and one of its inlet pipes: • • • Zoom in so that the header pipe fills most of the viewing window.: Positioning a Field Weld on P3 of 2006/B2. The header. Separating the Header Pipe You will now insert welds to separate the outlet pipes header from the outlet pipes of the condensate pumps. see Figure 9:11. Therefore you need to insert Field welds between the inlet pipes and the header. will be tested in the fabrication shop before shipping. Move the cursor over Design Point P3.: Positioning a Field Weld on P3 of 2006/B2.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling creating any extra work just moving the location for the work from the Fabrication Shop to the Erection Site. together with its outlet pipe. Position the cursor over one of the inlet TEE components (TEE 1 of 2006/B1 or TEE 1 of 2006/B2) then press and hold the left mouse button. Move the cursor over a p-point. The 3D View switches to the create weld mode and displays the EDG instruction ‘Pick a Design Point for WELD’. • • • 9:14 12. Then click Apply. For more information on p-points (Design Points) see Piping Components. Select Create>Weld. Exercise continues: 28. and release the button. see Figure 9:11. from the main menu bar. a highlighted message is appended to the instruction at the top of the window telling you the name of the Design Point you are over. see Figure 9:11. The CHOOSE form is displayed allowing you to select the type of weld you wish to insert. The header pipe (part of Pipe 2006/B1 & B2) consists of 3 TEE components with two end CAPs. Select Field from the Type drop-down list and check that the At drop-down list is set to Design Point (p-point). When you are exactly on top of it. The cursor changes to a small square with a point in the middle. The outline of the component is highlighted and the p-points are shown as dots.: Positioning a Field Weld on P3 of 2006/B2.

at the end nearest the heat exchanger. The 3D View switches to EDG mode and prompts you to pick the tube in which to insert the weld. Splitting the bottom tube. You are then prompted to pick the element from which to measure the distance. that can then be joined at the erection site. 9.4. Select Behind Item in the drop-down list and enter the value 6000 into the distance text box and then click Apply. Pick anywhere on that length of tube. Pick Elbow 3 in Pipe 2007. Note: The Create Weld form remains displayed allowing you to easily create further welds. Also. one or more Shop welds are normally defined in its length to show the fabricators where to join the lengths. • • 9:15 12. To split the heat exchanger outlet pipe (Pipe 2007): • • Select Field and In-tube on the Create Weld form. The bottom tube of the heat exchanger output pipe (leave tube of ELBO 3) is longer than a standard length of pipe (6 metres) and the complete outlet pipe is too large for a single spool. This activates the Position in Tube frame. 29. if a pipe has to pass through an opening at the erection site it may need to be split with a weld. Exercise continues: 30. This inserts the weld 6000mm back from the elbow. Now insert a Field weld on the P3 of the other inlet TEE.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:11. allowing you to set the position in the tube you want to insert the weld.0 . Positioning a Field Weld on P3 of 2006/B2 • Select a suitable type of weld and click OK. with a field weld will divide the pipe into two manageable spools. The weld is created at P3 and the 3D View window returns to navigation mode.5 Splitting a Tube with a Weld If a pipe is too long to be fabricated from a single length of pipe.

Go to the Fabrication database. a spool break will be enforced at any change at the corresponding element level. the SHOP Flag is true) it generates a SPOOL.5. Whereas. the SHOP Flag is false) it generates a FIELD. called SPOOL BREAKS.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 9. The ends of the spools. You can also force SPOOL BREAKS by defining Field Welds or Joints at the required point in the SPOOL. occur when the SHOP Flag status changes. Spools and fields are defined by picking an element in the 3D View window.e. into one of them. which are created by selecting pipework elements to be added to a spool drawing (SPLDRG) . Now create three Spool Drawings. 2005 and 2006). 9. if the selected element has been defined as being fitted on site (i. PIPE. 9.0 .1 Pipework Spooling SPOOLER works with spooling networks. by selecting Display>Fabrication Explorer from the main menu bar and navigate to the ‘Condensate_Pumps’ registry. Exercise continues: 26. ZONE or SITE (the default is WORLD). Where a SPOOL is defined as a run of piping components and tube that will be connected during fabrication and a FIELD is an individual or group of piping components that will be connected during the erection phase.5 Spooling the Piping Network In this section you will: • • look at the principles of using SPOOLER learn how to split the pipes at the Condensate Pumps piping network into Spool Drawings. the software searches all connected piping components and tube and then adds all adjacent components that have the same SHOP Flag status to that spool or field. When an element is picked. as follows: • Select Create>Spool Drawing from the main menu bar (or select Spool Drawing from the drop-down list in the main toolbar and click the Create button) and name the Spool Drawing ‘Inlet_Pipe’.2 Creating Spool Drawings You will now create some Spool Drawings and spool the pipes between the condensate pumps and the heat exchanger (Pipes 2004. 9:16 12. The selected elements must form an interconnected piping network but are not limited to a single branch or pipe in the design model. Field welds can be used to split a piping section at a particular component or at some defined point along a length of tube. If the element has been defined as a fabrication element (i. SPOOLER checks that it is an interconnected network before it adds all the spools and fields to the SPOOL DRAWING. to add to the SPOOL DRAWING or by picking two ends of a continuous piping network. SPOOLING NETWORKS can be defined by picking each SPOOL and FIELD in sequence. Spooling networks consist of interconnected spools and fields.e.5. The forced spool break is used to create a break at joint that does not have a field element in it (for example: a flanged joint with no gasket). using the default Shop Flag settings. By setting the SFLimit (Spool/Field Limit) attribute for a SPLDRG to either BRAN.

: Adding the First Spool. see Figure 9:12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling This becomes the Current Element (CE) in the Fabrication Explorer and is displayed as the active Spool Drawing in the text box on the SPOOLER tool bar. • Click further along this piping branch before it reaches the header pipe. as far as the Field weld you inserted in Separating the Header Pipe.0 . Zoom in on the condensate pumps outlet network. Note how the mode of the 3D View window changes. • Figure 9:12.: Adding the First Spool. as shown in Figure 9:12. 9:17 12. Adding the First Spool • Pick the gate valve and then the elbow following the selected flange in the pipe. Pick the input pipe to the heat exchanger.as long as they form a continuous network. to the Spool Drawing. including the complete header pipe. The control valve and the complete length of the pipe. • These steps show how the elements in between the existing spools and the picked element are added automatically . The piping is now spooled between the first condensate pump and the heat exchanger. • Now create two more ‘Heat_Exch_Outlet’. as shown in Figure 9:12. • Add the rest of the network from the header pipe to the second condensate pump. These steps illustrate how items can be added sequentially to a Spool Drawing. The flange and its leave tube change to the default spool colour and are added to the Explorer hierachy as SPOOL 1.: Adding the First Spool. respectively. as indicated by the text in the prompt bar. making this the CE. Click on the Add to Spool Drawing button in the SPOOLER tool bar. The next element you pick in the 3D View will be added to the Spool Drawing. They are added to the Spool Drawing as FIELD 1 and SPOOL 1. named ‘Outlet_Network’ and 27. are added to the Spool Drawing. You will now start to spool the piping network between the Condensate pumps and the Heat Exchanger: • • • Navigate to the ‘Outlet_Network’ Spool Drawing. Pick one of the flanges between the valve and the condensate pump. Spool Drawings.

with the results of the check shown in the Status section. click the Update/Number button tool bar (or select Numbering>Update from the main menu bar). so close the form by clicking on Cancel. Exercise continues: 30. or the parts can be numbered for each spool individually. The numbering is generated and the data in the Status section is updated to show the actions that have been carried out. You will leave the settings as they are at present. To define what elements of the spools you wish to be numbered. 9.3 Numbering the Spool Drawing SPOOLER allows you to generate numbers automatically for spools.0 . The numbering is normally used to provide full accountability and repeatability through design changes. You will now correct the missing gaskets from the end of the pipe. you can automatically include adjacent field components. • Note: You should ALWAYS update the numbering after you have defined or modified a Spool Drawing. Although the spools and fields you have created are shown in the Fabrication Explorer there is as yet no numbering applied to the components. The Parts Numbers can be applied to complete Spool Drawings. as separate FIELDs. select Settings>Numbering from the main menu bar.4 Selecting Adjacent Field Components Gaskets on the ends of pipes (e. in the SPOOLER 29. • To generate the numbers. between a flange and the nozzle of an equipment) cannot be picked in the 3D View and therefore cannot be manually added to a Spool Drawing. Extra elements. The software carries out a check of the Spool Drawing numbering (Note this will take a few seconds) and then displays the Update/Number Spool Drawing form. This involves first removing that spool from the drawing and then adding it with the adjacent gasket. joints. • In the Fabrication Explorer navigate back to the ‘Outlet_Network’ Spool Drawing. including the Weld and Joint groups. Click Dismiss to remove the form. when you add a spool to a Spool Drawing. Select the default update numbering method. To overcome this problem. Note: The choices in the Update Choice Handling section do not affect you at this stage. bends and parts. To generate the numbering. the default setting. This displays the Numbering Settings form.g. click Apply. 9:18 12. Select the part numbering option and define a spool prefix. Exercise Continues: 28. welds.5. You will now generate the numbering for the Spool Drawing. This form contains three sections allowing you to: • • • Select what numbering data to maintain. You will now use this option to add the gaskets at the ends of the pipes to the Spool Drawing. are added to the Explorer hierarchy.5.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling 9.

The text in the Prompt bar changes to indicate the current operating mode. 32.6 Advanced SPOOLER Features In this section you look at the advanced features of SPOOLER that allow you to check and make further changes to the spooling model.0 . on the SPOOLER tool bar. To check the size of SPOOL 1 of the ‘Inlet_Pipe’ Spool Drawing: • • Navigate to that spool in the Design Explorer. again. 9. Exercise continues: 37. adjacent to the Condensate Pumps. This displays the Spool Shipping Volume form showing the name of the selected spool and its dimensions. • • • 31. Navigate to the GASKet in the DESIGN database and check that it has been added to the Spool Drawing. Update the Spool Drawing numbering. The size of a spool can be checked in SPOOLER by querying the spool shipping volume. such as the gasket on the end of the pipe. Select the Include Adjacent Field Components button on the SPOOLER tool bar.: Shipping Volume of a Spool.6. 9. see Figure 9:13. to removes it from the Spool Drawing. Now spool the inlet pipe to the Condensate Pumps and the outlet from the Heat Exchanger into the appropriate Spool Drawings. Select Query>Spool Shipping Volume from the main menu bar. 9:19 12. Click on the Add to Spool Drawing button and pick anywhere on the pipe going up to the heat exchanger. Any spools you now add or remove from the Spool Drawing will automatically add/ remove any adjacent field elements.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling • • • Click the Remove from Spool Drawing button . if that pipe is too large to be transported the spool may need to be split. Pick anywhere on the pipe going up to the heat exchanger. Correct the omission of the gaskets on the other ends of this piping network (Pipes 2004/B1 and 2005/B1). The spool is added and a FIELD is automatically created for the gasket.1 Checking the Spool Size While it may be logical to have a long pipe as one spool.

if you have set up the following spool drawing: Explorer SPOOL 1 FIELD 1 SPOOL 2 FIELD 2 SPOOL 3 SPL3 SPL2 Numbering SPL1 and you then split ‘Spool 2’. • Split the pipe by inserting a Field weld on Elbow 1. When you update the numbering after you have changed something (e.g.6. 9. For example.0 .5 x 2.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:13. When you update the numbering. Shipping Volume of a Spool This shows that the spool is too large to be transported according to the specifications (12 x 2. but do not update the Spool Drawing at this stage.2 Selecting the Numbering Update Options The numbers shown in the Design Explorer are for indication purposes only.5 metres) and will need to be split into sections for shipping. inserted a field weld to split a spool) the members list numbers get out of synchronisation with the real numbers. They only match the real spool numbers when the Spool Drawing is first numbered. it may look like this (depending on the Update Choice handling option you have chosen): Explorer SPOOL 1 FIELD 1 SPOOL 2 FIELD 2 SPL2 Numbering SPL1 9:20 12.

A form is displayed allowing you to decide which existing number to use for which of the affected spools or whether to generate new data.0 .The first spool in which the data has changed will automatically pick up the first available number. SPOOL 3 or neither of them uses the existing number (SPL2) in the above example. now become important. The software starts to update the numbering. on the Update/Number Spool Drawing form You will now update the numbering on the ‘Outlet_Pipe’ Spool Drawing. You could decide that either SPOOL 2. select Display>Fabrication Explorer from the menu bar. on the Update/Number Spool Drawing form. When you update the numbering. then when a choice has to be made the Select Data for Spool Elements form is displayed allowing you to select the data to apply to which spool. Exercise continues: 38.Existing numbers are ignored and new data is generated for all affected spools. (See the example above. Click the Update/Number button Select Manual data selection in the Update Choice Handling section and click Apply.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Explorer SPOOL 3 FIELD 3 SPOOL 4 Numbering SPL4 SPL3 The three options available when updating the numbering are: • Use first available data . • The WELD element is not in the Spool Drawing at this point. • • These options can be set as a default.) Always generate new data . • • 9:21 12. You must now return to and Update the Spool Drawing. Manual data selection . or for each time you use them. the Update Choice Handling options. In the above example. so to return to the Spool Drawing. When there are no more existing numbers new data is generated for any remaining spools. on the Numbering Settings form. SPOOL 2 would be SPL4 and SPOOL 3 would be SPL5.

