2012

Summer Guide
to Santa Fe
and northern
new mexico
the Santa Fe new mexican
|
www.SantaFenewmexican.com
Bienvenidos
After dark
|
Gallery trot in Truchas
|
Low and slow in El Norte

27-hole golf course

Seven restaurants, from fne dining to casual

Full service spa and salon

A world-class, museum quality collection of Native American artwork

Easy access to hiking, rafting and other outdoor adventures
BUFFALO THUNDER RESORT
LET’S PLAY
BUFFALOTHUNDERRESORT.com

877-THUNDER
30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, Pueblo of Pojoaque, NM 87506. 15 minutes north of the Santa Fe Plaza on Highway 84/285
217 W Water St • Santa Fe NM 87501
(505) 983 1012
info@marjigallerysantafe.com
marji gallery&
contemporary projects
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
Casweck Galleries
One of a Kind Fine Art
Fine Paintings, Sculpture, Jewelry and Furniture
203 W WATER STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO IN THE WATER/GALISTEO DISTRICT
CASWECKGALLERIES@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASWECKGALLERIES.COM
5 0 5 - 9 8 8 - 2 9 6 6
t
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CHARITY AnTIque SHow
August 4
th
and 5
th
2012
Sneak Preview August 3
rd
2012
Lujan Center • Expo NM • Albuquerque Fairgrounds
Benefting UNM Hospital’s
Nurse Oncology Endowment
4000 Central SE • ABQ, NM 87108
Open 7 Days • (505) 255-4054
cowboysandindiansnm.com
greatsouthwesternantiqueshow.com
2012 Bienvenidos 5
6 2012 Bienvenidos
Georgia O’Keeffe, Black Place, Grey and Pink, 1949. Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Gift of The Burnett Foundation. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.
217 JOHNSON Street, SaNta fe • 5O5.946.1OOO • OKMUSeUM.OrG
OPeN DaILY 1O aM – 5 PM • OPeN Late, UNtIL 7 PM, frIDaY eveNINGS
Georgia O’Keeffe
and the Faraway:
nat ur e anD i mage
M aY 1 1 , 2 O 1 2 – M aY 5 , 2 O 1 3
t He eXHi Bi t i On t Hat SHeDS neW L i gHt On t He
aDVent ureSOme aSPeCt S OF O’ KeeF F e’ S L i F e & art
Georgia O’Keeffe, White Place in Shadow, 1941. Oil on Canvas, 19 x 10 inches. Loan, Private Collection. Todd Webb, Georgia O’Keeffe at Glen Canyon, 1961. Gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches.
Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation. © Todd Webb Estate.
2012 Bienvenidos 7
8 2012 Bienvenidos
enlas calles | on the streets
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2012 Bienvenidos 9
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Our location on the Plaza also has museum quality
antique and contemporary Native art
Native Jackets
u
On The Plaza
u
Santa Fe, New Mexico
505-984-0005
u
888-420-0005
www.NativeJackets.com
u
www.toadlenatradingpost.com
MARIA MARTINEZ
NAMPEYO
MARGARET TAFOYA
Mandarin Collar Blazer from the Chey Eagle Blanket
10 2012 Bienvenidos
COVER PHOTO
Don J. Usner
Fred and Anthony Rael in Fred’s 1967 Impala
show car, “Liquid Sunshine”
COVER DESIGN
Deborah Villa
OWNER
Robin Martin
PUBLISHER
Ginny Sohn
EDITOR
Rob Dean
EDITORIAL
Creative director Deborah Villa
986-3027, dvilla@sfnewmexican.com
Magazine editor Pat West-Barker
986-3052, mag@sfnewmexican.com
ADVERTISING
Advertising director Tamara Hand
986-3007
ART DEPARTMENT
Scott Fowler, manager
Rick Artiaga, Dale Deforest,
Elspeth Hilbert, Melyssa Holik
Advertising layout Christine Huffman
ADVERTISINGSALES
Michael Brendel, 995-3825
Gary Brouse, 995-3861
Kaycee Cantor, 995-3844
Mike Flores, 995-3840
Margaret Henkels, 995-3820
Belinda Hoschar, 995-3844
Cristina Iverson, 995-3830
Stephanie Green, 995-3820
Jan Montoya, 995-3838
Art Trujillo, 995-3820
NATIONALS ACCOUNT MANAGER
Rob Newlin, 505-995-3841
nationals@sfnewmexican.com
SYSTEMS
Technology director Michael Campbell
PRODUCTION
Operations director Al Waldron
Assistant production director TimCramer
Prepress manager Dan Gomez
Press manager Larry Quintana
Packaging manager Brian Schultz
DISTRIBUTION
Circulation manager Michael Reichard
Distribution coordinator Casey Brewer
WEB
Digital development Geoff Grammer
www.santafenewmexican.com
ADDRESS
Office: 202 E. Marcy St.
Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
Advertising information: 505-986-3082
Delivery: 505-986-3010, 800-873-3372
For copies of this magazine, call 428-7645
or email caseyb@sfnewmexican.com.
enlas calles | on the streets
8 Where to park in downtown Santa Fe
mosaciode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
12 Sunset, Rio Grande, El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro
14 Broncos, bandstand, marimas and a naturalist’s birthday
16 Martín Rios’ cool summer salad and cooler head prevail
18 City of markets —Four not to miss, seven more to note
20 Collectibles for all tastes and budgets
22 Five Santa Fe chefs share some favorite things
24 Must-reads for NewMexico history lovers
cientos de años | hundreds of years
26 Letting our freak flags fly: City’s dwellers embrace ‘different’ label
28 Signs of the times: NewMexico’s state symbols offer mini-history lessons
30 10 Landmark images: Telling NewMexico’s history through its art
33 Turn left at A-l-b-u-q-u-e-r-q-u-e: ‘R’ we there yet?
adentro| inside
2012 Bienvenidos 11
BIENVENIDOS
2012 SUMMER GUIDE TO SANTA FE AND NORTHERN NEW MEXICO
colores | colors
46 Lowriders cruising el norte: An important part of Hispanic culture
52 The sounds of music: There are treats for every taste this summer
55 Going to the dogs: Off-leash and on-patio in Santa Fe
59 Life is short, art long —wear comfortable shoes
62 Love the nightlife? Live music after dark
aire libre | fresh air
68 Fort Union is a ghost of its former self
70 Villanueva State Park: Agreat place to hike, picnic or fish
72 Small is educational: The Pecos National Historical Park Museum
76 Santa Clara Pueblo’s enterprises cover a broad spectrum
78 Rules of etiquette for pueblo visitation
79 Picuris Pueblo’s quiet village and elegant hotel are worlds apart
84 Digging it in Madrid: Nonconformists rule former mining town
comida| food
87 Cutting out the carne: High cuisine while eating lowon the food chain
90 Benedictine monks brew‘with care and a prayer’ in Abiquiú
94 Brewing up a storm: Where to find the suds in Santa Fe and points north
96 The guard changes but The Palace still stands
98 Eating at the extremes: Far-flung communities offer local specialties
por el camino| along the road
104 Legendary and living: Taos celebrates its remarkable women
107 High art: An art scene thrives in the mountain town of Truchas
110 Road trippin’ in Northern NewMexico
almanaque | almanac
115 Calendar of summer events (and moon cycles)
los esperamos | we’ll wait for you
123 Mountain bikers blaze a trail in October
124 Come back for special fall and winter events
PUBLI SHED MAY 13, 2012
12 2012 Bienvenidos
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ANNERINO PHOTOGRAPHY
Sunset, Rio Grande, El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro
“There was no record but memory and it became tradition and then legend and then religion.
So long ago that they did not knowthemselves howlong, their ancestors, the ancient people,
moved. They went with the weather. Seasons, generations, centuries went by
as each brought discovery of places farther toward morning.”
— PAUL HORGAN, 1954, GREAT RIVER BOOK
“My journey with camera and pen through the Land of Enchantment was not very direct. I traced many
highways, dirt roads, trails, and stony paths across NewMexico to witness sundown on the Rio Grande. There were
many forks and detours. Each demanded its own time-line, proffered its own symbol, presented its own distinct
marker, and carried its own legend: There were Spanish caminos, jornadas, and entradas; Old West trails, wagon
routes, and outlawtrails; Native American trade routes and migration trails; literary and artistic paths and sojourns.
Together they enticed me across a landscape of crimson deserts, mysterious cliff dwellings, lofty mesas, and snow-
blessed mountains I hadn’t seen before. Many were —and remain —like no place on earth. When Willa Cather
wrote her endearing novel in 1927, Death Comes for the Archbishop, she described my own feelings that surfaced
while tracing echoes of the past across NewMexico’s beloved land: ‘They whispered to the ear on the pillow,
lightened the heart, softly picked the lock, slid the bolts, and released the prisoned spirit of man into the wind,
into the blue and gold, into the morning, into the morning.’ Hypnotized by the soothing sounds of the Rio Grande,
I counted my self lucky to be among them, my spirit set free into the luminous twilight.”
— JOHN ANNERINO
NEWMEXICO: A PHOTOGRAPHIC TRIBUTE, CENTENNIAL EDITION BY JOHN ANNERINO
Globe Pequot Press, 2012 Available at Garcia Street Books and Collected Works Bookstore, Santa Fe, and online from
Amazon.com. Inscribed editions are available fromthe author: www.johnannerinobooks.com.
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
2012 Bienvenidos 13
\uscun o| lncian Arts c Cu|turc
Museum Hill off Old Santa Fe Trail | (505) 476-1250 | indianartsandculture.org |
They Wove For Horses
Diné Saddle Blankets
Through March 4, 2013
Thc grcat ¡ricc anc ski|| thc linc takc in
acorning thcir horscs is rc·ca|cc in this
cis¡|ay o| wca·ings |oth c·crycay anc |anci|u|
Buchsbaum Gallery of
Southwestern Pottery
Ongoing
\orks |ron thc ¡uc||os o| Ncw \cxico anc
Arizona arc ¡rcscntcc hcrc, rc¡rcscnting thc
c·o|ution o| connunity tracitions
Woven Identities
Through April 1, 2014
lxquisitc |askcts wo·cn |y artists rc¡rcscnt
ing 6o cu|tura| grou¡s in six cu|tura| arcas
o| wcstcrn North Ancrica thc :outhwcst,
Crcat lasin, l|atcau, Ca|i|ornia, thc North
wcst Coast, anc thc Arctic
Top: Margarete Bagshaw, Ancestral Procession, 2010. Bottom, left to right: Diné tapestry- and diagonal twill-weave single saddle blanket, Spider Woman Cross style, 1880–9, photo by Blair Clark. Western Apache jar, c. 1900, photo by Addison Doty. Tesuque polychrome jar, 1890, photo by Blair Clark.
Margarete Bagshaw:
Breaking the Rules
Through December 30, 2012
laintings, |ronzcs anc ¡o|ychronc ccranic
·cssc|s ccnonstratc thc nu|ticincnsiona|ity
o| thc artist’s cazz|ing work
14 2012 Bienvenidos
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
GENE PEACH
Clap your hands, tap your toes or get up and boogie: The
Santa Fe Bandstand brings free, danceable music to the
Plaza four nights and two afternoons a week betweenJuly 5
andAugust 16. Local andtouring bands play traditional New
Mexican, Tex-Mex, Latin American, folk, swing, jazz, blues,
rock, country, zydeco, soul and just about anything else
you can think of on Monday through Thursday evenings at
6 p.m, and at noon on Mondays and Wednesdays. See
www.Santafebandstand.org/schedule for the 2012 lineup.
Santa Fe’s inaugural Marimba
Festival gathers 10
international artists in
The City Different for
multiple concerts
and workshops
celebrating
marimba music
from around the
world between
June 6 and 9.
Catch free concerts
at the gazebo on the
Plaza from 3-4:30
p.m. on June 7 and
from 3:30-4:30 p.m. on
June 8; a free workshop for
kids and families from 9-11 a.m.
at the New Mexico School for the
Arts, 275 E. Alameda St., on Saturday
morning, June 9; and a free concert from 12:30-2
p.m. that day at the St. Francis auditorium in the New Mexico
Museum of Art. Order tickets to four other events from the
Lensic box office (505-988-1234 or www.ticketssantafe.org/
tsf). For a complete list of concerts and workshops, visit www.
santafemarimbafestival.org.
PUT ON YOUR DANCING SHOES
Santa Fe Marimba Festival
Rodeode Santa Fe —one of the top
60PRCArodeos intheU.S. —hosts
it 63rd annual competition from
June 20-23 at the fairgrounds, 3237
Rodeo Road. Events include bull
riding, bareback and saddle bronc
riding, team and tie-down roping,
steer wrestling and barrel racing.
Rodeo queen and princesses will
be crowned before the first night’s
show. The annual rodeo parade
through downtown Santa Fe starts
at 10 a.m. on June 16. Tickets to all
events can be ordered online at
www.ticketssantafe.org, by calling
505-988-1234, or visiting http://
rodeodesantafe.org.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, ERNEST!
What forces transform a man from a professional hunter of wolves to one who champions the intelligence of wild animals and a right
relationship with the natural world?
On Saturday, August 11, the Academy for the Love of Learning celebrates the 152nd birthday and the legacy of Ernest Thomson Seton
— writer, artist, naturalist, early environmentalist and co-founder of Boy Scouts of America — with free programs from 1 to 5 p.m. on
the grounds of Seton’s former Santa Fe home. The event includes admission to the Seton Gallery and Archives display housed in the
academy’s center and a guided one-hour tour of the Learning Landscape program installed outside the ruins of Seton Castle. Dramatic
readings, hosted by David L. Witt, Seton biographer and curator of the Seton Legacy Project, will bring some of the naturalist’s best
writings to life. For more information, log onto www.aloveoflearning.org and click on Seton Legacy.
— PAT WEST-BARKER
Ride ’em, rope ’em, race ’em
GENE PEACH
2012 Bienvenidos 15
on the plaza in santa fe
NEW MEXI CO
MUSEUM OF ART
IT’S ABOUT TIME:
14,000 YEARS OF
ART IN NEW MEXICO
505.476.5072
NEW MEXI CO
HI STORY MUSEUM/
PALACE OF
THE GOVERNORS
ILLUMINATING THE
WORD: THE SAINT
JOHN’S BIBLE
505.476.5100
on museum hill in santa fe
MUSEUM OF I NDI AN
ARTS & CULTURE
THE BUCHSBAUM GALLERY OF
SOUTHWESTERN POTTERY
505.476.1250
MUSEUM OF
I NTERNATI ONAL
FOLK ART
FOLK ART OF THE ANDES
505.476.1200
16 2012 Bienvenidos
What’s redandblue
andgreenall over?
Martín Rios’ blue lump crab salad is the
essence of summer, combining the color and
crunch of radish, house-dehydrated beets and
micro-greens with the freshness of fennel
and pear, a spicy avocado pudding and citrusy
Greek yogurt dressing. On the appetizer
menu at Restaurant Martín in Santa Fe.
ALWAYS A BEARDSMAID?
In the 2 1/2 years since he opened his accessible
fine-dining restaurant with his wife Jennifer,
Martín Rios has been nominated three times
by the James Beard Foundation — once for
best new restaurant and twice for best chef
in the Southwest. Although he has yet to win
the coveted award, Rios — who has competed
on Iron Chef and received rave reviews from
such national publications as Bon Appétit, The
NewYork Times, the Washington Post and the
Los Angeles Times — is philosophical about his
continuing “Beardsmaid” status. Another chef
he knows was nominated for 10 years before he
finally won, Rios said with a laugh and a shrug.
— PAT WEST-BARKER
PHOTO BY KITTY LEAKEN
2012 Bienvenidos 17
Funded and hosted
& Gift Show
SANTA FE COUNTRY FURNITURE
525 Airport Road • 660-4003 • Corner of Center Drive & Airport
1708 Cerrillos Road • 984-1478 • Corner of 2nd & Cerrillos
Monday - Saturday • 9 - 5 • Closed Sundays
Furnishing New Mexico’s Beautiful Homes Since 1987
Dining Room • Bedroom • Entertainment • Lighting • Accessories

Reasonable prices every day of the year!
Please come in, you’ll be pleasantly surprised.
Featuring Attractive Handcrafted Furniture
Southwest Style • One-of-a kind Pieces
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
TRADITIONAL
SPANISHMARKET
ANDCONTEMPORARY
HISPANIC MARKET
July 28-29
Traditional Spanish Market is the oldest juried
market featuring Spanish colonial arts in the
U.S., selling traditional tinwork, retablos, bultos,
straw appliqué and other historically significant
arts and crafts since 1926. Established in 1986,
Contemporary Hispanic Market showcases regional
Hispanic artists working in a wide range of formats,
including photography, printmaking, painting,
sculpture, and jewelry. Visit spanishcolonial.org
and contemporaryhispanicmarket.com for more
information and a schedule of events.
SANTAFE
INDIANMARKET
August 18-19
Traditional and contemporary art forms and jewelry
fill hundreds of booths at what may be the nation’s
—and the world’s —most important annual Native
art market. Nowin its 91st year, Santa Fe Indian
Market brings thousands of the most gifted Native
artists in the Americas to the Santa Fe Plaza and
surrounding streets. Music, dance, food, film, a live
auction and a Native dress competition round out
the weekend. Visit swaia.org for more history and a
schedule of events.
ALSOSCHEDULEDFOR 2012
NATIVE TREASURES INDIAN ARTS
FESTIVAL May 26-27
ART SANTA FE July 12-15
GIRLS INC. OF SANTA FE ARTS & CRAFTS
SHOW August 4-5
MOUNTAIN MAN TRADE FAIR AND
RENDEZVOUS August 9
THE RAG RUG FESTIVAL AND CRAFT SHOW
August 11
WHITEHAWK ETHNOGRAPHIC ART SHOW
August 9-11
ANTIQUE INDIAN ART SHOW August 12-14
— PAT WEST-BARKER
Summer in Santa Fe sparkles with specialty markets offering one-of-a-kind
arts and crafts.
SANTAFE INTERNATIONAL FOLKART MARKET
July 13-15
The largest event of its kind in the world, the International Folk Art Market brings more than 150 accomplished folk
artists from about 50 countries to Santa Fe to show and sell their handmade work in a festival atmosphere. A week
of associated events starts July 7, and includes an artists’ procession and free community celebration at the Santa
Fe Railyard from 5-9 p.m. on July 12. Visit www.folkartmarket.org for tickets and a complete schedule.
SOFAWEST: SANTAFE
August 2-5
The Sculpture Objects Functional Art Fair visits Santa Fe for the fourth time, bringing with it dealers specializing in
international arts and design. Silver, glass, ceramics and fiber arts are among this year’s must-see works. There’s an
opening night preview (by invitation or ticket purchase only) on August 1 and lectures scheduled throughout the
event. Visit www.sofaexpo.com/santa-fe/2012/ for more information.
Tomarket, tomarket …
18 2012 Bienvenidos
Roxanne Swentzell, sculptor
Photo Kitty Leaken
2012 Bienvenidos 19
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
A milagro cross made
in Mexico is $70 at
Ritual Adornments
Hand-painted,
one-of-a-kind
parfleche boxes
by Native
American artist
Jerry Ingram are
filled with an
assortment of
chocolates, $62
at Todos Santos
Artist Don Lucas created
this squash blossom
style necklace of sterling
silver and Mediterranean
coral, $1,995 at Ortega’s
on the Plaza
Zuni artists Sheldon and
Nancy Westika created
cufflinks of sterling
silver and Sleeping
Beauty Mine turquoise,
$180 at Keshi
A tin heart from
an artist co-op
in San Miguel de
Allende, Mexico,
is $30 at Ritual
Adornments
Shopping
A natural clay seed pot by
Rachel Concho of Acoma
Pueblo is $300 at Keshi
A Mexican talavera
ceramic plate is $10.95
at Guadalupano Imports
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
20 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 21
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
On the menu: An Ethiopian spice blend called berbere. It’s a combination that includes ground ginger,
cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, fenugreek and red pepper. It improves everything, especially beef and
pork. At Café Pasqual’s, we use it in our carne asada and in our summer ribs. We put it on fish, too. We
buy an organic version in bulk and sell it on our website.
At home: I never go to the store without buying fennel and lemons. I use themrawand cooked all year
round —they brighten and add flavor to everything.
Katharine Kagel, chef/owner, Café Pasqual’s (http://pasquals.com/)
On the menu: Chile —red and green. Our NewMexico green chile is roasted, chopped and
frozen. We use the Caribe method to make our red sauce, cleaning and soaking whole pods,
then putting themin a high-tech blender with some water. Chile has been grown here for
hundreds of years and is part of our culture. You can’t get it anywhere else.
At home: Eggs fromthe farmers market and more chile! In my spare time I growmy own chile on a plot
of land in Villanueva. We make a lot of omelets and huevos rancheros.
George Gundry, chef/owner, Atrisco Café &Bar (http://atriscocafe.com/)
On the menu: Anise, in one formor another —fresh fennel, anise seed, fennel pollen. I always put
it somewhere —in fish, in cookies, in chicken stock. People will say they don’t care for licorice, but
if they don’t knowit’s there, they usually like it.
At home: There’s always Heinz ketchup and organic, unsweetened soy milk in my refrigerator. The
ketchup is just there. I use the soy milk in my cereal and make an Alfredo sauce with it.
Eric DiStefano, chef/co-owner, Geronimo, Coyote Café and The Den
(www.geronimorestaurant.comand www.coyotecafe.com)
On the menu: Sweet soy sauce (aka kecap manis). We use it in our sweet and spicy bar nuts,
add it to a pomegranate reduction and mix it into a soy vinaigrette; it’s not particularly salty on its
own. It adds body and a deep base flavor note to dishes.
At home: Dijon mustard is always on hand. I use it to make a simple French vinaigrette —mustard, red
wine vinegar, salt and a really good olive oil. My kids are starting to like it on their salads, too.
Charles Dale, executive chef, Terra restaurant at Encantado Resort (www.encantadoresort.com/
dining/restaurant/)
James Caruso Campbell began exploring Spanish and Spanish-inspired foods when he moved
to NewMexico in 1989. His first cookbook captured the flavors of Santa Fe’s El Farol restaurant,
where he was executive chef for seven years. His newest book —España: Exploring
the Flavors of Spain —celebrates the ingredients that formthe backbone of the
cuisine at La Boca, the tapas bar and restaurant he opened in 2006.
In the book: Beautifully photographed recipes for salads, soups and stews,
vegetable, meat and seafood tapas, main dishes and desserts. Prominently
featured are Spanish cheeses, pork, olives, olive oil, peppers and fish —from
preserved white anchovies to canned and jarred conservas, fromdried salt cod
to fresh fish and shellfish —it’s all here for the adventurous home cook.
Find a copy at local bookstores, on La Boca’s website (http://labocasf.com/) or at
Amazon.com.
— PAT WEST-BARKER
‘These are afewof myfavorite things …’
Chefs, like the rest of us, have a fewpet ingredients that showup on their tables over and over again. We asked a fewof Santa Fe’s
pros what we can always find on their menus in one formor another —and what is always in their home pantry.
22 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 23
A Season of Splendor
Classical Concerts • Southwestern Art Auction
Music from
Angel
Fire
This project funded in part by public funds from Angel Fire, Las Vegas,
San Miguel County and Raton Lodgers’ Tax, Town of Taos,
New Mexico Arts, a division of the Dept. of Cultural Affairs
and the National Endowment for the Arts.
ANGEL FI RE • TAOS • LAS VEGAS • RATON
AUGUST 17 - SEPT 2, 2012
FOR TICKETS & INFORMATION
(575) 377-3233 • Toll Free (888) 377-3300
musicfromangelfire.org
108 Don Gaspar
505-988-9558
open daily
Komarov dress with
Tony Malmed jewelry
24 2012 Bienvenidos
mosaicode santafe | mosaic of santa fe
The names of things
What is a movida? Who is Debbie
Jaramillo? Where is the Bosque
Redondo?*
The Encyclopedia of Santa Fe
and Northern NewMexico
answers these and many other
questions about el norte’s places,
spaces, famous (and infamous)
denizens, flora, fauna, family
names, local lore and much,
much more. Author Mark Cross
began his research for the book
shortly after moving to Santa Fe
in 1996 —first for his own
education, then as a resource for
visitors, transplants and even
natives who may not know
everything about their home
territory. Listings are
alphabetical and include a
pronunciation guide. Indexes
make the material easy to find;
Cross’ breezy style makes it easy
to read. An entertaining and
useful addition to any library, The
Encyclopedia is available locally
at Collected Works Bookstore
and Garcia Street Books and
online fromAmazon.comor
www.encyclopediaofsantafe.com.
Painting the town
Howdid tiny Santa Fe, tucked
away in relative isolation in the
mountains of Northern New
Mexico, become one of the top
art markets and cultural travel
destinations in the U.S.? Santa
Fe resident, gallerist and art
writer Stacia Lewandowski
explores just that question in
Light, Landscape and the Creative
Quest: Early Artists of Santa Fe.
With stories about more than
40 painters, writers, architects
and sculptors who moved to or
visited Santa Fe —fromCarlos
Vierra in 1904 to Alfred Morang
in 1937 —she traces both the
artists’ influence on the culture
and development of the City
Different and Northern New
Mexico’s impact on their work.
Four walking tours, ranging
fromapproximately one to three
miles, make up a second, smaller
book tucked into the cover of the
first. Walking in the Paths of the
Artists: AGuide to the Artists’
Homes shares Lewandowski’s
knowledge and love of the
neighborhoods once occupied
by these early artists —tours
she also leads in person (book
through her website, www.salska.
com). Beautifully reproduced
images and artfully designed
pages make the books themselves
—available at Collected Works
and through the author’s
website —small works of art.
Foodfor thought
andtable
Tasting NewMexico: Recipes
Celebrating One Hundred Years
of Distinctive Home Cooking
by four-time James Beard
Award-winning authors Cheryl
and Bill Jamison is more than
a cookbook. “The book ranges
beyond just recipes …” said
Cheryl Jamison, “to tell the
story of the cuisine culturally
and historically. …” NewMexico
can trace its culinary heritage,
they conclude, directly to early
Puebloans who first lived and
farmed here; to the Spanish
and Mexican colonists who
brought newfruits, vegetables
and livestock to the region;
and to the Anglo-American
settlers and waves of immigrants
who followed in the 19th and
20th centuries. The Jamisons
gathered recipes and stories
fromhome cooks across the
state, searched past and present
community cookbooks and
interviewed chefs, restaurateurs
and food producers. You’ll find
everything fromcarne adovada to
cabrito, albóndigas to watercress
salad here. But it’s the stories
the Jamisons tell of the farmers,
ranchers, and others who helped
create, and then preserve, New
Mexico’s singular culinary and
cultural history that make the
book as suitable for the bedside
table as for the kitchen counter.
Tasting NewMexico is available
in local bookstores, at the New
Mexico History Museumgift
shop and via Amazon.com.
What’s
past is prologue
The Plazas of NewMexico —a
more than 300-page collection
of essays, site drawings and
hundreds of historic and
contemporary photos of 75 of the
plazas remaining in NewMexico
—is more than a celebration
of the state’s past: It also offers
models for revitalizing existing
urban sprawl and for creating
more sustainable and enlivening
public spaces. Edited by Chris
Wilson of the University of New
Mexico’s School of Architecture
and Planning and architect
Stefanos Polyzoides, founder
of the Congress for a New
Urbanism, the book looks at
three design traditions more
abundant in
NewMexico than in any other
part of the U.S. —the Native
American “center place” with
kivas and terraced residences;
the Spanish colonial village
plaza with church and courtyard
houses; and Anglo town squares
accommodating courthouses and
business blocks. The result, while
scholarly, is also highly readable
and should intrigue anyone who’s
interested in livable cities or
heritage tourismthat is not at
“the expense of local quality of
life” —a topic Wilson previously
explored in The Myth of Santa
Fe. The Plazas of NewMexico
is available at Collected Works
Bookstore and Garcia Street
Books and online at Amazon and
Barnes &Noble.com.
*Answers: Amovida is
a secret or under-the-
table deal, usually made
by a politician. Debbie
Jaramillo was Santa Fe’s
controversial mayor from
1994 to 1998. The Bosque
Redondo, about 160 miles
southeast of Santa Fe, is
where 8,500 Navajo and
450 Mescalero Apaches were
interned in the 1860s. Their
forced march there is known as
the Long Walk.
— PAT WEST-BARKER
Reading between the times
2012 Bienvenidos 25
26 2012 Bienvenidos
BY EMILY DRABANSKI
Santa Fe ranks second in having America’s “Strangest People,” say
Travel &Leisure magazine readers —lagging just a bit behind New
Orleans. Those same readers rank Santa Fe No. 1 for “Cultural Getaway,”
“Independent Boutiques,” “Home Décor and Design Stores” and “Peace
and Quiet.”
While the merits of the individual rankings can be debated, the results do reflect some
of the initiatives that led to Santa Fe being nicknamed the “City Different” not long after
NewMexico became a state in 1912.
Chris Wilson, J.B. Jackson Professor of Cultural Landscape Studies in the University
of NewMexico School of Architecture and Planning, wrote extensively about that
period in his groundbreaking book, The Myth of Santa Fe: Creating a Modern Regional
Tradition. In that work, Wilson examines howcultural leaders in the years following
statehood shaped both the look and image of the capital city —a campaign that
ultimately led to the development of Santa Fe as an international tourismdestination.
He also adds sobering insight into the impact of the tourismboomand the proliferation
of ethnic stereotypes that resulted in cultural strife and social displacement among the
city’s Native American and Hispanic residents.
“I think that the state’s centennial is a good time to reflect on the past and to look at the
future,” Wilson said during a recent interview.
In NewMexico’s Quest for Statehood, 1846-1912, historian Robert W. Larson detailed
the political wrangling that came into play during NewMexico’s six-decade-struggle for
statehood, such as Texas’ claimof northeastern NewMexico, the Civil War controversy
over whether NewMexico would be a free state or slave state, and the maneuvers of
various individuals who fought to keep NewMexico a territory for their own gain. One of
the uglier recurring obstacles to statehood that Larson’s book recounts was a prejudice
against Spanish-speaking people who were very different fromthe majority of Anglo
pioneers settling the Western frontier.
“There was a prejudice [against] Spanish speakers who were also Catholics,” Wilson
said. “It was a different language, religion and —because of [the territory’s] ties to
Mexico, there also were fears about the people’s allegiance. Up until statehood, the kind
of American xenophobic take on NewMexico was strong, and it’s the one that local
leaders had to fight against. And then, once statehood is achieved, Santa Fe in particular
realizes that tourismis a way to turn the local economy around.”
Image control
During this period, many Anglos —among themarchaeologists and artists —came
to Santa Fe to flee the straight-laced ways of the East and became quite enamored of
Letting our freakflags fly
City’s dwellers embrace ‘different’ label
T. HARMON PARKHURST, COURTESY PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES (NMHM/DCA), NEG. #118249
Santa Fe Fiesta parade, East San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico, ca 1925-45
2012 Bienvenidos 27
both the Hispano residents and the Native peoples. “They really liked the more relaxed
lifestyle that they found in Santa Fe,” Wilson said.
Some of these newcomers had read the dispatches of Charles F. Lummis in the
Los Angeles Times (circa 1884) as he crossed the deserts of the Southwest, extolling
the virtues of the people and the landscape. “Though my conscience was Puritan, my
whole imagination and sympathy and feeling were Latin,” Lummis wrote. Lummis
would write five books and then serve as editor of The Land of Sunshine magazine
(renamed Out West in 1902) from1894 to 1909. These publications often presented
a romanticized —and, by today's standards, somewhat stereotypical —version of the
region’s people and scenic beauty.
Adding to the area’s allure were the marketing campaigns of the Atchison, Topeka
and Santa Fe Railroad fromthe 1890s to the 1930s. Under the direction of WilliamH.
Simpson from1900 to 1933, writers, artists and photographers were paid or given train
tickets to help promote the AT&SFroute in brochures, articles and advertisements.
The artist Gerald Cassidy originally came to Albuquerque to recover from
tuberculosis in 1890, moving to Santa Fe in 1912. His paintings of the landscape and
Pueblo people reached a national audience because of the support of the railroad. Eanger
Irving Couse, one of the founders of the Taos Society of Artists, had his paintings of Taos
Pueblo people widely distributed, particularly on the railroad’s calendars.
Molding acitystyle
When NewMexico became a state on January 6, 1912, Santa Fe —the state’s capital
—was a city of about 5,000 people. Yet by that point, Wilson said, the city had seen about
30 years of economic decline.
Arthur Seligman (then mayor of Santa Fe) appointed archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewitt,
director of the Museumof NewMexico and School of American Archeology (later
School of American Research), and Sylvanus Morley, archaeologist and museumstaff
member, to the city’s planning board in the spring of 1912. Harry H. Dorman, who ran a
real estate company and insurance business and served as the secretary-treasurer of The
Santa Fe NewMexican, headed the committee.
Unable to hire a city planner, Dorman sent letters to leaders in large cities soliciting
advice. Many of the answers reflected the era’s national City Beautiful Movement, which
placed an emphasis on the beautification of parks and the building of stately museums,
such as those developed for the 1898 Chicago Exhibition. It was an effort to limit the
imprint of industrialismwhile encouraging homogeneity within cultural urban centers.
Santa Fe’s city planning board developed a plan but could not afford to embrace the
prevailing Beaux Arts classicismthat favored enormous public buildings with towering
pillars and ornate decoration. “They realized they could not afford marble for public
buildings but wanted a unified style,” Wilson said. Board member Morley also objected
to radical changes that would destroy “our most priceless possession, an individuality,
which raises us above hundreds of other American cities.”
Wilson notes that Santa Fe was not only the smallest community with a City
Beautiful plan but also that it broke newground by combining the standard emphasis
on architectural homogeneity with local revival style based on a study of the city’s old
architecture. “Architectural image became central to stimulating tourismand reversing
economic decline,” Wilson said.
The city planning board’s 1912 plan emphasized the promotional value of preserving
adobe buildings and the long, lowstyle of houses through tax incentives and regulation
along the city’s oldest streets. Much of that look is still retained today in what is loosely
termed “Santa Fe Style.”
Within the next fewyears, Wilson said, the city and Museumof NewMexico began
promoting Santa Fe as the City Different, distinguishing their efforts fromthe national
City Beautiful movement.
¡Vivaladifference!
Today, the City Different designation often includes a free-spirited sense of “anything
goes” that also has its roots in the decades before and after statehood.
“The attitude was almost ‘What happened in Santa Fe stayed in Santa Fe,’” Wilson
said with a chuckle. “It was part of developing a newAmerican lifestyle that definitely
was more relaxed than the rigid ways back east. You had the influence of people like
Lummis, whose writings were bringing in people fromSouthern California. And then
Santa Fe had its ongoing development of its art colony. Fromabout 1916 on, you had
artists fromGreenwich Village coming out on the train —often spending the entire
summer in Santa Fe. And then more of those people began staying.”
While Wilson has raised concerns about the consequences of the tourismboom, he’s
optimistic about the future. Today the city has developed creative tourisminitiatives
that give visitors a more authentic experience.
“I think the centennial is important,” he said. “We need to look back, but we also need
to think about the future and sustainability of our communities.”
Tolearnmore
The Myth of Santa Fe: Creating a Modern Regional Tradition by Chris Wilson,
The University of NewMexico Press, 1997
NewMexico’s Quest for Statehood, 1846-1912 by Robert W. Larson,
The University of NewMexico Press, 1968
hundreds of years | cientos de años
JESSE NUSBAUM, COURTESY PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES
(NMHM/DCA), NEG. #013029
Construction of newportal, Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, NewMexico, 1913
JESSE NUSBAUM, COURTESY PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS PHOTO ARCHIVES
(NMHM/DCA), NEG. #066658
Railroad depot, Santa Fe, NewMexico, ca 1912
28 2012 Bienvenidos
BY EMILY DRABANSKI
ILLUSTRATION BY WILLIAM ROTSAERT
Whether this is your first trip to the Land of
Enchantment or your 10th, or you’ve lived here
all your life, NewMexico’s centennial summer
is the perfect time to learn more about some of
our state’s official symbols.
State Aircraft | Hot Air Balloon
With the popularity of the Albuquerque
International Balloon Fiesta, which officially
took off in 1977, hot air balloons became
prevalent, colorful additions to NewMexico’s
turquoise skies. In March 2005, hot air balloons
were designated the state aircraft. If you ever have
the opportunity to float above Santa Fe in one of
these, you’ll definitely knowyou’re not in Kansas
anymore.
State Bird| The Greater
Roadrunner
Beep! Beep! Yes, you can actually
see that bird scooting across New
Mexico’s highways —especially on
the flatter terrain below7,000 feet.
You’ll see plenty of roadrunners downstate, but you
can also often catch a glimpse of these fleet-footed birds
on the southern edges of Santa Fe. The Legislature
adopted the Greater Roadrunner as the state bird
in March 1949. An interesting tidbit: The Warner
Brothers’ cartoon Fast and Furry-ous, directed by the late
Chuck Jones, featured the animated debut of both the
Roadrunner and his nemesis Wile E. Coyote in September
1949. (Today, you can see other creations by Jones at
Chuck Jones Gallery, 135 W. Palace Avenue.)
State Mammal | AmericanBlackBear
If you’re camping in the area, make sure your food is
secured in a bear-proof place, such as the trunk of your car
or suspended froma tree. Otherwise, you might encounter
our state mammal, the American black bear, adopted in
February 1963. One of the country’s most famous bears,
Smokey Bear, was a cub that survived a fire downstate in
NewMexico’s Lincoln County National Forest. Smokey
Bear became a popular symbol of the U.S. Forest Service
and the National Advertising Council in 1950. He’s buried
in Smokey Bear State Park in Capitán, near Ruidoso.
State Necktie | Bolo Tie
Men can leave their standard neckties at home when
they come to Santa Fe. Whether you’re horseback
riding or attending the Santa Fe Opera, you can just
slip on a bolo tie. (Women in the Southwest often get
a hankerin’ to wear a bolo tie, too.) Often made with a
sturdy braided leather cord, bolo ties are fastened with
either silver conchos or turquoise, which is the state gem.
Arizonans tend to call thembola ties, but the NewMexico
Legislature clearly proclaimed the bolo the official state
tie in 2007.
State Question| Redor Green?
If you order an enchilada, don’t be surprised if your
server asks, “Red or green?” —a question that refers
to your choice of chile. The state Legislature made the
question official in 1996 in recognition of the state’s most
important cash crop. In NewMexico, chile generally
refers to a sauce made fromred or green chile peppers. If
you see it spelled “chili” —usually on a chain restaurant’s
menu —it’s likely to be a closer cousin to Texas-style
chili, a less spicy combination of ground beef, beans and
peppers. If, after being asked the state question, you can’t
decide what you want, just give a popular local answer
—“Christmas” —and your server will soon bring you an
enchilada covered in both red and green.
State Vegetables | Chile, Beans
If chile is important enough to be central
to the state question, it would be a safe
bet the pepper also would be the state
vegetable. But determining which
vegetable deserved the designation
created quite a heated debate back
in 1965, until the Legislature decided
that beans and chile were inseparable
and designated both as state vegetables.
The Hatch Chile Festival, in Southern New
Mexico, celebrates the beloved pods every
Labor Day weekend. On the very same weekend,
Wagon Mound in northeastern NewMexico
generally celebrates Wagon Mound Bean Day. In
Santa Fe, expect fresh chile to be at its peak in early
September —just in time to order steaming plates of
both state vegetables at Fiesta de Santa Fe.
State Cookie | Bizcochito
NewMexico was the first state to adopt an official cookie,
and it chose the bizcochito in 1989. Anise and a bit of
brandy give this sugar cookie a special zing and,
while a number of recipes exist for
this treat, locals swear it does not have
authentic flavor unless it’s made with
lard. Brought to Northern NewMexico
by early Spanish settlers, bizcochitos are
a favorite dessert at family celebrations,
especially during winter holiday season.
State Capitol | The Roundhouse
The state canboast having both the newest and
oldest state Capitol building. Folks affectionately
call the newest Capitol “the Roundhouse.” Dedicated in
1966, it has a round center that has been modified with
four spokes that evoke the shape of the Zia sun symbol,
which can be seen emblazoned in red on the state flag.
Art lovers should check out the diverse collection of
contemporary art on display at The Roundhouse. The
Palace of the Governors, facing the Santa Fe Plaza on
Palace Avenue, is the oldest Capitol building in the United
States. Today, the adobe structure, built in 1610, houses
history exhibitions as an older component of the New
Mexico History Museum.
There’s more where these came from…
The NewMexico Secretary of State website —www.sos.
state.nm.us/KidsCorner/StateSymbols.html —lists many
more state symbols. There you can find everything from
a recipe for those yummy bizcochitos to a sample of the
state’s song. Youngsters might particularly like finding out
about some of the more obscure symbols, such as our state
fossil and state amphibian.
Signs of the times
New Mexico’s state symbols offer mini-history lessons
cientos de años | hundreds of years
2012 Bienvenidos 29
30 2012 Bienvenidos
cientos de años | hundreds of years
BY WOLF SCHNEIDER
NewMexico has a worldwide reputation as an art colony, what with Georgia O’Keeffe, Bruce
Nauman, Agnes Sims, Fritz Scholder and Gerald Cassidy all calling it home at some point in
their lives. It’s a place where the culturati came to paint Native Americans in the late 1800s
and where even the image of the detonation of the first nuclear bomb can be considered “art.”
So the showIt’s About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New Mexico, opening May 11 at the New
Mexico Museumof Art for a two-year run, seems like a natural. Here, we trace the trajectory
of NewMexico history through 10 of the 137 artworks in the exhibit.
1.
CLOVISPOINT
circa 13,650 to 12,800 years B.P.
MAKER UNKNOWN
The past is always present in NewMexico. With just
2.1 million residents in the fifth-largest state in the
country (only Alaska, Texas, California, and Montana
are geographically larger), NewMexico’s open country
allows artifacts like arrowheads to be stumbled
upon. This Clovis point dates back to prehistoric
Paleo-Indian culture at the end of the last glacial age.
Made of flint, agate or obsidian, the 3- to 4-inch long
Clovis point was created by a human, most likely to
hunt mammoths, said Joseph Traugott, curator of
20th century art at the NewMexico Museumof Art.
What makes it art? “The extreme level of craft and
the technology that is involved,” Traugott said. “After
these objects were found in the context of the extinct
animals, it raised a different understanding of howlong
humans have been living in NewMexico.”
2.
GALLUPBLACK-ON-WHITE
BOWL, CHETRO-KETL, CHACO
CANYON, circa 1000-1125 C.E.
MAKER UNKNOWN
Pretty much everything about Chaco Canyon is
shrouded in mystery. Located in northwestern New
Mexico, Chaco is hard to get to even today, with miles
of rough dirt road leading in. This national historical
park contains possibly the most remarkable collection
of Pueblo remains in all of the American Southwest.
Apre-Columbian cultural and historical area, it was
home to the Ancestral Puebloan people between A.D.
900 and 1150 (A.D. being the equivalent of C.E., or
Common Era). Notable on this prehistoric pot is a
complex design integrating painted positive shapes
with unpainted negative areas.
3.
SANTACOLETA/ST. COLETTE
circa 1780-1820s
BY PEDRO ANTONIO FRESQUIS
In the 1700s, Spanish colonial art began emerging from
the villages of Northern NewMexico and southern
Colorado as Hispano artists created devotional
artworks like this, which portray saints. They frequently
made retablos, painted on flat wooden panels, and
bultos —three-dimensional carvings. The tradition
continues today, with many santeros participating in
July’s Spanish Market in Santa Fe.
10Landmarkimages
Telling New Mexico’s history through its art
4.
INTERIORCOURTYARDOF
PUEBLO, SANTACLARA, NM
circa 1883
BY CHARLES CRAIG
Back in the 1880s, the conventional wisdomwas that
Native American cultures were going to disappear.
While fierce wars were being fought between soldiers
THE NEWMEXICOMUSEUMOF ART
107 West Palace Avenue
Phone: 505-476-5072 or visit
www.nmartmuseum.org
2012 Bienvenidos 31
5.
CUI BONO?
circa 1911
BY GERALD CASSIDY
Painted just as NewMexico was on the cusp of
statehood, this iconic figurative painting with the title
“Cui Bono?” —Latin for “To Whose Advantage?” —asks
what statehood’s impact will be and who will benefit
fromit. It depicts a Native American wrapped in a white
cotton blanket wearing leggings of blue jean material,
with Taos Pueblo in the background. The divided
composition positions the Taos Pueblo of the past on
the left and, on the right, the contemporary Indian.
Painter Cassidy was a founding member of the Santa
Fe Art Colony in the early 1900s. He died in 1934, after
contracting lead poisoning while painting a mural for
the Works Progress Administration.
6.
BLACK-ON-MATTEJAR
1919-20
BY MARIA AND JULIAN MARTINEZ
Possibly the most famous of American Indian potters,
Maria Martinez of San Ildefonso Pueblo, which is 20
miles northwest of Santa Fe, became internationally
known for her innovative black-on-black wares and
reinvigorated traditional pottery making. She generally
shaped her polished clay pots and then her husband
Julian painted the matte designs on them.
7.
FIRSTATOMICEXPLOSION
at a distance of about five miles,
Trinity Site, NewMexico
July 16, 1945
BY BERLYN B. BRIXNER
Aterrifying image, this photograph captures the
detonation of the first nuclear weapon at the Trinity
Site near Alamogordo, NewMexico. It documents what
is perhaps the most significant human-caused event in
the 14,000 years of human activity in NewMexico.
8.
ANGUSDEI
1950
BY REBECCA SALSBURY (STRAND) JAMES
While married to photographer Paul Strand in the
1920s, Rebecca Salsbury became part of an avant-garde
10.
SIEGEOFSANTAFE
2009
BY DIEGO ROMERO
Diego Romero connects past and present in the
complex narrative scenes of his contemporary ceramic
vessels, like this terra cotta pot that revisits the Pueblo
Revolt of 1680, when the Pueblo Indian people rose up
against the governing Hispanos in Santa Fe. The battle
is intentionally presented here as a cultural standoff.
Comic books and pop culture influence Romero’s
thoughtful conceptual style.
9.
CHIMAALTAR,
BERTRAM’SCRUISE, 1992
BY LUIS TAPIA
Aconceptual artwork imbued with contemporary
social commentary, this polychrome carved-wood
sculpture depicts the dashboard and bucket seats of
an automobile, with the rear-viewmirror presenting
an image of death riding in a death cart. The steering
wheel that is a crown of thorns references Spanish
colonial symbolism. The piece reminds us our lifetimes
are limited.
and Indians on the Great Plains, painter Charles Craig
rushed to NewMexico to paint what he thought might
become one of the last images of an Indian pueblo.
“These were peaceful agricultural Indians and the
image refutes the Native-as-savage stereotype of the
times,” Curator Traugott said. Santa Clara Pueblo still
exists 25 miles north of Santa Fe.
art circle in NewYork that included photographer
Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O’Keeffe. At
the invitation of Mabel Dodge Luhan, Salsbury
and O’Keeffe famously traveled to Taos in 1929,
with Salsbury teaching her friend O’Keeffe howto
drive that summer. Both Salsbury, a folk artist, and
O’Keeffe, a modernist painter, would later move here,
immortalizing Northern NewMexico scenes and
symbols such as these.
32 2012 Bienvenidos
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2012 Bienvenidos 33
BY KATE NELSON
What if Bugs Bunny really had taken that left turn at
Alba-quoy-kee?
Besides not getting lost, the wascally wabbit would have stolen
NewMexico’s admittedly slimclaimto Looney Tunes fame.
Worse, the Saturday morning cartoon
crowd might never have heard the name
of a city so difficult to spell that not even
the city itself gets it right.
Besides Bugs’ oft-repeated left-turn
punch line, a century of statehood has
produced enough NewMexico trivia to
keep Alex Trebek in Final Jeopardy answers for
a good while to come.
We’re not talking Diego de Vargas, Lew
Wallace and Robert Oppenheimer. We’re
talking little green men, Lucy’s best bud and TV’s
favorite meth lab. Here’s a glimpse at just some of
NewMexico’s contributions to American pop culture.
They came fromouter space
Roswell has its oft-dissed UFOincident and even built
an International Museumand Research Center to
(playfully) celebrate it. But the self-dubbed “Alien City”
hardly has a monopoly on the woo-woo side of New
Mexico.
Near Dulce, the red cliffs of Archuleta Mesa have long been
rumored to shield a secret underground facility of …of what?
Nefarious government defense programs? Alayover spot for
a superior species? In 2009, the History Channel brought its
UFOHunters programto NewMexico. Residents and other
folks interviewed reported seeing UFOs as well as signs of cattle
mutilation in the area, but hard evidence that Archuleta Mesa
holds a portal to anything other than mountain lions remains
elusive.
Other UFOstories have hovered around Aztec and Socorro, but
so far only Roswell can lay claimto a highly questionable black-
and-white movie of a so-called alien autopsy.
‘R’ we there yet?
Anyone who’s lived in Albuquerque knows the drill: Say the name
of your city to a mail-order clerk or an out-of-state colleague, and
you’ll surely be asked to spell it. So
we do: A-l-b-u-q-u-e-r-q-u-e.
Trouble is, that’s wrong.
NewMexico’s biggest city
was named for
Alburquerque,
a town in
the Spanish
province of
Badajoz. Howthe
already unwieldy
name lost one of its
R’s is a matter as ripe
for conspiracy theorists as
the probability of aliens in our
midst. One popular version holds
that an early postmaster or railway
worker committed that most human
of failings: a misspelling. Another version blames
Zebulon Pike. The namesake of a big hill in Colorado moved
into NewMexico when it was still a closed Spanish colony,
built an armed stockade and hoisted the U.S. flag over it.
Spanish soldiers promptly arrested himand carried him
to authorities in Chihuahua, Mexico, stopping along the
way for a meal with the priest of the San Felipe de Neri
church in Alburquerque. Pike later drewa map of the trip
and ID’d the Duke City as a one-RAlbuquerque.
Former Mayor Martin Chavez briefly tried to revive
the extra Rbut, in the end, settled for making the city’s
moniker a single Q.
Crunchtime
Would there be a Taco Bell today if Fabiola Cabeza de Baca
hadn’t included hard-shell tacos in her 1949 cookbook, The
Good Life: NewMexico Traditions and Food? Food historians
credit that as the first reference to today’s Tex-Mex mainstay.
As for Frito pie, one story, not surprisingly, holds that the gut-
bomb-in-a-bag was invented by the mother of Frito-Lay’s
Turnleft at A-l-b-u-q-u-e-r-q-u-e

hundreds of years | cientos de años
gut-bomb-in-a-bag
34 2012 Bienvenidos
founder. We prefer the origin
story that pays homage to
Teresa Hernández, who
worked at the Woolworth’s
lunch counter on the Santa
Fe Plaza in the 1960s.
The Five and Dime now
occupying the former
Woolworth’s site still
serves Frito pie, which
a 2006 MSNBCarticle
on iconic American
foods described as
“trash food” with
“wondrous charms.”
The red(and
green) carpet
Once they’ve achieved stardom, more
than a fewcelebrities have set down roots
in NewMexico. But another good-sized
batch started out here.
Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.
comwas born in Albuquerque, which
also nurtured future Doors frontman Jim
Morrison while his father was stationed at
Kirtland Air Force Base, and it served as a
career stop for Vivian Vance (aka Ethel
Mertz in I Love Lucy). La Cueva High
School in Albuquerque once counted
actors Neil Patrick Harris and Freddie
Prinze Jr. as students. Mike Judge,
creator of Beavis and Butt-Head,
sends his two dimwits to Highland
High School, just like the one in
Albuquerque.
And if you did any clubbing in the
Duke City in the 1990s, you got to
see the start of a little band named
The Shins.
Roswell was home to Hall
of Fame golfer Nancy Lopez,
actress Demi Moore and the late singer-
songwriter John Denver. Carlsbad claims NPRcorrespondent
Linda Wertheimer.
The name “Hilton” means first class around the world, but the founder of the hotel
chain, Conrad Hilton, came fromSan Antonio, NewMexico.
Fashion designer TomFord grewup in Santa Fe and still has a home here.
Buddy Holly recorded some of his early hits at Norman Petty’s Clovis studio.
Clovis was also the hometown of Hank Baskett, a onetime Lobo football star who’s
nowmarried to a onetime Playboy playmate with a reality TVshowcalled Kendra.
Ready for our close-up
Moviemakers have turned to NewMexico as a backdrop for everything from
the award-winning Crazy Heart to the fun-loving Beer for My Horses. But our
most memorable turn in the spotlight has nothing to do with turquoise skies and
breathtaking mountains. The TVshowBreaking Bad stars Bryan Cranston as Walter
White, a chemistry teacher with terminal lung cancer who decides to bank some
money for his family by building a meth lab. The showstars Albuquerque’s seediest
side —bedbug motels, drugged-up hookers and the desperate feel of empty pockets.
Will Albuquerque survive a primetime reputation as the epitome of the meth life?
Well, it bears noting that memories do fade. In 1974, Harper’s Magazine dubbed a
certain Northern NewMexico community “Smack City,” and if you can name that
town today, maybe you and Trebek should meet over a round of Final Jeopardy.
Buddy Holly
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SANTA FE
the
historic
railyard &
guadalupe
districts
2012 Bienvenidos 37
SITE Santa Fe
JUL 8, 2012–JAN 6, 2013
Gala Opening | July 6–8
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
MAR 3–JUN 2, 2013
More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness is presented by
the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and SITE Santa Fe. The
exhibition is organized by Elizabeth Armstrong, Curator of
Contemporary Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts.
More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness is made possible
by generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation
for the Visual Arts. Additional support is provided by Étant
donnés, the French-American Fund for Contemporary Art.
Image: Eva and Franco Mattes aka 0100101110101101.ORG,
Catt (Fake Cattelan sculpture), 2010.This announcement is
made possible in part by The City of Santa Fe Arts Commission
and the 1% Lodgers’ Tax.
1606 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501
505.989.1199 | www.sitesantafe.org
RAILYARD PARK SUMMER MOVIE SERIES
Every other Friday Night at dusk • June 1 thru August 24
Produced by Heath Concerts
RAILYARD PLAZA SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
June 2: The BoDeans • June 6: Fun!
AND MORE TO COME! • Produced by Heath Concerts
BUCKAROO BARN DANCE & BBQ • June 16 / On the Plaza
With The Paula Nelson Band • Produced by Buckaroo Ball
MAKE MUSIC SANTA FE • June 21 / On the Plaza
Produced by Santa Fean Magazine
CURRENTS 2012 OUTDOOR VIDEO SHOW • June 22 & July 7
Produced by Parallel Studios & SFUAD / ON THE PLAZA
SANTA FE PRIDE • June 23 / In the Park
Produced by Human Rights Alliance
FOLK ART MARKET COMMUNITY CELEBRATION
JULY12 / IN THE PARK • Produced by IFAM
BOYS & GIRLS CLUB FUN FAIR • September 1/ In the Park
Produced by Boys & Girls Club of Santa Fe
SANTA FE REPORTER AHA FESTIVAL • September 16 / On the Plaza
Produced by After Hours Alliance
SANTA FE RECOVERY DAY • September 22 / In the Park
Produced by Santa Fe Recovery Center
SANTA FE FARMERS MARKET • Tuesdays & Saturdays / On the Plaza
SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET • Saturdays / In the Park
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38 2012 Bienvenidos
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2012 Bienvenidos 39
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530 South Guadalupe @
the Railyard • 505. 983. 8558
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2012 Bienvenidos 41
42 2012 Bienvenidos
PETER ALEXANDER
SUBHANKAR BANERJEE
UTA BARTH
THOMAS JOSHUA COOPER
GLORIA GRAHAM
MORRI S LOUI S
ROBERT MOSKOWITZ
FRED SANDBACK
KATE SHEPHERD
IAI N STEWART
JAMES TURRELL
Transparent presents painting, photography, sculpture and works on
paper spanning over 50 years from the Lannan Collection. Each artwork
embodies an aspect of the word transparent, from transmitting light so
that what lies beyond is seen clearly, or being fine or sheer enough to be
seen through, to work that is free from pretense or deceit, or that seems
to allow the passage of x-ray or ultraviolet light.
28 APRIL–15 JULY 2012
Image: Uta Barth, Ground #78, 1997, color photograph on panel, 41 x 39 inches, Collection Lannan Foundation
309 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501
Tel. 505 954 5149
Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5pm (weekends only)
www.lannan.org
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2012 Bienvenidos 43
44 2012 Bienvenidos
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2012 Bienvenidos 45
46 2012 Bienvenidos 46 2012 Bienvenidos
STO
RY
A
N
D
PH
O
TO
S
BY
D
O
N
U
SN
ER
For years I’ve m
arveled
at processions of low
-slung cars m
aking their w
ay
through
sm
all N
orthern
N
ew
M
exico
tow
ns or w
inding along rural roads
against a backdrop
of old
adobe buildings, cham
isa-lined
arroyos, and
the
rolling red
foothills of the Sangre de C
risto
M
ountains. A
s they
cruise by
at
a leisurely
pace, it’s hard
to
m
iss their glim
m
er and
gleam
or the pulse of the
m
assive w
oofers rattling their w
indow
s.
Engine in Fred Rael’s 1967 Impala showcar, “Liquid
Sunshine”
Derrick Olverson and his 1951 GM
C
truck
Fred Rael in his
1964 Chevy Im
pala
convertible
Elmo Sanchez with his 1950 Chevy DeLuxe
L
O
W
R
I
D
E
R
S
Carmelito Martinez in his shop
2012 Bienvenidos 47
Eppie Martinez with Cindy Pacheco and Lisa Romo in his
1963 Chevy Impala
Robert Morales with his 1976 Pontiac Grand Prix Los Guys’ early 1950s-era dump truck in Chimayó
Eppie Martinez’s 1963 Chevy Impala in front of his shop Right, Eppie Martinez inside the office of Ray’s Hydraulics
These elegant anachronisms of
the road have been cruising the highways and
dirt roads of Northern NewMexico for decades. They were once
regarded as the inventions of miscreants and hardly worth a passing glance, but they
have gradually assumed a more respectable reputation. Thanks to the diligent efforts of generations of
aficionados, lowriders are coming into their own as a symbol of the Hispanic cultural identity of the region as evocative
as homegrown chile, rural adobe architecture, and the Spanglish dialect.
Lowriders ply the streets of many NewMexico towns, but the epicenter of lowrider culture in El Norte (Northern NewMexico) lies in the
Española Valley, including outlying rural towns like Chimayó. Here, individuals and commercial garages make lowriders out of all kinds of vehicles,
fromclassic old “bombs” (the large, rotund American cars fromabout 1930 to 1955) to fin-flaunting late ’50s Chevys, fromsleek Impalas and El Caminos
to Cadillacs.
I’ve long admired lowriders for their beauty and workmanship, but I haven’t understood much about themor the people who cruise them. My search to find out
more led me to Española’s lowrider impresario, Andres Valdez, who gave me a list of names and places to visit in the Española Valley.
Hopping inChimayó
I start with a trip to Chimayó, a place I knowvery well, and make my way to Ray’s Hydraulics, a small garage in the plaza of La Cuchilla. There I meet Epimenio Martinez, aka
Eppie, who explains to me his fascination with customizing cars: “I grewup with car work, and I owe it all to my dad, Ray. When I was 12, he gave me my first car, that one right
there,” he says, gesturing to a 1953 Chevy Bel Air in front of his shop, its hood propped open.
“My dad let me have that car to fix up before I could even drive. I been working on cars ever since —and nowI got all these people working with me, and we’re keeping pretty
C
R
U
I
S
I
N
G
E
L
N
O
R
T
E
C
H
I
M
A
Y
O
R
O
A
D
K
I
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T
Y
L
E
A
K
E
N
48 2012 Bienvenidos
busy,” Eppie says, pointing to the two-bay garage across
the parking lot, bustling like a beehive with men amid
vehicles in various states of reconstruction.
Amural on the wall behind Eppie’s old Bel Air depicts
one of Northern NewMexico’s most potent icons: the
Santuario de Chimayó, a church just down the road that
has long been revered as a holy site by people fromall
over the Southwest. It’s an apt juxtaposition, the lowrider
and the mural of the church. “That’s part of who we are,”
Eppie says as I admire the mural. “Howcould it not be?
Look where we are, man —we’re in the holy land!”
Eppie’s shop can handle just about any kind of car
customizing, using his own crewor calling on talented
workers and artists in the community to modify cars
and paint themwith air-brush art, much of it featuring
religious motifs and imagery that express a strong
affiliation with Hispanic culture. Eppie’s specialty,
though, is installing hydraulic systems, so that vehicles
can be raised up or down. Eppie relates to me howhe and
others in Chimayó became focused on this particular
aspect of the lowrider craft.
“It started out because we have rough dirt roads here
in Chimayó, you know. So we wanted to bring our low
riders to shows, but they’d get banged up on the bumps
and ruts and rocks here, so we figured out ways to jack
themup, take themto cruise in the shows, and then lower
themagain when we hit the roads here. Fromthere we got
crazier and crazier and built cars that jump and twist and
do all kinds of things.
“Guys fromCalifornia started to come here because
they made laws out there outlawing lowriders. We didn’t
have no laws like that here. We could go as lowor as high
as we wanted.”
Eppie and his father began to explore all the
possibilities with hydraulics and they eventually pushed
the limits further than anyone had before. As they
perfected their craft, they resolved to prove that they
could compete with other car customizers.
“I wanted to do something different, and to do it really
big, so I took a ’95 Ranger pickup and made it into a
hopper. We drove it to the Phoenix Super Showin 2005
and won first place.”
That “hopper”—a vehicle equipped with hydraulic lifts
that allowit to “hop” up and down, virtually on end—is
what put Ray’s shop on the map. I see that its fame has
only grown as Eppie shows me the dozens of trophies the
shop has won over the years.
BorninEast LA
I find the passion in the air at Eppie’s equaled at
Carmelito’s Muffler Shop, down the road four or five
miles in La Puebla, halfway to Española. Carmelito
Martinez, the proprietor of this highly successful garage,
relates to me his story of becoming a professional
mechanic and body worker.
“All my life I’ve been working on cars,” Carmelito says,
“and I’ve always loved the lowriders. I sawmy first one
when my uncle Calletano Martinez came home from
working in California, in the ’40s. He had a lowrider, and I
decided right there that I wanted one of those. My first car
was a ’41 Chevy. I paid eighty bucks for it.”
Carmelito’s tale jibes with the story told by historians,
who identify lowriders as one manifestation of a
tradition of customizing cars that began practically as
soon as Henry Ford perfected the mass production of
automobiles. The tinkering went in many directions, but
some car-customizing enthusiasts focused on low-riding
vehicles and began to cruise them“lowand slow” down
urban streets to showthemoff.
Some believe the lowrider phenomenon started in
Juárez, Mexico, and its sister city across the border, El
Paso, Texas. Advocates of this idea trace the first lowrider
cars to the Pachuco subculture that emerged in those
towns in the early 20th century. Others point to East LA
as the place of origin. Wherever it started, it is clear that
lowrider culture blossomed in Southern California when
a burgeoning automobile industry provided an abundance
of vehicles, newand used, and trained mechanics with the
skills to modify them. Customcars, including lowriders,
emerged in the 1930s in LA. As people made wealthy in
the motion picture industry and other businesses spent
their discretionary money on customcars, a newindustry
was born, transforming stock vehicles in manifold ways.
World War II put a damper on the customcar craze, but
it reignited in the postwar economic boomwhen an influx
of workers flooded LAfor the abundant jobs. Many of
the immigrants were Mexicans and NewMexicans, who
settled predominantly in East LA. Fewamong themhad
extra money for the luxury of buying a customcar, though;
instead they found old cars and fixed themup using parts
scavenged fromjunkyards. They developed a particular
fondness for lowriders, and East LAbecame a hotbed of
lowrider activity.
Carmelito’s tio Calletano was part of this demographic,
and he and many other NewMexicans brought their zeal
home along with their cars when they came to visit kin
in NewMexico. The practice of making lowriders found
a niche in the Hispanic culture of Northern NewMexico
as enthusiastic mechanics began to turn themout. New
Mexicans proved to be passionate about and adept at
their craft, perhaps because of a history of folk art and
pageantry with deep roots in Hispanic NewMexico.
“In those days, we made the cars lowby heating the
springs with a blowtorch,” Carmelito explains. “We still
do that sometimes, but nowwe have these air bags,” he
says, grinning broadly as he flips a switch to make his
white 1961 Impala sink to the ground with a loud hiss.
Agood piece of Carmelito’s business comes from
Interior, Carmelito’s ’58 Impala Elmo Sanchez’s 1950 Chevy DeLuxe Hydraulic pumps in Fred Rael’s 1967 Impala showcar,
“Liquid Sunshine”
Carmelito’s grandson Lloyd Gonzales in a 1951 Chevy
truck
Larry Martinez’s Buick Regal with mural by Randy
Martinez
Carmelito’s granddaughter Vanessa Gonzales in a 1960
Impala
2012 Bienvenidos 49
making lowriders for other people. “I used to just do my
own stuff,” he says, “but about 1972 I started working for
others. I’ve worked on so many cars, I can’t tell you, and I
have about a dozen of my own here that I’ve kept.”