The ends of the spool are called SPOOL BREAKS and they occur where the Shop Flag status changes. The valves immediately after the Condensate Pumps are all welded and are going to be assembled with the tubing in the fabrication shop. You will see that a new FIELD and second SPOOL have been created. but this may have been changed by the designer or from within SPOOLER. if the Shop Flag status is false the components are added as a Field.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:14. not on site. Note: In this case. • Click OK on the Update Complete alert form. Selecting Data for Updating Spool Numbering • To apply the displayed attribute data. If the Shop Flag is true the selected components are added as a Spool. the software searches all connected piping components and tube and adds all the components that have the same SHOP Flag status to that spool or field. Exercise continues: 39. Whereas. This could be used to break up a spool or to remove a spool break.0 . Note: Any changes you make to the Shop Flag settings are added to the design model in the DESIGN database. this becomes the CE. once you have applied the data to SPOOL 1. The Shop Flag status for a piping component is normally set by its attributes in the DESIGN catalogue.3 Changing the Shop/Field Setting When an element is picked. The FIELD is the WELD element.6. select SPOOL 1 in the Spool numbers window and select the data in the right hand window. To change the Shop Flag status of the welded valves: • Switch to Navigate mode and select one of the gate valves next to a Condensate Pump. 9. the software will automatically generate new data for SPOOL 2. then click the Use Selected Data button. 9:22 12. where you want the whole assembly to be fabricated as one piece in the shop.

The Right Arrow button takes you to the Next element in the list (downwards) and the Left Arrow takes you to the previous element (upwards). Example of Using a Forced Spool Break CSFBREAK False Shop True CSFBREAK True Spool Y The Spool Break is forced by changing the CSFBREAK attributes for the selected piping components to True.: Example of Using a Forced Spool Break. Change the status of the Shop Flag by selecting Fabrication Material from the drop-down list box and then clicking Apply. Use the Left Arrow button to move up the list and change the Shop Flag of the control valve. which allows you to check and change the Shop Flag setting for any element in the piping network. • • Repeat this procedure for the valves next to the other Condensate Pump.0 . Update the Spool Drawing and note the colour of the valves change to the spool colour and the associated fields disappear from the Explorer hierarchy. even though the Shop Flags on either side of the joint are the same. This function could be used to split pipes at any component. All included in single Spool CSFBREAK False Shop True CSFBREAK True Spool X Spool Break Figure 9:15. 9:23 12. Note: Any Spool Breaks you define changes the flags of those components in the DESIGN database.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling • Select Modify>Shop/Field from the main menu bar.4 Forcing a Spool Break at a Joint You can also split spools by defining SPOOL BREAKS at Joints in the network. When SPOOLER finds two adjacent True CSFBREAK or TSFBREAK attributes it inserts a Spool Break between them. e. 9. a flanged joint with no gasket as shown in Figure 9:15.g. but this would create problems during the Erection phase because no method of connecting the two parts would be shown on the drawings. • • Note: The Shop Flag can only be changed on one piping component at a time. The Piping component frame at the top of the form shows the identity of the currently selected element and allows you to scroll through the elements in the BRANch using the Right and Left Arrow buttons. this displays the Shop/Field form.6.

PIPE. ZONE or SITE. The menu bar gives you access to a wide range of facilities for generating customised isometric plots. The Standard Isometric form is displayed allowing you to specify which plotting options to use. To switch to the PDMS ISODRAFT module: • Select Spooler>Modules>Isodraft>Macro files from the main menu bar and click OK to any confirmation dialogues.7 Outputting Spool Data In this section you will learn how to plot annotated spool drawings. Drawings have to be produced for the fabrication of the spools. The default setting is WORLD. the Application window and the ISODRAFT Explorer for the ISODRAFT application are displayed on the screen.1 Plotting the Spool Drawings To plot the Spool Drawings you need to: switch to the ISODRAFT module. Forcing a Spool Break at a Specified Element Level To force a spool break at any change of Branch. To generate isometric plots of the Spool Drawings: • • Switch to the Fabrication Explorer and navigate to the ‘Outlet_Network’ Spool Drawing.MET (advanced metric) from the Standard iso options list. Select Isometrics>Standard from the ISODRAFT main menu bar. The views are annotated to show the updated numbering and connection information and have an associated parts list.7. set the SFLimit (Spool/ Field Limit) attribute for the SPLDRG to BRAN. • 9:24 12. Note: There are no tool bars on the ISODRAFT Application Window. select the required Spool Drawings and then generate the plots. 9. You are then prompted to select the two piping components that you wish to reset the C/TSFBREAK attributes on. When loading finishes. see Figure 9:16. you will simply generate isometric plots of the spool drawings using the supplied options files. respectively. Pipe. Exercise continues: 40. The list is split into two sections: • • Fabrication materials Erection materials. Zone or Site. For the purposes of this exercise.: Standard Isometric Options Form. 41. Click Apply to start the isometric plotting process.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Forced Spool Breaks can also be removed by selecting Delete>Spool Break from the main menu bar. Select Company from the Options drop-down list and then select ADVANCED. This is done using the PDMS ISODRAFT module which provides very powerful facilities for plotting any specified isometric view of all or any of the Spool Drawings.0 . 9.

Display List Form • Display Isometric . with the currently displayed plot highlighted.This form is shown within the Application window.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:16. see Figure 9:17. The time taken is related to the number and complexity of the PLOT files being created.: Display List Form. 9:25 12. that are available for display. see Figure 9:18. the following new ISODRAFT windows are displayed: • Display List . Figure 9:17. When processing is complete. It shows the PLOT file currently selected on the Display List form.: Display Isometric Form. Standard Isometric Options Form ISODRAFT: composes and annotates the PLOT files and compiles the material take-off lists.Lists all the isometric plots created in this session.0 .

: Isodraft Messages Form.: Zoomed View of an Isometric Plot) but are displayed so as best to show the information. The algorithms are controlled by the Standard iso options selected before plotting the drawing. including details of any problems encountered.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Figure 9:18. 9:26 12.7. The drawings are NOT TO SCALE (see the two sides of the U-bend in Figure 9:20. Display Isometric Form • Isodraft Messages .2 Isometric Drawing Contents The content of each isometric drawing is calculated using complex algorithms to best display all of the required data in the available space. Figure 9:19. see Figure 9:19.this shows a log of the PLOT file process. Isodraft Messages Form Exercise Ends 9.0 .

at the end of the Spool Drawing.7. or directed to line by arrow.3 Drawing Annotations Figure 9:20. Annotation Dimension Key Value shown in break in dimensioning line. 9:27 12. illustrating the annotation data. to component. first Remarks Spool Number Part Number Number in a rectangular box.: Zoomed View of an Isometric Plot shows a zoomed view of an isometric plot. Zoomed View of an Isometric Plot 9. may even be abbreviated with just the annotation showing the true length. The annotation data shown is also controlled by the selections made in the SPOOLER Numbering >Settings form. Figure 9:20. Number in a double box with Arrow points at the the spool prefix. A ‘Key’ to the markings is shown in the table below.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Pipes with no components attached to them. Flanged components also show along pipe or arrow pointing the Gasket (Gxx) and Bolt set (Bxx) numbers. Any options deselected on this form are not included on the plotted drawings.0 . component in the spool.

9:28 12. Number in a diamond.Pipework Design User Guide Pipework Spooling Annotation Weld Number Joint Number Key Number in a circle Remarks Key for different types of weld is shown on the plot. F = Flanged joint prefixed by letter showing S = Screwed joint type of joint.0 . C = Compression joint For a full description of all the symbols used in the plots refer to the ISODRAFT Reference Manual.

Fabrication machines are currently limited to bending and auto welding. and defined stock-lengths of tubing. • • Production checks run against available stock length and fabrication machines. often welded together in a workshop before being sent to be fitted on-site. It relates to a continuous piece of pipe tube that can be fabricated from stock material. pipe cut lengths on drawings and reports.1. AVEVA PDMS does not include gaskets in the spool.1 10. The system derives pipe-pieces: users cannot create or delete them. but they can also be more complicated fabrications with branches. bending machines. 10. 10:1 12.1 Definitions Pipe Piece A pipe-piece is the lowest level of fabricated item in the pipe. and other components. valves.0 . 10.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks 10 Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks AVEVA PDMS allows you to check pipe pieces and pipe spools for production readiness against welding machines.2 Pipe Spool A pipe spool is a prefabricated part of a pipe or branch. The pipe piece holds references to the components at the start and end of the piece. Pipe spools typically comprise a bent pipe with welded flanges at each end. For more infomation about the production checks and the machines that carry them out see Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data and Fabrication Machine Data.1. reducers.

Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

The system derives spools: users cannot create or delete them.

10.2

Pipe Production Checks Form
To check pipe spools for production readiness, you need to be in the DESIGN module and running the Pipework application. To display the Production Pipe Checks form, select Utilities>Production Checks from the main menu bar: How the form appears initially depends on whether or not you have selected a pipe or pipe element before you invoke the form. No Pipe or Pipe Element Selected

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

Pipe or Pipe Element with No Spools Selected

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

Pipe or Pipe Element with Spools Selected

10.2.1

Generating Spools
To generate the spools for a pipe, select it in the Design Explorer and click Generate Spools on the Pipe Production Checks form:

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

Alternatively select a part of the pipe in the 3D View and click Generate Spools on the Pipe Production Checks form to get the same result:

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

In each case the form tracks the currently selected pipe or pipe element.

10.3

Options on the Pipe Production Checks Form
The form has five sections that allow you to control different aspects of the production check on the pipe and its spools:

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Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks

Pipe Spools - Lists the spools for the currently selected pipe and shows their Production Status. Pipe Tasks • • • Validate Pipe - Runs the production checks against the entire pipe. The checks run for each spool in the pipe that requires validating. View Production Information - Displays the production information currently associated with each pipe spool and pipe-piece. Remove Machine Info - Removes machine fabrication information for all pipe spools and pipe-pieces in the pipe.

Spool Tasks • Validate Spool - Runs the production checks against the selected spool.

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Define Auto-Resolve Preferences . Define Stock Length .Sets up the 3D View so the selected spool fits in it. Navigation • View Spool in Graphics .or welding-machine associated with it when the production checks run.3.1 Setting Up Production Checks Production checks are run against fabrication machines and tube stock lengths defined using the options on the Setup Production Checks section of the Pipe Production Checks form. the system checks the pipe-piece against all machines selected in the default machine list. The lower pane now displays a selectable list of the available fabrication machines. 10. This allows the system to identify and assign fabrication machines. click Select Default Fabrication Machines. To define the default bending.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks • • View Production Information .Enables auto-naming of new spools when they are generated.Displays the production information currently associated with the spool and the pipe-pieces it contains.and welding-machines to use in production checks. Define Auto-Naming Preferences .Removes machine fabrication information for the selected spool. Setup Production Checks • • • • Select Default Fabrication Machines .0 . if you want to cancel the operation. Select the machine you want to use and click Apply. click Back.Sets up the stock length used in checks.Sets options for automatically adding any excess needed as a result of a check against a bending machine. Remove Machine Info . Select Default Fabrication Machines If a pipe-piece does not have a bending. 10:9 12.Allows the user to define the fabrication machines to use when running production checks against the pipe spools.

When selected.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks To avoid choosing incompatible machines. (where x is the number of the selected spool) and the lower pane changes to display a list of the machines that can handle the pipe tube in the selected spool: Select the machines you want to use from the list and then either append them to the current default machine list by clicking Append to Default Machine List or replace the entire list by clicking Replace Default Machine List. 10. each newly created spool will be automatically named using the auto-naming rules.3 Define Auto-Naming Preferences Auto-naming enables the automatic naming of new spools when they are generated. 10. you can pick out fabrication machines that can handle the pipe tubing in the selected spool. Spool2). material. 10:10 12. The system checks the bore.3. If auto-naming is turned off then spools will be given default names (Spool1. The lower pane changes to display the available preferences: If you check Include End Excess. the system adds feed excess to the pipe-piece if needed. and length of the tubes to see which machines can handle the spool. the system adds excess pipe to the end of the pipe-piece if needed. If you check Include Feed Excess. To do this below Indentify Suitable Machines click For Spool x.2 Define Auto-Resolve Preferences To define auto-resolve preferences click Define Auto-Resolve Preferences.0 . Clicking Back will take you back to the previous screen.3.

Feedback is given next to the Define AutoNaming Preferences link to indicate whether auto-naming is currently ON or OFF. Click the Back button to return to the Setup Production Checks section of the Form. To define the stock length click Define Stock Length.0 . This opens an edit-box you can use to change the stock-length value: Enter the new value then click Apply to accept the value.3. 10:11 12. To turn auto-naming on. The lower pane changes to display the Use Auto Naming Rules checkbox. Naming rules can be setup by clicking on Define Naming Rules. or Back to cancel and reset the form to the previous value. check Use Auto-Naming Rules and click Apply.4 Define Stock Length The system checks the final cut length of a pipe-piece against the available stock length. 10.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks To define auto-naming preferences click Define Auto-Naming Preferences.