Carmelito’s car collectionis stashedinsecure garages
aroundhis modest house inLa Puebla, near the homes he
andhis wife grewupin. Like most Hispanics inNorthern
NewMexico, his roots go deephere, andjust across the
fieldfromhis sprawling shops andgarages lies the large
gardenwhere his wife andhe, along withher 85-year-old
mother, growchile peppers andother crops, just as the
family has done for many generations. His son, Ricky,
works withhiminthe business, andhis daughters and
grandchildren, who live next door, share his love of the
cars. WhenI ask to see some of the cars out inthe open, he
directs his grandchildren, ages 12and14, to drive themout,
andthey do so, announcing proudly that they one day will
ownthe cars they carefully maneuver into place for me to
photograph. Beside the ’61 Impala they parade out a bright
turquoise ’58Impala, a bullet-gray 1951 Chevy truck, a two-
tone ’55 Chevy Bel Air, anda 1972Chevy C10pickup.
Of course, not all lowrider enthusiasts run auto
businesses. Most do it as a hobby at home, but they are
no less passionate than the workers at the garages that
specialize in making customcars. In fact, it’s hard to
drawa line between amateur devotees and professionals
because many individuals who work out of their homes
occasionally take on work for others, and the professional
shops end up devoting a lot of time and energy to the
owners’ personal lowrider projects —which often eats up
the profit that the business side generates.
Los Guys andtheir bombs
I drive up N.M. 76 a fewmiles fromCarmelito’s, admiring
the views of the Santa Cruz Valley as it sweeps up through
arid barrancas, or badlands, to the towering blue Sangre
de Cristos. I find my way up an obscure arroyo to another
car customizing business in Chimayó. Bobby Chacón and
his partners run this operation fromthe yard beside his
double-wide trailer in Chimayó, a lot filled with a crazy
assortment of old vehicles —the rawmaterial for the
polished products that will someday emerge. As I enter, I
pass a 1950s-era dump truck with “Los Guys” painted on
the door. I’ve heard of Los Guys but I’ve never known who
they are. I’mabout to find out.
As I pull upto the trailer, Bobby andhis cousinChris
Martinez come out to greet me. Thena shiny black 1950
Chevy bomb rumbles into the yardandElmo Sánchez, from
Velarde, emerges. The three introduce themselves and
name the others who make upLos Guys, but before we can
start to talk about their famous bombs, parkedall around
us, another car pulls upanda dignified, older Hispanic
womangets out andannounces to me, “I’mthe grandma,
Bobby’s mom,” andhurries into the home. Bobby explains
that he has a newbaby, only two days old, andhe andthe
other Guys followhis mother inside to see the infant. “I’ll
be right back,” Bobby apologizes; family has a highpriority,
evenamong the most fanatic lowrider creators.
When Los Guys come back fromthe trailer, it’s all about
cars again.
Los Guys’ specialty is installing air bags that, like
Eppie’s hydraulic systems, raise and lower cars. But as
far as their own creations go, Los Guys are known for
their bombs, and they roll out a fewto showme. First
Chris glides by in his dazzling 1953 Cadillac, painted a
rich maroon color and restored meticulously. It gleams in
the sun like a time capsule froma bygone era, as if it just
rolled off the lot to the cool clinking of change in an LA
high roller’s pocket.
Next Elmo fires up his ’50 Chevy, a dark black beauty.
He climbs out of the behemoth, opens the back door,
and extracts a life-size Elmo doll. He rolls down the car
windowand places the effigy so that his head hangs out,
as if he’s cruising in the car. As Elmo backs out of the
vehicle, I notice among his numerous tattoos an image of
Elmo the Muppet on his shaved head, and I learn that the
Sesame Street character is indeed Elmo’s namesake. The
whimsical image of the Muppet completely deflates the
stereotype of the shaved, tattooed man in baggy pants as a
dangerous character.
Bobby shows me his blue ’51 Chevy and a ’61 Chevy
Impala, which he’s especially proud of because it was
recently used in making a Hollywood movie, Blaze You
Out. The moviemakers used several cars fromChimayó,
including the Impala and some fromEppie’s shop.
Passing onthe passion
Inspired by the lowrider creations at Los Guys’ place, I
resolve to visit one more enthusiast that I’ve heard of,
Fred Rael, in Española. It’s only a fewmiles and a cruise
through the old Santa Cruz plaza to get to Fred’s place,
recognizable by the two large garages and the long,
enclosed trailer he uses to haul cars to shows.
As soon as I arrive at Fred’s, he asks if I’d like to go out
on a cruise, and before long I find myself seated in a ’64
Chevy Impala convertible, floating through the tree-lined
thoroughfares of Fairviewwith the deep bass fromhis
massive car stereo resounding in my ears. Fred flips a
switch on a console to raise the car a bit when we cross
speed bumps, then lowers it again, effortlessly, when we
hit smooth pavement.
Fred has a passion for car shows and has been working
hard on another Impala back home, in the trailer. The
one we’re riding in is his “cruiser,” and he explains that
it’s not nearly as fancy as his showcar. I’mimpressed
nevertheless with the fine paint job, including the
exquisite pinstriping, of our humble vehicle. We stop in
front of the Santa Cruz church, built in the 1730s, one
Larry Martinez’s Buick Regal with mural by Randy
Martinez
Chris Martinez in his 1953 Cadillac Carmelito’s 1955 Chevy BelAir
Lico Rael in his lowrider at the Española Plaza. Fred Rael with his son Lico Jody Garduño with his ‘63 Chevy Impala
50 2012 Bienvenidos
the most impressive of
the colonial churches
remaining in New
Mexico. Fred parks in
front of the main gate to
the church courtyard and
we talk cars as Saturday
morning traffic passes
by, every other driver
giving us a nod and a toot
on the horn.
Fred started working
on cars in the late 1970s.
He has shown cars
since he built his first
showcar, a 1973 Super
Beetle. He, like all the
other lowrider buffs I’ve
met, is determined, not
only to promote his own
creations, but also to
foster a positive image
of lowrider culture.
He helped found the
Prestigious car club,
based in Española, in
1993, and he’s won in
numerous competitions,
including, most recently,
first place at a hot rod
showin Phoenix.
It isn’t until we get
back to Fred’s and he
opens up the trailer
to showme his other
Impala that I understand
the difference between
a street car, like the one
we’ve been riding in,
and a showcar. Even
in the darkness of the
trailer, the chrome on Fred’s masterpiece is dazzling—and there’s lots of it, even on
the undercarriage and the engine. Every square inch of the car is finely detailed with
perfection, fromupholstery to headlights to windowglass.
As part of his efforts to get and keep young people involved with the lowrider craft,
Fred plans to be part of a “model car and lowrider bike show” that Eppie, Andres
Valdez and others are planning in Española in April. They’re also gearing up for the
Mainstreet Showdown de Española, a big car showin August that will feature bombas
(bombs), trokitas (customized small trucks), and the ever-popular Impalas and other
lowriders. They expect hundreds of cars at the event, and hope that it will attract and
inspire a newgeneration to build and showlowriders.
“Alot of the kids these days, they just like to get a little car and make it into a tuner,”
Fred explains, referring to cars whose main feature is a massive stereo system. “But
when they see these cars line up, and they meet these guys and see howthey love their
cars—we’re just hoping it inspires themto get into it, too.”
Listening to Fred talk about the youth event, I reflect on the industriousness,
inventiveness, and creativity I’ve seen among the lowrider devotees I’ve met. If even
a little bit of their passion wears off, we’re sure to see lowriders cruising the streets of
Northern NewMexico for years to come. It’s a sight I will welcome, not only because it
will help perpetuate this craft that has become a tradition, but because it will inspire in
young people the work ethic and standard of excellence that has gone into the cars I’ve
seen today. That’s a good thing for all NewMexicans.
To learnmore about the lowrider culture
Low’n Slow: Lowriding in NewMexico by Jack Parsons, Carmella Padilla and Juan
Estevan Arellano, Museumof NewMexico Press, 2005 (paperback edition)
Lowriders in Chicano Culture: FromLowto Slowto Showby Charles M. Tatum,
Greenwood, 2011
Showdownde Española
Low riders will take to the street in force on Saturday,
August 4, in Española for the Mainstreet Showdown,
the biggest car show in Northern New Mexico in
several years. The event, sponsored by Cultural
Promotions, an Española-based car club, will also
include a hopping contest and a concert. “We’re
hoping to get several hundred cars in the show,” says
Andres Valdez, a co-founder of Cultural Promotions.
“It will be a great opportunity to come out and see
the best of the best of the lowriders, muscle cars,
hot rods and jumpers.” The show begins at 11 a.m. on
Española’s Oñate Street, near the Española Plaza, and
runs all afternoon.
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2012 Bienvenidos 51
May 26-27, 2012
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• Over 200 of the best Native American artists
• Benefits the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
• www.nativetreasures.org
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Featured
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JOIN US AT
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Wednesday May 23, 9 am
Museum Hill Café/
Museum of Indian Arts & Culture
Tickets $40
Available at www.ticketssantafe.org
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Tony Abeyta
Jody Naranjo
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52 2012 Bienvenidos
ASanta Fe summer is a performing arts
wonder.
Both locals and visitors have several major milestones
to look forward to in 2012. The Santa Fe Desert Chorale,
first heard in 1983, celebrates its 30th season. The Santa
Fe Chamber Music Festival, which began here in 1973,
marks its 40th summer. The Santa Fe Opera presents five
newproductions, three of themcompany premieres.
Several collaborations with the opera are set as well.
Desert Chorale singers will join the SFOforces in Karol
Szymanowski’s massive, mystical King Roger. The Santa
Fe Concert Association presents three one-hour voice
recitals by Santa Fe Opera stars, while the Chamber
Music Festival features several SFOsingers in concert.
In other performances, SFCApresents two evenings
of dance by soloists and principals of the NewYork City
Ballet; Aspen Santa Fe Ballet brings its probing artistry
back to its second home; and the NewMexico Jazz
Festival again explores “America’s music.”
And of course, behind the public concerts are the
people who cast the artistic spells for each group —music
directors, managers and performers.
Way-better-than-OKChorale
The Desert Chorale “is celebrating all kinds of music
for the 30th anniversary,” said music director Joshua
Habermann. “We have four different programs, two with
all …[24] singers and two with smaller ensembles, and
one with an additional group of singers.”
The first repertoire, FromBach to the Beatles (opens
July 20), will feature works ranging fromBach’s first
motet for a capella chorus to excerpts froma setting
of the Russian Orthodox Vespers by Finnish composer
Einojuhani Rautavaara. That ties in with the final concert
of the season, a performance of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s
powerful All-Night Vespers, set for Aug. 16. For that,
an extra contingent of singers will be brought in to
supplement the chorale’s regular members.
The other repertoires, each with 12 singers, cover a
great deal of ground. Celebrating the Centenary, which
opens July 28 and salutes NewMexico’s 100 years of
statehood, features three pieces by composers who
embody the state’s ethnic diversity: Native American
(Jerod Impichchaachaaha’ Tate), Hispanic (Christian
Grases) and Anglo (Robert Kier). Another, Dancing the
Mystery, deals exclusively with Sufi poetry, especially
that of Rumi. It opens July 24. Santa Fean and opera star
Patricia Racette will give a benefit concert August 9 for
SFDCthat shows her jazz roots.
“I feel really good about attracting audiences with this
repertoire,” the Desert Chorale’s Habermann said. “We’ve
definitely had an uptick in quality of singers over the last
years, and it’s a great honor to be asked by the opera to be
in King Roger.” (The Chorale also took the Santa Fe Opera
stage in 1998 in Ingvar Lindholm’s ADreamPlay.)
‘Pretty yummy stuff’
For SFOgeneral director Charles MacKay, the 2012
season is a perfect hand of artistic cards. “I love the fact
we have four of the biggest names in opera: Puccini, Bizet,
Rossini, and Richard Strauss,” he said. “Then there’s
the wild card of King Roger. It’s a beautiful piece —an
extraordinary work with a very big chorus and orchestra.
I’mso happy about the Desert Chorale joining us.”
The opera’s 2012 opening night (June 29) is splashy,
with Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca mounted for the first time
since 1984. Georges Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers, famous
for the tenor-baritone duet “Au fond du temple saint,”
receives its Santa Fe premiere the following night, June
30. Rossini’s big-themed Maometto II (opens July 14),
the Szymanowski (opens July 21), and Richard Strauss’
Arabella (opens July 28) round out the season.
As always, the singers will cover the waterfront from
the apprentice artists to international newcomers
and major stars. “It’s an important part of a company’s
mission to showcase emerging artists on the international
scene and, at the same time, to showcase American
artists who are showing great promise and also feature
established artists,” MacKay explained. “We create an
eclectic mix of talent.
“It’s exciting when we have an opportunity to present
an artist doing a role for the first time in the U.S.” he
added, instancing Thomas Hampson. The baritone sang
Malatesta in Don Pasquale for SFOin 1983 and has gone
on to become a world-famous operatic personality. His
Scarpia in Tosca marks the first time he has sung that
villainous role in the U.S.
MacKay described Maometto II as “a pivotal work in
the bel canto repertoire,” written when Rossini was 28;
SFOis using a new, critical edition of the problematic,
multi-version piece. As for Arabella, “I think there are two
things that people have said to me since I returned,” he
said. “ ‘When are we going to have some more Strauss?’
is one. And ‘Please, please, please, can the operas be any
earlier?’ This summer everything is moved back, a half
hour earlier, to 8:30 or 8 p.m.”
In addition to the mainstage productions, MacKay
pointed out that the popular Apprentice Artists concerts
will return and that there will be a special gala on August
4. The host is world-famous mezzo-soprano Susan
Graham, a frequent Santa Fe visitor.
“It’s going to be absolutely spectacular; we’re having
such fun putting the programtogether,” he said. “Susan is
plotting and planning. It’s going to be like a fantasy night
of what opera singers would like to do if they could just
have a good time. Basically, it’s a concert with orchestra,
with a lot of serious music on the programfromMozart
The sounds of music
Opera to choral music, chamber music to recitals, dance to jazz, there are treats for every taste
The Santa Fe Desert Chorale Joseph Illick, Santa Fe Concert Association director Susan Graham
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2012 Bienvenidos 53
to Bernstein. But other things, too. It’s going to be pretty
yummy stuff.”
Concert associationreturns with
summer program
Besides its collaboration with the Chorale, the opera has
sanctioned Santa Fe Concert Association presenting
three one-hour vocal recitals by leading opera artists.
This is SFCA’s second-year foray into summer
programming, which began in 2011 with other recitals by
SFOheavyweight artists Daniel Okulitch, Eric Owens and
Isabel Leonard.
“These will all be one-hour concerts without
intermission on Sunday afternoons at 4 p.m.,” said SFCA
director Joseph Illick. “They’ll be at the Scottish Rite
Center and followed by meet-the-artist receptions with
refreshments in their lovely courtyard.”
Sopranos Nicole Cabell and Leah Crocetto will be the
first two artists featured, on July 22 and 29, respectively.
Cabell will sing a concert of music by American composer
Ricky Ian Gordon, who will accompany her. Crocetto
will be accompanied by Illick, as will bass-baritone Luca
Pisaroni on August 5.
In between the three recitals, SFCApresents two
evenings of dance featuring principals and soloists of New
York City Ballet —including choreographer and dancer
Daniel Ulbricht, who put together a similar ensemble
that took the boards for SFCAthis past season. “We’re
bringing themJuly 25 and 26,” Illick noted. “Daniel said
that’s when he can bring the best dancers.”
In other summer dance, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet returns
to Santa Fe July 13 and 14 with two mountings of a new
work by Alejandro Cerrudo of Hubbard Street Dance
Chicago, Jiri Kylian’s Sechs Tanzes and Norbert De La
Cruz III’s Square None. Hong Kong Ballet takes the boards
as an ASFBguest on July 31.
Chamber music milestone
With 40 years under its belt, the Santa Fe Chamber Music
Festival has planned a four-decade anniversary full of
highlights. These include world premiere commissions
by Helen Grime and Magnus Lindberg; co-commission
premieres by David Del Tredici and Aaron Jay Kernis;
a tribute to the late composer Peter Lieberson; and
the return of conductor-violinist Alan Gilbert, former
SFOmusic director and nowhead of the NewYork
Philharmonic, as artist in residence.
CMFartistic director Marc Neikrug has assembled a
long list of fine performers to take on the enterprising
list of repertoire. Some will arrive here as members of
a regular ensemble, such as string quartets. Others will
come singly, only to merge with other artists, through
intensive rehearsals, to become momentary families in a
musical clan.
“The highlights of our 40th anniversary season are the
Sunday concerts and the always popular noon series in
the historic St. Francis auditorium,” Neikrug said. “Each
programis particularly fashioned to appeal to music
lovers of all genres. Concertgoers will also hear a wide
variety of the stellar artists performing at the festival,”
including violinists Alan Gilbert and Ida Kavafian,
pianists Kirill Gerstein and Jon Kimura Parker, cellist
Gary Hoffman, and the Orion and Miro string quartets.
CMFhas only had three artistic directors in 40 years:
Alicia Schachter fromthe 1973 founding through 1991;
Heiichiro Ohyama from1992 to 1997; and Neikrug from
1998 to the present.
Even more powerful than the players, however, is the
actual repertoire. Talk about people who make things
happen: living or dead, CMF’s composers are splendid
creators: fromJ.S. Bach, Samuel Barber, Béla Bartók,
Amy Beach and Alban Berg to Oliver Knussen, Lieberson,
Sergei Prokofiev, Franz Schubert and Arnold Schoenberg.
And one can observe the interaction between the masters’
legacy on the printed page and those interpreting them
through daily open rehearsals —a Chamber Music
Festival anchor project since the early 1980s.
Other jazz
The NewMexico Jazz Festival offers another
collaborative project this summer —a three-way between
Outpost Performance Space, Lensic Performing Arts
Center and the Santa Fe Jazz Foundation. The seventh
season Santa Fe performances include Dianne Reeves
and Sheila Jordon on July 2 and Kurt Elling and Jon
Hendricks July 28, both in the Lensic. In 2011, 90-year-
old Mose Allison gave a free concert on the Santa Fe Plaza
—so plan on some surprises when festival performers are
in town.
colors | colores
Charles MacKay, general director of the Santa Fe Opera Patricia Racette Alan Gilbert
CLICK IT FOR TICKETS
Aspen Santa Fe Ballet
July 13-September 1
www.aspensantafeballet.com
Tickets Santa Fe, 505-988-1234
Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival
July 15-August 20
www.santafechambermusic.org
Tickets Santa Fe, 505-988-1234
Santa Fe Desert Chorale
July 20-August 18
www.desertchorale.org
Tickets Santa Fe, 505-988-1234
Santa Fe Concert Association
July 22-August 5
www.santafeconcerts.org
Tickets Santa Fe, 505-988-1234
Santa Fe Jazz Festival
July 13-20
www.outpostspace.org
Tickets Santa Fe, 505-988-1234
Santa Fe Opera
June 29-August 25
www.santafeopera.org
505-986-5900
Venues include Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of
Assisi, St. Francis Auditoriumin the New Mexico
Museumof Art, Lensic Performing Arts Center,
Santa Fe Opera, Loretto Chapel, Cristo Rey Church,
Scottish Rite Center and New Mexico History
Museum. See websites for details.
54 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 55
BY BEN SWAN
There’s no doubt that Santa Fe has gone to
the dogs. Telltale signs of pampered pooches
abound throughout the City Different, from
the ubiquitous water dishes in front of many
downtown stores to pet-friendly hotels and
restaurants that boast special menus for their
four-legged guests.
It’s hard to keep track of the number of specialty stores
and businesses that cater to canines. There are at least
four pet boutiques, a bakery that caters to dogs, a handful
of obedience schools, several doggie day-care businesses,
canine masseuses and stylists, dog acupuncturists and
countless bowls of dog biscuits at stores, banks and drive-
through windows just waiting for a chance to satisfy
Fido’s hunger pains.
And last year, when Gov. Susana Martinez —an avid
canine lover —signed legislation that allowed dogs to
accompany their owners to restaurant patios throughout
the state, many animal-welfare advocates breathed a
collective sigh of relief.
“We’re finally civilized,” said Catherine Joyce-
Coll, one of several ardent supporters of the so-called
“dogs-on-patio” legislation, at a victory celebration last
summer at Zia Diner on Guadalupe Street. Joyce-Coll
had worried that the city was turning against canines
and their companions, so she and Linda Kastner enlisted
the help of state Sen. Peter Wirth, Santa Fe, to craft the
patio-pups legislation.
Fat chance. While many restaurants had quietly
accepted dogs as patrons —Albuquerque has long had
its own ordinance allowing dogs in eateries —many
restaurants quickly embraced the concept. Zia Diner chef
Peter Walsh created special dog biscuits to celebrate the
legislation’s passing and said the restaurant plans to have
treats and water available at all times for canine guests.
“We love dogs,” Walsh said, adding that he was happy
to create a canine menu. “It makes themfeel special when
they come in. In all the years that we’ve been permitting
it, we’ve never had any trouble.”
Those who don’t enjoy sharing their space with dogs
can easily eat inside the restaurant, whether it’s his
restaurant or any other, Walsh said. Canines are still
confined to outdoor spaces in eateries, but more and more
other kinds of businesses are encouraging customers to
bring along their pets while they shop.
Naturally, with so many places welcoming dogs in
the city, it’s nice to knowthat when dogs need to stretch
their legs, there are plenty of open spaces for themto
explore. While many public spaces allowdogs —a quick
turn around the Plaza makes that abundantly clear —the
city still requires all dogs to be on leashes unless they are
romping in a designated dog park.
Two relatively newdog parks include the Villa Linda
Park, 4350 Rodeo Road, which is open to all dogs, and the
small-dog park at the Salvador Perez Park, 601 Alta Vista
Street. Acity official said dog-walkers should check the
rules and regulations at the parks to make sure whether
leashes are required or not.
The city’s premier off-leash dog-meeting spot, the
Frank Ortiz Dog Park, in the Solano neighborhood, is
often viewed as a dog’s idea of heaven, with huge open
spaces for catching balls and Frisbees, meandering
trails, piñon and juniper trees, and lots of opportunities
to socialize. Early mornings and evenings are the prime
times for people and canines to get acquainted or catch up
on the day’s activities. The awe-inspiring vistas are a plus
for animal guardians.
Going tothe dogs
AMIRAN WHITE
The Frank Ortiz Dog Park is the most popular off-leash open space in Santa Fe.
56 2012 Bienvenidos
“I love the open space,” said Jason Mitchell, toting his
children, Lily Claire and Gabriel, up near the “King of the
Hill” bench one Sunday evening. “And the sunsets are
gorgeous.”
The family, which includes momHelena, makes regular
visits to the park to exercise its young yellowLabrador,
Jack. The dog loves to interact with other canines, but the
Mitchell children also love to be a part of the pack.
Newand longtime residents often find themselves at
the park, sharing canine-training tips or stories of their
lives in Santa Fe. Visitors are always welcome —with or
without canines. Sylvia Sieland started visiting the park
with her two beagles shortly after she moved to the city.
While the park is vital for canine socialization, Sieland
said the human interaction is equally important. It’s a
place where people can get to knowtheir community.
“This is one of the ways I’ve networked,” Sieland said.
“Tourists love to come here in the summer. It’s hot, but
once that sun goes down, it’s like an air conditioner has
been turned on.”
The park, which was once the site of the city’s landfill,
has improved tremendously over the years. Thanks to the
voter-approved bond for parks and open spaces, the area
nowhas several shade structures, access to water, trees,
benches and newtrails for the disabled.
At least twice a year, dedicated volunteers gather to
clean up the park. It’s an ongoing effort coordinated by
Friends of the Dog Park, the Department of Parks and
Recreation, and Keep Santa Fe Beautiful. Pamela Geyer,
who, along with Jane Tokunaga, organizes the loose-knit
group of park users, says the seasonal cleanup efforts
help raise consciousness for the hundreds of people who
enjoy the park. Daily visitors to the park easily reach 400
humans and their canines.
As with many community meeting places, dog-park
users have put their mark on their beloved slice of
paradise. In summer, tables, chairs, water and bowls
spring up under shady spots. In the winter, trees sprout
bright ribbons, ornaments, birdseed bells, toys and dog
treats. Gathering spots often memorialize dogs or dog-
park users who have moved on.
It’s a place where children learn responsible human-
animal interactions, and notices of services (such as dog-
sitting), meetings and lost-and-found pets are scattered
around the park. For the most part, people and dogs just
want to get along —an attitude that reflects the spirit of
Santa Fe.
Geyer calls the park a place where “the love of
companion animals, our appreciation of the fantastic
resource we have in the dog park, and sharing the
exquisite beauty of the space create bonds that surmount
differences of politics, economics or culture and can
even smooth over the many disparate personalities that
converge here.”
One drawback of the off-leash park, however, is the
lack of an enclosing fence. To be safe there, dogs should
be under complete voice control and be able to obey their
owners’ commands to “come.”
The Santa Fe Animal Shelter &Humane Society’s
fenced-in, off-leash dog parks are another alternative.
The private nonprofit that maintains the parks has one
large, enclosed community dog park for canines of all
sizes and another fenced-in park for small dogs. There
are also several fenced-in areas for dogs that might not
Canine al fresco
The following restaurants with patios have
indicated they are canine-welcoming. It’s always
a good idea to call ahead to make sure there have
been no changes in restaurant policy. Remember:
Well-behaved dogs are welcome on restaurant
patios, but only service dogs are allowed inside
restaurants.
Aztec Street Cafe 317 Aztec St., 820-0025
Backroad Pizza 1807 Second St., No. 1, 955-9055
The Burrito Company
111 Washington Ave., 982-4453
C. G. Higgins Artisan Chocolates &Chuck’s
Nuts 847 Ninita St., 820-1315
Café Café 500 Sandoval St., 466-1391
Counter Culture 930 Baca St., No. 1, 995-1105
Cowgirl BBQ319 S. Guadalupe St., 982-2562
Dish NSpoon 616 Canyon Road, 983-7676
Downtown Subscription
376 Garcia St., 983-3085
El Farol Restaurant 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912
El Tesoro Café 500 Montezuma Ave., Ste. 104,
988-3886
La Casa Sena 125 E. Palace Ave., 988-9232
La Choza 905 Alarid St., 982-0909
Los Cuates NewMexican Restaurant at The
Lodge 750 N. St. Francis Drive, 992-5800
Pink Adobe and Dragon RoomBar
406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712
Pranzo 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645
Restaurant Martin 526 Galisteo St., 820-0919
Santa Fe Baking Company
504 W. Cordova Road, 988-4292
Tabla de los Santos
Hotel St. Francis, 210 Don Gaspar St., 983-5700
Tia’s Cocina, Hotel Chimayó de Santa Fe
125 Washington Ave., 988-4900
Tomme 229 Galisteo St., 820-2253
Tune Up Café 1115 Hickox St., 983-7060
Vinaigrette 709 Don Cubero Alley, 820-9205
Zia Diner 326 S. Guadalupe St., 988-7008
SantaFe cityparks
Santa Fe parks and plazas are open to the public
between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. daily, except when
organized activities are scheduled by approval of
city officials. Unless designated as an official dog
park, all dogs must be on a secure leash.
• Railyard Park and Plaza along Cerrillos Road
between Guadalupe and Alarid streets; the plaza
is in the heart of the Railyard at the Railyard Water
Tower, along the rail corridor and Chile Line Lane,
north of Paseo de Peralta
• Fort Marcy Ballpark near Murales and Bishop’s
Lodge Road
• Entrada Park at the intersection of Don Diego
Avenue, Guadalupe Street and Cerrillos Road
• Frank S. Ortiz Dog Park The city’s official off-
leash dog park, 160 Camino de las Crucitas
• Martin Luther King Jr. Park near Camino
Carlos Rey, Calle Serena and Rodeo Road
• Santa Fe Plaza in the heart of downtown Santa
Fe, it is framed by Lincoln and Palace avenues, San
Francisco Street and Old Santa Fe Trail
• Franklin E. Miles Park on Camino Carlos Rey
and Siringo Road
• Salvador Perez Park 601 Alta Vista Street
• Federal Park next to the U.S. District Court on
Federal Place
• Ashbaugh Park 1703 Cerrillos Road, behind Fire
Station No. 3
• Amelia White Park 981 Old Santa Fe Trail
• Alto/Bicentennial Park 1043 Alto Street
• Pueblos del Sol Park Nizhoni Drive and
Governor Miles Road
• Torreon Park 1515 West Alameda Street
• Gregory Lopez Park San Felipe Road and Hano
Road
• Ragle Park located on Yucca and Zia streets
• Herb Martinez Park on Camino Carlos Rey
• Las Acequias Park on Calle Atajo
• Monica Lucero Park on Avenida de las
Campanas
• Frenchy’s Field near the intersection of Osage
Avenue and Agua Fria Street
• Patrick Smith Park 1001 Canyon Road
Santa Fe Animal Shelter Dog Parks
100 Caja del Rio Road. Four enclosed dog parks: one
large park for dogs of all sizes, one for small dogs
and two individual parks. Operated by the Santa Fe
Animal Shelter & Humane Society.
be comfortable in a social environment. The parks boast
access to water, shade stations, benches, dog-waste bags
and waste containers.
All visitors to the area’s dog parks should be aware that
cactus abounds, and snakes are often present. People
are urged to keep a close eye on their dogs and to keep a
pair of tweezers handy in case a canine stumbles upon a
prickly cholla.
NATALIE GUILLÉN
Cody Burch with her dog Maddie, right, and friend Jake,
at the Frank Ortiz Dog Park.
2012 Bienvenidos 57
58 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 59
BY BETH SURDUT
Art extends an invitation to walk in, lose your edges, and shimmer in its beauty.
Art makes a socio-political statement.
Art makes you wonder.
Art makes you wonder what the bleep the message is supposed to be.
Art matches the sofa. (Sigh)
Art tells a story.
Art prompts a story.
Art is interactive.
You’ve arrived in Santa Fe, a city so steeped in art that you need a map,
a compass, a plan and stamina. One way to avoid sensory overload is to
take a Zen approach. Go slowly. Pay attention. Take small bites. Good
luck with that.
Here is an admittedly incomplete menu of suggestions on ways to experience the art
districts that drawpeople fromaround the globe. Most of the galleries mentioned are
either newor literally and figuratively off the main path. Art may stimulate the mind and
feed the soul —but the body also needs fuel. Fortunately, a number of restaurants are
within or very near each of the major arts districts.
OPTION NO. 1 CANYONROADLESS TRAVELED
Welcome to the all-you-can-eat banquet of more than 100 galleries, studios and
boutiques on the main street and lanes of the historic Canyon Road arts district. Copious
choices line the half-mile-long hill, but turning off the main drag into an alley colored by
light and shadows offers the illicit pleasure of a hidden treasure hunt. Any place is the
right place to start.
At the bottomcorner of Canyon Road, at Paseo de Peralta, Hunter Kirkland Gallery
tucks in with other contemporary offerings. Owner Nancy Hunter has been in the art
business for 35 years. “My relationship with my artists is much like a marriage,” she said,
and like the elements of a good relationship, she looks for art that can “soothe, stimulate,
excite and inspire.”
Close by and across the street, the spacious enclave at 225 offers parking for a
selection of galleries, outdoor sculpture settings, clothing and home accessories stores.
Not far up Canyon Road to the left, intimate galleries dot little Delgado Street.
Beginning at the 600 block, the elegant Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery (with
parking!) and sculpture garden sits amid private homes. The beautiful, sun-washed
compound was developed by artist Agnes Sims in the 1940s. According to gallery
director Michael Ettema, Sims was prolific and multitalented and encouraged other
artists by hosting performances and readings on the patio.
In Gypsy Alley (700 block), the connected adobe buildings of the Chiaroscuro
Gallery span centuries, melding traditional Santa Fe style with architecture as open and
contemporary as the art exhibited. “I like being off the main drag. People seek us out,”
said gallery director John Addison.
Across Canyon Road, the signs for The Compound Restaurant are clear, but it takes
some hunting to find Bellas Artes gallery. Followthe signs to The Compound to the lone
gallery on this side road where paper, porcelain and textile extend common definitions to
become museum-quality objects.
Between the 600 and 700 block, down an unpaved alley on the right, Canyon Alley
offers a mixture of styles and independence, including the outsider art of Kelly Moore.
Strolling down the gravel and dirt lane past Nordwall Art and newly ensconced David
Rothermel, a seeker might find painter/wordsmith Moore and photographer Kate
Livengood(say that aloud) —or not. There are two signs at their adobe at the end of the
road: OPENand another more telling of why artists come to NewMexico.
There was a time when visitors were more likely to meet artists in their studios rather
colors | colores
Life is short, art long —
wear comfortable shoes
Other pockets of wonder exist
Galleries appear on all the streets that border and extend outward from the Plaza,
including second-floor show spaces well worth the stairs or elevator rides. Travel slowly
from Paseo de Peralta up old Santa Fe Trail toward the junction of Old Pecos Trail so you
can discover small new venues.
The Santa Fe NewMexican prints news and schedules of cultural events every Friday
in its Pasatiempo magazine. Web resources include santafe.org and SantaFe.com.
Friday mornings from 8 to 8:30 a.m., alternative radio station KSFR-FM 101.1 hosts Mary
Charlotte Domandi and local guests who offer a rundown on weekly events, as well as
interviews with local and visiting arts personalities every Monday through Friday between
8 and 9 a.m.
KITTY LEAKEN
Aviewof Canyon Road
60 2012 Bienvenidos
than in the plethora of galleries that represent them. At the top of Canyon Road, in
The Stables at 821, small artist studios congregate in the former stables of the Vigil
family next to the Teahouse, which was originally home to the Vigils. The parking is
limited; imagination is not. Artist Ed Larsenlists available subjects on a sign: “birds,
cowboys, fish, past life experiences.”
OPTIONNO. 2 ATTENDTHE GALA
Fresh and contemporary, nine galleries stand in the newly organized GALADistrict —
it stands for Galleries at Lincoln Avenue —between the Plaza and West Marcy Street.
At the Plaza end of Lincoln, the gorgeous NewMexico History Museumhouses the
Spiegelberg gallery store specializing in living NewMexican artisans.
Galleries in the district include Allan Houser, David Richard Contemporary,
Legends Santa Fe, Niman Fine Art, Pippin Contemporary, Windsor Betts, One
Artist Road Fine Art and Evoke Gallery. “We look for provocative and compelling
contemporary art that is thought-provoking and not always comfortable,” said Evoke
co-owner Kathrine Erickson. Afewdoors away, Blue Rain Gallery offers a decidedly
current counterpoint, focusing primarily on Native American and/or NewMexican
artists working in pottery, bronzes, paintings, jewelry and glass.
OPTIONNO. 3 VISIT THE PALACE
Within walking distance of GALA, ancient meets modern at the intersection of
the West Palace Arts District and the Palace of the Governors, where Indian
artists set out their own beautifully crafted jewelry and pottery under the portal.
The West Palace Arts District includes the NewMexico Museumof Art as well
as the Museumof NewMexico Foundation, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum
and LewAllen, Manitou, Wadle and Peterson-Cody galleries. Patina Gallery
owner/artists Allison and Ivan Barnett present fine craft, primarily 21st century
jewelers whose nontraditional jewelry dances between the lines of wearable art and
sculpture. “I get turned on by unique and fabulous color, texture, surface and quality
of workmanship. I look for unusual juxtapositions,” Allison Barnett said.
OPTIONNO. 4 HEAR THAT TRAINA’ COMIN’
The Santa Fe Railyard District, opened in 2008, is a combination of steel, sparks
and anticipation. Home to modern international contemporary art venues, the
Railyard Arts District includes 10 galleries —Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, Gebert
Contemporary, James Kelly Contemporary, Santa Fe Clay, Box, Jay Etkin,
WilliamSiegal, Tai, Zane Bennett and LewAllen galleries —and SITE Santa Fe,
a renowned contemporary arts exhibition and programming space. Natural light fills
the two-story LewAllen Gallery (which has a companion location on West Palace
Avenue) that is specifically designed to showcase large contemporary pieces. “Alot
of our artwork is up and coming, and so is this district,” said gallery representative
Iris McLister. In addition to the formal galleries, open-air art booths appear on
weekends along the rails across the road fromthe indoor/outdoor Santa Fe Farmers
Market and Railyard Artisans Market.
Art walks and websites
The Canyon Road Art Walk is held on the fourth Friday of each month, when many
galleries host openings from5 to 7 p.m. (Not all galleries participate.) Check The
Santa Fe NewMexican’s Friday arts, entertainment and culture magazine for listings
or visit www.canyonroadarts.com/ or www.visitcanyonroad.com.
The West Palace Arts District is bounded by the NewMexico Museumof Art,
the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, and the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum.
Member businesses and museums are located on West Palace Avenue, Johnson
Street and Marcy Street. The association hosts an art walk on the first Friday of each
month from
5 to 7:30 p.m. (www.westpalace.org)
The nine galleries at Lincoln Avenue (GALA) represent more than 500
contemporary artists. Located between West Palace Avenue (the Plaza) and West
Marcy Street, the association hosts an art walk between 5 and 7 p.m. on the first
Friday of every month. (www.sfgala.org)
The Railyard Arts District stretches out fromthe intersection of South Guadalupe
Street and Paseo de Peralta. The district hosts an art walk from5 to 7 p.m. on the last
Friday of every month.
3018-A Cielo Court
Santa Fe, NM 87507
505-473-3747
www.santafequilting.com
We Are
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Cottons, Batiks, Orientals, Southwest Fabrics,
Silks, Classes & Sewing Supplies
Open 7 Days a Week: 10-5:30 Mon.-Sat., Thurs. 10-7 pm, Sun. 1-5 pm
Open 7 Days a Week: 10-5:30 Mon.-Sat., Thurs. 10-7 pm, Sun. 1-5 pm
471-2625 2101 Cerrillos Rd.
WHY SANTA FE READERS
SHOP AT BOOK MOUNTAIN
1. LARGE SELECTION: More than 30,000 different titles on our shelves.
2. LOW PRICES: We sell used paperbacks at 40% of the cover price.
3. EASY TO FIND: Books are categorized and alphabetized.
4. READ & RECYCLE: A generous exchange policy.
5. FUN: A friendly and helpful staff.
2012 Bienvenidos 61
SUMMER 2011 THANKYOU’S
Cornerstones Community Partnerships and
St. Michael’s High School thanks these very
generous donors and volunteers for their support on our
San Miguel Chapel Preservation Project 2011
Alysia Abbott • Rachel Adler • Heath Bailey • Lea Barsocchini • Austin Basham
David Blackman • Kathleen Blanch • Leslie Carpenter • Josh Carrasco • Paul Chattey
Robin Chavez • Fabian Chavez III • Bruce Chemel • Santo Coppola • Ashley Crossin
Lynn Daniel •Marty Davenport • Sue Ann DeGarbo •Larry and Angie Delgado
Rodrigo Delgado • Shannon Dennison • William Dodge • Sue Eininger • Andi Espinoza
Anna Farner • Janet Fowler • John Fox • William Garcia • Anne Goler • Sam Govea • Anastasia Gumbinez
Charles Haecker • Ted Harsha • Clif Hickey • Robert Himmerich y Valencia • Eva Valencia de Himmerich
David Holtkamp • Jake Ivey • Cameron Jackson •Mark Johnson• Carola Kieve • Luke Kuzava • Ryan Lamb
Chester Liebs • Alex Longacre • Carrie Mardorf • Renee Martinez • Solomon Martinez • Exilda Martinez
Candace McKinley • Charles McKinley • Lauren Meyer • Rachel Miller-Howard • Joel Miyamonto • Max Myers
Elizabeth Oster • Daniel Ortega • Kendra Owenby • Lievre Oxa • Mollie Parsons • William Powell • William Rekas
Michael Rekas • Mary Ann Rekas • Elliot Richman • Greg Ridgley • Serafna Ridgley • Debra Royall • Alex Saiz
Virginia Salazar-Halfmoon • Irvin Sandoval • Esteban Segura • Lawrence Sena • Cory Serna • Daniel Sexton
Samantha Sexton • Michelle Schuster • J.T. Stark • Marsha Sullivan • Sergi Talamantes •Fenton and Judy Talbott
Alysha Trujillo • Raymond Trujillo • Adrianna VanderBorgh • Andrew Veech • Tim Vigil • David Vlaming
Bradley Wheaton • Daniel Wlupp • Susan Woodburn • Students and Staf from St. Michael’s High School
Students and Staf fromArchbishop Rummel High School in NewOrleans • Students and Staf fromBosque School in Albuquerque
Students from College of Art and Design: Natalie Abel • Madeline Bentley • Dylan Bucher Sohl • Jorge DeAvila • Bruno DePaschoal
Ebony Dubose • Jacey Ellis • Sam Funk • Tales Griego de Aguliar • Christine Guevera • Marcelino Gutierrez • Elizabeth Hasbun • Santa Fe Land Use Department: Austin Alt
John Armijo • Wendy Blackwell • Yolanda Cortez • Darcy Griego • Grace Griego • Jon Griego •Marylynn Griego • David Leyba • Matthew O’Reilly • Adrian Ortiz
Victor Ortiz • Juliana Rivera • Mike Rivera • Richard Trujillo • Aaron Vigil • Edward Vigil • John Vigil • Donna Wyrant • R.B. Zaxus
Students from the Breadloaf School of English • Anonymous • Barker Welfare Foundation • Eugene V. and Clare E. Taw Charitable Trust
Tornburg Investment Management • State of New Mexico • City of Santa Fe
AND ANNOUNCING OUR CALL FOR
SUMMER 2012 VOLUNTEERS —
COME HELP US FINISHTHE LAST WALL
We’ve done the north, east, west walls—come join in the
community efort to preserve a Santa Fe treasure.
To volunteer call Cornerstones Community Partnerships
505-982-9521
62 2012 Bienvenidos
colores | colors
STORY BY GABE GOMEZ
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
Santa Fe is a daytime city. Let’s face it; we are not well known for
our nightlife. Even the Santa Fe Opera, which for years began its
performances at 9 p.m., has shifted to earlier curtain times this season in
response to patron requests.
But to be fair, there are many options for those who prefer the after-dinner evening out.
Indeed, our spectacular sunsets don’t necessarily herald the conclusion to our day but,
rather, the beginning of another part of Santa Fe life that you won’t necessarily find in a
guidebook —such as a substantial music scene.
It’s probably downright inevitable that the emotional undercurrent of Santa Fe’s allure
includes an appropriate soundtrack provided by a local musician. Predictably, the time
between Memorial Day and Labor Day is a busy time for many local musicians. Live
music pops up in unexpected places, and the mainstays in the local nightlife provide a
wider variety of acts.
Vanessie Santa Fe, for example, has recently succeeded in reinventing itself and
revitalizing the live music scene with its ambitious newmusic calendar. Santa Fe
institution Evangelo’s Cocktail Lounge offers two stages. The upstairs stage boasts one
of the city’s most sophisticated sound systems, where you’ll hear a variety of musical
acts, while The Underground at Evangelo’s hosts some of the best local DJs and live
music of all stripes.
The Rouge Cat nightclub offers all kinds of late-night revelry most nights of the
week, and one would be remiss not to mention El Farol Restaurant and Cantina and the
Love the nightlife?
If you know where to look, you can find live music in Santa Fe all year round
Members of Le Chat Lunatique —fromleft, Muni Kulasinghe on violin, Fernando Garavito on drums, John Sandlin on guitar, and Jared Putnamon bass —play at the Second
Street Brewery (original location) on a Friday night. The group is fromAlbuquerque and describes its sound as “filthy, mangy jazz.”
2012 Bienvenidos 63
Cowgirl BBQfor their steady contributions to Santa Fe’s
nightlife options.
There are many other outstanding places in Santa
Fe that host live music or DJs —but suppose you are on
the hunt for something different. Maybe you’re the kind
of traveler and music lover who appreciates the local
atmosphere as much as the amplified sound that fills a
room. And as much as you love saying “Christmas” in
response to your chile options, perhaps there is a venue
beyond the well-worn path that reminds you why this
place is truly special.
Homegrowngigs
You can tell a lot about a town by the beer it brews.
Although it may not be the oldest microbrewery in Santa
Fe, Second Street Brewery produces some of the most
complex and well-balanced flavor profiles in town. In this,
it speaks to Santa Fe’s sophisticated foodie palate without
forgetting that nothing beats a cold brewat the end of a
long day. With two locations —the original “Oldery” on
Second Street and the “Newery” in the Santa Fe Railyard
—Second Street Brewery is the restaurant equivalent of
boots and blue jeans; sure it’s casual, but around here that
passes as unassuming refinement.
And like the beer it brews, the live music at Second
Street Brewery on Friday and Saturday evenings between
6 and 9 p.m. is not the usual fare. Where the objective of
most bars’ live entertainment is to drawin the thirsty
throngs for the well drinks and jalapeño popper specials
—sadly obscuring the talent of musicians —Second
Street Brewery is the place where one can actually
appreciate the nuance of musicianship, the poignancy of
singer-songwriters, and the low-end rump shake if the
feeling happens to arise. Add the outdoor seating areas
and the ample sunshine that usually lead to stunning
sunsets, and there’s not a lot missing for a great time out.
Bluegrass, Americana, and roots rock singer-
songwriters like Joe West and duos like Todd and the
Fox performon occasion, with the occasional funk
outfit like Pollo Frito or the Gypsy swing of Le Chat
Lunatique rounding out a panoramic sampling of local
and Albuquerque-based bands. On Tuesday nights at
the Railyard location, the open mic night hosted by Case
Tanner brings out the local hidden talent. Throughout
the summer, acts such as the Bo Deans and Fun perform
at the Heath Concerts’ free Railyard Community Concert
Series, where the brewery is among the business sponsors
and provides the suds for the occasion.
Tiny Dancer
If you have ever visited Santa Fe and wandered into Tiny’s
Restaurant on Early Street, chances are good that it still
looks exactly as you remember it. The ceramic decanters,
absence of natural light and the artwork depicting what
seemto be images of a brothel are still there and will
probably be forever. Despite its proximity to the Plaza and
the up-and-coming Railyard District, Tiny’s manages to
maintain its anonymity.
It’s tough to call anyplace in Santa Fe a “locals”
hangout, considering that many of the people who live
here are probably fromsomewhere else. But it’s safe to say
that Tiny’s is the dye in the fabric of Santa Fe.
While the faux adobe, teal coyote lamps and needless
variations of Frito Pie rule the center of town, Tiny’s is
your grandmother's rec room—the place you destroyed
on Sunday afternoons with your cousins and where you
played spin the bottle and had Led Zeppelin listening
parties. In other words, it’s comfortable and without
pretense.
Imagine your parents, in their 70s, going out on a
dinner-and-dancing date —this is the place. Say you
want some outstanding chile rellenos, a cold brewand
to be entertained by a karaoke singer mutilating Steve
Miller’s The Joker —this is the place. Need to two-step to
some original country music on a Thursday night? This
is the place.
During the summer months most music venues,
restaurants and bars bulk up their music offerings. Tiny’s
—where you can find music most nights of the week
—is somewhat impervious to the whims of the tourist
foot traffic. Tuesdays are open mic nights for aspiring
musicians; Wednesday nights offer jazz. Thursday, one
of its most popular nights, features Americana bands like
the Broomdust Caravan, while Friday brings in the rock
‘n’ roll crowd. The aforementioned karaoke is an audience
favorite on Saturdays.
SECOND STREET BREWERY
Original location
1814 Second St.
505-982-3030
Railyard
1607 Paseo De Peralta
505-989-3278
TINY’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE
1005 St. Francis Drive
505-983-9817
EL FAROL RESTAURANT AND CANTINA
808 Canyon Road
505-983-9912
EVANGELO’S COCKTAIL LOUNGE
AND THE UNDERGROUND
200 W. San Francisco St.
505-982-9014
ROUGE CAT
101 W. Marcy Ave.
505-983-6603
THE COWGIRL BBQ
319 S. Guadalupe St.
505-982-2565
VANESSIE SANTA FE
427 W. Water St.
505-982-9966
IF YOU GO
Acouple dances to the tunes of Broomdust Caravan at Tiny’s Restaurant &Lounge. Members of Broomdust Caravan —fromleft, Karina Wilson on violin, Felecia Ford on
vocals, and Johny Broomdust on bass —performat Tiny’s Restaurant &Lounge.
64 2012 Bienvenidos
SANBUSCO
Where the locals shop and dine...
Santa Fe’S FineSt Specialty Mall
In the heart of the Historic Railyard District
500 Montezuma avenue , Santa Fe
505.989.9390 • www.sanbusco.com • FREE WIFI • Free Parking
2012 Bienvenidos 65
66 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 67
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68 2012 Bienvenidos
STORY AND PHOTOS BY KARL F. MOFFATT
NewMexico’s Santa Fe Trail is steeped in
history and adventure, and visitors to the
City Different can enjoy some of the best the
trail has to offer by taking a day trip to nearby
attractions.
The road to Fort Union, just a couple of hours east of
Santa Fe, is an enjoyable drive with a great history —and
a bonus for visitors: Your admission receipt will also get
you into Pecos National Historical Park —another fine
day trip out of Santa Fe.
At one time the Southwest’s largest military
installation and supply depot, Fort Union contained one
of the best hospitals in the West, an ammo depot, military
prison, several warehouses, mechanics shops, corrals
and troop quarters. It also served as a vital stopping point
on the Santa Fe Trail for merchants and other travelers
seeking safety and relief fromthe open road. Nowit
stands eerily silent, its remaining chimneys and walls
rising above the grasslands like an adobe Stonehenge.
During the eight-mile trip to the fort after you exit
Interstate 25 North, you’ll be able to see remnants of the
deep ruts left by long processions of wagon trains that
helped settle the West back in the 1800s. Today herds of
antelope graze those same plains, and real cowboys work
cattle in the fields.
Immersed in a sea of grass that extends for miles,
the valley in which the fort sits is flanked on both sides
by piñon-, juniper- and ponderosa-covered hills. It’s a
picturesque and reverent place.
There are stone walkways and foundations still laid out
in military precision and the remnants of brick chimneys
standing as silent sentinels over the old fort’s parade
grounds. Walking the sprawling ruins provides a leisurely
hike and gives visitors a feel for the size and scope of
the garrison; the many signs posted about the grounds
help you interpret what you see. Folks with active
imaginations might even hear the creak and groan of
wagon wheels and the crack of a drover’s whip —or detect
the musky odor of leather and horses upon the wind.
Hungry for more?
On your way back to Santa Fe, stop for an authentic
New Mexican meal at the Spic and Span restaurant in
historic Las Vegas. Take an after-dinner cruise around
town and enjoy some of the best-preserved Victorian
architecture in the state. Visitors can also stop by the
railroad depot for a look at the once-grand Harvey
Hotel still standing there.
Fort Unionis aghost of its former
Roads
less taken
aire libre | fresh air
Fort Union National Monument is located
about 90 miles northeast of Santa Fe off I-25
North. Take Exit 366 at N.M. 161 just after
Watrous and followthe signs.
For more information, visit
www.nps.gov/foun/index.htm.
t of its former self
IF YOU GO
NOWIT STANDS EERILY
SILENT, ITS REMAINING
CHIMNEYS ANDWALLS
RISINGABOVE THE
GRASSLANDS LIKE AN
ADOBE STONEHENGE.
2012 Bienvenidos 69
70 2012 Bienvenidos
STORY AND PHOTOS BY KARL F. MOFFATT
NewMexico’s Spanish heritage is evident in
the little villages and settlements found along
the old Santa Fe Trail, and a leisurely drive
out to Villanueva State Park is a great way
to experience the traditional rural lifestyle
that has served as the backbone of the local
Hispano culture for so long.
Just 60 miles east of Santa Fe, off Interstate 25 North,
tidy little Villanueva State Park is tucked away in a
picturesque valley. Because the Pecos River flows through
it, the park is a great midweek destination for a hike, to
picnic or to fish.
Villanueva State Park’s visitor center sports a classic
Southwest-style adobe-colored, stucco exterior with a
small cupola atop the metal roof; you’ll find brochures,
pamphlets and small informative displays inside. The
park features good campsites —some nestled among
shade trees by the river, more on top of a hill overlooking
the valley. There’s a bathhouse with showers and a
modern playground for kids.
Although swimming and wading are favorite activities
during the hot summer months, the river is regularly
stocked with trout for good fishing fromfall through
spring.
Crossing the attractive iron bridge that spans the river,
you’ll find a 2.5-mile loop trail that heads up to the ravine
overlooking the campground and river below. The views
fromatop the mesa are spectacular and worth the hike.
The park was created fromland donated by members
of the local Spanish land grant, many of whomlived in
the nearby village of Villanueva, so it’s a popular weekend
destination for locals.
Hungryfor more?
Stop in the village of Villanueva, where you’ll find a
beautiful church constructed in 1830 of local rock and
a classic, small-town mercantile. You may also want to
drive to the top of the hill overlooking the village to see
the grotto that contains santos and other religious items.
On the drive home, visitors should consider stopping
for an exceptional meal at La Risa Café in Ribera, where
breakfast is available all day and beer and wine can be
ordered with a meal on the patio.
FromSanta Fe take I-25 North toward Las Vegas.
Get off at Exit 323 and followN.M. 3 to the
outskirts of the village of Villanueva. Note the
sign at the intersection with County Road B 28
A, which leads down to Villanueva State Park.
For more information, visit
www.emnrd.state.nm.us/prd/villanueva.htm.
VillanuevaState Park
agreat place tohike, picnic or fish
IF YOU GO
aire libre | fresh air
2012 Bienvenidos 71
72 2012 Bienvenidos
STORY AND PHOTOS BY KARL F. MOFFATT
The interpretive display at the Pecos National
Historical Park Museum35 miles east of Santa
Fe begins with the story of the Puebloans who
called the area home long before the Spanish
arrived. On exhibition are pots, tools and other
artifacts that illustrate the lifestyle of the
Pecos Pueblo Indians when they lived in this
valley located on the edge of the Great Plains.
At its height in the 1400s, the pueblo boasted
700 rooms and housed about 2,000 Indians. It
served as a regional trading center and drew
nomadic Plains Indians to its doorsteps to
trade goods and services.
Adiorama in a glass case recreates the four-story tall
adobe pueblo featuring latillas and covered portals —a
design influence that can still be seen today in some
downtown Santa Fe buildings.
Large, colorful panels complement brief blocks of text
that spell out in greater detail the series of historical
events instrumental in shaping both the park’s and
the state’s history —especially the arrival of Spanish
conquistadors, whose settlements throughout the area
eventually led to the Indians’ abandonment of the pueblo.
ASpanish mission built next to the Indian pueblo
was destroyed during a widespread Indian uprising in
1680 that drove the Spanish out of NewMexico. It was
rebuilt after the Spanish returned some 12 years later.
Meanwhile, the fewremaining Puebloans had moved on
to a more hospitable location —Jemez Pueblo outside of
Albuquerque —where many of their descendants can still
be found.
The ruins of the Spanish mission and excavated
remains of the Indian pueblo may be the most dominant
features of the park today, but the visitor center might be
its best attraction.
Museumdisplays further document the role the Santa
Fe Trail played in bringing Anglo settlers to the area
in search of trade with the local Spanish and Indian
populations. There is a good accounting of one of the
pivotal battles of the Civil War —often referred to as
the Gettysburg of the West —during which Union and
Confederate forces clashed over much of the same ground
the park occupies today.
The center also pays homage to the park’s primary
Small is educational
The little museumat Pecos National Historical Park offers a well-designed and easily absorbed
aire libre | fresh air
2012 Bienvenidos 73
account of the park’s —and the state’s —fascinating history
benefactors, Texas oilman and cattle rancher E.E.
“Buddy” Fogelson and his wife, actress Greer Garson.
The couple donated most of the money and many of the
exhibits to build and equip the visitor center and left their
nearby Forked Lightning Ranch headquarters and land to
the park, too.
The Fogelsons’ involvement in the park is typical of an
era during which Santa Fe became a playground for the
rich and famous, who reveled in its earthy ambiance and
Southwest art and culture. A1980s-era short filmabout
the park narrated by Garson, which features early flyover
cinematography, can be viewed in the attached Kiva
Auditoriuminside the center.
The visitor center building itself is an excellent example
of classic southwestern construction incorporating
stucco, carved wooden beams, adobes, vigas and latillas,
as well as tinwork —all set amid a stunning backdrop of
forested mountains framed by an expansive sky. Its shop
features a great selection of park and Southwest-related
books, gifts and mementos.
Another interesting feature of the park is the limited
fishing programon a three-mile segment of the Pecos
River that wends its way through the grounds. There are
also self-guided tours of the Civil War battlefields for
those seeking a hike.
Take I-25 North out of Santa Fe toward Las
Vegas and get off at the Pecos/Glorieta Exit
299 at N.M. 50. Drive into town and make a
right at the stop sign at the intersection of
N.M. 63. Followfor a couple of miles to the
visitor center entrance.
For more information, visit www.nps.gov/
peco/index.htmor call the visitor center at
505-757-7241.
IF YOU GO
A1980S-ERASHORT FILM
ABOUT THE PARKNARRATED
BYGREERGARSON, WHICH
FEATURES EARLYFLYOVER
CINEMATOGRAPHY, CANBE
VIEWEDINTHE ATTACHEDKIVA
AUDITORIUMINSIDE THE CENTER.
74 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 75
Serious
&
F
u
n
1O98
1
/ 2 S. ST FRANCI S DR. @ PEN RD. MON– SAT 1O – 5 982. 2592
FOLK ART • TEXTILES • CDS • BOOKS • JEWELRY
WITH A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
76 2012 Bienvenidos
BY ARIN MCKENNA
First and foremost, last summer’s devastating
Las Conchas Fire did not close Santa Clara
Pueblo. Although the fire dealt the pueblo a
heavy blow, destroying more than 16,600 acres
(80 percent) of its forested lands and impacting
95 percent of its watershed, Santa Clara’s
village and enterprises are largely unaffected.
The Puye Cliff Dwellings —a national historical landmark
—are the ancestral homes of the Santa Claran people,
occupied fromapproximately 1200 until the Pueblo
Revolt of 1680. The settlement housed nearly 1,200
people, the largest on the Pajarito Plateau.
Tribal members lead guided tours of the cliff dwellings.
Learning fromtheir descendents howancestral people
lived is excellent preparation for visitors who want to
see other ancestral Puebloan (often mistakenly called
Anasazi) ruins, including nearby Bandelier National
Monument.
“It is important that Santa Clara people are able to
educate others about the significance of our ancestral
dwellings,” said Puye operations manager Lucinda
Williams. “We can enhance a visitor’s experience
with accurate information. We’re ambassadors for our
community. We’re passionate about our culture, we’re
passionate about our traditions and dances, and we’re
passionate about our ancestral ruins.”
The guides’ training ranges fromCPRand first aid to
hearing oral histories fromtribal elders. Many elders
remember their parents selling pottery at the Harvey
House bed and breakfast at the base of the cliff dwellings.
The Harvey House —dating to the 1920s —nowserves
as an interpretive center and gift shop. On summer
weekends Santa Claran people demonstrate or sell their
art there.
According to Williams, providing visitors with a “touch
of culture” is the focus of all the pueblo’s enterprises.
“That means we are always respectful of our guests,
inviting themin,” Williams said. “Warmth, friendship
and hospitality” are cultural values tribal members hope
to convey.
Fromancient cliff dwellings
toworld-class golf
Santa Clara Pueblo’s enterprises cover broad spectrum
ARIN MCKENNA
2012 Bienvenidos 77
Puye reopened in 2008, after an eight-year closure in the
aftermath of the Cerro Grande Fire. Before the closure,
visitors were allowed to wander freely through the
dwellings, something many people miss. But the lack of
restrictions led to looted artifacts and damage ranging
fromerosion to graffiti.
“Every person makes an impact on the land. That’s been
one of the hardest things to teach people,” Williams said.
“We want this for the next 100 generations, so we need
to preserve this nowfor the future of our community. We
decided upon tours to minimize the impact and provide a
more meaningful experience for people.”
Galleries emphasize personal touch
The Santa Clara people left the cliff dwellings for fertile
ground by the Río Grande more than three centuries ago.
Santa Clara village is open to visitors, but do not expect a
tourist haven in this quiet village. Afewtribal members
still occupy homes in the village, but most live in new
housing developments on Pueblo lands. The church and
cemetery are off-limits to visitors.
An “open” sign indicates someone selling pottery from
his or her home. Astop at one of those or at two artist-
owned galleries might inspire a treasured memory.
Merrock Gallery, owned by Paul and Rosalda Speckled
Rock, carries pottery by Paul and other Native artists,
American Indian jewelry and Rosalda’s paintings. The
gallery occupies the house Paul’s grandmother lived in
and serves as the artists’ studio.
“This is our retirement,” Paul said. “This is like our
garden or our little fishing place.”
Paul always has a table set up where he can
demonstrate, with the help of photographs, how
traditional pottery is hand coiled and fired. He may
tell stories of learning the art fromhis grandmother
or explain the pottery designs. This type of personal
interaction is rarely found at busier pueblos.
But it also is available at Naranjo’s Pottery, located in
Sammy Naranjo and Melony Gutierrez’s home. Sammy
learned pottery making fromhis mother Flora when he
was 12 years old and is known for his two-toned sgraffito
(etched) pottery.
Melony is one of the fewartists still practicing red
willowbasketry. She also learned pottery making from
fresh air | aire libre
Visitors often arrive in New Mexico with Hollywood
images of American Indians in mind. They may
visit the pueblos expecting either a theme park
experience of multistoried pueblos (remembered
from grade school lessons) or Plains Indians wearing
feathered headdresses and living in tepees.
Many are disappointed to find that most Puebloan
villages are very similar to any other Northern New
Mexico village, comprising single-family adobe
homes with residents engaged in the same activities
their contemporaries engage in elsewhere. “When
they see me in my Nike shirt and Nike shoes, they
sometimes ask if I’m an Indian,” said artist Melony
Gutierrez of Santa Clara Pueblo.
The villages are usually quiet, with few people
about, because most pueblo members live in
contemporary homes away from the older village and
work at day jobs. Most villages have a few “open”
signs indicating families selling pottery or other
artwork from their homes and maybe a family-owned
gallery or two.
Those wanting to see more traditional Puebloan
structures should visit Taos or Acoma. Taos has two
multistoried pueblos inhabited for more than 1,000
years. Acoma’s multistory structures are smaller, due
to the pueblo’s perch on a mesa top, but they also
hold centuries of history.
Taos and Acoma have also embraced tourism.
Acoma offers only guided tours of the ancient
pueblo, with pueblo members selling pottery along
the tour route. Visitors at Taos may wander the
village on their own or enrich their experience with a
guided tour, and many Taos people have established
galleries in their ancestral homes.
But visiting a sleepier Puebloan village may reap
other rewards. Artists selling from their homes
may tell stories of learning pottery making from a
grandmother or an aunt. Galleries are less crowded,
and the artists who own them are often generous
with their time and willing to educate visitors about
the ancient art of pottery making.
Santa Clara and Picuris pueblos in some ways
exemplify contemporary Puebloan life. Both
offer experiences ranging from quiet villages to
contemporary hotels, providing opportunities to
learn more about Puebloan people and the world
they inhabit today.
Those planning to purchase pottery or artwork
at the pueblos are advised to carry cash. Galleries
usually accept credit cards, but individual artists
often do not.
Many pueblos are offering other venues for
interacting with Puebloan people and aesthetics
— modern enterprises ranging from hotels to golf
courses.
Resort/casinos such as Sandia Resort & Casino
or Santa Ana Pueblo’s Hyatt Regency Tamaya
Resort and Spa offer luxurious accommodations
with a contemporary Puebloan aesthetic. Buffalo
Thunder Resort & Casino is filled with museum-
quality contemporary American Indian art. Puebloan
golf courses are often masterpieces of landscape
architecture. Casinos are often worth visiting for
their interior design and architecture.
TODAY’S PUEBLOS MERGE ANCIENT TRADITIONS
WITHCONTEMPORARY LIFESTYLES
COURTESY
Black Mesa Golf Club
78 2012 Bienvenidos
Sammy and specializes in turtles and other animal
figurines, a tribute to the pottery style of her grandparents
Esquipula and Joseph Gutierrez. She is currently
stretching the boundaries of both art forms by integrating
basketry with pottery.
The couple also use photographs to explain the art of
pottery making. Melony may describe howwonderful
the pueblo smells when all the hornos (adobe ovens) are
filled with bread and pies before feast day or when she is
passing down traditions to younger generations. “We get
a little break fromworking and get to speak with people,”
she said. “That’s the delight of it.”
Hotel, golf course anewfocus
The Santa Clara Development Corporation manages
several tribal enterprises.
The Santa Claran Hotel’s Native aesthetic and its
central location are selling points for those exploring
Northern NewMexico. The lobby’s whitewashed walls
are set off by viga (log beam) and latilla (wood slat)
ceilings, hand-wrought woodwork, hand-woven rugs
and tin wall sconces created by local artists. Historic
photographs of the pueblo adorn the walls, along with the
pottery for which the pueblo is famous. Three restaurants
are all located off the adjoining casino. The pueblo also
owns the Big Rock Bowling Center in the same complex.