Production checks were successful. and each piece also has one of the three states above associated with it. These options run the production checks and show the results in the lower pane of the form. The lower part of the form shows the results for each pipe-piece of the selected spool. Failed .Spool had already been validated so was not rechecked. Valid for production .5 Running a Production Check To run a production check against every spool in the pipe you want to validate.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks 10.3. 10:12 12.Some part of the production check failed. click Validate Pipe. This can be one of the following three states: • • • Successful . A list of pipe-pieces shows the production check results per piece. Production checks run using the fabrication machines associated with the individual pipepieces of the spool. then the system checks it against all machines defined in the default machine list: When the checks have run the spool list at the top of the form displays the results of the check for each spool. to run the checks against a single spool click Validate Spool.0 . If no machines are associated with a pipe-piece.

you can see no bending was required. if any. and some excesses were needed to make the pipe-piece pass the checks. The Results panel shows which. bending machine was used and which flanges. The information displayed in this part of the form depends on the results of the check. Some examples of different results follow. 10:13 12. can be pre-welded. Successful Check with no Modifications You will see this result where the check succeeded against both bending. and the pipe-piece did not have to be modified. you can see the check succeeded against both bending.0 . if any.and welding-machines. In the example below. Successful Check with Modifications In the different example below. and the leave flange can be machine-welded by Wm1. if these machines were required.and weldingmachines.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks Selecting a pipe-piece from the list displays the detailed results of the check below the pipepiece list.

In the example above. and both the arrive and the leave of the tube required excesses.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks As well as the bending and welding machine information there is a list of excesses the pipe required. You can accept these excesses to make the pipe-piece pass the checks. you can see Bm1 is suitable for bending the tube. For each excess there is a link-label for the type of excess.0 . If you click on this link the excess shows a tag in the graphics view so you can see where it applies to the pipe-piece: Failed Check with Modifications Required If the pipe-piece requires excesses to pass the checks but you have set up the auto resolve preferences not to include excess automatically. no flanges can be pre-welded. 10:14 12. In this case the results display the excess required. then the check will fail.

For example.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks You can also set the pipe to be manually bent and so ignore bending checks.0 . it may not be possible to find a bending machine that can handle the pipe tubing the pipepiece uses. 10:15 12. Non Resolvable Failure The pipe-piece may fail the production checks for a more serious reason.

If there is more information to view then the Expand icon appears by the Bending Machine Result title. you can set the pipe-piece to be manually bent: Stock Length Failure If the pipe-piece also fails a stock length check then this is reported in the lower part of the panel.0 . To overcome this. 10:16 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks In this case the results panel shows the system cannot resolve the failure by adding excess. Clicking the title or the icon expands the bending machine results. Expanding Machine Results Panel You may be able to expand the bending machine and welding machine results in the results panel. to display more information.

0 . 10:17 12. Click Modify Production Information… to display the required panel. If no machine is associated with the pipe-piece then Change bending machine… will read Assign Bending machine…. If there are no pre-welded flanges then there are no welding machine options. Use this panel to change the bending or welding machines and modify the end excesses or apply minimum feed to a leg. Changing or Assigning a Machine To change or assign a bending or welding machine click the appropriate link.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks Modifying Production Information You can also modify the production information applied to the pipe-piece. If the tube is straight then there are no bending machine options.

Click Accept Changes to accept the new value. To cancel any changes and go back to the previous panel. click Back.0 . You can add your own end-excess by entering a value in the User Defined text box. 10:18 12. After selecting a new machine click Accept Changes at the bottom of the panel to accept the changes. Editing End Excess To edit the end excess first expand the collapsible panel by clicking End Excess. Applying a Minimum Feed to a Leg To view the feed excesses applied to a leg between two bends.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks Select the required machine then click Apply. click Feed Excess to expand collapsible panel.

10:19 12. Finishing Viewing Results To finish viewing the results of the production checks click Finish Viewing Results to return to the top level of the form.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks For each leg there is an editable text box in which you can enter a minimum feed value for the leg. Viewing Production Information You can view the production information assigned to pipe-pieces of a spool without having to go through a production check. Revalidating the Pipe Piece After changing the production information you can revalidate the pipe-piece by clicking Revalidate Pipe Piece. If you enter a new minimum feed value for the leg then the system recalculates the feed excess the next time it checks the pipe-piece. This displays a view of the production information assigned to each pipe-piece in the same way as does clicking on Modify Production Information from the production check results panel. This runs a production check on the pipe-piece with the new values. To do this click on View Production Information for either the pipe or a spool.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks Removing Machine Information To remove all machine information associated with a pipe spool or all the spools on a pipe click Remove Machine Info for either the pipe or the selected spool: 10:20 12.0 .

1 Renaming Spools Individual renaming Individual spools can be renamed by right-clicking on the spool to be renamed and selecting "Rename Spool" from the popup menu. A form will be displayed which allows you to enter a new name or reset the name. 10:21 12.e. i.4 10. unset the name back to default.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks 10.4.

10:22 12. otherwise spool names will be set to default.5 Automatic Flange Alignment For pipe-pieces and pipe spools that have been set up to be machine-welded.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Production Checks 10. The system checks flange-alignment as part of the pipe-checking and Datacon functionality. If auto-naming is turned on then spools names will be set using auto-naming rules.2 Group renaming All spools for a specified pipe can be renamed by right-clicking on any spool and selecting "Rename All".4.0 . the system ensures it correctly orientates the piping model so flange-holes and spools align when assembled. See Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data for more details. 10.

Then in PDMS Draft .General select DRAFT>Auto Drawing Production. To produce pipe sketches: In DRAFT . The form can be undocked and moved as required. 11:1 12. use the Explorer to navigate to the required pipe and select Create>Pipe Sketches. The sketches include dimensioned and scale drawings of a pipe spool along with tables of relevant manufacturing data.1 Pipe Sketches Creating Pipe Sketches Pipe Sketches can be produced automatically in Automatic Drawing Production (ADP) using production-checked pipe-spool data from the Design application.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11 11. The Pipe Sketches form is displayed and docked to the right-hand side of the window by default. For more on the details of how the sheets look and how you can customise them for your own purposes see Pipe Sketch Administration.Automatic Drawing Production.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches The Pipe Sketches form can be resized such that list and text fields expand with it. 11:2 12.

0 .1.1 How to Use the Pipe Sketches Form 11:3 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11.

Filter the spools using Allow the user to filter the spools. Production Status Offers three options in a drop-down list: • • • • Any . both validated and not validated Valid .Matches only spools valid for production Not Valid . This field gives the date the drawing was created. The results obtained using the search criteria will be displayed in the Search Results pane. either wholly or partially in the text box.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches Search Criteria In the Pipe Sketches form. 11:4 12. Valid 3. this field displays the name of the resulting drawing. depending on whether the spool has been validated.Matches all spools.Matches only pipe spools without pipe sketches Search Click to action the search.0 .Matches only spools not valid for production. the search criteria are entered for the spool using any or all of the following: • Design Element to search under This is the name of the design element. If a sketch has been created. both with and without pipe sketches Created .‘ 4. Name 2. this field displays FALSE.Matches all spools.Matches only pipe spools with pipe sketches Not Created . • • • Sketch Status Offers three options in a drop-down list: • • • Any . All or part of the spool name Enter the spool name. You can populate the field using the CE button or by typing in the name. The list has four columns: 1. Search Results Lists all the pipe spool elements. Sketch The name of the pipe spool True or False. Drawn The Search Results pane has a popup menu which can be accesssed by right-clicking. If no drawing exists the field displays ‘ . if a sketch has not been created.

0 . Create Sketches in Registry — The named element must be an existing REGIstry element into which the system puts all new pipe sketch drawings. This field shows the file name the system will write to. Log File — The system records progress of the creation process as text that can be written to file. Now it is necessary to select the template to be used for the sketch. CE button — This top CE button (denoted DRWG) allows for quick capture of the current drawing. the sketches can be created and displayed by: 11:5 12. Sketch Creation Options This part of the form has the following: Sketch Template .Selects all pipe spools in the list Clear Selection .Invokes a standard browse form to let you select a log file.Unselects all pipe spools in the list Print Sketch . CE button — This bottom CE button (denoted REGI) allows for quick capture of the current registry. The system overwrites this file if it already exists.Print dialog to print all selected spool sketches Delete Sketch . Browse button . When the options have been entered. This is done by using the Sketch Creation Options part at the bottom of the form.Deletes each selected spool sketch Any number of spools can be selected from the list for sketch creation. a storage area for the created sketch and a log file name.This must be an existing DRWG element that can be used as a template for the pipe sketch drawings.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches The options are: • • • • Select All .

0 .1.Displays the selected spool sketch and adds it to a working list of sheets for display. refreshing the Search Results pane to show the spool sketch has been created and the date on which it was drawn. although it is only possible to display one sheet at a time. Display .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches • • Create Sketches .2 Created Sketches When the system has created the pipe sketches it adds them to the DRAFT Explorer: Selecting a created sketch from the list on the Pipe Sketches form and clicking the Display button.Actions the sketch creation. The 3D View shows the model representation of the spool: 11:6 12. The up and down arrow icons can be used to navigate up and down the list. displays the pipe sketch in the Main Display area. 11.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches And a typical example pipe sketch drawing of a pipe spool looks like this: 11:7 12.0 .

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11:8 12.

The Template Drawing contains views and layers like any other Draft Template drawing.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11.0 . for other Drawing information the Template Drawing references a Backing Sheet.2 11.1 Pipe Sketch Administration Drawing Template Every Pipe Sketch drawing is based on a Template Drawing used as the basic definition of the Pipe Sketch. 11:9 12.2.

2. which is generally user-defined. It is a standard backing sheet containing the drawing title block.2 Backing Sheet The Pipe Sketch references the Backing Sheet. 11:10 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11. the backing sheet is used to identify and locate ‘TABLES’ that are to be used on the Pipe Sketch. In addition to the standard title block. #DATE<FR DRWG> and #:UDA_Name etc. with drawing data displayed via intelligent text e.0 .g.

3 Tables In database terms the Table is a NOTE of the Backing Sheet (BACK). one for the Table headings and one for the Table cells.2. For example: BACK named /DRA/MAS/BACKS/PipeSketch/A4 SETST NOTE named */ExampleTable function ‘ENDPOINT SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ NOTE named */ExampleCells function ‘ENDPOINT SpPurpose ‘CELLS’ 11:11 12. Both notes are positioned at the same point.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches These tables are identified by: MaterialTakeOff Bending Table Bending Activies Welding Assembly End Points function ‘MTO’ function ‘BENDING’ function ‘BENDINGA function ‘WELDING function ‘ASSEMBLY function ‘ENDPOINT SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ SpPurpose ‘TABLE’ or or or or or or SpPurpose ‘CELLS SpPurpose ‘CELLS SpPurpose ‘CELLS SpPurpose ‘CELLS SpPurpose ‘CELLS SpPurpose ‘CELLS 11. There are two notes required.0 .

MTO Tables The above figures show the MTO/Material Take-off tables first on the backing sheet and then on the finished drawing. Although this table is visible in the view. On this type of table the ‘cells’ data need to be attributes of the Pipe Spool elements. it will in practice have its visibility flag (LVIS) set to false.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches The above is an example of a table defined on a backing sheet.g. Bending Tables 11:12 12. DTXR and MTXR attributes as used in the Description and Material columns.0 . The reason being that this table is copied onto the Pipe Sketch Drawing then the cells of the table are populated with data from the actual Pipe Spool. E. The figure below shows the table in situ on the final pipe Sketch Drawing.

Pipework Design User Guide
Pipe Sketches

Bending Activities Tables

Automatic Welding Tables

Assembly Activities Tables

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Pipe Sketches

End Points Tables

11.2.4

Styles
All Drawing Styles and Representations are inherited from the template drawing. These include the View Representations, text colours and font size for Labels and Dimensions.

Example:

VIEW Rrsf /DRA/PRJ/RERP/GEN/BASIC LAYER TSIZE 3mm
etc

11.2.5

Common Object
The system uses one object that does all the work to produce Pipe Sketch Drawings. This is so you do not have to use the form and graphics mode to produce a batch of drawings. The common object is a global instance of a pipeSketches object called !!pipeSketch. The Key Members:

Member !!pipeSketch.createIn !!pipeSketch.selectedTem plate !!pipeSketch.pipeSpool

Type DBREF DBREF DBREF

Comment Must be an existing Registry - REGI element Must be an existing Drawing - DRWG element. Must the an existing Pipe Spool - PSPOOL element.

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Pipe Sketches

Optional members

Member !!pipeSketch.logFile !!pipeSketch..drawingPre fix !!pipeSketch..sheetPrefix

Type FILE STRING STRING

Comment The Form or User must write and read this file. Default is ‘DR’. Default is ‘S’.