The pueblo is building strong partnerships for
economic development and tourism. One example of
this is a partnership among the hotel, the Albuquerque
International Balloon Fiesta and six Northern New
Mexico wineries to host a festival May 19-20.
According to principal Eddie Peck, Black Mesa Golf
Club is listed among the top 100 golf courses on all the
major ratings panels. Links magazine called it “one of the
more spectacular courses anywhere” and named it one of
18 major-worthy public courses. “I’mproud that we have
a world-class golf course here in NewMexico,” Peck said.
“It also offers one of the best values for a course of this
quality.”
Robert Baxter Spanndesigned the course, which is
integrated into the natural contours of the land. “It’s a
challenging course but one of the best there is. I don’t think
anyone is disappointed once they come out,” Peck said.
RULES OF ETIQUETTE FOR PUEBLO VISITATION
Visiting pueblos or attending feast day dances are remarkable opportunities to experience another culture
and religion. Showing respect for the Pueblo regulations and etiquette allows you to have a rich and rewarding
experience without mishap.
• Sketching, recording and any other means of audio or visual reproduction are prohibited at most pueblos,
although most do allowphotography with the purchase of a camera permit. Permits usually cost $5 to $15
and may be purchased at tribal offices or visitor centers. (Note: At many pueblos, camera permits may only be
purchased at tribal offices Monday through Friday.) Never photograph an individual or private property without
asking permission. Violating pueblo regulations concerning photography —this includes cell phone cameras
—could result in the confiscation of your camera by tribal police.
• Pueblos are not amusement parks or living history museums but residential communities. Behave as you would
want others to behave if they were visiting your community.
• Enter a pueblo home as you would any other —by invitation only.
• Do not climb ladders or climb on walls and other structures. Structures may be several hundred years old and
easily damaged. Do not pick up or remove any artifacts or objects.
• Kivas and cemeteries are off-limits to non-Puebloan people. Churches may also be off-limits and are definitely
closed to non-Pueblo people if surrounded by a cemetery. If you are unsure whether you may enter a structure or
area, obtain permission first.
• Alcohol, weapons and drugs are not allowed in the pueblos.
• Do not bring dogs to the pueblos.
RULES OF ETIQUETTE DURING TRADITIONAL DANCES
• Pueblo dances are religious ceremonies, not performances. Observe themas you would a church service, with
respect and quiet attention. Do not interrupt non-dance participants by pushing in front of them, blocking their
view, asking questions or visiting with friends.
• Most pueblos do not allowphotography on feast days.
• Do not conduct business or socialize loudly. Many pueblo members only have a chance to see certain dances
once a year and may have traveled many miles to participate.
• Cell phones should be turned off and may be confiscated if used during a ceremony.
• Plazas have been blessed for the dances and are considered holy space. Do not walk across a plaza even if the
dancing has stopped: Keep to the edges.
• Refrain fromtalking to the dancers. Do not approach dancers as they are entering, leaving or resting near the
kivas.
• Applause after dances is not appropriate.
• The dances start and end at their own pace. Be patient.
• If you are fortunate enough to receive an invitation to a feast day meal, there are some simple guidelines. If the
table is full, join those waiting in the living roomuntil everyone who arrived before you has had a chance to be
served. Do not linger at the table. It is polite to take desserts such as fruit pies as you leave so that others can be
seated. Thank your host, but a payment or tip is not appropriate.
COURTESY
Santa Claran Hotel
ARIN MCKENNA
The Puye Cliff Dwellings
2012 Bienvenidos 79
BY ARIN MCKENNA
Picuris means “the people who paint,” and
one of the best ways to gain an appreciation
of Picuris Pueblo is to first visit the gift shop
at the Hotel Santa Fe to see images of village
life painted by Picuris Governor Gerald Nailor
(NewDeer).
Although it holds the usual sundries and gift items, the
gift shop is more a miniature art gallery featuring Native
artists. Nailor himself is often there on weekends.
Nailor is the son of noted Diné (Navajo) artist Gerald
Nailor, Sr. His mother, Santana, was Picuris.
Nailor’s inspiration derives frommemories of growing
up at Picuris and fromstories passed down through his
family and village elders. His images evoke Picuris in the
early decades of the last century: people gathered around
a tractor-powered threshing machine, a woman and child
(his mother and grandmother) leading a burro down a
country road, villagers working together on the annual
spring cleaning of the acequia (irrigation ditch).
“Most of the art that I do is just reliving the areas that
are forgotten. Like the threshing machine —the last time
they did this was probably the early ’60s,” Nailor said. “I
see that great change within Picuris, howthe community
was much more intertwined, much more cohesive. They
were farming, working the fields together, plastering the
homes together and doing things communally. They still
kept some of the traditions, because most of the elders
were still there that knewthat road of life.”
World War II disrupted the continuity, when many
soldiers returned fromwar addicted to alcohol.
“In the ’50s it was very harsh, but slowly we began to
limp back to where, even if the farming was left behind,
there was still that communal togetherness, but a little bit
more distant,” Nailor said. “Most people born with those
traditional concepts, inherited through the dances and
the songs and the land, have a sense of survival. When
they left the fields, I think those first contacts with self-
being were through dancing.”
The pueblo’s decline had begun centuries earlier with
the arrival of the Spanish and the diseases they carried.
Don Juan de Oñate, who established the first Spanish
settlement in NewMexico in 1598, called it “Gran Pueblo
de los Picuris.” The pueblo was several stories high and
held 2,000 to 3,000 inhabitants. It was a center of trade
between the Plains Indians and the Puebloan people of
the Río Grande Valley.
The Picuris Pueblo population nowis less than 200.
Economic development, nogaming
Nailor has been on the tribal council for more than 30
years and served as governor for more than 15 terms. He
has labored not only to sustain and revive traditional
activities and values but also to introduce innovations he
feels will benefit the tribe. It was Nailor who convinced
the Picuris council to build the Hotel Santa Fe.
At an economic-development workshop for tribal
leaders, Nailor learned that investors wanted to partner
with a pueblo to build a hotel, with the help of the United
States Department of Agriculture’s guaranteed loan
programfor rural economic development.
Nailor realized this could help the tribe financially
without resorting to gaming. “Another concept had to be
formed so the pueblo would be supported futuristically,”
Nailor said. “We had heard about the many vices of
gaming when we were growing up, because the concept
through the traditional thought was to give, not to take.
“I took the package to Picuris, and I was almost shouted
off the podium. Even a $10 loan is very big for them, and
you talk about an eleven-and-a-half-million-dollar loan,
and it’s devastating.” The biggest fear was that tribal lands
would be lost if the hotel failed.
Eventually Nailor prevailed, and the hotel opened
in 1990. “We had a lot of input on the grounds, the
architecture, the plants, and what was needed here,”
Nailor said. Nailor also advocated for amenities such as a
swimming pool and the Amaya restaurant, rather than a
buffet. The restaurant has earned renown for its blending
of indigenous and nonindigenous ingredients.
When the hotel opened, training and shuttle service
to work was provided for Picuris members. Nailor
himself —between terms as governor —decided to learn
kitchen operations fromthe ground up. He started as a
dishwasher, worked his way up to prep cook and was the
hotel’s first breakfast chef.
Income fromthe hotel helps support tribal
administration, and the pueblo is slowly redeveloping.
Pueblo members nowenjoy a gym, fishing lakes and a
disc golf course.
Farming and traditional foods are being reintroduced.
Last year the tribe planted one field of traditional corn,
beans, squash and pumpkins and four fields of hay for its
bison herd. This year the tribe will plant five fields with
vegetables and five with hay. Tribal elders teach young
people about traditions such as wild food sources as they
work the land.
The pueblo has been proactive in protecting its
resources, expelling two mining companies fromtheir
traditional homelands and resolving water-rights issues
by working cooperatively with communities along the
Picuris provides contrast
The pueblo’s quiet village and elegant hotel are worlds apart
Those planning to visit Picuris Pueblo should realize
it is not a destination in itself. It has no galleries or
artists selling from their homes and nothing to cater
to tourism. But driving through the pueblo while on
the High Road to Taos (the pueblo has a northern
and southern entrance on New Mexico 75) may give
a sense of pueblo life today.
Spending the morning in Chimayó (famous for
the Santuario de Chimayó, weaving galleries and
the Rancho de Chimayó restaurant), then following
the High Road as far as Picuris before heading
south through Dixon to visit some Northern New
Mexico wineries is another good option.
The mission church of San Lorenzo is a focal
point of the village. The pueblo completely rebuilt
the adobe church after an attempt to preserve
it by plastering with cement caused the adobe
infrastructure to collapse. The church is only open
for services, but its adobe walls are a testament to
the community's cooperative efforts to preserve
something of value.
Viewing the bison herd from the road is another
highlight. Puebloan people used to travel to the
plains to hunt buffalo, and many tribes have
established herds to provide a healthy meat source
for their people. Buffalo meat is also for sale at the
smoke shop on the northern boundary.
To see Picuris at its best, attend the San Lorenzo
Feast Day on August 10. Religious dances take
place throughout the day, and Native artists will be
selling their wares.
watershed.
“We’re working with all the communities communally,
rather than litigating,” Nailor said. “We don’t want to
litigate our streambecause it’s not right. You don’t litigate
life, and you don’t weigh life and you don’t buy life.”
Nailor continues to focus on economic development.
He hopes to build a gas station/grocery on pueblo lands
so mountain residents do not have to drive to Taos or
Española for necessities.
Nailor, who is 70 years old, devotes significant energy
to Picuris’ future. “I’mtraining my youngsters to take
care of the land and protect the land and the water,” he
said. “So the younger generation is getting that sort of
insight, howimportant the water is, and the animal life,
the environment.”
IF YOU GO
fresh air | aire libre
80 2012 Bienvenidos
Santa Clara Pueblo and Puye Cliff Dwellings
800-320-5008
http://puyecliffs.com
Summer schedule: Tours on the hour, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., seven days a week, weather
permitting. Closed June 13 and Aug. 12.
Cost: Harvey House: $7 adults, $5 seniors 55+ and children 14 and under; Cliffside or Mesa
Top Tours: $20 adults, $18 seniors 55+ and children 14 and under; Puye Adventure Tour
(combining all tour options) $35 adults, $33 seniors 55+ and children 14 and under.
Directions: Take U.S. 84/285 north to NM 502 west. North on NM 30 to Santa Clara
Canyon Road/Puye Cliffs Road. Purchase tickets at the Valero Gas Station/Puye Cliffs
Welcome Center before driving to the cliff dwellings.
Santa Clara Village
Comanche Dance: June 13
Feast Day: Aug. 12
505-753-7330
Camera permits: $5. Purchase at tribal offices Monday-Friday.
Directions: Take U.S. 84/285 north to NM 502 west. North on NM 30 to the pueblo
entrance.
Santa Claran Hotel & Casino
www.santaclaran.com
877-505-4949 (hotel), 866-244-7625 (casino)
Directions: Take U.S. 84/285 north to Española. The hotel, casino and Big Rock Bowling
Center are .03 miles into town on the left-hand side (460 Riverside Drive).
Black Mesa Golf Club
www.blackmesagolfclub.com
505-747-8946
Directions: Take U.S. 84/285 north for 22 miles. Turn west on NM 399 for 1.6 miles to
entrance.
Santa Clara Pueblo Fund
Santa Clara Pueblo has partnered with the New Mexico Community Foundation to set up
a fund supporting the pueblo's fire rehabilitation and flood mitigation efforts. Restoration
from the Las Conchas Fire is expected to take years. The fund currently has approximately
$200,000, and the needs are significantly greater than that. Contributions provide
leverage in attaining matching FEMA funding.
To donate, go to www.nmcf.org.
Merrock Gallery
505-753-2083. Open 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. every day but Sunday.
Naranjo Gallery
505-929-2524 or 505-929-4813. Open daily, 10 a.m. to sundown.
Picuris Pueblo
575-587-2519
San Lorenzo Feast Day: Aug. 10
Camera permits: $15. Purchase at tribal offices Monday-Friday.
Directions on High Road to Taos: Take U.S. 84/285 north. Turn east on NM 503.
Continue 11 miles to Juan Medina Road, turn left. Turn right when Juan Medina Road ends
at NM 76. Continue on NM 76 when it turns left at Truchas. Turn left when NM 76 ends at
NM 75. The pueblo entrance is a quarter mile down on the right.
Directions fromthe LowRoad to Taos: Take U.S. 84/285 north to Española. From
Española take SR 68 north 25 miles to SR 75 (the Dixon turnoff). Continue through Dixon
north to the pueblo entrance on the left.
Hotel Santa Fe
www.hotelsantafe.com
982-1200 or 855-825-9876
For more information on all 19 pueblos, go to www.indianpueblo.org or
www.newmexico.org/nativeamerica.
IF YOU GO
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2012 Bienvenidos 81
Wheelwright Museum
of the american indian
704 camino Lejo, museum hill
Santa fe, nm 87505
www.wheelwright.org
monday–Saturday 10–5
Sunday 1–5
free admission
a certain fire: mary cabot Wheelwright collects the Southwest
through april 14, 2013
Projects are made possible in part by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission
and the 1% Lodgers’ tax; new mexico arts, a division of the
department of cultural affairs and the national endowment for the arts;
the thaw charitable trust; and many private donors.
acoma manta, circa 1855
indian arts research center, iaft.122
Gift of mary cabot Wheelwright
School for advanced research, Santa fe
Photo by addison doty
82 2012 Bienvenidos
Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian
704 Camino Lejo . Museum Hill. Santa Fe, NM 87505
505.982.4636, ext. 110. www.wheelwright.org
Monday-Saturday 10-5 Sunday 1-5
Case Trading Post Museum Shop
Ofering the Unique in Traditonal and Contemporary Natve American Art
Visit us today or shop online at www.casetradingpost.com.
Photo by Addison Doty
2012 Bienvenidos 83
84 2012 Bienvenidos
aire libre | fresh air
BY BETH SURDUT
PHOTOS BY KERRY SCHERK
I was on one of those roads that rental car
policies won’t cover. I’d stopped —not lost,
just not exactly sure where I was going. High
winds were tossing small birds around like
drunken baseballs. Then I sawthe bumper
sticker on a parked car: “Something wonderful
is about to happen.”
I raised an eyebrow.
My destination was the Madrid graveyard.
No one really lays claimto owning this high lonesome
piece of land. Hungry weather gnaws the wooden fence
poles still standing and chews the faded plastic flowers
on the graves.
Booker Weems, the titular owner of this small burial
ground that he estimates is 100 square feet within a 20-
acre parcel, said he bought it sometime around 1982.
The purchase was propelled by “strange stuff that was
going on up there,” according to Weems, who lives nearby.
But the ruckus wasn’t caused by spirits of this former
ghost town. “Men were fighting and shooting at each
other. I don’t knowwhy. They was supposed to be friends.”
Out of concern for his daughter, a small child riding her
bike too close for comfort, he bought the property. Things
have been pretty quiet since then.
James Mocho, the now-76-year-old Realtor who
sold Weems the land, grewup in the area on his father’s
115,000 acres. “That cemetery belongs to the people in it
and their folks,” Mocho said.
And what an assorted bunch they are. Life isn’t neat
and tidy and neither are these scattered graves, though it’s
evident that people cared. Early mining town residents,
some surely victims of a disastrous explosion in 1932, are
marked by nameless wooden crosses pointing in every
compass direction. Some headstones, most weather-
battered and listing, bear Spanish inscriptions.
But amid the piled rocks that discourage critters from
digging, distinctly unusual markers call out like noisy kids
who refuse to whisper at the library. Picture the contents
of a curio shop —quirky, humorous, loving, and just plain
weird. Without a map, one wonders if the memorials
explain what these folks loved or howthey died.
Dolphins dance on a pole high above this rock garden.
Clustered blue glass bottles glint and wink at names
drawn on grave markers as unusual as the residents —an
electrical box, a circular sawblade, and a knight’s helmet.
Can openers sprout in bone-dry dirt where an eternal
butterfly rests. Bike handles integrated with a cross
sit atop a wheel eternally riding somewhere. Ametal
hand rises fromthe grave, insouciantly waving a smoke
between tubular fingers while two guitars play on.
Fromcompany townto hippie enclave
Madrid started out as a company town, owned by the
Albuquerque &Cerrillos Coal Company in the 1930s and
’40s. When coal consumption declined, its owner, Oscar
Huber, had to shut the mines down. In 1954, the entire
town was advertised for sale in The Wall Street Journal
for $250,000. There were no buyers.
When Huber died in 1962, his son Joe inherited the
town. “Joe Huber let the long-haired young people, known
as hippies, live in the houses and fix the places up in lieu
of rent,” Mocho said. Some paid minimal rents, and not all
the residents were hippies.
In 1973 or ’74 or ’75 —depending on who tells the story
—the whole town sold for $500,00 in 16 days with no
advertising. Joe Huber was the seller; Mocho the Realtor;
and the temporary real estate office was the saloon still in
existence, the Mine Shaft Tavern.
Independent, radically creative, and proud of it, the
residents of Madrid are the people your parents may have
warned you about, and nowyou really want to get to know
them. Around 300 residents, self-identified as Madroids,
formthe puzzle pieces of this unincorporated town.
There is no post office. Not one chain store. No local
police. No undertaker. No clergy. No funeral home.
Madrid’s church is a private home. Yet, although
amenities may appear curtailed to an outsider, pioneering
spirits with a shovel and a plot can bring forth unusual
fruit in Madrid.
Astroll down the eclectic main street of galleries,
shops and eateries housed in former mining town shacks
shows that Madrid understood recycle, upcycle and
water conservation long before the terms became trendy.
Being green in the desert, which seems like an oxymoron,
is a challenge met daily by residents who landed here
fromfast American cities, wide open ranges and slow
Peace Corps outposts.
In this thirsty land where water tower gauges
perpetually register as low, aptly named community
garden coordinator Amanda Bramble oversees planting
and harvesting of food and flowers. This is definitely not
Digging it inMadrid
Noncomformists rule former mining town
2012 Bienvenidos 85
your average garden club. The local water co-op donates
water. There are no individual plots and “the only rule is
that every time you come to the garden, you have to make
a contribution —labor, seeds, manure, or something,”
said Bramble, who owns Ampersand Sustainable
Learning Center.
Diana Johnson —a 77-year-old Madrid matriarch,
textile artist and co-owner of Johnsons of Madrid gallery
—arrived here 39 years ago with husband Mel. Trained
at the Chicago Arts Institute where Mel also taught, she
and her husband were two decades older than most of
the residents and continue to be linchpins of the town.
Surrounded by the work of NewMexico artists and the
Johnsons’ signature creations, Diana talked about the
past, present and future of the town while Mel sustained
the writer and Diana with ginger ale and fudgsicles.
Of the fewplots set aside for community use, the one
for a community garden lay dormant until four years ago.
Diana described Bramble as “part of the newenergy, doing
what we couldn’t.”
Bramble, who is extremely organized, recognizes that
“if you put too much bureaucracy on anything in Madrid,
it fails.”
I’d seen the graveyard. I knewexactly what she meant.
Hours later, leaving Madrid, I passed that car again.
Another bumper sticker on it read, “What a long strange
trip it’s been.”
For more about Madrid
• Find a listing of Madrid shops and other attractions at
www.turquoisetrail.org/stops/category/madrid/.
• For more stories about Madrid residents, check out the trailer
to Sky Fabin’s DVD, Taking the High Road to Madrid (USA) at
skyfabinproductions.com/TTHRoad_main.htm.
• Madrid residents have revived the mining town's July Fourth
parade tradition; it generally starts at noon.
Diana Johnson, owner of Johnsons of Madrid Galleries, left, and Amanda Bramble, owner of Ampersand Sustainable
Learning Center, standing in Madrid on the Turquoise Trail (Hwy. 14).
86 2012 Bienvenidos
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food | comida
Cutting out the carne
Vegetarians can find high cuisine while eating low on the food chain
Raw sushi at Body Cafe is made using jicama rice or nut pâté, avocado, carrot,
cucumber, raw sauerkraut and sprouts.
STORY BY CRAIG SMITH
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
As a longtime lover of good food, I’ve always been in synch with that
wonderful song fromthe musical comedy Oliver! You know—the one
that starts off, “Food, glorious food!”
But now, since I’mtransitioning into a vegetarian regimen after years of omnivore-ism,
I’mnot sure which lyric to pop in next. My old favorite, the original “Hot sausage and
mustard,” must be left out —unless I can find a spinach sausage that almost oinks.
My quandary is one that’s shared by many locals, as well as many who come to visit
here during the busy summer season. Given the meat-based delights in our local eateries
and the traditional pork, lamb, goat and beef dishes fromnorteño kitchens, is coming
here to eat a plant-based diet like going to Agra and skipping the Taj Mahal?
Hardly, said noted cookbook author and lover of vegetarian cuisine Deborah Madison.
She said that what used to be called “the vegetarian option” is alive and well in Northern
NewMexico, especially given Santa Fe’s reliable sources of fresh-from-the-field raw
materials for home cookery and some restaurants devoted to vegetarian cuisine of taste
and virtue. And, she emphasized, we’re talking vegetarian cooking worthy of the name
—not just opening up a can of peas and dumping the contents on a plate.
“I must have written a million recipes for vegetarian cooking, though I’ma total
omnivore,” Madison admitted. “I’ve been writing about vegetables for 20 years and I still
dreamof cookies. I admit I’mpicky when it comes to going out to eat. There aren’t many
restaurants I’ll go to. High-end restaurants are often a disappointment: Their vegetable
side dishes are usually not so good.”
Madison still has some local favorites, though. “Vegetarian cooking can produce
some amazing treats. I do like Jambo. I almost always have their vegetarian lentil stew.
El Tesoro, a little Salvadoran restaurant (in the Sambusco shopping center), has an
excellent tostada. Treehouse Café is vegetarian and local. At La Boca, there are always
some amazing vegetable dishes on that menu. [Café] Pasqual’s always has something
good to eat that’s vegetarian, plus it’s all organic, which is a big plus in my book.”
Other noted eateries where vegetarian or vegan cooking are either regularly available
or the sole menu offerings include the city’s Indian restaurants, such as India Palace,
India House, and Raaga; Annapurna; Mu Du Noodles; and Asian restaurants, such as
Lan’s Vietnamese Cuisine. “Lan’s is fabulous and has some amazingly good things to
eat without meat, including their phos [a noodle soup that comes in many variants],”
Madison said.
And of course there’s Body of Santa Fe, where Madison will eat fromtime to time.
Vegetarian in training that I am, I went there doubting and stayed to wonder. Arawvegan
pumpkin cheesecake, carrot cake or pizza made with a crust derived fromground nuts
is absolutely delicious. So are the vegetarian soups at Back Street Bistro. And the Plaza
Cafe Southside serves one of the biggest, most superbly presented fruit plates I’ve found
in town.
There also are many vegetarian entrees at the small Mexican and Hispano restaurants
around town. After all, the traditional Three Sisters of southwest Pueblo cookery —corn,
beans and squash —provided the region’s first residents and early colonists with a well-
balanced plant-based diet even before the “V” word was used to describe it. (Some vegan
foodies add another sibling, chile, to the mix with good results.)
Just ask before you order to be sure that no lard or meat stock was used to create any
of the dishes that interest you.
For those nights you choose to eat at home, Madison’s recommendation is what many
88 2012 Bienvenidos
other vegetarian cooks advise: Shop fresh, local and fair-
trade. For her, that means trading at the Santa Fe Farmers
Market in the Railyard, or at La Montañita Co-op, or
through other local vendors she’s come to knowand trust.
Ripe heirloomor beefsteak tomatoes, greens with the
goodness of the earth coming through their rich taste,
organically raised apples fresh fromthe tree, zucchini
and carrots, squash blossoms to stuff with goat cheese (if
you’re lacto-ovo) or beans —what could be better?
One tree, manybranches
There seemto be more differences between those who
choose not to eat animal products in general, and the
fine variations they then espouse, than between a full-
state version of the Hatfields and the McCoys —or the
different sides in the Trojan War.
In general, a vegetarian eschews animal products in his
or her diet but admits everything that grows in or above
the ground, or in the sea —fromfruit and nuts to legumes
and seaweeds, or wheat products and root vegetables.
With personal exceptions, of course; the variable diets
of vegetarians are multifold. Lacto-ovo vegetarians will
consume eggs, butter, milk and cheese, but not meat or
fish. Other vegetarians partake of fish, possibly poultry
nowand then. (I’mstill lurking after turkey.) Others
adore certain kinds of vegetables but avoid others: sweet
potatoes, yes; baking Idahos, no.
Vegans, who are far stricter, have an abiding love affair
with plant foods. No, not fertilizers, but fruits, nuts,
legumes and vegetables fromboth land and sea. Some
vegans also partake of cereal products, but others can’t
abide them. They generally are not averse to cooking
their food.
Rawvegans, however, live up to their name. They
exclude all animal-derived products fromtheir diet and
don’t cook the fruits, vegetables or anything else they
consume. Period. I knowone rawvegan who won’t even
let water boil for tea: He believes subjecting anything to
heat destroys the intrinsic food value.
However, all three tribes, if you will, are perfectly
happy with natural sweeteners. Agave syrup; pure
maple syrup; stevia powder or leaves are all favored for
making a green shake suggest a treat rather than a dose
of medicine. Vegetarians enjoy honey —especially locally
harvested honey —while vegans avoid it because it
comes fromliving creatures.
So pull up a chair and feast away. The days are long
gone, especially in Santa Fe, when eating vegetarian
meant nothing but mounds of rabbit food.
Meat-free dining
ANNAPURNAAYURVEDIC CUISINE
1620 St. Michaels Drive
988-9688
BACKSTREET BISTRO
513 Camino de los Marquez
982-3500
http://backstreetbistrodailysoup.blogspot.com
BODY OF SANTAFE
333 W. Cordova Road
986-0362, www.bodyofsantafe.com
CAFÉ PASQUAL'S
121 Don Gaspar Ave.
983-9340, www.pasquals.com
EL TESOROCAFÉ
500 Montezuma Ave., Suite 104
988-3886
INDIAHOUSE
2501 Cerrillos Road
471-2651, http://indiahousenm.com
INDIAPALACE
227 Don Gaspar Ave.
986-5859
www.indiapalace.com
JAMBO
2010 Cerrillos Road
473-1269
www.jambocafe.net
LABOCA
72 W. Marcy St.
982-3433
www.labocasf.com
LAN'S VIETNAMESE CUISINE
2430 Cerrillos Road
986-1636
MUDUNOODLES
1494 Cerrillos Road
983-1411
www.mudunoodles.com
PLAZACAFÉ SOUTHSIDE
3466 Zafarano Drive
424-0755
www.plazacafesouth.com
RAAGA
544 Agua Fría St., Unit B
820-6440
http://indianrestaurantsantafe.com
THE BETTERDAY COFFEE SHOP
905 W. Alameda St.
780-8059
TREEHOUSE PASTRY SHOP/CAFÉ
1600 Lena St., Suite A2
474-5543
http://treehousepastry.com
Breakfast burritos your way
Here’s how a Northern New Mexico breakfast
burrito — that happy avatar of the hand-held
meal — could be interpreted by vegetarians of
varied persuasions, as compared to the standard
option.
STANDARD: A flour tortilla encases beans,
eggs and/or meat, with hot chile (green, red or
Christmas) and melted cheese on top. Also in, or
nearby on the plate, could be Mexican rice, beans,
onion, avocado, lettuce and tomato garnish, sour
cream and salsa. Lard or other animal fats likely
are lurking somewhere, too.
VEGETARIAN: Flour tortilla, beans or grains,
veggies and chile, no meat. Laco-ovos might add
eggs or cheese, inside or on top of the burrito.
Sides and garnishes can be the same as for the
standard option as long as cooking oil and other
fats include no animal products.
RAWVEGAN: A tortilla made of lettuce or
cabbage leaves, seaweed wrap or ground nuts
— or a mix of blended peppers and spinach.
Inside and on the plate: everything raw that you
can imagine, including sprouted beans, with
most ingredients spiral-sliced into delicate curls
that fall lightly onto the tongue. Even apples can
have a place. Raw “cheese” made from nuts,
red pepper and soy sauce or liquid amino acids
also might appear if they are made following
the heating and ingredient guidelines of the raw
vegan diet.
A vegetable pakora at Raaga, served with tamarind
chutney and mint cilantro chutney, is made using
chickpea flour. This item is both vegan and gluten-free
and is only available on the daily lunch buffet.
2012 Bienvenidos 89
90 2012 Bienvenidos
BENEDICTINE MONKS BREW
‘WITHCARE ANDAPRAYER’
INABIQUIÚ
2012 Bienvenidos 91
STORY BY ADELE MELANDER-DAYTON
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
Driving north up N.M. 84 toward Ensenada, it’s easy to miss Forest Service
Road 151. The turnoff is dusty and faint. The road itself is one lane rutted to a
washboard and crossed with intermittent cattle guards (in springtime, calves
wander by the roadside), with steep hairpin
turns and gravel the size of shooter marbles. This
means the trip up Chama Canyon isn’t for the
faint of heart. But fewdirt roads in Northern New
Mexico yield sweeter rewards. For 13 pleasantly
slowmiles, F.S. Road 151 hugs the Chama River,
winding past chalky mesa cliffs and views of
Pedernal, until at last it ends at the Monastery of
Christ in the Desert.
Founded in 1964 by monks fromMount Saviour Monastery in
NewYork, Christ in the Desert is a collection of adobe and straw
bale buildings (and a tall, glassy chapel, plus a huge photovoltaic
array) clustered where Chama Canyon begins to narrow. The low
brown structures are peaceful and modest, befitting a Benedictine
monastery. But drive up the road a little farther, past the refractory
and the gift shop, and you’ll find a newer, smaller building. It’s tiny,
tiled and lit with fluorescent lights. The building’s sterility and
sheer newness stand out against the old adobes and red sandstone
dirt. This is the year-old microbrewery of Christ in the Desert,
where, as a hanging vinyl banner proclaims, beer is brewed “with
care and a prayer.”
At the end of March, the monks were hard at work on their
first production brew. This was an exciting moment: While the
Monastery of Christ in the Desert
P. O. Box 270
Abiquiú
801-545-8567
www.christdesert.org/
IF YOU GO
Brother Augustine Seiker stirs hops into the brew.
92 2012 Bienvenidos
brewery has been used a handful of times over the past year, the monastery had been
waiting on state and federal licensing to legally sell beers brewed on-site. Later this
summer, they hope to open a tasting roomon the property —check the website or call for
current information —but until then, guests are welcome to visit the brewery.
Five brothers —one dressed in full habit (long black robes) and four in shorter, shirt-
length work habits worn with jeans and sneakers —moved in concert through the small
room. In the center stands the three-tiered brewing sculpture: shiny stainless steel
kettles (arranged in graduated heights for gravity-assisted draining), valves, burners
and lots of tubing. Test tubes and droppers line one wall, and supplies (bags of sugar and
grain) are stacked neatly in a storeroom. The design of the brewery is solely functional,
save for a simple crucifix hanging over the sink.
Abbey Beverage Company (ABC) was founded in 2004, when two Santa Fe physicians
provided the startup capital. “Monasteries have to earn their own living and be
economically self-sustaining,” said Berkeley Merchant, general manager of ABC. “That’s
the rule of St. Benedict: ora et labora, prayer and work.”
Merchant is an oblate, or a layperson who’s dedicated to the monastic way of life. His
religious name is Brother Barnabas. Merchant moved to Santa Fe with his wife in 2006
after 30 years as a successful entrepreneur in Portland, Oregon, and the brothers asked
if he’d like to become the monastery’s business manager. “Be careful what you pray for!”
said Merchant, laughing.
Merchant was on hand with brewmaster Brad Kraus to instruct the brothers in the
exacting process of crafting a perfect brew—on this particular day, tripel, an aromatic
and grain-intensive recipe that yields a high-alcohol beer. Because the operation at
the monastery is small-scale, most of ABC’s brewing takes place at Sierra Blanca
Brewery in Moriarty. (Even the small batches of beer brewed at Christ in the Desert
will eventually travel there for carbonation and bottling.) “The goal is for the brothers
to [eventually] become totally independent in brewing, but we’ll always rely on Brad for
the recipes,” Merchant said.
Dressed fromhead to toe in carefully pressed denim, Kraus has brewed all over the
world and studied both beer brewing and winemaking. Locally, he’s worked for the Santa
Fe Brewing Company and Blue Corn Brewery, among others, and helped found the New
Mexico Association of Small Brewers (nowthe NewMexico Brewers Guild). It’s clear
fromKraus’ easy demeanor and attention to details —temperature, the density of the
barley grind —that he knows his way around a brewing sculpture.