Other Members set and used in the background by the system:

Member !!pipeSketch..type !!pipeSketch..pipePieces !!pipeSketch..drawing !!pipeSketch..sheet !!pipeSketch..backingShe et !!pipeSketch..mtoHeadin gs !!pipeSketch..logData

Type STRING ARRAY DBREF DBREF DBREF ARRAY ARRAY

Comment Will always be ‘drawing’ or ‘drtmpl’. System records the Pipe Pieces of the Pipe Spool. System records the new drawing. System records the new sheet. System records the backing sheet being used. Array of strings read from backing sheet MTO table. Array of comment strings that user or form can read)

An Example

!!pipeSketch.createIn !!pipeSketch.selectedTemplate !!pipeSketch.pipeSpool --Then to create the sketch !!pipeSketch.apply()

= object DBREF (‘/MyRegistry’) = object DBREF (‘/MyTemplateDrawing’) = object DBREF (‘/MyPipeSpool’)

11.2.6

Log Messages
To write any message to the Log Data from any PML function use :

!!pipeSketchesLog(‘Text of your choice’)
To clear the messages from the Log Data use:

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!!pipeSketch.emptyLogData()
To write to the log file use:

!!pipeSketch.logFile !!pipeSketch.openLogFile() !!pipeSketch.writeLogFile() !!pipeSketch.closeLogFile()

= object FILE(‘%PDMSUSER%/ pipeSketches.txt’)

- This write the contents of .log Data to the .logFile

11.2.7

How to Define Tables
Under a Backing Sheet

BACK /ExampleBack SETST
Create NOTEs
NEW NOTE */---Table SETST FUNC ‘---’ (‘--‘ can be MTO, BENDING, BENDINGA, WELDING, ENDPOINT or ASSEMBLY) SpPurpose TABLE

Set the XYpos and usual attributes for text size colour etc. Create and name TEXP and STRA elements under NOTE. In the example below there are 4 TEXP elements and 7 STRA elements (Shown in Black)
NEW NOTE */---Cells SETST FUNC ‘---’ (‘--‘ can be MTO, BENDING, BENDINGA, WELDING, ENDPOINT or ASSEMBLY) SpPurpose TABLE

Set the XYpos and usual attributes for text size colour etc. Create and name TEXP and STRA elements under NOTE. In the example below there are 3 TEXP elements and 1 STRA element (Shown in Red)

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11.2.8

Dimensions
Dimensioning is controlled from the Template Drawing: A VIEW will only be dimensioned if it has a LAYER with a PURPose of ‘DIMA’. If this layer exists then the dimensions go into that layer. The style of the dimension will be cascaded from the owning layer.

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11.2.9

Tags
Tagging is controlled from the Template Drawing: A VIEW will only be tagged if it has a LAYER with a PURPose of ‘LABA’. If this layer exists then the tags will go into that layer. The style of the tag will be cascaded from the owning layer, or taken from a symbol template in the case of component tags. A typical symbol may look like this:

To control how the components of the Pipe Spool are tagged. Firstly: A LAYER with PURPose of ‘LABA’ Must own a TASK element with a SpPurpose of ‘TAGDEF’, Which owns 4 Task Parameter elements (TKPARA) With FUNCtion equal to ‘TEMPLATE’, ‘OFFSET’, ‘TPEN’ and ‘FPEN’ And suitable TPVALUEs. Example:
LAYER TASK TKPARA FUNC ‘TEMPLATE’ TKPARA ‘/MySymbol’ TKPARA FUNC ‘OFFSET’ TKPARA ’10 10’ TKPARA FUNC ‘TPEN’ TKPARA ‘1’ TKPARA FUNC ‘FPEN’ TKPARA ‘11’

When tagging views the system will create a Symbolic Label (SLAB) for each component, using the attributes of the above task parameters. Secondly:

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A LAYER with PURPose of ‘LABA’ Must own a TASK element with a SpPurpose of 'ARRLAB' Which owns 6 Task Parameter elements (TKPARA) And specific FUNCtions and suitable TPVALUEs Example:
LAYER TASK TKPARA FUNC ‘Top Side’ TKPARA ‘On’ TKPARA FUNC ‘Bottom Side’ TKPARA ‘Off’ TKPARA FUNC ‘Left Side’ TKPARA ‘On’ TKPARA FUNC ‘Right Side TKPARA ‘On’ TKPARA FUNC ‘Margin’ TKPARA ‘5’ TKPARA FUNC ‘Minimum Gap’ TKPARA ‘1’

When tagging views the system will now arrange the Label around the view, using the attributes of the above task parameters.

11.2.10 Defaults
Users will generally have their own Sketch Templates for Pipe Sketches. The very first time you display this form there will be a default AVEVA Template in the Template field and a default log file name in the log file field. When the form is applied the current setting of the Registry, Template and Log File are written to a defaults file named %pdmsuser%/PipeSketches.pmldat These values are used as the default next time the form is displayed.

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0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Sketches 11:20 12.

Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies 12 Piping Assemblies Building pipes in PDMS is often a case of building single components into a complex structure of branches and components. 12. For an explanation of how the Component Creation form is displayed see Modifying Pipe Sequences. A typical piping assembly is shown above. Alternatively. Part of the Component Creation form is shown: 12:1 12. In engineering there are often fixed configurations of components which can be reused many times in a design and these form the basis of assemblies.1 Creating Assemblies Assemblies are accessed from the Component Creation form in the Piping application in the same way as any other component type.0 . An assembly in PDMS is a series of components and branches in a predefined configuration which may be copied into the Design many times. an assembly definition may be created to access existing macros or forms.

The Component Creation form now looks as shown: 12:2 12. the original assembly is shown in a graphical view. a list of assembly types and subtypes is shown on the Component Creation form.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies When the Assemblies entry is selected from Component Types. For copy-base assemblies.

Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies Filter By option . 12:3 12. you will be asked to supply the relevant details via the CHOOSE form during the building process. When an appropriate selection has been made. you will be able to insert an instance of the assembly in a straight tube or connected to a component by clicking the Place button or Connect button respectively. For example the above form shows a tee with a flange. The graphical view is updated after each component to show you where the current component is. This can be applied on any line with any direction and bore so you are prompted at each point.0 . If the assembly contains directional or multi bore components.allows various categories of assembly to be selected and then each sub selection selects an individual assembly type.

Changing the direction to West and clicking OK completes the sequence and the assembly is built. 12:4 12. The default direction shown in the form is that of the original assembly.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies The Input form is shown to ask you in which direction to orientate P3 of the tee.0 .

Another problem arises when the first component in the assembly is a directional component like an elbow. VENT or DRAN. Origins By default. 12. For example a simple assembly consisting of a flange. The same applies for a reducing tee where the branch size may be determined by the header size. This happens automatically if the offline branch of the assembly has a connection type of OPEN.0 . At DESIGN World level a separate World type called an "Application Data World" can be created. User interaction For example when a reducer is part of an assembly. so if an origin has been defined. These all have to be orientated to ensure that they are inserted in the correct position and orientation. it will automatically be used to position the assembly. a separate hierarchy is available. so it is possible to define an assembly origin at some other point in the assembly. gasket and flange may need to be positioned by the flange face of the first flange. tee.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies In this case a new branch has been created but the branch tail is left for completion later. If an assembly is connected to a component then the position is derived by connecting the first component to the existing one. the arrive end is determined by the size of pipe at the insertion point. The concept of an Application Data World is to 12:5 12. assembly origins are at the arrive point of the first component in the first branch of the assembly. you are prompted to enter a value or to choose a component from the specification. A similar result would be achieved using the Connect button on the Component creation creation form. The assembly origin point is configurable using the assembly application. eccentric reducer etc. CLOS.2 Assembly Hierarchy In order to separate Assemblies and other design template type items from the main design data. When the system cannot decide the orientation or size of a component automatically. but in this case. the tee would be connected to the previous component to the insertion point. The leave of the reducer cannot be determined automatically by the copy process as it may be a number of different values. Certain assemblies need to be positioned using a different position. It is also possible for the assembly to be completed with the tail at the leave of the gasket.

items will not be clash checked against a set of assemblies. Note: This sounds like the Template structure but Templates (TMPLs) are generally considered as single entities. The Design Point Set (DPSE) is not used by this utility. In contrast application data provides a reference model which is built using conventional design tools. From the point of view of assemblies. Piping assemblies are evaluated at branch level where the head of the first branch is the starting point for the assembly.0 . PIPE. All other branches are copied as new branches in the pipe. The benefit of a separe hierachy is that the Application Data World is separated from the normal design. Each assembly also has a Design Data Set as part of its structure. DDSE (Design Data Set) and one or more branches. Instances of assemblies in the piping design are a series of components which are replica copies of the original assembly components but utilising the same piping specifications and bore of the host pipe. Templates may also be part of the application data structure. Every piping assembly must have an owning Zone and Pipe for administration purposes. The components of the first branch are considered to be inline so the first branch itself is not replicated. Note: an assembly may be as little as a single component but it must be part of a standard pipe/branch structure. 12:6 12. This is used to store rules associated with the assembly and its individual components. and real design. each individual assembly will be an Application Data element owning a ZONE.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies provide a storage area for design type items which are not part of the design model but form some kind of reference model or starting point for real design items. The Application Data World hierarchy (APPLDW) is as follows The Application Data World owns Application Data Area (APPDAR) which in turn own Application Data (APPLDA) elements.

12:7 12.3 Building and Maintaining Assemblies The assembly building and maintenance application is accessed by selecting Utilities > Pipe Assemblies from the main menu bar in the Piping application. This principle is not applicable for all types of assembly as a simple copy may not be enough to satisfy the design requirements and you may need to enter some values.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies For example a FLAN GASK FLAN combination as an assembly could be used on any size or any specification provided that the appropriate components exist and the STYPEs remain constant. 12.0 . In this situation a single assembly could be utilised for all cases. The displayed Pipe Assembly Manager form enables the building and editing of assemblies The Pipe Assembly Manager form is split into separate panes with different functions: • The top pane allows the assembly hierarchy (World Area and Assembly) to be created.

which sets a purpose attribute of PASY. • • • • Display Name/Description . Create Area and Create Assembly links .1 Creating the Hierarchy The top part of the Assembly Manager form allows you to create and move around the Assembly hierarchy. In applying Assemblies in the design.0 .aligns the form with the currently selected assembly.3.each displays the appropriate create form to create the Assembly hierarchy. 12:8 12. In the first stage you create the basic assembly hierarchy using the Create Assembly form. 12.2 Building an Assembly Building an assembly is in two stages.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies • • • The Explorer view shows the assembly hierarchy (except for the DDSE and its members) The Assembly Rules pane is context sensitive to create and edit rules for both the assembly and its members. Create World.option to show assemblies by name or description for convenience. Application World. 12.3. This type of form is also used to create assembly areas and assemblies. CE button . only the description is displayed. The bottom pane is a 3D view to show the assembly contents. Application Area and Assemblies drop-down lists are user defined and show a list of what has been created. The Purpose option of Piping Assembly is selected.

pipe and data elements. This can be done graphically by holding the right hand mouse button down and enclosing all of the items in a selection box or alternatively selecting individual items in conjunction with the control key.0 . In the next stage the assembly design is created.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies This creates the basic hierarchy with an appropriate zone. A typical example is shown below First all of the components to be copied into the assembly are selected. 12:9 12. the easiest way to create an assembly is to identify some existing design and copy it into the pre-built assembly using the Copy Design button on the Pipe Assembly Manager form. Although it is possible to build assemblies using standard piping commands.

the copy process prompts the user to identify the main branch. the main branch is the one containing the Tee because this must be in place before the second branch is built. After the Copy Design process has completed. 12:10 12. For example in the vent shown above. the form’s Explorer View and 3D View show the assembly contents.0 . This copies all of the selected elements into one or more branches depending on the configuration. before the copy takes place. they can be copied into the assembly using the Copy Design button.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies Once the appropriate design elements have been selected. If more than one branch is involved.

These do not instigate any other operation other than starting the function or showing the form.0 . The assembly is now complete although it is possible to add additional rules for selection orientation and positioning. When the assembly is inserted into a pipe. so all user interaction is done via the user called routines.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies Note: Branch1 has a Tee (sockolet) as its only member and the head and tail of the branch is connected to each end of the Tee.3 Non-Graphical Assemblies In order to cater for users who have existing functions or forms to create assemblies it is possible to build an assembly which either runs a function or shows a form. The execution is done from the Connect or Place buttons on the Component Creation form. To enable an assembly to call a function or show a form. a basic assembly needs to be created and you need to add the appropriate input to the assembly rules panel as shown below: 12:11 12. 12. the head and tail are ignored and the first component to be built will be the Tee.3.

the Function line in the Assembly Rules box is selected and the New button is clicked.pmlfnc. When the OK button is clicked. In the displayed Pipe Assembly Rules form. 12:12 12.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies To enable the assembly to run a function. the function name is added to the Assembly Rules and stored in the Assembly Design Data Set so that it can be run each time the assembly is used.0 . the Function Name is entered without the "!!" or the extension . The same method is used to store form names.

To enable an assembly to be positioned by some other feature.3. Note: Secondary origins are used in pipe splitting to derive correct spool lengths without the thickness of the gasket. When the option to insert an assembly in a section of tube is selected. If you choose to connect an assembly. this is used instead. 12:13 12.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies 12. the arrive point of the first component is used to position the assembly. The PICK button can be used to pick a point in the graphics view or alternatively the Element name or reference number and the required PPOINT number can be entered on the form. If a primary origin is present. the first component is positioned at the leave of the selected item.0 . To set a primary or secondary origin. See Assembly Build Origin.4 Primary and Secondary Origins One of the most common types of assembly is likely to be a set of break flanges where the relevant points for positioning the assembly are on either flange face. it is possible to set Primary and Secondary origins. the appropriate line in the Assembly Rules pane is selected and the New button is clicked to display the Pipe Assembly Rules form.

Each component in the assembly may have instances of all rule types associated with it. Assembly rules cover multiple STYPEs. because the selection will fail.0 . the STYPE for a gasket in one specification is RF where in another it is G. One solution to this problem would be to have two assemblies to cater for both cases but this is dealt with by having rules in the assembly template. For example in the AVEVA sample project. The concept of copying an assembly instance has limitations where specifications have different STYPEs (see STYPE Rules). When the component is copied into a design instance the rules are evaluated in place of the default actions.6 STYPE Rules STYPE rules are a mechanism to allow an assembly to work with different specifications by supplying a list of alternative STYPES. The distinct actions for each component are: 1) 2) 3) 4) Selection Positioning Orientation Bore Selection - SEL WITH STYP RF DIST 200 FROM PREV ORI Y IS N WRT PREV Use PL of PREV ELBO The addition of rules enables the default actions to be supplemented or overridden as described below: 12.3. each component may also have rules.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies All values may be edited or deleted by selecting the rule value and using the Edit or Delete buttons accordingly.5 Piping Assembly Component Rules As well as rules on the assembly itself. and restricting the STYPE to a particular SPEC/STYPE combination. STYPE rules are in two parts. Positions.3. If no rules are present then a new item is created using the same relative position and orientation as that of the original. Orientation. Note: there are no rules for pipe and branch levels Component rules are necessary to add greater flexibility to assemblies in general use. a specification and an 12:14 12. 12.

0 . for spec /A3B the STYPE for a Gasket is G so if the assembly component has a different STYPE then the rules will be evaluated to find the STYPE for the current SPEC. To make the assembly work in this instance a new rule could be added so that a gasket in spec /A3B always looks for STYPE G. the rule is applied to all similar items in the assembly. To set the rule. For example. The Pipe Assembly Rules form displays configured for STYPE rules. 12:15 12. Next select the Stype line in the Component Rules panel and click the New button.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies STYPE. If no rule is present then the assembly instance will fail. This is done as follows: First navigate to a gasket which needs the rule. enter the following two parts: • • The Specification where the STYPE rule applies The actual STYPE By checking the Apply to Similar Items box.

the Force this SPEC. Otherwise. The command could be for example "ORI and P3 is D" for a tee in a Drain to always force it to point down.7 Position Rules Position and Orientation rules are essentially a replacement of the default action in the form of a command line. 12:16 12. To make this work.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies An alternative STYPE rule mechanism is to force the assembly to use a particular specification and stype regardless of the pipe specification where the assembly is being built. After clicking the OK button. These lines will be executed as complete positioning commands in place of the default position derived from the relative position in the assembly. or as a trigger to prompt the user for orientation. first as a single command in place of the default orientation. 12.8 Orientation Rules Orientation rules can be in two forms. For example certain instrument items may only exist in an Instrument specification so the system needs to be forced to look in a specific place rather than try to find an equivalent. To edit or delete this.3.0 . 12. a new rule is built and shown in the Component Rules list. select it and then click the appropriate button.3. In practice a position rule may be a through command such as THRO PT or Dist 1000./STYPE checkbox is checked. you could enter the keyword 'PROMPT' to force the system to ask for the appropriate orientation when the assembly is being built.

Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies In the example shown.9 Bore Selection Rules In the assembly shown above. When this assembly is being built in the design. the selected Valve will always trigger a prompt to ask for the hand wheel orientation.0 . 12. 12:17 12. you will be prompted 5 times to select the appropriate component bore. there are five points where the bore changes. Whilst at least one size will need to be entered.3. other sizes can be derived.

To reduce the amount of selection which you need to do. The rule is shown in the Component Rules list: Note: For a tee the bore selection is applied to P3.0 . the system will look at the previous reducer to obtain the leave bore rather than prompting or instigating a choose operation. This means that when the component is selected. bore selection rules can be put in place to use other components as a reference.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies For example the reducers either side of the control valve will be the same size but with reversed flow. In the example. 12:18 12. the leave point of a component is being set to have the same bore size as the arrive point of the previous reducer.

0 . To set the Key element.Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies 12. 12:19 12. Because there can only be one Key element. In effect a design component is used as a positioning and orientation component for the rest of the assembly.4 Key Elements Assemblies such as Control sets are often built around a single elbow in the design as a locating item but with our previous example this is in the middle of the assembly and cannot be used as a positioning item. The concept of a Key element is provided to allow an existing element in the design to directly replace an element in an assembly such that the assembly is built around the existing design element as if it was part of the assembly. this is set by a right mouse click on the assembly design Explorer window. navigate to the required element and select the right-click option to set this as the Key element.

Pipework Design User Guide Piping Assemblies The 3D window displays which element has been selected. 12:20 12.0 .

refer to the sources of information listed in Other Relevant Documentation. If you have not already done so. which will show you how to get the maximum benefits from the product in your own working environment (see Further Training in Using PDMS). 13:1 12.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Conclusion 13 Conclusion This concludes both the tutorial exercises and this introduction to some of the ways in which AVEVA PDMS applications can help you in your piping design work. you are strongly advised to attend one or more of the specialised AVEVA PDMS training courses. You should now have an insight into the potential power of AVEVA PDMS and sufficient confidence to explore some of the more advanced options on your own. For further technical details.

Pipework Design User Guide Conclusion 13:2 12.0 .

O TTO M E D C YLIN D E R B FLANGE (FLAN) SN O U T FO U R .0 .IN T STU B E N D ( JO LJSE ) O LE T ( LE T) O RED U CER ( ED U ) R STA N D A R D H O O K . are Equipment items). LA P.P ( U ) U SH TE E ( E ) TE TH R E E .A Y V A LV E ( TW A ) W V TR A P ( A P) TR U N IO N ( N IO ) U V A LV E ( A LV ) V V E N T ( E N T) V W E LD ( E LD ) W A:1 12. (Elements shown in italics.Pipework Design User Guide Equipment and Piping DESIGN Database A Equipment and Piping DESIGN Database This appendix shows the part of the DESIGN database hierarchy which holds elements relevant to equipment and piping design.A Y V A LV E ( FW A ) W V ( l pri i i shapes have a A l m t ve G A SK E T ( A SK ) G negat ve equi entt i val hat G E N E R A L PIPE C O M PO N E N T ( O M ) PC m ay be ow ned by a posi i t ve IN STR U M E N T ( ST) IN el ent em . BOX for example. ZO N E PIPE ( PIPE ) E Q U IPM E N T * ( Q U I) E R O U TIN G PLA N E G R O U P ( PLG ) R BRAN CH ( RAN ) B opt onal i SU B E Q U IPM E N T ( BE) SU R O U TIN G PLA N E ( PLA ) R pi ng pi s com ponent desi gn N O ZZLE LO A D PO IN T A TTA C H M E N T PO IN T ( TTA ) A ( O ZZ) N ( A P) LO pri i i m t ves BEN D ( EN D ) B B LIN D FLA N G E ( LI) FB BO X C A P ( A P) C C IR C U LA R TO R U S C LO SU R E ( LO S) C CO N E C O U PLIN G ( O U P) C C YLIN D E R C R O SS ( R O S) C D ISH D U C TIN G ( U C T) D PO LYH E D R O N ELBOW (ELBO) PYR A M ID FILTE R ( FILT) R E C TA N G U LAR TO R U S FIX E D LE N G TH TU B E ( FTU B ) SLO PE .

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Equipment and Piping DESIGN Database A:2 12.

g.Pipework Design User Guide SPOOLER Reference Information B SPOOLER Reference Information This appendix provides additional information on some important aspects of the SPOOLER module.2 Connection Types The p-points of every piping component have associated connection types. which is added to B:1 12. to enable them to modify existing databases and catalogues making them compatible with SPOOLER. B. It occurs at the junction of two piping components (or implied TUBE) that fulfils one of the following cases: 1. in the database. The type of connection is identified by the Ckey attribute. True-to-False or False-toTrue. The Shop Flag status of the two components is different.0 . If a component is the end of the piping network (e. This functionality has been extended for SPOOLER so that it also specifies what type of connection it is. Note: TSFBREAK is an attribute of the piping component not the leave tube. 2. derived from their catalogue definitions. This information is intended for experienced users and system administrators.1 Spool Breaks A Spool Break is the changeover point between SHOP and FIELD components. This condition can be forced using the Create>Spool Break function in SPOOLER. Although its effect is on the leave tube. These are used in conjunction with the Connection Compatibility (COCO) tables. i. connected to an EQUIpment item) it is automatically the end of the Spool/Field and the Spool Drawing. Note: The connection type for the arrive and leave points of a TUBI component are always derived from p-point P1 of the tube catalogue element.e. to check if two components may be legally connected to each other. The Shop Flag status of elements in the DESIGN database can be changed in SPOOLER using the Modify>Shop/Field function. B. 3. BOTH piping components have their spool break attributes set to true (CSFBREAK for a piping component and TSFBREAK for the leave tube).

The welds and joints are grouped in the fabrication database in the WLDGRP (Weld Group) and JNTGRP (Joint Group) elements. Implied Welds IWELD components provide a link in the Fabrication database to the position of a weld that must be inserted to join two piping components or tubes. the connection is assumed to be ‘Plain’. B. A connection is considered to belong to a Spool Drawing if: • • • Both piping components involved in the connection belong to that Spool Drawing.0 . These are: Definition IWELD RWELD AWELD IJOINT Description Implied weld Real weld Attached weld Implied joint The types of welds and joints are described in the following sections. B.1 Weld and Joint Connections Connections between piping components (and tube) come in two forms: welds and nonwelded joints (e. flanged. A connection can have an IWELD element associated with it if: B:2 12. For example: fit a flange onto the end of a tube. respectively. The Ckey attribute can be set to any of the standard ISODRAFT end connection types: Ckey BW SW SC CP FL PL Connection Type Butt weld Socket weld Screwed connection Compression Flanged Plain If the Ckey attribute is left unset. screwed or compression connections).Pipework Design User Guide SPOOLER Reference Information the COCO element definition. These groups are created. You do not have to explicitly define these welds as they are implied by the nature of the components involved. when numbering is first inserted into the Spool Drawing. The downstream piping component in the connection is on one end of the piping network in that Spool Drawing. In the case of a flanged joint with a gasket.2.2 Types of Welds and Joints SPOOLER uses three types of weld definitions and one type of joint definition.g.2. the flange owning the gasket is on that Spool Drawing. by default.

Inserting a field weld is a modification to the DESIGN database and immediately after its creation the weld and its leave tube are not in the Spool Drawing. Note: If you have explicitly defined a weld (RWELD element) to connect the two components.0 .3.3 B. its status is ignored when spooling a piping network. using the Modify>Attached Welds function. compression joints or screwed connections).g. These can effect the placement of Spool Breaks and the handling of some elements. ATTAchments While ATTAs do have a Shop Flag. B. Note: The leave tube of a spec break ATTA (SPECBR attribute is True) still has an active Shop Flag.1 Special Cases The following sub-sections contain descriptions of some special cases within SPOOLER. Typically these are used to secure the piping network to the support ATTAchments.Pipework Design User Guide SPOOLER Reference Information • It has a Ckey (Connection key) of types BW or SW. They are normally inserted in AVEVA DESIGN but can also be added in SPOOLER. in the normal way. For example: a shop false ATTA will not break a spool. A connection can have an IJOINT element associated with it if: • • It has a Ckey (Connection key) of types CP. the section between the weld and the end of the tube is reassigned as the leave tube of the weld. Attached Welds AWELD components provide a method for numbering the welds required for welded attachments. B:3 12. The number of welds on each attachment can be defined in SPOOLER. You can add the weld and its leave tube by updating the numbering of the Spool Drawing. Implied Joints IJOINT components define the connection between two non-welded piping components or tubes (e. You do not have to explicitly define the details of these joints as they are implied by the nature of the components involved. the software will not insert a implied weld at that point. B. Shop Flag Status This section describes some of the special cases for the Shop Flag. bolted flanges.3. Neither of the components are Gaskets. to break up a spool.2 Leave Tubes of Welds If you break a spool by inserting a field weld into the leave tube after the last component in a pipe. FL or SC. Real Welds RWELD components link to explicitly defined Shop or Field welds in the DESIGN database.