“We make the dubbel, the tripel, Monk’s Ale and Monk’s Wit,” said Krause. “They’re
traditional Belgian ales; we wanted to stay in that Benedictine tradition. Monk’s Ale is
similar to what typical monks would have as a daily single, but it has broader appeal, too.
It’s around 5 percent [alcohol volume]. It’s approachable; it pairs well with food.”
Brother Bernard Cranor in front of the gift shop and visitor center.
Precise temperatures are very important.
The mash tun should stay between 150°F
and 154°F.
Brother Christian Leisy stirs the barley in the mash tun.
2012 Bienvenidos 93
To begin brewing, Merchant and Kraus instructed three monks —Brother Christian
Leisy, Brother Bernard Cranor, and Brother Augustine Seiker —in measuring and
grinding precise amounts of barley. The barley grinding was loud, like ice in a blender.
Then the mash-in began. Kraus changed fromhis cowboy boots into black waterproof
brewing boots. The monks stood on a ladder and poured the ground barley into the top
kettle, called the mash tun. Brother Christian stirred the grain and hot water with a
white plastic paddle that looked better suited for kayaking. Aromatic barley went in last.
“The process is really simple,” said Merchant. “You take the barley, grind it and then you
steep it, just like you would tea.”
“Ooh, it smells so good,” Brother Christian said. The whole roomwas warmand toasty,
and it smelled sweet, like grass baking in the sun after it rains in the summertime. Even
the propane delivery guy stopped in to smell the brewand peek in the mash tun.
“We’re in the recirculation phase,” said Kraus. Once the mashing —the conversion
of starch into sugars —was over, the wort (sweet, malted barley liquid) circulated over
the top of the grain, which acted as a natural filter. Here, the meticulousness of the
grinding suddenly made sense; the size of the grains must be just right for the wort to
filter properly.
We passed around a shot glass filled with wort, viscous and heavy like honey. “I taste
all along the process,” said Kraus. “That way, you knowwhere [the beer] is coming from
and where it’s going.”
Near the end of brewing, hops are added to the tripel. “Hops actually growwild in
NewMexico,” said Merchant. “[Juan de] Oñate, in his journals, even mentions that he
sawthemhere.” The barley may come fromWisconsin, but the hops used in ABCbrews
are all organic and grown by the monks in a trellised field on the property, not far from
the banks of the Chama. The entire hops cycle is local and self-sustaining: Fields are
irrigated with water fromthe Chama and nearby Gallina Creek, and grains leftover from
brewing are used as compost for the crop.
To see it done at Christ in the Desert, brewing is a joyful process. Everyone was serious
and attentive when it came to measuring grains or keeping an eye on the temperature of
the mash tun, but there was an easy camaraderie, too. As the kettles simmered, everyone
chatted and swapped stories.
“Sacramento wine is what kept California wineries afloat during Prohibition,” said
Brother Bernard, speaking not of the city but of wine used for religious purposes. Brother
Bernard is a spry 80-year-old with tortoise-shell trifocals and a full white beard. He’s
been at the monastery for 21 years and has assisted on three brews so far. Brewing is an
optional activity for the monks, and about 10 to 14 of 25 monks participate.
“It seemed like kind of a cool thing to,” Brother Bernard said, eyeing the kettles. “I
don’t consider myself a brewer —yet.”
Brothers Bernard, Christian and Augustine look into a kettle during brewing. Brother Bernard sips warm wort.
Brother Christian holds ground barley before it’s stirred into the mash tun. Hops! Different varieties grow on the
monastery property.
Chama River
94 2012 Bienvenidos
BY ADELE MELANDER-DAYTON
Nothing announces the arrival of sweet,
sweet summer better than a fresh pint
of cold beer. Fortunately, Northern New
Mexico is a budding mecca for beer lovers,
whether you’re a microbrewconnoisseur
or just starting to expand your taste
buds beyond the ho-humBud and Coors
rotation. NewMexico’s beers and the
people who make themare as varied and
unique as the state itself: they’re brewed
in 19th-century log cabins; Santa Fe
neighborhoods; and soon, on a flat expanse
of dusty mesa outside Taos.
SantaFe suds
SECONDSTREET BREWERY
1814 Second St. 505-982-3030
1607 Paseo De Peralta #10
505-989-3278
www.secondstreetbrewery.com
With two locations (the standby on its
namesake street and a newer, industrial-chic
space at the Santa Fe Railyard), daily happy
hour deals on pints and eclectic appetizers,
Second Street Brewery epitomizes the friendly
neighborhood pub. Both locations boast live
music — usually on Fridays and Saturdays
— open mic nights and the occasional trivia
competition. The nine taps (eight at the
Railyard) offer a rotating selection of Second
Street’s 44 brews, including two or three
mainstays augmented by other beers that
change depending on the season or brewer’s
whims. The light n’ bright kölsch ale tastes
like the beginning of summer and is an ideal
choice for breezy afternoons and warmer
temperatures.
SANTAFE BREWINGCOMPANY
35 Fireplace Road
505-424-3333
www.santafebrewing.com
Contrary to popular belief, the Santa Fe Brewing
Company doesn’t have a music venue — that
would be Santa Fe Sol Stage and Grill. What it
does have is tasty beer and lots of it, including
cans (portable and perfect for picnics and
camping), introduced in 2010. For summertime,
the canned selection will include the Freestyle
Pilsner — so called because it doesn’t conform
to a classic pilsner classification, according to
general manager Alana Jones — a light lager
with a hoppy afterbite, which makes it an
ideal beverage for your next al fresco dinner.
As an alternative to the main brewery out on
N.M. 14, Eldorado folks can enjoy the satellite
tasting room in the La Tienda shopping center.
Although there’s no food available on site,
patrons are encouraged to bring their own eats
and hang out.
MARBLE BREWERY TAP ROOM
60 E. San Francisco St. 505-989-3565
marblebrewery.com/marblesantafe.html
Take a shuffleboard table, 14 taps, pizzas from
Rooftop and combine these with one of the
best patios on the Plaza, and it’s no surprise
that the Marble Brewery Tap Room has become
one of Santa Fe’s most popular bars since its
opening three years ago. Beer lovers are treated
to Marble’s seven regular taps (that include
yummy choices like the Wildflower Wheat,
Oatmeal Stout and a pilsner that took home
a bronze medal from the National Brew Fest
in Denver) in addition to a rotating, seasonal
selection of specials made up of guest brews
from other breweries around New Mexico.
Next year, Marble hopes to take its cult beers
national as it expands distribution beyond the
20 states that currently carry its brews. While
the Tap Room doesn’t offer live music, the
summer bandstand series on the Plaza wafts up
to drinkers four nights a week during the warmer
months. As an added bonus, you can score free
Wi-Fi while sipping your Imperial Red.
BLUE CORNCAFÉ ANDBREWERY
133 Water St. 505-984-1800
4056 Cerrillos Road 505-438-1800
bluecorncafe.com
Blue Corn turned 15 this April, and in honor
of this momentous birthday, new head brewer
John Bullard has crafted a colossal brew: the
Colossal Pils, that is. Bullard cited cleaner
flavors as one of his contributions to the
brewery, and come summertime, he’ll add a
couple of fruit brews to the mix. Check out the
Facebook page for information about upcoming
events (beer and small plate pairings happen
regularly), along with deals and specials. The
Southside location has lots of parking, seating
and a sports bar vibe, while the downtown spot
offers open balconies in the summertime.
IL VICINO
321 W. San Francisco St.
505-986-8700
ilvicino.com/brewery/
You probably already knew that Il Vicino serves
up a tasty thin-crusted pizza, but as a bubbly
bonus, the restaurant also brews all of its
own beer. The Il Vicino Brewing Company in
Albuquerque (with an attached canteen that
serves food and has live music) keeps all four
New Mexico locations stocked with its Wet
Mountain IPA, American Wheat 28M, Slow
Down Brown and Pigtail Pilsner. Other taps
rotate often, and seasonal varieties ensure fresh
beer and optimal pizza pairings. Brewer Brady
McKeown recommends the dark American lager
for spring and summertime sipping. He said
there’s always something going on at Il Vicino.
Check the website for up-to-date information.
Farther afield
BLUE HERONBREWINGCOMPANY
2214 N.M. 68, Embudo
505-579-9188
www.blueheronbrews.com/
The nearest town is Embudo, but husband and
wife co-owners of the Blue Heron Brewing
Company, Kristin and Scott Hennelly, prefer to
think of their spot off N.M. 68 as Rinconada,
Spanish for “corner of nowhere.” Blue Heron is
hyper-local, from the hops grown by Kristin’s
cousin in nearby Dixon right down to the names
of the beers they brew. The brewery is run
by the Hennellys with help from brewmaster
Brandon Santos. In May, we’ll see the return of
the seasonal maiboch, the lightest of the boch
beers. A favorite standby is La Llorona Scottish
Ale (a smoky beer with chocolate undertones).
The big news at Blue Heron is the opening of
an outdoor patio for warm-weather drinking.
The patio plays host to live music on Friday and
Saturday nights in the summertime (there’s
music on Saturdays year-round) and to an
open-mic night every other Wednesday.
THE TAOS MESABREWINGCOMPANY
20 ABC Mesa Road, El Prado
www.taosmesabrewing.com/
A musician, a lawyer, a brewer and a sustainable
developer walk into a bar. This isn’t the
beginning of a bad joke; it’s the business plan
behind the almost-open Taos Mesa Brewing
Company, a 5,000 square foot brewery and
music venue. Brewer Jason Wylie is all set
to begin brewing at the state-of-the-art and
totally green, solar-powered facility (designed
by developer Peter Kolshorn) and hopes to have
beer ready to go by Memorial Day Weekend.
The idea for a music space first took root a few
years ago when lawyer Gary Feuerman and
musician Dan Irion (of Taos band Last to Know)
were traveling in a caravan up to Colorado for a
String Cheese Incident show; they talked about
opening their own music venue on a mesa near
Taos. An encounter with Wylie and Kolshorn at
the Arroyo Seco Fourth of July parade led to a
speedy and serendipitous meeting of the minds.
Taos Mesa Brewery is located on N.M. 64, three
miles from the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge.
ESKE’S BREWPUBANDRESTAURANT
106 Des Georges Lane, Taos
575-758-1517
www.eskesbrewpub.com/
Eske’s Brew Pub and Restaurant is the best-
known and longest-established brewery north
of Santa Fe. Microbrew enthusiasts shouldn’t
miss tasting its fragrant green chile beer, or
the Eske Special Bitter, made from 95 percent
organic grains. The food is a draw in its own
right — try world cuisine Thursday (Indian,
Greek and other globally adventurous dishes)
or, for a change of pace, sushi Tuesday. Eske’s
is turning 20 this September, and news for 2012
includes the removal of guest beers and wines
from the menu, due to changes in licensing
laws. But Eske’s fans shouldn’t worry too much;
the pub will still have plenty of its own beers
on hand. In fact, brewer Chris Jones is working
on a gluten-free brew for celiac-suffering beer
lovers. Check out the lively and oft-updated
Facebook page for Eske’s devotee discussion
and drool-worthy pictures of blue plate specials
and foamy heads of beer.
TAOS ALE HOUSE
401 Paseo de Pueblo Norte, Taos
575-758-5522
taosalehouse.com/
It’s been a busy year for Jesse Cook, the
brewmaster and owner of the Taos Ale House.
Since its opening last August, the Taos Ale
House has experimented with different brews,
culinary offerings and outdoor seating setups.
Cook has developed more than 25 beer recipes,
which he’s gradually winnowing down to a few
choice favorites. For now, nuanced, personal
recipes like the simple porter are popular, along
with the Mogul Imperial IPAand the Stone
Lake IPA, named for a fishing spot near Dulce.
Sports fans, take note: The Ale House boasts a
“really nice flat screen” and what Cook said is the
only NFL package in town. If you’re not up for
catching the game, local bands like Boris and the
Salt Licks occasionally perform. And to address
those hanging-out-in-the-afternoon-sun-
without-getting-fried needs, look for a covered
portal to accent the patio in summer 2012.
COMANCHE CREEKBREWING
COMPANY
225 Comanche Creek Road, Eagle Nest
575-377-2337
comanchecreekbrewingco.com/
Homebrewers Kody and Tasha Mutz crossed the
border fromColorado and settled in Eagle Nest
to open Comanche Creek Brewing Company
at the homestead of Kody’s great-grandfather.
(You can still see the log cabin he built as a
blacksmithing shop some 100 years ago.) While
microbrewery competition is stiff in Colorado,
fromthe Mutzes’ gorgeous perch at the foot
of the Sangre de Cristos, there are no rivals in
sight. The Mutzes use pure mountain water
as the foundation for their beers —rugged,
appropriately named brews like Homestead
Amber, Touch-Me-Not IPAand Deadman
Pale Ale. In the summertime, Kody brews fruit
beers: This year’s plans include raspberry wheat
and honey cherry. “We’ve had great support
fromthe community,” said Kody, citing the Pike
Tournament and the High Country Arts Festival
in Eagle Nest as fun events where they’ve offered
a tasting table. “And we love having people come
out to the patio.”
(ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY SEAN BRANDER)
Brewing upastorm
comida| food
Apitcher of “Rod’s Best Bitter” at
Second Street Brewery
2012 Bienvenidos 95
96 2012 Bienvenidos
STORY BY JOHN VOLLERTSEN
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
Although the address is not quite as
notorious as 109 E. Palace Ave. —where
scientists and military men and women were
cleared to work in the secret atomic world
at Los Alamos in the 1940s —The Palace
restaurant at 142 W. Palace Ave. has easily
had as historic an impact on our fair city
—minus the nuclear fission.
In a year when NewMexico celebrates its 100th birthday
and Santa Fe its 401st, this landmark establishment
continues to set herself apart fromour foodie town’s other
200-plus restaurants by constantly reinventing herself,
changing out the culinary talents, painting or flocking
the walls, and striving to keep the old-timers happy while
luring the young and trendy through the swinging doors.
Avast array of characters has helped formThe Palace’s
rich history. Perhaps most notorious was Doña Maria
Gertrudis Barcelo, aka La Doña Tules, a Mexican woman
who established a saloon on the site circa 1835. Until her
death in 1853, La Doña ran The Palace as a gambling joint
(with rumors of more intimate entertainment upstairs).
Historical records describe her as more handsome than a
beauty, and one can only surmise that she must have had
an amazing presence to successfully run such a business
when Santa Fe was still part of the Wild West.
Owners fromafar
The many operators of the long-lived eatery have spanned
the globe. The building as it stands today opened in
1961 under the ownership of a French couple named
Charles and Mimi Besre. Two sets of proprietors later,
restaurateur Lino Pertusini, an Italian, took over.
Pertusini, who owned and operated The Palace for 18
years, is happy to share what he thinks gave the restaurant
its drawin its glory days. “In those days that part of town
was the center of Santa Fe living,” he said. “There was a
gas station across the street, a parking lot and Safeway.
People would do their banking on the Plaza and walk
down to shop [and] it was easy to park. We would do 200
lunches and 400 dinners [a day].”
Pertusini, who nowowns both Pizzeria da Lino and
Osteria d’Assisi, has many fond memories of the halcyon
years he operated the place. “We brought in an Italian
designer to host a fashion showin the dining room.
[You have to] realize that in those days there were only
a handful of dining options. Customers would arrive for
dinner [before the] opera and be all dressed up; it was an
event. We were lucky; we had a very loyal and consistent
following.”
Though many might remember Pertusini’s menu
as being Italian, he considered it more Continental,
with Caesar salads assembled at the table. “For a time,”
Pertusini said, “I had both a Frenchman and an Austrian
working as chefs in different stations in the kitchen.
They were iincredibly competitive with each other,
always trying to outdo one another; the food they put out
was fantastic.”
Roland Richter, chef-owner of Joe’s Diner and Pizza,
got his culinary start in Santa Fe at The Palace under
Pertusini. “I interviewed with all of the major restaurants
in town,” he said, “with Mark Miller at The Coyote Café,
at SantaCafé and The Compound, but took The Palace job
with Lino because I liked the idea of working with a
hands-on operator. I liked howLino’s brothers Bruno and
Pietro were all involved.” Richter, who is German-born,
had just arrived in the States fromToronto.
When Lino sold The Palace in 2003 to focus on his new
venture, Osteria d’Assisi, he was able to bring many of his
staff to his second project. “I had a bartender that worked
for me for 27 years,” he recalled. And, like The Palace, the
building that houses the Osteria was also a house of ill-
repute. “I see a trend here,” he chuckled.
The next owners of The Palace included a successful
NewYork restaurateur named Jean DeNoyer, local
businessman Eddie Gilbert and chef Alain Jorand, who
today heads up the cuisine at Adobo Catering.
“Our original plan was to reopen The Palace as a French
brasserie similar to the ones DeNoyer was famous for,”
Jorand recalled. “Amassive [$2 million] renovation
took place. …We took over in December and opened in
January, sadly missing the holiday season. The menu
was primarily French with a fewNewMexico dishes.
We flewin Dover sole and offered dishes like osso buco,
lobster with vanilla beurre blanc, and côte du boeuf. Fairly
quickly I discovered that we all were not in agreement
on what the food should be and I left the project by April,
followed by DeNoyer a short time later. After that I took a
break fromcooking and sold cars.”
After the French departed, Gilbert drewGeronimo
owner Cliff Skoglund and its chef Eric DiStefano into the
project. Skoglund envisioned The Palace returning to its
Italian heritage with the help of DiStefano’s modern spin
on the popular cuisine.
“We set out to return The Palace to its former glory and
it was fun for me to be cooking some of those classics,”
DiStefano said. “Our most popular dish was spaghetti and
meatballs, and regulars would come in to the kitchen and
ask me to prepare their favorites dishes.”
The restaurant was given a cosmopolitan makeover
with flat screen TVs scattered around the roomshowing
Italian “art” films, many of which boasted muscular men
in various degrees of undress going through what might
be described as wrestling moves.
“I remember being there and there were two older
ladies fromSanta Fe society dining while that soft porn
was playing over their shoulders,” Pertusini recalled
with a hearty laugh. “I think the décor was a stretch for
some people,” DiStefano added, “and not everybody was
digging it.”
Ayear later, Skoglund abandoned the Italian theme
and adopted a modern Southwestern saloon concept
that he hoped could become the model for a chain
Frombrasserie to bucking
bronco, the guard changes,
but The Palace still stands
From
bordello to
fine dining
comida| food
2012 Bienvenidos 97
—and Señor Lucky’s was born. Stylish cowboy motifs
replaced any trace of the room’s original design, with
a mechanical bucking bull placed center stage in the
dining roomto attract a decidedly different clientele
fromthe days of yore.
Nonstop concept-hopscotching eventually sawthe
closure of Señor Lucky’s in 2007. Skoglund moved on
to Scottsdale, Arizona, while DiStefano continues to
wowlocals and visitors alike with his Coyote Café and
Geronimo. (He plans to open a newventure, Stats, a
sports bar, in the old Swig location across fromThe
Palace this summer.)
Where everybody knows your name
After Señor Lucky hit the trail, the historic location sat
empty for four years. Many chefs and restaurateurs flirted
with the idea of reviving The Palace, but it wasn’t until
April 2011 that entrepreneur David Bigby took over the
lease and invested yet another million-plus to breathe life
back into the grande dame.
Bigby’s secret weapon was nationally celebrated chef
Joseph Wrede, former owner of the popular Joseph’s
Table in Taos.
Wrede originally dabbled with Italian touches on
the menu before deciding to embrace a more American
approach. “The Palace has been a challenge because
it meant so many things to so many people. I have
realized that the bar is its own entity [separate] fromthe
restaurant. Because of its history, there is definitely a
good feng shui happening...
“I feel as though I amslowly picking up on my cooking
where I left off at Joseph’s Table,” he said. “American
cooking nowencompasses so many ethnic cuisines. It is
exciting and risky taking on an establishment like The
Palace. It’s interesting to think howurban it has always
been in a relatively rural area.”
With all remnants of the bucking bull gone, The
Palace’s newdécor pays tribute to its former incarnation:
The red-flecked wallpaper and saloon feel are back.
Though Bigby had no previous restaurant experience,
he, like his predecessors, had a vision. “When I retired
…I wanted to do a business that connected me to the
community in Santa Fe,” Bigby said. “Alot of my friends
had fond memories of The Palace as a local institution
and encouraged me to renewand revitalize it. My wife,
Barbara, is an artist and helped with design ideas and
painted pictures to hang in the dining room. We set out
to blend the old with some new, the Spanish with some
contemporary.”
Even the spirit of Doña Tules watches over Bigby’s new
Palace in the formof a portrait painted by Barbara.
Bartender Lynn Otero said it seems like every day
a former employee stops in for a meal and memories.
“They tell me about high school proms, parties and
family celebrations —and many still remember a Cuban
bartender named Alfonso who worked here for 30 years.”
Otero also looks after the “Wax MuseumBoys,” headed
by former Santa Fe Mayor SamPick, who are regulars at
her bar.
“We call ourselves [the Wax MuseumBoys] because
we have all known each other for so long,” Pick said. “I
like to think of The Palace as a Santa Fe version of the
Cheers bar fromthe TVshow. My buddies and I have been
coming here since the 1970s. Of course it has closed a few
times, and we weren’t into wearing cowboy hats during
the bucking bull days, but I think the folks at the new
Palace are doing a great job.”
Pick celebrated his 76th birthday at The Palace in
March surrounded by 100 of his closest friends and
compadres.
Fromthe early years when a raucous card game
presided over by Doña Tules could be enjoyed by
cowboys, ranchers, traders, military officers and
merchants (with the promise of a slap and tickle
upstairs), through its fancy dress and dining days to
urban cowboys riding a mechanical bull, The Palace has
prevailed. With good food, good feng shui and a good
location, everything old is newagain.
DETAILS
THE PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON
142 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe
505-428-0690
www.palacesantafe.com
Risotto cake with portobello mushroomsyrup, Parma prosciutto and Parmigiano-Reggiano
Fromthe top, the saloon at The Palace
The exterior and entrance to The Palace Restaurant
The Palace executive chef Joseph Wrede, seated in the
restaurant’s dining room
98 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 99
STORY BY HEATHER WOOD
PHOTOS BY KERRY SHERCK
Estella’s Café lights upLas Vegas
Located on Bridge Street in Las Vegas, NewMexico, just steps fromPlaza Park,
Estella’s Café beckons with a neon sign fromthe past.
The restaurant, founded by Luis and Estella Gonzales, has been at this location
since 1953 and is nowrun by their daughter Abelita Lujan and her son Zachary. The
dining room’s pressed-tin ceiling and floor-to-ceiling shelving are reminiscent of an
early 20th-century mercantile store, and Abelita is nowsorting through artifacts in
the basement, some of which pre-date her grandparents. “It’s been an adventure,” she
said. “Every single letter, receipt and card is down here. It’s a history lesson.”
Estella’s menu is built on popular local dishes, such as the best-selling handmade
chile rellenos stuffed with Monterey jack cheese, dipped in a light egg batter and deep
fried, then topped with salsa or smothered in your choice of red or green chile. “The
batter is so light that they’re crispy; that’s why they are so popular,” Abelita said.
The flautas are served with either beef, chicken, pork or chicharones (long-
simmered fried pork fat —try thembefore you turn your nose up). “Our flautas are
different,” Abelita said. “They’re served like soft tacos with a little bit of onion and
tomatoes —and guacamole and sour creamon the side.”
Abelita and Zachary, “the recipe man,” are adding some more contemporary
offerings to the menu, like beef sliders prepared from100 percent organic, grass-fed
beef froma nearby ranch. This popular addition is topped with grilled onions and
homemade pickles and served on a home-baked bun. The teamalso has added “Chef’s
Choice Dinner Specials” to the menu that change frequently and include pasta dishes.
They’re venturing into the breakfast scene with huevos rancheros, home-baked goods
and fair-trade coffee. For dessert, try the natillas much loved by norteños —
a cinnamon-scented egg custard.
“When movies are being filmed around Las Vegas, the cast and creweat here,”
Abelita said. “They love the green chile stew.”
Eating at the extremes
Northern New Mexico’s far-flung communities offer local specialties
food | comida
100 2012 Bienvenidos
The lanternstays lit inEl Rito
Thirty years ago, when Dennis Trujillo and his sister
started El Farolito restaurant, it seemed natural to
welcome locals and travelers alike with a lantern —el
farolito —in the window. Nowtheir little light welcomes
thousands of diners every year, including celebrities
Shirley MacLaine, Marsha Mason, Susan Sarandon and
former Gov. Bill Richardson.
The restaurant is a family affair. Dennis and son
Dominic man the range. Mom, Carmelita, is in charge
of the handmade tamales and chile rellenos. Dominic’s
sister, Marisol, and his wife, Andrea, pitch in, too, as do
their two children.
People travel for miles to choose frommore than
four pages of homemade NewMexican and American
specialties. Hungry? You can’t go wrong with the best-
selling No. 5 combo plate. which nets you one enchilada,
one chile relleno, rice, beans and two sopapillas. Or try
the Farolito burger, cooked to order and topped with
green chile, cheddar cheese and bacon and served with
mayo, mustard, pickles and onions. The chile rellenos
are wrapped in a flourless meringue-like batter and
smothered in red or green chile. There’s a special kid’s
menu for los niños.
Soft drinks are available and the restaurant boasts a
server’s license that allows diners to bring their own brown
bag of wine or beer to enjoy with their meal.
El Farolito is small —just eight tables seating 32 diners.
Reservations aren’t necessary, but Dominic asks that large
parties call ahead to give thema heads-up. “We’re small
enough to pay attention,” noted Dominic, which is no doubt
a large part of their recipe for success.
Atree grows throughEl Paragua
Why should you make a special trip to Española to eat at
El Paragua? “Because of the food! The food is homemade,
everything is prepared in house,” said Jose Atencio, one of
nine members of the Atencio family that runs this Northern
NewMexico restaurant. “Plus it’s a historic building, with
ambience, atmosphere and a tree growing through it.”
Frances and Luis Atencio started the restaurant in
1966 after selling tacos and tamales froma roadside
cart covered with a parasol. As they grew, they expanded
into what was originally a tack roomin one of Jose’s
grandfather’s ranch buildings.
“Dad was the builder and bartender and Momwas
the cook,” Atencio said. “They knewnothing about the
restaurant business, but they made it work. They just kept
adding on —the tree used to be outside the restaurant,
but instead of cutting it down, they just built around it.”
That beloved tree stands like a paragua (umbrella) over
the restaurant, and people come fromfar and wide to sit
around it in the bar.
Perennial best-sellers at El Paragua include the chile
rellenos that are made one at a time with freshly roasted
green chiles, stuffed with tomato and onion, dipped in a
light egg batter and fried, then smothered with cheddar and
Monterey jack. The enchiladas supremo feature chicken
enchiladas with red or green chile (or both) topped with
sour cream. And the award-winning beef tacos are available
in soft or crispy shells, topped with house-made salsa.
“We make our flour tortillas on a wood stove in the front
of the restaurant,” Atencio said. “We even make our own
chips.”
Breakfast is served on Saturday and Sunday only. It
features a waffle bar with a variety of toppings, the “Buenos
Dias Combo” —a hearty plate of enchiladas, fried potatoes
and eggs —house-made menudo and smothered breakfast
burritos with homemade chorizo.
The full bar is known for its made-from-scratch
margaritas, but you also can peruse the five-page wine
list, which features vino fromPortugal, Spain, France,
California and other places, as well as domestic and
imported beers.
Homemade flan, natillas and raisin-bread pudding will
satisfy your sweet tooth.
ESTELLA’S CAFÉ
148 Bridge St., Las Vegas
505-454-0048; call to confirm hours
Cash and local checks only; no credit cards
Monday-Wednesday 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Thursday-Friday 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
closed Sunday
EL FAROLITO RESTAURANT
1212 Main St., El Rito
575-581-9509
Cash and local checks only; no credit cards
Closed Monday
Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 4:30-7 or
8 p.m. (depending on how busy)
Saturday and Sunday 11:30 a.m. or noon to 7 or
7:30 p.m. (depending on how busy)
EL PARAGUA
603 Santa Cruz Road, Española, at the corner
of U.S. 285 and County Road 76
505-753-3211
www.ElParagua.com
Reservations are recommended on weekends
Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
(breakfast ends at 1 pm)
IF YOU GO
As El Paragua grew, it expanded into a former ranch building and wrapped around a tree instead of cutting it down. The tree now stands like a paragua (umbrella) over the restaurant.
Why shouldyoumake a special tripto Española to eat at El Paragua?
“Because of the food! The foodis homemade,
everything is preparedinhouse”
— JOSE ATENCIO
2012 Bienvenidos 101
of except i onal
musi c- maki ng
JUL 15 - AUG 20
2 0 1 2
Marc Neikrug, Artistic Director
Intimate. Compelling. Unforgettable.
E
njoy a remarkable variety of
chamber music jewels performed
by world-class musicians, including
our 2012 Artist-in-Residence,
Alan Gilbert — the critically
acclaimed music director of the
New York Philharmonic.
toll free 888.221.9836
— or 505.982.1890 —
SantaFeChamberMusic.com
J o i n u s f o r t h i s
MileStone SeaSon
For Tickets and Information
travel our
ENCHANTING NEWMEXICO art trails!

new mexico fiber arts trails
A Guide to Rural Fiber Arts Destinations | www.nmfiberarts.org

artistic vistas and treasures
Studios & Galleries from Taos Canyon east to Angel Fire and Cimarron | www.artisticvistas.org

ancient way arts trail
Artisans along Route 53: Gallup to Zuni to Grants | www.ancientwayartstrail.com

trails & rails
Arts and Heritage in Valencia County | www.artsandheritagenm.com
CAN YOU SAY road trip?
102 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 103
NewMexico statehood collectible issue available at The NewMexican
505-983-3303
104 2012 Bienvenidos 104 2012 Bienvenidos
BY TANIA CASSELLE
This year’s Remarkable Women of Taos
programcelebrates the adventurous, creative,
and often groundbreaking women who have
made their home in this small mountain town,
whether they were born here or drawn here.
It’s a vintage year for the town of Taos to pick
remarkable women as a theme, coinciding with
the centennial of the births of two prominent
Taos artists: the internationally acclaimed Agnes
Martin and modernist Beatrice Mandelman.
2012 also marks 50 years since the death of
Mabel Dodge Luhan, who had such an impact
introducing creative types and thinkers to Taos.
The Taos community already knows that
the women who choose to live in this beautiful
but challenging environment tend to be
strong, independent, resourceful and open to
change. What draws or keeps such women
in Taos? Some say the land, some say the
light, the mountain, the history, the people,
the creative vibe, the feeling that you can
be yourself here and achieve your true
purpose. Who knows? But talk to any woman
who has transplanted herself to Taos and so often
you hear the same story. They visited Taos once —on
vacation, a road trip, visiting friends —and something
about Taos grabbed them, shook them,
and wouldn’t let go. They returned to their
cities, their normal lives, their successful
careers, but Taos kept whispering, calling
themback. Next thing, they’ve moved to
the high desert.
Often they reinvent themselves once
they arrive. As actress Marsha Mason said
at the Remarkable Women of Taos program
launch, it was the spirit of the creative and
adventurous women who’d gone before
that inspired her to believe “I could literally
throwup the pieces of my life and see how
they came down.” Mason lives in Abiquiú,
within sight of Georgia O’Keeffe’s house, and
she’s certainly made a huge change, becoming
an organic farmer and creator of the Resting
in the River range of herbal products. “When I
came here I was one person, and nowI’ma much
bigger person because of my experiences in New
Mexico. When I go back to film, TVand theater
work, I bring so much more.”
One year is almost too short to pay respect to the
women past and present who have been officially selected
as outstanding in their fields. Programorganizers have
received more than 350 nominations (and counting)
for the honor. For each woman nominated, you can bet
a dozen others are equally worthy of the title in a town
where women go about their business, pursuing their art,
their activism, or simply the role of being a good mother
and community member, always ready with a helping
hand. And unlike the early heiresses who made their
home in Taos, today’s remarkable women usually have to
work to support their passion, doing the “Taos shuffle” to
make a living, often juggling several jobs.
Profiles of all the legendary and living women working
in the arts, business, outdoors and well-being categories
can be found at http://taos.org/women. But let’s introduce
a fewas an example of the range of remarkable women
you’ll encounter or hear about on a visit to Taos.