By default this should give two welds.Pipework Design User Guide SPOOLER Reference Information B. P1 and P2 are coincident and are normally treated as a single point. one for each point.0 . A problem could occur if points P1 and P2 have Ckeys of BWD or SWD. B:4 12.3.3 Welds for OLETs An OLET element has 3 p-points: P1 (p-arrive) and P2 (p-leave) in the main tube and P3 in the off-line leg. but the software recognises the OLET as a special case and only allocates one weld.

0 .2. C.1.1 Pipe Piece Manager PML Methods The pipe piece manager has no exposed functions.2 Functionality Function Delete pipe pieces Description C.1. It includes the underlying objects and functionality and the database attributes and pseudo-attributes.2 C.1 C. C.1 Pipe Piece Pipe Piece Functionality Function Invalidate all verified Query bend activities Description Set appropriate validation attributes Returns bending activities C:1 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data C Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data This Appendix contains the detailed system-specific information about pipe pieces and pipe spools.

0 . Start/End excesses are used only where the relevant start/end flanges are manually welded. Bend M/C Start Excess User Excess End REAL REAL REAL REAL ARRAY REAL 0 Holds the stock length that was checked against Invisible to user Invisible to user Invisible to user 0 0 0 Bend M/C End Excess Feed Excess Stock Value Length Pipe verified piece BOOLEAN BOOLEAN BOOLEAN False True False Pipe piece modified Pipe piece contains bends C:2 12. Mngr Bend M/C Weld M/C Stock Len.2. The cut length calculation should always user the greater value of the user or bend machine excess. Remarks Machine Bent Bending Machine Reference Bending flow Auto Start Auto End with BOOLEAN DBREF False May not be required BOOLEAN ENUM ENUM DBREF True Welded Welded Welding Machine Reference User Excess Start REAL 0 The system should always remember user excesses.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data C.2 Pipe Piece Attributes Attribute Type Default Get Set User Spool Mngr Pipe Mngr Fab.

i. shop = true and loose = false Nominal bore Outside diameter Material Specification Wall thickness HBOR on branch or LBOR of start component HOD on branch or LOD of start component PPNBOR PPOUTD Returns the MATR attribute of the spec of the first MATREF component HSTU on branch or LSTU of first component SPRE The wall thickness of the implied tube of the pipe WALLTH piece.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data C.e.e.3 Pipe Piece Pseudo Attributes Attribute Arrive position Leave position Arrive direction Leave direction Comment HPOS on branch or LPOS of first component TPOS on branch or APOS of last component HDIR on branch or LDIR of first component TDIR on branch or ADIR of last component Attribute Name APOS LPOS ADIR LDIR ACON LCON PPAREF PPLREF Arrive connection LCON of start component type Leave connection ACON of end component type Arrive component The first component of the Pipe Piece Leave component The Last Component of the Pipe Piece Arrive flange req Returns whether the start flange should be welding considered for pre-welding. i. Calculated using relevant information MTCL Array of radius of bends for pipe piece PPCUTL PPFINL PPBRAD Cut length Finished length Bend radii Bend ratio Array of Ratio of radius to OD of bends for pipe PPBRAT piece Ratio of radius to OD Angle between The required angle between flanges at pipe piece PPANFL flanges ends before the pipe piece is bent. Get pipe piece Returns all the components within the pipe piece components PPAREF C:3 12.0 . Uses the OUTD and ACBO attributes from the property database. shop = true and loose = false Leave flange req Returns whether the end flange should be welding considered for pre-welding.2.

getBranchElements(DBREF) Result Description ARRAY ARRAY Returns all the pipe elements contained in the spool. Returns the pipe pieces and other components need in .2 Functionality Function Autonaming Description C.getPipePieces(DBREF) .3. This includes tubes.getActivityTables(DBREF) C.3 C.generatePipeSpools(DBREF) .getBendingTables(DBREF) .verifies if modified flag is true Attribute Name PPFMCV PPSTOV length True/False .1 Pipe Spool Manager PML Methods Name .1 Pipe Spool Pipe Spool Functionality Function MTO Fabrication activities Bending information Description C:4 12.verifies if modified flag is true C.getWeldingTables(DBREF) .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Attribute Fabrication machine verified Stock verified Comment True/False .3.getMTOElements(DBREF) ARRAY ARRAY ARRAY ARRAY .4 C.4.0 .

The tags correspond to .2 Pipe Spool Members Name .pipeSpool Type DBREF Description Pipe Spool element C.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Function Welding information End points Description 2D array of start and end points of the segments of a pipe spool C.getAssemblyTables() ARRAY Results in a table / 2 dimensional array: Table of information to put on the pipe sketch Assembly Activities Table .getPlaneTags() ARRAY Results in a table / 2 dimensional array: PPoint/ Element and text to allow this text to be tagged on the pipe sketch.4.EndPointTable() for cross-reference the . Columns = Attribute values requested.getEndPointTags() ARRAY Results in a table / 2 dimensional array: PPoint/Element and text to allow this text to be tagged on the pipe sketch.getMtoTables(DB_Ele ment) Type ARRAY of Description Pass an array of attributes.0 . Y and Z positions for the open ends of the pipe spool . .4. Results in a table / 2 dimensional array: Rows = all elements in the pipe spool. The tags correspond to the Planes referenced on the .getAssembly() table for crossreference C:5 12.3 Pipe Spool Methods (not implemented) Name .getEndpointTable() ARRAY Results in a table / 2 dimensional array: Connection number and X.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data C. Remarks Name PSARFA name Array DB_Element Array DB_Element UNSET UNSET Array of arrive elements the PSLRFA UNSET Array of the leave elements C.5 C. C:6 12.4. C.5 Pipe Spool Pseudo Attributes Attribute PPRFA BELRFA BELTYP MELRFA PSVLD Comment List of pipe pieces within the spool.1 Pipe Spool Reporting Data MTO This is a query that returns the components and pipe pieces for a pipe spool.4.5.0 . Mngr Bend M/C Weld M/C Stock Len. C.2 Assembly Activities Array of activities for each of the components in the pipe spool Flanges Activity object definition for orienting a flange component.4 Pipe Spool Attributes Attribute Type Default Get Set User Spool Mngr Pipe Mngr Fab. will NOT generate pipe pieces List of piping elements within the spool List of piping elements types within the spool List of MTO components needed to construct the pipe spool If all the pipe pieces are valid this is true. The default order of the list is in hierarchical sequence order.5.

to another branch. Inclination Angle REAL The inclination is the angle between the branch piece and the main pipe measured in the direction towards the reference component Type of connection of branch piece to main pipe Component used to define reference plane Direction of the plane acting through the reference component Branch Connection ENUM Reference Plane DBREF Component Plane Direction DIRECTION Elbow Activity object definition for defining elbow component. olet. tee.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Attribute Component Offset Angle Type DBREF REAL Description Component activity relates to Offset angle (Rotation) of flange from reference plane Reference Plane DBREF Component Plane Direction DIRECTION Component used to define reference plane Direction of the plane acting through the reference component Branch Pieces Activity object definition for defining branch connection. Attribute Component Offset Angle Rotation Angle Type DBREF REAL REAL Description Component activity relates to Offset angle of connection from reference plane (Turn) Only relevant for straight branch pieces ending in a flanged connection The reference plane for the flange rotation is defined by the branch piece and the main pipe. etc. Attribute Component Offset Angle Type DBREF REAL Description Component activity relates to Offset angle with respect to reference plane (Turn) C:7 12.

Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Attribute Type Description Component used to define reference plane Direction of the plane acting through the reference component Reference Plane DBREF Component Plane Direction DIRECTION Mitre (Single Cut) Activity object definition for defining elbow component. Attribute Component End Final Length Reference Component Split Type DBREF ENUM REAL DBREF Description Pipe piece activity relates to End cut is related to (Inclination) Final cut length from reference component Reference component final cut is measured from Activity object definition for defining split in a pipe piece. Attribute Component Type DBREF Description Pipe piece activity relates to C:8 12. Attribute Component Offset Angle Cut Angle Type DBREF REAL REAL Description Component activity relates to Offset angle with respect to reference plane (Turn) Angle pipe is cut (Inclination) Component used to define reference plane Direction of the plane acting through the reference component Reference Plane DBREF Component Plane Direction DIRECTION Cut Activity object definition for defining cut at start/end of a pipe piece.0 .

5.0 . Attribute Component End Thread Length Thread Insert Type DBREF ENUM REAL ? Description Pipe piece activity relates to End threading is related to (Inclination) Length of threading required Threading information Activity object definition for defining inserts at the end of a pipe piece. Attribute Component Insert Length Type DBREF REAL Description Pipe piece activity relates to Length of insertion into following pipe piece C.3 Bending Table Attribute Pipe Piece Bending Machine Clutch arrive tube Check Sum Activities Type DBREF DBREF BOOLEAN ? Bend Array Description Pipe piece bending table relates to Bending machine reference True if the bending machine clutches the arrive tube NOT IMPLEMENTED Activity Array with bending activities for the pipe piece C:9 12.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Attribute Feed Excess Reference Component Thread Type REAL DBREF Description Excess removed from feed tube following reference component Reference component preceding feed excess is removed from Activity object definition for defining threading at start/end of a pipe piece.

leave flange can be welded and leave flange is pre-welded Angle between the arrive flange and leave flange where both pre-welded Flange Boolean DBREF Leave Flange Leave Welded Angle Flange Boolean Real C.5.4 Welding Table Managed by attributes and pseudo attributes of pipe piece. Attribute Pipe Piece Welding Machine Arrive Flange Arrive Welded Type DBREF DBREF DBREF Description Pipe piece welding table relates to Welding machine reference Flange at arrive of pipe piece True if welding machine set. arrive flange can be welded and arrive flange is pre-welded Flange at leave of pipe piece True if welding machine set.Pipework Design User Guide Pipe Piece and Pipe Spool Data Bending Activity Attribute Feed Rotate Bend Type REAL REAL REAL Description Feed activity value Rotation activity value Bend activity value C.0 .5 Spool Extents/End Point Information derived from Pipe Spool to determine the positions at the start and end of the first branch/section of branch of a spool: Start equates to APOS of PSSRFA[1] End equates to LPOS of PSERFA[1] C:10 12.5.

0 .1.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data D Fabrication Machine Data The system can check pipe pieces for production readiness against bending machines. current welding GetWeldingMachine( ) DBREF D:1 12. Production test requests are made to a Fabrication Machine Manager controlling the fabrication machines. Sets the current bending machine. D. welding machines and the defined stock length of tubing.1 Fabrication Machine Manager Methods Name Result Purpose Sets the maximum material length. Information about the welding/bending machine operation and their corresponding activity tables can be obtained from the Manager. Future fabrication tests will use this welding machine. Gets the maximum material length. Future fabrication tests will use this bending machine.1 D. current bending SetMaximumMaterialLength(RE NO RESULT AL length) GetMaximumMaterialLength( ) REAL SetBendingMachine(DBREF bendingMachine) NO RESULT GetBendingMachine( ) SetWeldingMachine(DBREF weldingMachine) DBREF NO RESULT Sets the current welding machine. Gets the machine. Gets the machine.

0 . Tells the fabrication machine manager if excesses at the ends of the pipe piece can be added in order to satisfy bending machine fabrication requirements. Tells the fabrication machine manager if the current stock length must be checked during fabrication.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Name Result BOOLEAN Purpose Checks if the given pipe piece can be fabricated by the current combination of bending / welding machines. The first feed in the bending machine will be negative (the pipe is inserted into the bending machine) ValidatePipePiece(DBREF pipePiece) SetAddExcessBetweenBends(BO NO RESULT OLEAN add) GetAddExcessBetweenBends( ) BOOLEAN SetAddEndExcess(BOOLEAN add) NO RESULT GetAddEndExcess( ) BOOLEAN SetChangeFlangeToManual(BOO NO RESULT LEAN change) GetChangeFlangeToManual( ) BOOLEAN SetCheckStockLength(BOOLEAN NO RESULT check) GetCheckStockLength( ) SetFirstFeedNegative (BOOLEAN firstNegative) BOOLEAN NO RESULT D:2 12. Gets the current check stock length setting. Gets the current add end excess setting. Gets the current add excess between bends setting. Information about fabrication for the bending/welding machine can be obtained by requesting the corresponding bending/welding result objects. Tells the fabrication machine manager if flanges at the end of the pipe piece can be changed to manually welded in order to be able to fabricate the pipe piece. Gets the current change flange to manual setting. Tells the fabrication machine manager if excesses between bends can be added to the pipe piece in order to satisfy bending machine fabrication requirements.

Priority can take the following values: ‘FLANGED’ ‘NONFLANGED’ ‘NOPREFERENCE’ GetWeldingMachineResult( ) SetClutchEndPriority(STRING NO RESULT priority) GetClutchEndPriority( ) STRING ‘FLANGED’. “NOSTRETC H” Gets the current material stretch configuration. Config can take the values : ‘SYSTEMDEFAULT’ ‘MACHINE’ ‘MATERIAL’ ‘NOSTRETCH’ GetMaterialStretchConfig( ) STRING “SYSTEMDE FAULT”. ‘NONFLANG ED’. D:3 12. ‘NOPREFER ENCE’ Gets the current clutch end priority.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Name Result BOOLEAN Purpose Gets the FirstFeedNegative setting of the fabrication machine manager. SetMaterialStretchConfig(ST NO RESULT RING config) Sets the stretching parameters of the bending machine for the following fabrication tests. “MATERIAL”. WELDINGMA Gets a CHINERESU WeldingMachineResult LT object with information about the welding machine for the last fabrication test. Informs the fabrication machine manager about which end should be inserted in the bending machine clutch.0 . “MACHINE”. GetFirstFeedNegative ( ) GetBendingMachineResult( ) BENDINGMA Gets a CHINERESU BendingMachineResult LT object with information about the bending machine for the last fabrication test.

The pipe piece does not collide with the Bending Machine collision planes.2 BendingMachineResult Name Result DBREF DBREF BOOLEAN Purpose Bending machine used Pipe piece being checked Whether passed checks pipe piece has bending machine BendingMachine( ) PipePiece( ) Pass( ) ValidMaterial( ) ValidOD( ) ValidWallThickness( ) BOOLEAN BOOLEAN BOOLEAN The Bending Machine can deal with the pipe piece material. BendingMachineAcceptsPipePi BOOLEAN ece(DBREF pipePiece) WeldingMachineAcceptsPipePi BOOLEAN ece(DBREF pipePiece) D.0 .Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Name Result Purpose Quick check to establish if the current bending machine accepts the given pipe piece. First leg doesn’t excess the initial feed of the bending machine The Bending Machine can deal with the bend radius of the pipe piece. The Bending Machine can deal with the pipe piece wall thickness. Quick check to establish if the current welding machine accepts the given pipe piece. End excess required. feed excesses ValidInitialFeedLength( ) BOOLEAN ValidBendRadius( ) BOOLEAN AllBendsSameRadius( ) WithinCollisionPlanes( ) BOOLEAN BOOLEAN FailureIsResolvable( ) BOOLEAN PipePieceStartExcess( ) PipePieceEndExcess( ) PipePieceFeedExcess( ) REAL REAL REAL ARRAY D:4 12. The Bending Machine can deal with the pipe piece OD. Modifications to pipe piece definition is required to pass the bending machine checks Start excess required.1. Array of required. All the bends in the pipe piece have the same radius.

Bend in direction of flow. material before PipePieceStart FlangeManuallyWelded( ) PipePieceEndFlangeManuallyW BOOLEAN elded( ) PipePieceCutLength( ) PipePieceFinishedLength( ) EndsExcessPassed( ) FeedExcessPassed( ) FlangeModifiedPassed( ) BendingDirectionForward( ) REAL REAL BOOLEAN BOOLEAN BOOLEAN BOOLEAN As above. The flange at the start of the pipe piece is accepted by the welding machine.0 . Length of fabrication.1. Check against preference for change in state. but with excesses removed. End flange required to be manually welded.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Name Result BOOLEAN Purpose Start flange required to be manually welded. The Welding Machine can deal with the pipe piece OD. ValidMaximumLength( ) BOOLEAN ValidStartFlangeGroup( ) BOOLEAN D:5 12. Check against preference for change in state.3 WeldingMachineResult Name Result DBREF DBREF BOOLEAN Purpose Welding machine used Pipe piece being checked Whether passed checks pipe piece has welding machine Welding machine( ) PipePiece( ) Pass( ) ValidMaterial( ) ValidOD( ) ValidMinimumLength( ) BOOLEAN BOOLEAN BOOLEAN The Welding Machine can deal with the pipe piece material. Check against preference for change in state. The length of the pipe piece is greater than the minimum length of the welding machine. D. The length of the pipe piece is smaller than the maximum length of the welding machine.

4 BendingTable Name Result DBREF DBREF BOOLEAN ? BENDACTIVI TY ARRAY Purpose Pipe piece relates to bending table PipePiece( ) BendingMachine( ) ClutchArriveTube( ) CheckSum( ) Activities( ) Bending machine reference True if the bending machine clutches the arrive tube NOT IMPLEMENTED Array with bending activities for the pipe piece D.1.1. Maximum number of welded flanges the can be handled by welding machine MaxWeldedFlanges( ) REAL D.6 WeldingTable Name Result DBREF DBREF DBREF BOOLEAN Purpose Pipe piece relates to welding table PipePiece( ) WeldingMachine( ) ArriveFlange( ) ArriveFlangeWelded( ) Welding machine reference Flange at arrive of pipe piece True if welding machine set.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data ValidEndFlangeGroup( ) BOOLEAN The flange at the end of the pipe piece is accepted by the welding machine.1.5 BendActivity Name Result REAL REAL REAL Purpose Feed activity value Rotation activity value Bend activity value Feed( ) Rotate( ) Bend( ) D. arrive flange can be welded and arrive flange is pre-welded D:6 12.0 .

0 D:7 12.2.0 0.1 Database Support The database ddl supports the following new objects to support fabrication machines. leave flange can be welded and leave flange is pre-welded Angle between the arrive flange and leave flange where both pre-welded LeaveFlange( ) LeaveFlangeWelded( ) Angle( ) REAL D.2 FMGRP .3 FMBEND .2.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Name Result DBREF BOOLEAN Purpose Flange at leave of pipe piece True if welding machine set.2. FMWL .Fabrication Machine World Top Level Element Attribute NAME DESC Description Name Description Type name text Default unset unset D.2 D.Fabrication Machine Group Attribute NAME PURP DESC FUNC Description Name Purpose Description Function Type name text text text Default unset unset unset unset D.Fabrication Machine .0 .Bending Attribute NAME STFP STFC MAXLP Description Name Constant Stretch Factor Proportional Stretch Factor Maximum Length of Pipe Type name real real real Default unset 1.0 6000.

5 FMBDIM .4 FMBPLN .0.Springback/Stretch Factor Attribute NAME OD WTHICK MATREF ANGSPA ANGSPB STFP STFC Description Name Outside Diameter Wall Thickness Material reference Angle At 20 Degrees Angle At 120 Degrees Constant Stretch Factor Proportional Stretch Factor Type name real real real real real real real Default unset 0.0 120.2.6 FMBSST .Fabrication Machine .Dimension Attribute NAME OD WTHICK GRIP MLEF MLIF FCMEAS BRAD Description Name Outside Diameter Wall Thickness Grip Measure Type name real real real Default unset 0.0 0.0.0 0.Plane Attribute NAME MINPLN MAXPLN Description Name Plane Minimum Point Plane Maximum Point Type name real[3] real[3] Default unset {0.Fabrication Machine .0 1.0 0. 0.2.0 0.Bending . 0.0 0.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data D.0 0.0 0.0 D:8 12. 0.Bending .0.2.0 .0 Minimum Length Excluding real Flanges Minimum Flanges Length Including real real real Flange Correction Measure Bend Radius D.0 3. 0.0 0.Fabrication Machine .0 20.0} D.Bending .0.0} {0.

0 0.2. A set of pseudo attributes to allow it to be queried in the design.7 FMWELD .1 New Attribute for PTCA. PTAX.SKEY Attribute NAME DESC SKEY Description Name Description Flange group skey Type name text text Default unset unset unset D. PTPOS Attribute PZAXI Description Z direction Type Directio n Default unset D.Welding Attribute NAME MINOD MAXOD MINLP MAXLP Description Name Minimum Outside Diameter Maximum Outside Diameter Minimum Length of Pipe Maximum Length of Pipe Type name real real real real Default unset 0. PTMI. D.2.0 0.8 FMWSK .2 New Pseudo Attributes for Branch Members All these pseudo attributes are valid for Branch members.3 Automatic Flange Alignment This development allows piping components to be connected so that by default their Z directions are aligned.0 D.Fabrication Machine .0 . The functionality comprises the following: • • • • An attribute on the different ppoint elements in the catalogue.Fabrication Machine Welding .3. An enhanced connect command to take account if set. This is particularly useful for ducting and other BOXI piping. Datacon check. D:9 12.3.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data D.0 6000.

However.3 Connection Command The command syntax is unchanged. Angle between alignment direction for arrive ppoint and previous component. Alignment direction for arrive ppoint Alignment direction for leave ppoint. ANGLE IS 45 D:10 12.0 .. D. D850 BAD ARRIVE ALIGNMENT GEOMETRY. Also if an orientation is specified as well such as CONNECT AND P3 IS UP then this overrides the alignment direction. ANGLE IS 15 D850 BAD LEAVE ALIGNMENT GEOMETRY. If the element being connected to is a gasket or a weld and does not have a set PZAXI then the ppoint of the next element is used instead.3. Angle between alignment direction for leave ppoint and next component. Angle between alignment direction for specified ppoint and adjacent component.Pipework Design User Guide Fabrication Machine Data Attribute PZDIR AZDIR LZDIR PQAANG AQAANG LQAANG Comment Alignment direction for specified ppoint. D.4 New Datacon Warning Messages The following warnings are now generated. it now uses valid alignment directions in place of a default orientation. If there is either one or two unset alignment directions then the connection command functions exactly as before.3. It checks that a PZAXI is set for the relevant ppoint of the current element and for the ppoint it is connecting to. They are not output if the branch is badly routed.

including the use of expressions to select relevant data. E:1 12. Should you need more detailed information about any topic.0 .2 AVEVA PDMS Reference Manuals The full PDMS documentation set includes a number of reference manuals which give detailed explanations of all the technical concepts involved. it describes only the main concepts needed to get you started.Pipework Design User Guide Other Relevant Documentation E Other Relevant Documentation This guide is intended only as an introduction to those parts of AVEVA PDMS most relevant to Pipework design. • E. Graphical Model Manipulation Guide Introduces the DESIGN Model Editor. Reporting Introduces the database reporting utility available from within most AVEVA PDMS applications.1 PDMS Introductory Guides The following guides introduce the principal AVEVA PDMS facilities to new users (this Pipework guide forms part of the set): • • • • • • • • • Introduction to Common Functionality Introduces PDMS and related products HVAC Design User Guide Accommodation User Guide Structural Design Using PDMS User Guide Pipework Support Design User Guide Introduction to Templates ISODRAFT User Guide Drawing Production User Guide Introduces the range of facilities available in the DRAFT module. which enables you to position and orientate selected Plant items using the mouse pointer. As such. E. These manuals also describe the underlying command syntax which can be used to control AVEVA PDMS directly (thus bypassing the forms and menus interface). Those particularly relevant to Pipework design include: • DESIGN Reference Manual Covers concepts and commands for all design disciplines. the following documents are available.

Includes a list of PML 2 Objects. E. Catalogues and Specifications Reference Manual Explains how to set up a PDMS Catalogue and create tabulated specifications. the command syntax relating to the objects is included.3 General Guides The following guides are intended for use only by experienced PDMS users who want to write their own applications: • Software Customisation Guide Explains how to write your own application macros using PML (AVEVA’s Programmable Macro Language) and how to design your own forms and menus interface. For forms and Menus objects. Members and Methods. DRAFT Reference Manual Explains the commands for the PDMS 2D drafting facilities. • E:2 12.0 . Software Customisation Reference Manual Supplements the Customisation Guide.Pipework Design User Guide Other Relevant Documentation • • • ISODRAFT Reference Manual Explains how to create customised piping isometric plots.

Pipework Design User Guide Sample Plots F Sample Plots This appendix comprises some examples of typical (though relatively simple) plots showing the sorts of piping design outputs that can be created using with the AVEVA PDMS pipework application.0 . F:1 12.

0 .Pipework Design User Guide Sample Plots F:2 12.