Mabel DodgeLuhan
Pioneering promoter
Famed as the hostess of a NewYork City salon of artists
and intellectuals, the wealthy Mabel Dodge Sterne arrived
in Taos with her avant-garde ideas in 1917. There she
met the man of her dreams —literally. Mabel claimed
that when she met Taos Pueblo member Tony Lujan
—his name was spelled Lujan, but she spelled hers with
an “h” so her friends would pronounce it correctly —she
recognized himat once, as he’d previously appeared to
her in a dream. Both were married to other people at
the time, but love, and certainly Mabel, never let such
inconveniences stand in the way. The couple soon
married, and Mabel bought land bordering Taos Pueblo,
expanding a small property into what is nowthe Mabel
Dodge Luhan House. She recreated her NewYork salon,
inviting prominent artistic, literary and intellectual
figures to Taos —in fact, insisting they come to Taos
—to experience the unspoiled beauty, local culture and
inspiration she found there. Her guests included D.H.
Lawrence, Georgia O’Keeffe, Willa Cather, Ansel Adams,
Carl Jung and Spud Johnson.
Today, the Mabel Dodge Luhan House is a bed-and-
breakfast inn and conference center, hosting workshops
by artists and authors including Natalie Goldberg,
another remarkable woman who lived and wrote for many
years in Taos; she is acclaimed for the best-seller Writing
Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within, and her novel
Banana Rose evocatively captures the Taos hippie era.
Visitors can stay in Mabel’s own room—and sleep in her
handsome bed —as well as in other rooms named for the
famous people who once occupied them.
(www.mabeldodgeluhan.com.)
Legendaryandliving
Taos celebrates its remarkable women
M
abel Dodge Lujan
M
illicent Rodgers
Agnes M
artin
COLLECTION THE HARWOOD MUSEUMOF ART,
COURTESY MILDRED TOLBERT ARCHIVES
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LOUISE DAHL WOLFE
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Jacqueline Gala All that glitters
The Taos Pueblo silversmith and jewelry designer was
already selling her work at the pueblo when she was
selected for the invitational Originals 2007: NewMexico
Women in the Arts in Taos, one of only two silversmiths
in the show. Gala’s reputation took off and her work now
appears in Santa Fe’s NewMexico History Museumand
at markets including the prestigious Heard Museum
Guild Indian Fair &Market in Phoenix. She draws
inspiration fromher Taos Pueblo and Hopi heritage to
create her beautifully contemporary collection of jewelry
and has come a long way since she first went into a Santa
Fe art store with $100, telling themshe wanted to solder.
“They helped me put together what I needed. And I
melted it all!” After some burning/melting trial and error,
she learned howto work with metal. “It moved me so
much that I can design around a piece of stone that I cut.”
Gala is still getting used to her work being bought by
collectors all over the world —she’s blown away when
she spots a woman wearing it —and she’s still shy enough
that her boyfriend submitted her work to a juried showin
Florida without her knowing. She was chosen for that too.
But Gala is also encouraged by other women coming out
of the pueblo and achieving recognition; she’s especially
proud of Maria Samora. “I look at her like…wow! If she’s
doing it, I’mdoing it too.”
Before work goes to market, Gala follows the ritual of a
jeweler friend who puts each piece on the ground “so our
Mother Earth can wear it and all our ancestors who went
before us can get to wear the jewelry before it goes out
there. I thought that was really sweet, so I do a lot of that
when I’ve finished with all my work. I lay it on the ground
and do a little blessing and send it on its way.”
(http://jacquelinegala.com)
KimAnnTreiber-Thompson
Musical groove
KimTreiber made Taos her home in 1983. She’s produced
and acted in many plays, fromHamlet to Hair, but is best
known as a musician. Treiber can check off a long list of
local bands she’s performed with over the years, but she
found a groove heading Kimand the Caballeros, playing
up a stormof “big ol’ twangy country music” with the
band including her husband Chipper Thompson. Visitors
can hear Kimand the Caballeros at various venues around
town, including the Adobe Bar at the Taos Inn and the
Anaconda bar at El Monte Sagrado.
Treiber co-foundedThe Dreamtree project inTaos, a
nonprofit serving NewMexico youthinneed, andshe also
pursues photography. She still finds time to take to the
trails onhorseback, describing riding inthe great outdoors
as a time to “rejuvenate, feedmy soul.”
(www.kimandthecaballeros.com)
along the road | por el camino
SOME ‘REMARKABLE’ EVENTS
The Remarkable Women program features
exhibitions, talks and events through the year. One
highlight is the exhibit Agnes Martin: Before the
Grid, on display at the Harwood Museum of Art
until June 17, 2012. This is the debut showing for
many of Martin’s early works. While you’re there,
don’t miss the permanent gallery built specially
to house seven paintings donated by Martin in
the years when she lived in Taos until her death
in 2004. It’s a beautiful and meditative space, and
Martin herself would often sit in contemplation
here. During her Taos years, she was an inspiration
to younger artists through her art, work ethic and
encouragement. Fine art photographer Lenny
Foster, a new kid on the Taos block at the time,
recalls lunching with Martin at The Trading Post
—one of her favorite haunts. “She’d have a steak
and a margarita, I’d have lunch, and she’d never
let me pay. She wouldn’t hear it,” Foster said. He
always remembers her advice on art. “She told me
to keep it simple …the way you live your life, the
way you create your art.”
Exhibits at the Millicent Rogers Museum
throughout 2012 celebrate female artists and the
legacy of Millicent Rogers, the Standard Oil heiress
who settled in Taos in 1947 (recovering froma
breakup with Clark Gable!). Rogers was a passionate
advocate of Native American arts, and, as a fashion
icon, adopted local styles of dress and jewelry,
putting her stamp on Southwest style. Her extensive
collection of Native American jewelry, textiles and
other objects is on display in the museum. The show
Millicent Rogers &Her Circle (June 1 to September 9)
covers Rogers’ relationships with women including
Dorothy Brett, the British painter and close friend
of D.H. Lawrence, and Mabel Dodge Luhan. Before
heading to the museum, it’s worth reading the
recently published biography Searching for Beauty:
The Life of Millicent Rogers by Taos author Cherie
Burns. Proving that history doesn’t have to be dull,
Burns brings Rogers to life in the book described
by the Wall Street Journal as a “bracing, sex-and-
shopping account.”
The program also includes the Taos modernist
Beatrice Mandelman Centennial at the Harwood
Museum of Art from July 7 to October 14, a series
of talks at the Taos Public Library and a host of
other events, talks, tours and performances as the
community picks up on the Remarkable Women
theme.
Details at taos.org/women.
Kim
Treiber
Jacqueline Gala
DAVID VEDOE
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AN ART SCENE
THRIVES IN THE
MOUNTAIN TOWN
OF TRUCHAS
HIGHART
BY WOLF SCHNEIDER
After 22 years in a downtown Santa Fe location, Rey Móntez moved his Móntez Gallery to the
tiny town of Truchas last year. While it might have seemed that he was dropping out of the
gallery scene, it looked otherwise to artists already based in this far-flung mountaintop village
of 611 people; to them, it was an indication that their art colony was growing.
Although remote Truchas might seemlike an unlikely art hub, situated an hour’s drive north of Santa Fe on the
rugged High Road to Taos, it has its own quirky way of attracting artistic and intellectual people. “My father
died in a hospital [where he had] a roommate fromTruchas,” Móntez said. When Móntez paid his respects to
the roommate’s family, he noticed that the village’s 100-year-old adobe church appeared unoccupied.
“I’mthe guy who represents the saint makers fromNorthern NewMexico and southern Colorado, and I
2012 Bienvenidos 107
along the road | por el camino
PHOTO BY LOREY SEBASTIAN
108 2012 Bienvenidos
thought the church would be the perfect place to display
and sell their work,” he said. And so he moved his gallery
of santos and bultos to the vacant church.
Nowthat he has had a chance to visit the town’s other
art galleries —which wasn’t hard, as most are found on
the milelong stretch of road that runs through town —
Móntez even suggested that some Truchas art “is on equal
footing with Canyon Road and downtown Santa Fe.”
Consider painter-sculptor-potter Ramon Cortina, who
has done art restoration for the Smithsonian Institution
in Washington, D.C. He moved into his 100-year-old
adobe 10 years ago, transforming it into Cortina Fine Art
Gallery. Figurative paintings, coasters, sage burners and
bread plates fill the gallery.
Cortina is as interested in thoughtful conversation as
he is in selling art. “If you want to talk about string theory
and quantumphysics, let’s go,” he offered. “Politics, war,
philosophy —I’man existentialist. I don’t believe in male
gods, but I do believe goddesses reign supreme, and all of
this is reflected in my art.”
Afewblocks away, Bill G. Loyd welds architectural bells
and sculptures fromindustrial steel castoffs. Priced from
$160 to $1,000, the colorful bells emit meditative tones
that linger. When he isn’t outside making art, he’s inside
reading Rolling Stone, Art in America and Tricycle: The
Buddhist Review. “It’s a loose mesh of people up here,”
he said of the town. “We’re independent. I can fix about
anything except a computer.”
Elevating the whole Truchas art scene is the Cardona-
Hine Gallery, representing expressionist Alvaro Cardona-
Hine and abstract landscapist Barbara McCauley in a
sophisticated exhibition space with gallery lighting on
high white walls reaching to a slanted roof. She listens to
Leonard Cohen and he used to conduct the Grand Rapids
Symphony. They read The NewYorker, watch PBS and
quietly tap into the local zeitgeist. “I love living in a place
where the people are deeply connected to the land and
there’s a respect for nature,” McCauley said.
Nature is emphasized at Hand Artes Gallery too.
Opened by Bill Franke in 1987, it nowrepresents 20
artists, mostly fromNorthern NewMexico. “By the
mid-’80s, the tourist traffic was growing as a result of
publicity for the High Road concept begun by then-state
Senator Arturo Jaramillo.” he said. “Our focus is work
inspired by nature.”
At Anna Karin Gallery, there are graceful realist
paintings by Swedish-born Karin along with abstract
works by Jeane George Weigel, who writes an evocative
blog at www.high-road-artist.com. “Being an artist in
Truchas is not for the faint of heart,” Weigal said. That
makes sense, given that the nearest café open some days
is a 20-minute drive away in either Peñasco or Chimayó.
Talented master woodcarver Isabro Ortega, who has
lived here all his life, carves everything fromdoors,
windows and ceilings to coffins and crosses, and he
operates out of a rustic, castle-like structure. “The whole
cemetery is full of my crosses,” he said. “I love Truchas
—it’s away fromthe world.”
The Cordovas Handweaving Workshop, a longtime
family business near the town’s entrance, has been run by
Harry Cordova for 42 years. He quipped, “There isn’t a lot
of pressure and stress and I don’t have a 401(k), but the air
is good, it’s pure, and I didn’t have to fight anybody but the
gophers for a parking space.”
MÓNTEZ GALLERY
505-689-1082, www.montezsantafe.com
CORTINAFINE ART GALLERY
505-689-1123, yessy.com/djvolatile2/gallery.html
BILL G. LOYD
505-689-1090, www.gongwiththewind.net
CARDONA-HINE GALLERY
505-689-2253, www.cardonahinegallery.com
HANDARTES GALLERY
505-689-2443, www.handartesgallery.com
GHOST PONY GALLERY
505-689-1704, www.ghostponygallery.com
ANNAKARINGALLERY
505-689-1090, www.annakaringallery.com
ISABROORTEGA505-689-2581
THE CORDOVAS HANDWEAVING
WORKSHOP 505-689-1124
eL GALLERY 505-689-1018, www.ericluplow.com
Móntez Gallery Hand Artes Gallery
Hand Artes Gallery
Guatemalan Madonna at Móntes Gallery
IF YOU GO
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Nearby is Ghost Pony Gallery, with botanical paintings by
South Africa-raised Leonardo Pieterse and mixed-media
Western iconography by Trish Booth.
With more than a dozen galleries in Truchas, the most
dynamic might be eLGallery, owned by 6-foot-3 Eric
Luplow, a watercolorist who has trademarked the term
“Sur-Folk” to describe his vibrant paintings merging
surrealismwith folk art. Luplowdescribes himself as
being “left of the dial —you know, down there with the
public radio stations.”
With credits including work in the movie Spy Kids and
gallery shows throughout Texas, he moved here 12 years
ago because, he said, “Truchas is open to anything and
everything, and that’s the beauty of it. You’re not judged to
be in a straight line. Truchas is actually a pretty crooked
line, meaning anything and everything works.” Skeleton
art, posters, CDcovers —Luplowdoes it all. Originally
attracted to the area because The Milagro Beanfield
War was filmed there, Luplowsaid, “We’re pretty high
up there! Every day —looking at the clouds, the sun,
taking the dog for a walk and seeing the horses and cows
—Truchas has got its own reality.”
Alvaro Cardona-Hind
Bill Loyd’s bells Anna Karin
Anna Karin Gallery Ramon Cortina
A little fish story
Situated at 8,400 feet in the Sangre de
Cristo Mountains, tiny Truchas (“trout” in
Spanish)emerged as a Spanish land grant in
1754, its name prompted by the river that runs
through the area and irrigates the land. This
community was shaped by Spanish settlers who
established an agricultural lifestyle there. The
main road through town finally was paved in
the 1970s. Cars still must share that road with
livestock according to land grant bylaws — and
yes, a herd of horses does occasionally clatter
through.
Truchas is located on N.M. 76 and County
Road 75 north of Santa Fe.
—WS
110 2012 Bienvenidos
BY PATRICIA GREATHOUSE
PAINTINGS BY RICHARD C. SANDOVAL
Where canvisitors turnfor a true experience of NorthernNewMexico once the
galleries, farmers market, museums, restaurants, opera and Plaza beginto pale? Where
canyoufind friendly little towns, pristine wilderness and refreshingly cleanair?
Ashort drive up the road toward Georgia O’Keeffe’s old stamping grounds, life is slower and the crowds
number in the single digits. There, you can get lost in contemplation or find yourself anew, far fromthe
bustle and jostle of Santa Fe.
This trip is a lesson in balance, a short exercise in meeting NewMexico and NewMexicans outside
the “Santafelandia” experience. While it’s not possible to take in all the sights in a single day, it is
possible to pack in a satisfying variety of stops —and, if you like what you see, come back another day to
complete the trip.
Start by driving north up U.S. 84/285. Once you’re over the Tesuque hill, the vista opens up.
Remember the end of Crazy Heart where Jeff Bridges and Maggie Gyllenhaal stand and watch the
sunset? That’s the viewfromthe Santa Fe Opera. Barrancas and mesas roll out into the distance and the
mountains behind themlayer into the horizon: That’s where we’re headed.
Roadtrippin’ NorthernNewMexico
Pedernal, O’Keeffe Country (Watercolor, 18”x24”)
Chama River at Abiquiú (Watercolor, 18”x24”)
The names of the villages and towns on our route reflect
their strong Native American and Spanish heritage:
Tesuque, Cuyamungue, Pojoaque, Arroyo Seco, La
Mesilla, Española, San Jose, Hernandez, La Cuachia,
Chili, Medanales. The farther fromSanta Fe you go, the
less planned things look, although the casinos, called “the
newbuffalo” by some tribes, look prosperous.
Boundless beauty
The first option is a stop for lunch at the well-appointed
ÓEating House in Pojoaque. It serves great thin-crust
pizzas, sandwiches and salads. If you stop here, check out
the Pueblo of Pojoaque’s Poeh Museumnext door with
its permanent Roxanne Swentzell sculpture exhibit. Or
continue on to La Cocina, a friendly, family run Northern
NewMexican restaurant in Española. It’s right on your
way: Take a left onto the Santa Clara Bridge Road at
Dandy Burger. Look for La Cocina across the bridge on
the right.
Just a couple of blocks fromLa Cocina, you’ll find the
Española Valley Fiber Arts Center. Take a right at
the light after La Cocina, then another right at the next
light; it’s in the middle of the block on the left. You’ll
find beautiful fibers and weavings at the center, many
using local wool. Everything here is handmade and very
reasonably priced.
Back on 84/285 about six miles north of Española,
Romero’s Fruit and Veggie Standis in a class by itself.
Stop to buy freshly roasted green chile and handmade
tamales and tortillas. (Be sure to bring a cooler for fresh
items.) They also have lots of seasonal produce, as well as
dried beans and chiles.
Shortly after the fruit stand, U.S. 84 and U.S. 285
split. Continue up 84 in the direction of Abiquiú. Along
the Chama River Valley, spanking-newhouses with big
barns sit side by side with weathered trailers in one of
the richest archaeological zones in NewMexico. The
Poshuouwinge Pueblo, two and a half miles before
Abiquiú on the left, was once a thriving settlement. It’s
believed to be the mother pueblo of the nearby Tewa
Pueblos of Ohkay Owingeh and Santa Clara, among
others. While the unexcavated ruins are little more than
outlines in the dirt, they once had more than 700 rooms
and two large plazas. There is a steep climb to two vista
points that reward with 360-degree views. At the top of
the climb, an artist’s rendition of the pueblo during its
heyday, complete with people and crop locations, makes
the site come alive.
The view—with Georgia O’Keeffe’s White Place to
the northwest, the full range of the Sangre de Cristo
Mountains to the east, the Chama River Valley belowand
the sky above —evoke the Navajo Blessingway prayer: “In
beauty I walk.”
To take a scenic backroad and skip the last chance to
buy a picnic lunch or green chile cheeseburger at Bode’s
Store in Abiquiú, turn right on the El Rito road (N.M. 554)
about four miles outside Abiquiú. Cross the river, then
make a left on N.M. 155 and enjoy a bumpy drive on the
north side of the Chama River. The road rejoins 84/285
after a fewmiles.
After continuing through the valley, the road rises
through immense red cliffs and passes Abiquiú Dam.
To stop there to fish, swim, hike, camp or boat, take a left
on N.M. 96. (If you continue on 84, the road passes Ghost
Ranch and goes on to Colorado.)
Some silence, some echoes
To reach the road to the Monastery of Christ in the
Desert and gorgeous wilderness hiking, turn left a mile
past the Ghost Ranch Visitor Center of the Carson
National Forest on Forest Service Road 151. The rough 13-
mile road to the monastery runs along the Chama River,
where you won’t be able to resist stopping to romp in
the water, take photos or hike. One of the most beautiful
drives in a state known for its scenery, it is also a difficult
trek in bad weather, so call ahead if you have doubts.
The autonomous abbey, which observes the
Benedictine life, maintains a guesthouse for private
retreats where anyone may enjoy a contemplative timeout
in an isolated location. Surrounded by wilderness and
overlooking the river, monks begin their days with
prayers at 4 a.m. They live a simple life, brewMonk’s Ale,
make shoes and run a gift shop. Guests are asked to be
quiet and respectful when they visit, remembering that
some come for silent meditation. The use of radios, tape
recorders without headphones and musical instruments
is prohibited.
For great hiking, try the area south of the monastery
ONE NEED NOT TRAVEL FAR TO FIND SOLITUDE, OPEN VISTAS
along the road | por el camino
Georgia O’Keeffe Country, Abiquiú, NM(Watercolor, 48” x 24”)
ABOUT THE ARTIST
With a family history that reaches back 300 years,
Nambé native Richard C. Sandoval has deep roots
in Northern New Mexico. He’s drawn to landscape
painting, he said, because he sees more designs in
clouds or rocks than when he puts something like a
still life or a book together. (He’s also an accomplished
graphic designer.)
Sandoval is particularly inspired by the mountains of
New Mexico. “I look for interesting shapes in the earth
and the clouds, and dramatic differences in color,”
he said. “Then it’s how the light affects it all. Like
my friend Wilson Hurley said about Northern New
Mexico, ‘Richard, we could never paint all of it in our
entire lives.’ ”
Richard Sandoval’s work is exclusively represented
by Chris McLarry Fine Art on Santa Fe’s Canyon Road.
2012 Bienvenidos 111
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gate in the national wilderness area. The wilderness area continues north of the
monastery as well, but hikers must cross the river to reach it. Hiking up into the
sandstone mountains is a great adventure; there are dramatic slot canyons to explore,
and around every corner another breathtaking viewawaits. Look for faint trails
leading off the road toward the cliffs, and in wet weather, be prepared for mud. If rain
is predicted, stay out of the slot canyons, as flash floods can be deadly.
The monastery asks that no one hikes alone on top of the mesa. These trails are
hazardous, especially to inexperienced climbers. Visitors must leave their names with
the guest master at the monastery if they intend to hike up on top of the mesa. In any
case, it’s always a good idea to tell someone where you’re going and when you expect to
return if you’re hiking in the wildness.
If you decide not to make the 13-mile drive and to stay on N.M. 84, one mile past
the turn to the monastery you’ll find Echo Amphitheater, a natural hollowin the
cliffside. It’s a short hike to reach the amphitheater fromthe parking lot, where you
can listen to your voice bounce around in longlasting echos. This is a good place for a
picnic with the only noise that of echoes and the sound of an occasional passing car.
Coupde spa
After a day of hiking, you may feel like a good soak and an excellent dinner. Ojo
Caliente Mineral Springs Resort &Spa, set on 1,100 secluded acres, is slightly more
than 32 miles round trip out of your way home and well worth the detour. It’s also a
terrific day trip in its own right —an easy and scenic 50-mile drive fromSanta Fe. Set
in harmony with nature among cliffs with several rock pools and a swimming pool, Ojo
Caliente offers solace for body and soul.
Agathering place for the Native peoples who lived in this area for thousands of
years, Ojo has been a hot spring spa since 1868 —and is the only hot spring in the
world to offer bathers four different, sulphur-free geothermal mineral waters: iron,
arsenic, soda and lithia. The Artesian Restaurant serves food with an eye to health
but not obsessively so, and the wine bar stays open late. The Ojo Caliente Gift
Shopfeatures work fromlocal artisans: Felipe Ortega, known for his micaceous clay
pottery; landscape painter J. Bowie Scott; metal worker and jeweler Shaesby Scott;
and ceramist Logan Wannamaker.
OEATINGHOUSE
86 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 505-455-2000. Thin-crust pizza, white
tablecloths, pasta, entrees.
POEHMUSEUM
78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 505-455-5041
www.poehmuseum.com. Small museumwith a permanent Roxanne Swentzell
exhibit and other changing exhibits.
LACOCINA
415 S. Santa Clara Bridge Road, 505-753-3016. Large servings of Northern New
Mexican-style food in a pleasant setting.
ESPAÑOLAVALLEYFIBERARTS CENTER
325 Paseo de Oñate, 505-747-3577, www.evfac.org. Hand-spun wools, beautiful
yarns, handmade weavings, classes.
ROMERO’S FRUIT ANDVEGGIE STAND
19543 U.S. 85/285. Along with fruits and vegetables in season, find freshly roasted
green chile, handmade tortillas and specialty beans.
BODE’S STORE
21196 U.S. 84, Abiquiú, 505-685-4422. Since 1893. Pick up a sandwich or a green
chile cheeseburger here while you fill up on gas. www.bodes.com
OJOCALIENTE MINERAL SPRINGS RESORT &SPA
800-222-9162 .www.ojospa.com. Excellent restaurant, mind-and-body-soothing
outdoor springs. Spa treatments available by appointment.
ECHOAMPHITHEATER
Four miles north of Ghost Ranch on U.S. 84/285. Natural amphitheater.
MONASTERYOF CHRIST INTHE DESERT
801-545-8567, www.christdesert.org. Gift shop, meditation garden, restrooms and
church open from9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. See website for road conditions, to check times
for Eucharist or to make reservations to stay in the guesthouse.
IF YOU GO
op.cit. books
www.opcit.com
930-C Baca Street Santa Fe, NM 87505
505.428.0321 info@opcit.com
Buy – Trade – Search New – Used – Collectibles
Open Every Day at 8 AM - 7/24 on the web
Santa Fe’s most interesting bookstore, so we’re told
independent by nature and by design
2012 Bienvenidos 113
114 2012 Bienvenidos
LIFE-CHANGING
”Like”us on
Facebook
www.folkartmarket.org
505.886.1251 • 505.992.7600
BUY TICKETSONLINE NOW
JULY 13, 14 &15
SANTAFE, NEWMEXICO
ON MUSEUMHILL
Elhadji Koumama, Tuareg Jeweler, Niger
Major partners: New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Museum of International Folk Art, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, and City of Santa Fe.
Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodger’s Tax and the Santa Fe County Lodgers’ Tax. Photograph © Christian Peacock.
Partially funded by the 1% Lodgers’ Tax and
2012 Bienvenidos 115
almanaque | almanac
COMPILED BY KAY LOCKRIDGE
DESIGN BY WHITNEY STEWART
MAY
Plantings: Tender crops may be planted
any time between April 15 and May 15. These
include, but are not limited to, snap and lima
beans, summer and winter squash, chile,
eggplant, sweet corn, tomatoes, cantaloupe,
okra, bell pepper, watermelon, cucumbers,
honeydew melons, sweet potatoes, pumpkins
and black-eyed peas. For details, contact the
Master Gardener Hotline (505-471-6251) or the
Master Gardener Website (www.sfmga.org).
May 16, Wednesday
6-8 p.m. City of Santa Fe andthe Arts
CommissionCommunity Gallery present a free
poetry reading by 18leading Santa Fe poets at
201 W. Marcy St. For information: 505-955-6705.
May 17, Thursday
Georgia O’Keeffe in NewMexico: Architecture,
Katsinamand the Land opens at the Georgia
O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson St. For
information, 505-946-1000 or visit
www.okeeffemuseum.org.
May 18, Friday
Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry
opens at the NewMexico History Museum,
113 Lincoln Ave. For information: 505-476-
5200 or www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
May 19, Saturday
10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Folk Art Flea Market,
benefitting programs at the Museumof
International Folk Art, MuseumHill, 706
Camino Lejo. Call 505-476-1200 or visit
www.internationalfolkart.org.
1-3 p.m. City of Santa Fe and the Arts
Commission Community Gallery present a free
Visual Arts Workshop —Five Folds Toward a
Book —with Suzanne Vilmain at the gallery,
201 W. Marcy St. Call 505-955-6705.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents
Travel Writing —and Blogging —for Fun and
Profit led by Lesley King at the Performance
Space of La Tienda, 7 Caliente Road, Eldorado.
To register, visit www.wordharvest.com.
For information: 505-471-1565 or email
wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
May 20, Sunday
Santa Fe Century Ride/Bike/Run: 27th annual
100-mile bicycle event on the Turquoise Trail,
NM14, with 25-, 50- and 75-mile routes also
available. Call 505-982-1282 or visit
www.santafecentury.com.
May 21, Monday
2 p.m. Museumof Spanish Colonial Art, 750
Camino Lejo, MuseumHill hosts The Sephardic
Legacy in NewMexico: AHistory of the Crypto-
Jews, a lecture by Stanley M. Hordes. Ph.D. For
information and reservations, 505-982-2226 or
www.spanishcolonial.org.
May 23, Wednesday
2-5 p.m. Cooking Inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe,
Santa Fe School of Cooking, 116 W. San
Francisco St. For informationor to register: 505-
983-4511 or www.santafeschoolofcooking.com.
6-8 p.m. City of Santa Fe andthe Arts
CommissionCommunity Gallery present a free
poetry reading by 18Santa Fe poets at the gallery,
201 W. Marcy St. For information: 505-955-6705.
Thursday, May 24
7 p.m. Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra and
Chorus present Vivaldi Gloria at the Cathedral
Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, 213 Cathedral
Place. Free. For information: 505-983-3530
or www.santafesymphony.org.
May 25, Friday
5:30-7:30 p.m. ABenefit Pre-sale Party kicks
off the Eighth Annual Native Treasures Indian
Arts Festival at the Santa Fe Community
Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. Admission
includes music, refreshments and an Early Bird
ticket for the showopening Saturday morning.
Tickets ($100) at the Lensic Box Office, 211 W.
San Francisco St. Call 505-988-1234 or visit
www.ticketssantafe.org.
It’s About Time: 14,000 Years of Art in New
Mexico opens at the NewMexico Museumof
Art, 107 W. Palace Ave. Call 505-476-5072 or
visit www.nmartmuseum.org.
May 26, Saturday
10 a.m. Eighth Annual Native Treasures Indian
Arts Festival opens at the Santa Fe Community
Convention Center. Sales benefit the artists and
the Museumof Indian Arts &Culture. Tickets
at the door: $10; $20 including the Early Bird
opening at 9 a.m. For information: 505-982-
7799 or www.nativetreasures.org.
Jemez Pueblo presents the Weekend Jemez Red
Rocks Arts and Crafts Show. For information:
575-834-7235 or www.jemezpueblo.com.
May 27, Sunday
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Eighth Annual Native
Treasures Indian Arts Festival continues at the
Community Convention Center. Free today.
The Weekend Jemez Red Rocks Arts and Crafts
Showcontinues at Jemez Pueblo.
2:30 p.m. Santa Fe Community Orchestra
seasonfinale at the St. Francis Auditoriuminthe
NewMexico Museumof Art onthe Plaza. Free.
May 28, Monday
The NewMexico Museumof Art, New
Mexico Museumof History and Palace of the
Governors, Museumof Indian Arts &Culture
and the Museumof International Folk Art are
nowopen on Mondays.
JUNE
June 1, Friday
6-7 p.m. At the The NewMexico History
Museum, 113 Lincoln Ave., Fragile Faith, a
lecture by David Robin about two exhibits:
Illuminating the Word: The St. John’s Bible, an
Epic Work of Art and Contemplative Landscape.
Free.
June 2, Saturday
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Spring Festival and Children’s
Fair at El Rancho de las Golondrinas. Call 505-
471-2261 or visit www.golondrinas.org.
The Annual Eldorado Area Gardening Tour
focuses on six gardens and the Community
Garden/Outdoor Classroom.
Visit www.EldoradoGardeningTour.com.
June 3, Sunday
Spring Festival and Children’s Fair continues
at El Rancho de las Golondrinas.
June 6, Wednesday
7 p.m. The four-day Santa Fe Marimba Festival
opens at the St. Francis Auditorium, followedby
a receptionat 9p.m., at the NewMexico Museum
of Art. For information: 505-982-9780or
www.santafemarimbafestival.org. For tickets:
505-988-1234or www.ticketssantafe.org.
June 7, Thursday
The 13th Annual Thirsty Ear Music Festival
begins. The City Different’s biggest roots-music
event features local and national acts at various
venues. For information and tickets:
www.thirstyearfestival.com.
7 p.m. Contemporary Marimba Concert at
the St. Francis Auditorium. For information:
505-982-9780 or www.santafemarimbafestival.
org. For tickets: 505-988-1234 or www.
ticketssantafe.org.
June 8, Friday
5-7 p.m. City of Santa Fe and the Arts
Commission Community Gallery present
Santa Fe Poet Laureate Joan Logghe at the
gallery, 201 W. Marcy St. Event concludes a
collaborative exhibit of poetry and the visual
arts that began in March. Call 505-955-6705.
6-7 p.m. Landscapes andMemory, a lecture by
artist andcalligrapher Laurie Doctor, at the New
Mexico History Museum, 113 LincolnAve. Free.
7 p.m. Double Image at the Lensic Performing
Arts Center, 225 SanFrancisco St., with
acclaimedmallet percussionists Dave Samuels
andDavidFriedmanperforming a vibe-marimba
duo concert. For information: 505-982-9780or
www.santafemarimbafestival.org. For tickets:
505-988-1234or www.ticketssantafe.org.
Thirsty Ear Festival continues. For information
and tickets: www.thirstyearfestival.com.
June 9, Saturday
8 p.m. The Santa Fe Marimba Festival
and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra &
Chorus present ANight of Premieres at the
Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San
Francisco St., with the American premiere of
Bird Rhythmics, a concerto for marimba and
orchestra, Op. 109, by renowned Japanese
composer Takashi Yoshimatsu and featuring
June 4, Monday
FULL MOON: 5:11 A.M. MST.
May28, Monday
FIRST QUARTER MOON: 2:16 P.M. MST.
116 2012 Bienvenidos
the world-class marimbist Nanae Mimura,
with special guests Valerie Naranjo, Ludwig
Alberi and Chin Cheng Lin. For information:
505-982-9780 or 505-983-3530; www.
santafemarimbafestival.org or www.
santafesymphony.org. For tickets: 505-988-
1234 or www.ticketssantafe.org.
Thirsty Ear Music Festival continues.
Visit www.thirstyearfestival.com.
June 10, Sunday
Thirsty Ear Music Festival continues. Visit
www.thirstyearfestival.com.
June 13, Wednesday
San Antonio Feast Corn Dance at Taos Pueblo.
For information: 575-758- 1024 (1028, 9593)
or vwww.taospueblo.com.
6-8 p.m. The Music on the Hill concert series,
sponsored by St. John’s College, begins and
continues on Wednesday evenings (June 20
and 27 and July 11, 18, and 25) on the college’s
athletic field. Free. Visit www.stjohnscollege.
edu/events/SF/music.shtml.