. 3:1 Branch rules Querying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:14 Ckey attribute . . . . . . routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide Index Numerics 3D Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:33 Assemblies creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:54 Catalogue database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1 CE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:99 Autocolour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:9. . . . . . . . B:3 Attribute definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1 administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:1 Clash definition . . . . 9:17 Adjacent field components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 Attributes. . . D:9 Automatic pipe routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:1 Assembly build origin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 Bores nearly equal . . . 10:10 Auto-resolve preferences C Cardinal direction handles . . . . . . . . . . . 10:10 AWELD . . . . 9:7 Choose form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:21 Application definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:13 definition . 4:3 Pipework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:5 selection rules . . . . . . . . 3:2. . . . . . . . . . . . 8:19 Branch details . . . . 9:18 Administrative elements creation . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:5 CE limits button . . . 3:4. . . 9:4 Aligning components . . . . 11:10 Behind item . . . . . . . . . . 8:19 Branch constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:44. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:22 Assembly hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59 Auto-naming preferences defining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:5 Attached welds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:17 Branch definition . . . . . . . 2:1 Equipment . . . . . . . 9:15 Bend numbers . . 5:3 Applying rules . . . . . 9:17 Add CE with colour . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . . . . . 3:1 A Add . . . . . . . .0 . . 8:36 Branch tail . . . . . . . . 8:13 definition . . . . 9:5 defining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:19 Branch head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 Always generate new data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:22. . . . . 9:3 Branch components . . . 9:1 3D View . . . . . . 9:7 Add to spool drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:7 Automatic flange alignment . . . . . 7:4 Index page i 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:3 B Backing sheet . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:41. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1 standard designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:53 Connection types . . . . . . . . . . . 4:2 Design Dataset element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Field weld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 Design point . . . 8:5 D Data consistency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:10 modifying specification . .Pipework Design User Guide Clash checking checking process . . . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:6 Create weld form . . . . . 9:24 at Joints . . . 9:2 Database hierarchy . . . . . . . . 9:25 Display list . 7:4 Clash limits . . . . . . . . . 7:5 Clashing extent . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Covered Nozzles . . . . . . 9:5 definition . . . . . 8:31 DB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:52 F Fabrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:24 Delete spool breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:60 Extend route handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Department creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:8 creating . 6:25 selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1 Design Data element . B:1 Continuous network . . . . 8:57. . 7:4 obstruction levels . . 7:4 Clearance definition . . . . 8:7 Create 3D View . . . 4:3 definition . . . . . . . 9:13 Fields . . . . 9:7 Colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:6 Event driven graphics . . . . . 8:20. . . . . . . . . . . . 9:4 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1 Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:51 Feature picking . . . . . . . . . . 7:5 extent of clash . . . . . . . . . 8:81 Forced spool breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2. . . . . . . 5:30 choosing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:5 Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:32. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:81 Flanges on routing planes . . 9:2 Fabrication machine data . . . . 9:3 Flange spacing on racks and planes . . . . . . 8:27 Conceptual pipe rack . . 5:3 Deletable components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Fabrication database . . . . . . D:1 Feature highlighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:25 Drawing annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:92 Component aligning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 G Geometry set . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 DATUMs as routing points . . . . . . . 9:27 Drawing contents . . . 9:1. . . 4:3 Erection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:46 Free Tails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:14 Current element . . . . . . . . 3:4 Index page ii 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4 obstruction list . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5 picking . . . . . . . . D:1 Fabrication machine manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:5 principles . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:9 Drawlist . . . . . . . . . 9:26 Drawing Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:14 Design templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:6 E EDG . . . . . . . . 9:3 Design data checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 at Branch/Pipe changes . . . . . . . . . . 4:2 Direction of travel on routing planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:27 Field . . . . . . . 6:3 setting attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:7 Command syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:5 clash limits . 9:2 Default specification setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:10 Data consistency checking principles . . 5:12 modifying bore . . . 5:3 Graphical view . . . 4:2 Design Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:44 Direction of view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 Equipment creating . . 9:14 Element definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:41. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4 Colour selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2. . . . 3:1 representation . . . . 9:23 Free tail with Pipe racks or planes . . . 8:87 Component positioning . 9:7 Display isometric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9:6 Menu bar . 9:23 O Obstruction levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:19 L Limits setting for view . . . . . . B:3 Implied welds . . . . B:2 N Naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 definition . . . 8:18 Minimum tube . . . . . . . . . . 8:14. . 9:21 Numbering update . . . . . . 9:26 Isometric drawing contents . . . . . . 3:1 creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Isometric plotting . . . . . B:2 Importing P&IDs . . . . . . . . . . 4:11. F:1 Isometric plots generating . . . . . . . . . 9:8 Manual data selection . . . . . 8:25 Nozzle (NOZZ) definition . . . . . . . 8:16 Orientation rules . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:20 Numbering update options . . . 9:13. . . . . 8:8. . 8:57 In tube weld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:7 H Hard obstruction . . 3:2 Members list . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Isodraft application window . 7:4 Head See Branch head . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Joint connections . . . . . 9:12 Member definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:24 Index page iii 12. . . . . . 12:16 Orthogonal view . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2. . 9:1 Isometric Plots . . . . 9:21 Measure . . . . . 9:11 Insulation specifications modifying . . . . . . . 9:18. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:2 Modify Components Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1 Multiple 3D Views . 4:1 Nozzles. . . . 7:4 Obstruction list . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 Joint types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:19 Inserting a weld . . . . . . . . A:1 OUTFITTING Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 Numbering settings form . . . B:2 Joint group . 3:1. . 5:2 Head work-point . . . . routing changing . . . . . . . . . . . 8:20. . . . . . . . . . B:2 Joint numbers . . . . 8:7 Numbering . . . . . . 6:13 ISO option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:15 Include adjacent field components . . . . . . . . . 6:2 Module definition . . . . . . . . 3:3 Look option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1 Outputting spool data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:5 Logging in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:20 J JNTGRP . . . . . . . . 9:7 IWELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:3 Implied joints . 3:2 K Key elements . . . . 8:24 Locking components . . . . B:2 Joints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:7 OUTFITTING DESIGN database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:11 Non-orthogonal routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Isodraft messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2 OUTFITTING Design database 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:12 Measuring a pipe . . . . 8:22 Head-relative positioning . covered . .Pipework Design User Guide Graphical views . . . . . . 9:5 Multiple mode splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Non-graphical assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:13 Inspecting the site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Isometric view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:26 Isometric drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:20 M Manipulating a 3D View . . . . . 6:16 I IJOINT . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:5 Order. . . . . . . . . . . 7:1 tolerances . . . . . 3:4 Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:27 Misalignment checking . . . . 9:7 Isodraft . . . . . . . . 4:13 Locked components . . . . 9:24 Owner definition . . . . . . . . . 9:2 Network . . . . . .

. . 5:55 Position options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:56 Pipe Packing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:46 Pipe packing additional gap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Piping Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . .C:4 Pipes splitting with a plane . . . . . . 5:2 p-leave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:1 administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Plotting options . . . 10:1 Pipe Spool Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:12 P-point . . . . . . . 7:4 Picking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:27 Positioning Control form . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:12 Production Checks . . . . . . . . 8:20. . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 PML functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:14 Pipe spool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:87 Packing on racks and planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Plotting facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:16 Positionable components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:51 conceptual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide P P&ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Pipe definition . . . . . . . 8:65 Registry Index page iv 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 P-arrive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 Physical clash definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . 9:24 Plotting spool drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:41 Pipe sketches . . . 8:36 Quick Pipe Routing . . . 4:1 geometry set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 creating . . 4:7 Plotting . . . 5:3 Production Check running . . . . . . . . . . . 12:1 Piping Assembly Component Rules . . 9:16 P-leave . . . . . . . . 5:12 Piping Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 modification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 Preparing a site . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 PURP attribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:83 weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 p-arrive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 point set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 definition . . . 8:84 Pipe packing methods . . . . . . . 10:1 Pipe Production Checks form options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:7 Pipe Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 Part numbers . 9:1. . . . . 8:61 in Rules . . . 8:44 adding to Branch constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:44 Pipe routes deleting . 5:31 Position rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59 Q Querying Branch rules . . . 6:22. . . . 8:81 rules . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:2 Plot view manipulating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59 Purposes Routing rules . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:1 Pipe splitting .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:24 Positioning components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:55. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:2 Pulled bend numbers . . . 8:55. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:53 packing . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:78 steelwork for . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:9 creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:13 Primitive creating . . . . . . . . 9:24 isometrics . . . . . . 8:5. . . . . . . . . . 5:3 Popup Menus on the QPR Handle . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:3 Reducers rules . . . . 6:1 Pipework spooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:13 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:21. . . 8:46 Panning view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:81 Packing methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Pipe gap rounding . . . . . . 10:1 setting up . . . 4:11 Parameters catalogue components . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:83 Packing pipes on Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:57 P&ID files neutral description language . 5:39 R Real welds . . . . . . . . . . 8:47 Pipe racks direction of travel . . . . . 10:9 Properties parameterised dimensions etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:10 Primary origin . . . . . . . . . . . 6:18 Pipework . 8:83 Pipe piece definition . . 5:65 Pipe routing handle . . . . . . . . . . . 8:69 Point set . . 8:83 height . . . . . . . . 12:14 Piping component aligning . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:5 Soft obstruction . . . . . . . . . 3:4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:71 Exit Plane (EXIT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:37 packing . B:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Spool Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:36. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Spool Drawing definition . 8:65 Clash exclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:27 Routing points position . . . . . . . 8:16 Routing pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:18 Routing order . . . . . . . . . . 8:61 reducers . . 8:38 Routing Points . . . . . . . . 9:18. . . . . . . . . . 9:9 Rotating view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:11 Rotation handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:5 definition . . . . . . . . . . 8:70 deleting . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:85 Rules for Pipe Racks . . . . . . 9:16 Secondary origin . . . . . . 9:19 Spool/field limit attribute . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Spooling networks . . . . . 5:44. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:1 Spool data outputting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:61 Ptr-processing (PRPR) . . 8:68 Pipe Racks . . . 9:24 Spooler . . . . . . 9:2. . . . . . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:72 Heavy Pipe (WEIG)) . 9:3 Remove CE . 8:40 adding to branches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:21 Index page v 12. . . . . . 8:61 Orientation on major axis (MAJO) . . . . . 8:70 RWELD . . 8:31 Routing rules . . . . . 9:1. . 8:71. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:59 constructing . 8:71 Shoe heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:55 Routing messages . . . . . 6:22. . . . . . 9:22 Single Mode Splitting . . . . 9:16 Spools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:81 Routing planes creating . . . 8:59 Rule Set . . . . . . . B:3 Shop/Field setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:9 Remove from Spool Drawing . 9:1 Spool/field limit attributeSee SFLimit attribute 9:16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:68 Entry Plane (ENTR) . . . . . . 8:78 PML functions in . . . . 5:51. . . . . . . . . . . . 9:5 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:31 Using Datums . . 8:68 logical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:55. . . . . . . . . . 12:13 Select data for spool elements form . . . 6:24 Site creating . . . . . . . 8:65 removing from component . 8:32. . . 8:60 purposes . . . . 8:72 including from another set or world 8:34 Location (LOCA) . . . . . . . . . . . 8:41 multiple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:80 Downstream pipe requirement (DNSM) 8:66 Elevation (ELEV) . . . . . . . 9:6 SFLimit attribute Spool breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:68 Orientation on minor axis (MINO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:75 Rule World . . . .9:22. . . . . . . . . . . 9:9 Searching . . . . . . . 4:4 Specification reference (SpecRef) definition . . . . . . . . .Pipework Design User Guide creating . . . 9:19 Spool size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:33 Bends or Elbows . 9:1 Spooling . . . . . . . 8:75 Rules applying . . . . . . . 9:1 Shop Flag . . . . . 9:21 Setting up a 3D View . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 renaming . . . . . . 8:85 Shoe height rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:19 Reports templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:72 Flange Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:20 Spool shipping volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16 Spool breaks . B:3 S Save View . . . . . . . . 9:24 Shoe height . . . 9:1 Spool numbers . . . . . . . 8:40 finding automatically . . . . . . 8:85 Travel Plane (TRAV) . . . . . . . 9:16 Spool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 selecting equipment . . . . . 9:3 Spool drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:71 Extra Gap (ADGP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:65 Shoe height (SHOE) . . . . 7:6 Restore View . 9:3 Sketch creation options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:62 real . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1 SPLDRG . . . 8:70 Upstream pipe requirement (UPSM) 8:67 rules real expressions in . . . . . . . . 9:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:4 Specification default . . . . 9:22 Shop Flag status . . . . . . . . . . . 8:14 Routing Planes . . . . . 8:85 Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:35 Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9:7 Type of view . . . . . . . 4:11 zooming . . . . . . . . . 9:24 STAP pseudo-attribute . . 3:5 definition . . . 8:16 STLE pseudo-attribute . . . . . 8:5 Title bar . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 Status summary form . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 Startup display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 T Tables . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 inserting . . . . . . . . 3:4 Tool bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:18 Update/Number spool drawing form 9:18. . . . . . . . . 4:11 U Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:16 Unlocking components . . . . . 9:13 WLDGRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:11 View limits . . . . . . . . B:2 Welds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:14 Subequipment element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:9 centre of interest . .Pipework Design User Guide Standard isometrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . positioning . . . . . . . . 9:7 W Weld connections . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Work-points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:13 panning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 Touch definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:50. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:21 V View 3D/graphical . . . . . 4:11 rotating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:24 Viewing direction . . . . . . 7:4 Tracing specifications modifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Types of welds . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:11 View contents . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:11 STYPE Rules . . . . . . 5:2 Tail work-point . . . . . . . 3:3 Status bar . . . . . 8:66 Starting . 9:7 Index page vi 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:13 Transparency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4. . . 9:18 Weld types . . . 9:3 Zooming view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:21 Update/Number button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:22 Tail-relative positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:2 Switching modules . . . . . . 11:11 Tail See Branch tail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3 SPOOLER session . . . . . . 9:5 View direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:20 Update choice handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 . . . . 9:7 Types of joints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:6 View control form . . . . . B:2 Z Zone creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:6. . . . . . . 8:22 World definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1. . 8:20 Tees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B:2 Weld numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:21 Use first available data . . . . 8:66 Stock length defining . . . 9:6. . . 3:1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:24 Update . . . . . . . 9:20. . . . . . . .

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