June 15, Friday
11 a.m.-9 p.m. 15th Annual Santa Fe Greek
Festival featuring food, music and dancing,
hosted by St. Elias the Prophet Greek Orthodox
Church, Santa Fe Community Convention
Center. For information: 505-577-4742
or www.santafegreekfestival.com.
10 a.m. Tasting NewMexico cooking class
with Cheryl and Bill Jamison at Santa Fe
School of Cooking, 116 W. San Francisco St.
For information or to register: 505-983-4511 or
www.santafeschoolofcooking.com.
June 16, Saturday
10 a.m. The Rodeo de Santa Fe Parade kicks off
the 62nd Annual Rodeo de Santa Fe week. For
information about the parade and howto enter:
505-490-3008 or www.rodeodesantafe.org.
11 a.m.-9 p.m. Santa Fe Greek Festival
continues at the Santa Fe Community
Convention Center. For information: 505-577-
4742 or www.santafegreekfestival.com.
Challenge NewMexico presents its 34th
Annual Art Showon the Santa Fe Plaza.
For information: 505-988-7621, Ext. 114, or
www.challengenewmexico.org.
June 17, Sunday
Challenge NewMexico arts and crafts show
continues on the Plaza.
June 19, Tuesday
Newmoon: 9:03 a.m. MST.
June 20, Wednesday
6-8 p.m. Music on the Hill at St. John’s College.
Free. For information: www.stjohnscollege.
edu/events/SF/music.shtml.
The 62nd Annual Rodeo de Santa Fe opens
today for a four-day stand at the Santa Fe
County Rodeo Grounds, on Rodeo Road. Gates
open at 5:30 p.m.; Mutton Bustin begins at
6:30 p.m.; Rodeo performances 7-9:30 p.m.
For information: 505-471-4300 or www.
rodeodesantafe.org. For tickets: 505-988-1234
or www.ticketssantafe.org.
June 21, Thursday
Rodeo de Santa Fe continues at the Santa Fe
County Rodeo Grounds. Gates open at 5:30 p.m.
Mutton Bustin begins at 6:30 p.m.; Rodeo
performances 7-9:30 p.m.
June 22, Friday
Currents: The Santa Fe International New
Media Festival, an annual, citywide event which
includes exhibitions, multimedia performances,
internships, workshops, panel discussions,
docent tours opens June 22 at El Museo
Cultural de Santa Fe, 555 Camino de la Familia.
For information: 505-992-0591
or www.elmuseocultural.org/calendar.php.
Rodeo de Santa Fe continues at the Santa Fe
County Rodeo Grounds. Gates openat 5:30p.m.
MuttonBustinbegins at 6:30p.m.; Rodeo
performances 7-9:30p.m.
June 23, Saturday
Rodeo de Santa Fe concludes today at the Santa
Fe Rodeo Grounds. Gates open at 5:30 p.m.;
Mutton Bustin begins at 6:30 p.m.; Rodeo
performances 7-9:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 24
San Juan Day Corn Dance at Taos Pueblo.
For information: 575-758-1024 (1028, 9593)
or www.taospueblo.com.
St. John the Baptist Feast Day dances at Ohkay
Owingeh Pueblo. For information: 595-852-
4400 or www.ohkay.com.
June 26, Tuesday
First-quarter moon: 9:30 p.m. MST.
June 27, Wednesday
6-8 p.m. Music on the Hill at St. John’s College.
Free. For information: www.stjohnscollege.
edu/events/SF/music.shtml.
June 29, Friday
Santa Fe Opera opens its 2012 festival season
and continues through August 25, presenting
five newoperas. U.S. 84/285, Exit 168. For
information and tickets: 505-986-5900,
800-280-4654 or www.santafeopera.org.
almanaque | almanac
June 11, Monday
LAST-QUARTER MOON: 4:42 A.M. MST.
2012 Bienvenidos 117
JULY
Fall crops, including hardy and semi-hardy
vegetables, may be planted between July 15
and August 1. Such vegetables include, but are
not limited to, broccoli, Chinese cabbage, kale,
radishes, turnips, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage,
garlic, kohlrabi and lettuce. For details, contact
the Master Gardener Hotline (505-471-6251)
or Master Gardener Website (www.sfmga.org).
July 4, Wednesday
7 a.m.-noonPancakes on the Plaza, with a
vintage car show(7 a.m.-1 p.m.), entertainment
(7 a.m.-3 p.m.) and an arts and crafts show
(7 a.m.-5 p.m.). Call 505-984-0022 or visit
www.pancakesontheplaza.com.
6-10 p.m. Annual fireworks showsponsored by
the Boys &Girls Club at Santa Fe High School,
2100 Yucca St.
July 7, Saturday
More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness opens
at SITESanta Fe, 1606 Paseo de Peralta, with
work by international artists. For information:
505-989-1199 or www.sitesantafe.org.
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Santa Fe Artists Market showat
Cathedral Park today and tomorrow. Free.
Noon-6 p.m. Santa Fe Wine Festival opens at
El Rancho de las Golondrinas with food, music
and Northern NewMexico arts and crafts. Visit
www.santafewinefestival.com.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents Sell
Your Book: The ABCs of Market Analysis and
Promotion with Shirley Raye Redmond at the
Performance Space at La Tienda, 7 Caliente
Road, Eldorado. To register: www.wordharvest.
com. For information: 505-471-1565 or email
wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
July 8, Sunday
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Santa Fe Artists Market
continues at Cathedral Park.
Noon-6 p.m. Santa Fe Wine Festival at El
Rancho de las Golondrinas continues.
Visit www.santafewinefestival.com.
The Art of Gaman: Arts andCrafts fromthe
Japanese-AmericanInternment Camps, 1942-
1946opens at the Museumof International Folk
Art, MuseumHill, 706Camino Lejo. Call 505-
476-1200or visit www.internationalfolkart.org.
July 9, Monday
8:30-10 a.m. Breakfast with the Curator
(Barbara Mauldin, Latin America) and tour of
Folk Art of the Andes exhibit at the Museumof
International Folk Art. For information and
reservations: 505-476-1207.
1-4 p.m. Artists attending the International
Folk Art Market demonstrate their work at the
Museumof International Folk Art. Call 505-
476-1200 or visit www.internationalfolkart.org
July 10, Tuesday
8:30-10 a.m. Breakfast with the Curator
(Bobbie Sumberg, Textiles and Costume)
and tour of Young Brides, Old Treasures:
Macedonian Embroidered Dresses exhibit at
the Museumof International Folk art. For
information and reservations: 505-476-1207.
1-4 p.m. Artists attending the International
Folk Art Market demonstrate their work at the
Museumof International Folk Art. Call 505-
476-1200 or www.internationalfolkart.org
FromZimbabwe to Santa Fe, a documentary
following an artist’s journey fromAfrica to the
United States by Cristina McCandless, at The
Screen. Call 505-670-6000 for details.
July 11, Wednesday
Last-quarter moon: 7:49 p.m. MST.
8:30-10 a.m. Breakfast with the Curator
(Felicia Katz-Harris, Asia and Middle Eastern
Collections and Asian Artists) and tour of
The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts fromthe
Japanese-American Internment Camps, 1942-
1946 exhibit. Call 505-476-1207.
1-4 p.m. Artists attending the International
Folk Art Market demonstrate their work at the
Museumof International Folk Art. Call 505-
476-1200 or visit www.internationalfolkart.org
An Evening with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon,
author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, at
the Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San
Francisco St. For tickets: 505-988-1234, the
Lensic Box Office or www.ticketssantafe.org.
6-8 p.m. Music on the Hill at St. John’s College.
Free. Visit www.stjohnscollege.edu/events/SF/
music.shtml.
July 12, Thursday
5-9 p.m. International Folk Art Market
Community Celebration at Railyard Park with a
free concert. Call 505-992-7600 or visit
www.folkartmarket.org.
5-8 p.m. Art Santa Fe’s 12th annual showopens
with a gala and vernissage at the Santa Fe
Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy
St., and continues through July 15. Call 505-
989-1119 or visit www.artsantafe.com.
For tickets: 505-988-1234, www.lensic.org
or www.ticketssantafe.org.
July 13, Friday
6-7 p.m. The NewMexico History Museum,
113 Lincoln Ave., presents Poetry and
Photographs with poet MiriamSagan and
photographer Teresa Neptune. Free. Call 505-
476-5100 or visit www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
6:30-9 p.m. The International Folk Art
Market kicks off its ninth season with a Global
Gathering Under the Stars on Milner Plaza on
MuseumHill, 706 Camino Lejo. Tickets ($125)
include refreshments, music, dancing and
shopping. Call 505-992-7600 or visit
www.folkartmarket.org.
NewMexico Jazz Festival starts July 13 and
concludes on July 29. For information on
venues, schedule and tickets visit
www.newmexicojazzfestival.org.
July3, Tuesday
FULL MOON: 12:51 P.M. MST.
A Feast for the Senses
La Plazuela at La Fonda on the Plaza is a feast for the senses.
The room is stunning and the menu sophisticated, showcasing
old favorites with New World twists and truly authentic
Northern New Mexican cuisine. Our wine list is award-winning,
our service is impeccable and, according to the reviewers,
you’ll be dining in the “best of Santa Fe style”.
Come make memories with us!
800.523.5002 Reservations
505.982.5511 Front Desk
www.lafondasantafe.com
100 E. San Francisco Street
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501
Dinner reservations recommended. Call 505.995.2334
118 2012 Bienvenidos
July 14, Saturday
Ninth Annual Santa Fe International Folk Art
Market on MuseumHill, 710 Camino Lejo.
Early Bird market opens at 7:30 a.m.; public
opening at 9 a.m. Tickets are $50 for the Early
Bird; $15 in advance; $20 at the gate. Call 505-
476-1200 or visit www.internationalfolkart.org
9 a.m.-3 p.m. Childrenof the Portal Artists’
annual showandsale inthe Palace Courtyard.
505-476-5100or www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents
Writing Throughthe Lens of Food withDeborah
Madisonat the Performance Space at La Tienda,
7 Caliente Road, Eldorado. To register: www.
wordharvest.com. For information: 505-471-
1565 or email wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
St. Bonaventure Feast Day dances at Cochití
Pueblo. For information: 505-465-2244
or www.pueblodecochiti.org.
July 15, Sunday
9a.m.-3 p.m. Young Native Arts and Crafts
Showand Sale, featuring children of the Portal
artists, continues in the Palace of the Governors
Courtyard. For information: 505-476-5100
or www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
9 a.m.-5 p.m. International Folk Art Market
celebrates Family Day. Tickets: $5 in advance,
children 16 and under free; $10 at the gate.
505-476-1200 or www.internationalfolkart.org.
Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival begins today
and continues through August 20 at various
venues in the City Different. For information
and tickets: 505-983-2075 or visit
www.santafechambermusic.org.
July 18, Wednesday
6-8 p.m. Music on the Hill at St. John’s College.
Free. For information: www.stjohnscollege.
edu/events/SF/music.shtml.
Newmoon: 10:24 p.m. MST.
July 20, Friday
8 p.m. The Desert Chorale, which performs in
various venues in Santa Fe and Albuquerque,
begins its 2012 summer season tonight and
concludes August 18. For information and
tickets: 505-988-2282, 800-244-4011 or
www.DesertChorale.org.
July 21, Saturday
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Rancho de las Golondrinas hosts
¡Viva Mexico! Celebration. For information:
505-471-2261 or www.golondrinas.org.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents
PoetryLaunchwithSanta Fe Poet Laureate Joan
Logghe at the Performance Space at La Tienda,
7 Caliente Road, Eldorado. To register: www.
wordharvest.com. Call 505-471-1565 or email
wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
Sunday, July 22
10 a.m.-5 p.m. ¡Viva Mexico! Celebration
continues at El Rancho de las Golondrinas.
July 24, Tuesday
12:30-4:30 p.m. Behind Adobe Walls Home
and Garden Tour sponsored by the Santa Fe
Garden Club visits four private residences with
outstanding high desert gardens. $75 includes
luxury buses; add lunch, $20. Reservations
suggested. Call www.thesantafegardenclub.org.
For tickets: 505-984-0022. (Tour four different
homes on July 31.)
4 p.m. Talk and collection tour led by curator
Robin Farwell Gavin of the Museumof Spanish
Colonial Art, 750 Camino Lejo, MuseumHill.
Call 505-982-2226; www.spanishcolonial.org.
July 25, Wednesday
Noon. Luncheon with the artists of Spanish
Market. For information and reservations: 505-
982-2226 or visit www.spanishcolonial.org.
10 a.m. NewMexico Favorites cooking class
with Chef Johnny Vee of Las Cosas Kitchen
Shoppe, 181 Paseo de Peralta. For information:
www.lascosascooking.com. For reservations:
877-229-7184.
Santiago Day Corn Dance at Taos Pueblo.
For information: 575-758-1024 (1028, 9593)
or www.taospueblo.com.
6-8 p.m. Final performance of Music on the
Hill at St. John’s College. Free. Visit www.
stjohnscollege.edu/events/SF/music.shtml.
July 26, Thursday
10 a.m. Spanish Influence on NewMexico’s
Norteño Cookery with Chef Johnny Vee of Las
Cosas Kitchen Shoppe, 181 Paseo de Peralta.
Visit www.lascosascooking.com.
For reservations: 877-229-7184.
4:30 p.m. Collecting Spanish Colonial Art in
the 21st Century, lecture by John Schaefer at
Peyton Wright Gallery, 237 E. Palace Ave.
For information: 505-989-9888, 800-879-8898
or visit www.peytonwright.com.
Santa Ana Day Corn Dance at Taos Pueblo.
Call 575-758-1024 (1028, 9593) or visit www.
taospueblo.com.
First-quarter moon: 2:56 a.m. MST.
July 27, Friday
9:30 a.m. Patina Gallery, 131 W. Palace Ave.,
hosts a breakfast reception and talk on Spanish
jeweler Enric Majoral. For information and
reservations: 505-986-3432 or visit
www.patina-gallery.com.
5:30-8 p.m. PreviewNight at Contemporary
Hispanic Market, Santa Fe Community
ConventionCenter, 201 W. Marcy St., includes
food, music anddancing under the stars inthe
courtyard. Free. Call 505-438-4367 or visit
www.contemporaryhispanicmarket.com.
7 p.m. Members-only previewof Traditional
Spanish Market, Santa Fe Community
Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. For
membership and previewinformation:
505-982-2226 or www.spanishmarket.org.
July 28, Saturday
8 a.m.-5 p.m. 61st Annual Traditional Spanish
Market featuring work of Spanish colonial
artists fromNorthern NewMexico and
southern Colorado on the Plaza, with food,
music and entertainment. Free. Call 505-982-
2226 or visit www.spanishmarket.org.
8 a.m.-5 p.m. 26th Annual Contemporary
Hispanic Market featuring arts and crafts by
NewMexico’s leading-edge Hispanic artists,
Lincoln Avenue, just off the Plaza. Free.
Call 505-438-4367 or visit www.
contemporaryhispanicmarket.com.
8 p.m. Santa Fe Desert Chorale presents
Celebrating the Centenary, featuring three new
choral works that celebrate the three ethnic
groups that contribute to the state’s distinctive
2012 Bienvenidos 119
cultural richness and diversity, at the New
Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln Ave. For
tickets and information: 505-988-2282 or 800-
244-4011 or visit www.DesertChorale.org.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents A
Mindful Approach to Improve Your Writing
with Kate Horsley at the Performance
Space at La Tienda, 7 Caliente Road,
Eldorado. To register: www.wordharvest.
com. For information: 505-471-1565 or email
wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
July 29, Sunday
8 a.m. Annual Spanish Market Mass at the
Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi.
9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Spanish Market continues on
the Plaza.
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Contemporary Hispanic Market
continues on Lincoln Avenue, just off the Plaza.
Kitchen Garden and Chicken Coop Tour
sponsored by Homegrown NewMexico.
Visit www.homegrownnewmexico.org.
JULY 31, Tuesday
12:30-4:30 p.m. Behind Adobe Walls Home
and Garden Tour sponsored by the Santa Fe
Garden Club visits four private residences with
outstanding high desert gardens. $75 includes
luxury buses; add lunch for $20. Reservations
suggested. Visit www.thesantafegardenclub.
org. For tickets: 505-984-0022.
AUGUST
August 1, Wednesday
Music at Angel Fire begins its 29th season
today, presenting 15 chamber music concerts
featuring more than 35 international artists
performing the works of the masters and
contemporary composers, concluding Sept. 2.
For information and tickets: 505-820-2540
or www.musicfromangelfire.org.
August 2, Thursday
SOFAWest: The three-day Sculptural Objects
and Functional Art (SOFA) Fair begins today at
the Santa Fe Community Convention Center,
201 W. Marcy St. For information and tickets:
800-563-7632 or www.sofaexpo.com.
August 3, Friday
SOFAWest continues at the Community
Convention Center.
August 4, Saturday
SOFAWest continues at the Community
Convention Center.
9 a.m. Girls Inc. 40thAnnual Arts andCrafts
Fair, a juriedshowfeaturing the work of more
than200artists, takes place onthe Plaza. Free.
Call 505-982-2042, www.girlsinc.ofsantafe.org.
Frontier Days &Horses of the West featuring
mountain men and women and Peruvian
Paso horses begins today at Rancho de las
Golondrinas. For information: 505-471-2261
or www.golondrinas.org.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents
Charismatic Characters with Julie Shigekuni at
the Performance Space at La Tienda, 7 Caliente
Road, Eldorado. To register: www.wordharvest.
com. For information: 505-471-1565 or email
wordharvest@wordharvest.com.
St. Dominic Feast Day dances at Kewa Pueblo,
formerly Santo Domingo Pueblo.
August 5, Sunday
Frontier Days &Horses of the West concludes
today at Rancho de las Golondrinas.
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Girls Inc. Arts and Crafts Fair
continues on the Plaza.
SOFAWest concludes today at the Community
Convention Center.
August 9, Thursday
10 a.m. The 28thAnnual MountainManTrade
Fair opens today inthe Palace of the Governors
Courtyardandcontinues for three days. Free.
6-9 p.m. Thetwo-dayAntiqueEthnographicArt
Showbegins todaywithagalapreviewopeningat
theSantaFeCommunityConventionCenter. Call
505-992-8929or www.whitehawkshows.com.
Last-quarter moon: 12:56 p.m. MST.
Friday, August 10
6-9 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of Art
kicks off the first of two weekends with an
Opening Night Preview&Party at El Museo
Cultural de Santa Fe, 555 Camino de la Familia.
Tickets, $50 at the door. Call 505-660-4701 or
visit www.SantaFeShow.com.
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mountain Man Trade Fair
continues in the Palace of the Governors
Courtyard. Free.
St. Lawrence Feast Day dances at Picuris
Pueblo. For information: 505-587-2519.
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Antique Ethnographic Art Show
continues at the Community ConventionCenter.
Call 505-992-8929 or visit www.
whitehawkshows.com.
August 11, Saturday
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mountain Man Trade Fair
continues in the Palace of the Governors
Courtyard. Free.
almanaque | almanac
August 1, Wednesday
FULL MOONAPPEARS AT 9:27 P.M. MST.
Experience the Early Days of
the Taos Art Colony
Visit the Couse-Sharp Historic Site this Summer
Take an in-depth tour of the home and studio of E. I. Couse
and studios of Joseph H. Sharp
Open Houses the frst Saturday from June through October • 5pm - 7pm
To schedule a visit May 6 - Oct. 31, call 575-751-0369
or email director@cousefoundation.org
Te Couse Foundation • 146 Kit Carson Road • www.cousefoundation.org
120 2012 Bienvenidos
10 a.m.-4 p.m. The 11th annual Rag Rug
Festival &Gift Show, sponsored by the New
Mexico Women’s Foundation, opens at the
Stewart Udall Center for MuseumResources,
725 Camino Lejo. Free. Call 505-983-6155 or
email info@nmwf.org.
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Antique Ethnographic Art Show
concludes today at the Community Convention
Center. Call 505-992-8929 or visit www.
whitehawkshows.com.
11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of
Art, featuring works of art fromgalleries, artists
and designers, opens at El Museo Cultural de
Santa Fe in the Santa Fe Railyard. Tickets, $12
each for the six-day showor $16 for all show
days, are available at the door. For information:
505-660-4701 or www.SantaFeShow.com.
Wordharvest Writers Workshops presents
Publish Your Book! with Cindy Bellinger at the
Performance Space at La Tienda, 7 Caliente
Road, Eldorado. To register: www.wordharvest.
com. Call 505-471-1565 or email wordharvest@
wordharvest.com.
August 12, Sunday
9 a.m.-3 p.m. Mountain Man Trade Fair
concludes today in the Palace of the Governors
Courtyard. Free.
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rag Rug Festival &Gift Show
continues at the Stewart Udall Center for
MuseumResources on MuseumHill.
11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of
Art continues at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
in the Santa Fe Railyard. Tickets $12 at the door.
6-9 p.m. The two-day Antique Indian Art
Showopens today at the Santa Fe Community
Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St., with a
gala preview. Call 505-982-8929 or visit
www.whitehawkshows.com.
St. Clare Feast Day dances at Santa Clara Pueblo.
Call 505-753-7326(7330) or www.puyecliffs.com.
August 13, Monday
The Southwest Association for Indian Arts,
the Center for Contemporary Arts and the
SmithsonianNational Museumof the American
Indian present the 10th Annual Native Cinema
Showcase, a four-day celebration of films
and videos by and about indigenous peoples,
beginning today. The showcase features 16
films and videos fromseven countries shown in
two central venues: the Cinematheque at CCA,
1050 Old Pecos Trail, and Cathedral Park, next
to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi.
The award recipients of SWAIA’s classification
category for moving images, Classification X,
will be shown. Free. Visit www.swaia.org.
10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Antique IndianArt Show
continues at the Community ConventionCenter.
Call 505-982-8929; www.whitehawkshows.com.
11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of
Art continues at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
in the Santa Fe Railyard. Tickets $12 at the door.
August 14, Tuesday
10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Antique Indian Art Show
concludes today at the Community Convention
Center. Call 505-982-8929 or visit
www.whitehawkshows.com.
Native Cinema Showcase continues.
Visit www.swaia.org for details.
August 15, Wednesday
Native Cinema Showcase continues.
Visit www.swaia.org for details.
August 16, Thursday
1 p.m. The Case Trading Post (Wheelwright
Museumstore) presents an afternoon of talks
and awards in the museumlibrary, with a
roundtable followed by the Fellowship Awards
presentation at 1:45 p.m. The annual Indian
Market Survival Guide panel begins at 2 p.m.
Free. Visit www.wheelwright.org.
4 p.m. The Wheelwright Museumof the
American Indian kicks off its 37th annual
auctions with a silent auction and live-auction
previewon museumgrounds, Camino Lejo.
Free. Visit www.wheelwright.org.
6 p.m. SWAIAand Collected Works Bookstore
present an established Indian writer and an
emerging writer. Aquestion-and-answer
session and book signing followthe readings,
202 Galisteo St. Visit www.swaia.org.
Native Cinema Showcase concludes today.
Visit www.swaia.org for details.
August 17, Friday
9 a.m. The Wheelwright Museumof the
AmericanIndian, Camino Lejo, Museum
Hill, begins its all-day events withits annual
Collectors’ Table featuring Indianart for sale
until 10:30a.m., whenthe fifthannual Art for
Wear andsecondlive-auctionpreviewbegins,
continuing until 12:30p.m. The live auctionis
from1-4p.m. Free. The Case Trading Post plans
other special events. Visit www.wheelwright.org.
11:30 a.m. Indian Market Best of Show
Ceremony and Luncheon at the Santa Fe
Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy
St. For tickets and information: 505-983-5220.
2 p.m. State of Native Arts symposiumat the
NewMexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln
Ave., featuring museumdirectors fromthe
Autry National Center of the American West,
the Eiteljorg Museumof American Indians
almanaque | almanac
August 24, Friday
FIRST-QUARTER MOON: 8:54 A.M. MST.
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2012 Bienvenidos 121
and Western Art, the Heard Museumand the
National Museumof the American Indian. Free.
Visit www.swaia.org.
5:30 p.m. Sneak previewof Indian Market
award-winning art for members only at the
Community Convention Center, followed by a
general previewfor the public at 7:30 p.m. For
tickets and information: 505-983-5220.
Newmoon: 9:54 a.m. MST.
August 18, Saturday
7 a.m.-5 p.m. The 91st Annual Indian Market,
sponsored by the Southwest Association
for Indian Arts and featuring artists from
throughout the United States and Canada,
opens on the Plaza today and tomorrow. Free.
Call 505-983-5220 or visit www.swaia.org.
11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of
Art continues at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
in the Santa Fe Railyard. Tickets $12 at the door.
5 p.m. SWAIALive Auction Gala at La Fonda
on the Plaza. Tickets are $150 general seating,
$225 for preferred seating. For tickets:
505-983-6220 or www.swaia.org.
The Native Cinema Showcase screens
Native-made and -directed films focusing
on issues of indigenous life and identity at
CCACinematheque, 1050 Old Pecos Trail,
throughout Indian Market weekend. For
information and tickets: 505-982-1338 or
www.ccasantafe.com.
9 a.m.-5 p.m. The annual two-day Portal
Artists Celebration features Portal artists
and their handcrafted work in the Palace of
the Governors Courtyard, 113 Lincoln Ave.
Traditional Indian dances, music, raffles and
Indian fry bread. Free. For information: 505-
476-1141 or www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
August 19, Sunday
9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Portal Artists Celebration
continues in the Palace of the Governors
Courtyard. Call 505-476-1141 or visit
www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
11 a.m.-5 p.m. The Santa Fe Show: Objects of
Art concludes at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
in the Santa Fe Railyard. Tickets $12 at the door.
8 a.m.-5 p.m. IndianMarket continues onthe
Plaza. Call 505-983-6220or www.swaia.org.
Native Cinema Showcase continues at CCA
Cinematheque. For details, visit www.swaia.org.
August 24, Friday
First-quarter moon: 7:54 a.m. MST.
August 24-26, Friday - Sunday
The Santa Fe Bluegrass and Old Time Music
Festival opens today at the Santa Fe County
Fairgrounds, Rodeo Road. For information and
tickets: www.southwestpickers.org.
August 31, Friday
People sing songs about it, write plays about
it and talk about it in awe —because special
things happen only “once in a blue moon.” The
second full moon in a month (or a fourth time in
a seasonal three months, according to The Old
Farmer’s Almanac) is known as a blue moon.
This year a blue moon appears in the morning
sky over NewMexico at 7:57 a.m. MSTtoday
—a wonderful way to end a “once-in-a-blue-
moon” summer season in the City Different.
Ongoing events
May through September: Pequeño Home and
Garden Tours of special homes and high-desert
gardens, sponsored by the Santa Fe Garden
Club. For information and reservations:
505-984-0022.
Historical downtown walking tours led by
NewMexico History Museumand Palace of the
Governors guides are Monday through Friday
from10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. throughout the
summer. $10 for adults, children 16 and under
free with an adult. Call 505-476-1141.
The Wheelwright Museumof the American
Indian, 704 Camino Lejo, presents Looking at
Indian Art every Saturday, beginning at 10:15
a.m. in the Case Trading Post on the lower level
of the museum.
The NorthernNewMexico Fine Arts and Crafts
Guild sponsors several shows at Cathedral Park
during the summer. Visit www.artsandcrafts
guild.org; 505-473-5590 or 505-412-1407.
Santa Fe Artists Market showcasing juried area
artists is held on Saturdays and Sundays, 8 a.m.-
2 p.m., at the Railyard Park, Paseo de Peralta at
S. Guadalupe St., next to SITESanta Fe. Free.
Call 505-310-1555 or visit
www.santafeartistsmarket.com.
The Santa Fe Society of Artists presents its
members’ work at the parking lot behind First
National Bank on the Plaza from9 a.m.-5:30
p.m. every weekend in May. Visit www.santafe
societyofartists.com.
The Randall Davey Audubon Center and
Sanctuary conducts free weekly bird walks led
by experienced birders every Saturday during
the summer from8-9 a.m., 1800 Upper Canyon
Road. Call 505-983-4609.
Tours of the historic Randall Davey House,
1800 Upper Canyon Road, are conducted
every Friday from2-3 p.m. Admission $5. For
information and reservations: 505-983-4609.
The Santa Fe Opera Festival runs June 29
through August 25. For schedule and tickets:
505-986-5900, 800-280-4654 or visit
www.santafeopera.org.
Santa Fe Farmers Market is held every Saturday
and Tuesday morning from7 a.m.-noon, in and
around the market building in the Santa Fe
Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta, at S. Guadalupe
St. Call 505-983-4098 or visit
www.santafefarmersmarket.com.
August 31, Friday
BLUE MOON: 7:57 A.M. MST.
122 2012 Bienvenidos
2012 Bienvenidos 123
BY DIANA DEL MAURO
Last fall, Scott Cejka was ecstatic after
mountain biking down the aspen-lined Winsor
Trail to Tesuque, a widely lauded stretch of
single-track that starts 10,300 feet above sea
level in the Santa Fe National Forest and drops
3,400 feet over 10 miles. Steep in parts and
“fast and flowy” in other parts, the trail offered
Cejka the added pleasure of soaring over
Tesuque Creek crossings at least a dozen times.
And best of all, he didn’t see another creature
(other than his riding buddy) until he passed a
gathering of cows at the bottom.
For the Boulder, Colorado, resident, Santa Fe offered
one of the best mountain biking experiences of his life.
“As much as I love Boulder and love using the thousands
of miles of trails around town for hiking, I have to get in
my car and drive out of Boulder to do any real mountain
biking,” Cejka said. “Santa Fe seems far less crowded and
still open to recreation activities. That’s what I like about
it. It’s like a Boulder before it was discovered.”
Santa Fe’s relatively quiet reputation for mountain
biking is about to undergo a significant transformation.
FromOctober 10 to 13, the 2012 International Mountain
Bicycling Association’s World Summit will showcase
Northern NewMexico’s trails, fromSanta Fe to Angel
Fire, during autumn’s comfortable riding temperatures
and bursts of color. Not only will the event create a forum
for hundreds of trail advocates and land managers to
learn howto cultivate bicycle tourismwhile balancing
recreation and land conservation, but it also will leave
tangible improvements behind.
“We hope to come and take what’s already good and
make it better,” IMBAspokesman Mark Eller said.
Adozen communities cast bids to host the sixth
world summit. In the end, Santa Fe beat out Lake Tahoe,
Nevada, “by a nose,” said Eller.
Anonprofit organization founded in 1988 by California
mountain bike enthusiasts who were being banned
fromtrails, IMBAtakes pride in its record of promoting
conservation and rider responsibility and providing a
million volunteer hours each year worldwide to build and
maintain low-impact, durable public trails. In 1994, IMBA
leaders convinced the Sierra Club to revise its policy to
recognize mountain biking as a legitimate recreational
activity. IMBAnowhas 35,000 members worldwide.
“Recreation and conservation are often pitched as
adversarial, but if you do it right, they can enhance each
other,” Eller said.
Eller also applauded Santa Fe Conservation Trust’s
recent effort to build newtrails that connect downtown
trails to mountain trails, so bike enthusiasts can avoid a
car altogether.
In just the last 10 years, the city, the county and various
trail advocates have come together to develop Santa Fe
as a mountain biking destination. Before that, the trail
network was limited and bicycle-friendly amenities
were lacking. “We have this amazing asset in our trails,”
said Charlie O’Leary, director of Santa Fe Conservation
Trust and an avid mountain biker. “I certainly think it’s
underutilized as a recreation community. But there’s been
a big shift, and it’s still occurring.”
Permanent improvements
Whenever a summit comes to a community, IMBAstrives
to leave something worthwhile behind. For Santa Fe, that
will mean a bike skills park, a comprehensive trail map
(in electronic and print versions), and revamped Dale
Ball trails. Assuming the educational forumis successful,
the city will be better equipped to shape the future of
mountain biking here.
IMBAis sending its trail solutions teamto work side
by side with local volunteers to build a small park at La
Tierra Trails, located off NM599, where bikers of all
levels can practice a wide variety of skills through jump
lines, cross-country riding, balance beams, and a short
pump track, where riders cruise around the undulating
course by moving up and down on the bike rather than
pedaling. It will be free for all to use.
This October, the crowning activity for summit
delegates will be a ride on the Winsor Trail organized and
led by the Santa Fe Fat Tire Society, a local IMBAchapter.
Instead of bombing straight down it, as Cejka did, riders
will experience a route that starts high on the Winsor
Trail but uses a newconnecting segment, La Piedra Trail,
built by Santa Fe Conservation Trust.
Mountainbikers blaze atrail
October summit blends recreation, conservation
LUIS SANCHEZ SATURNO
Mountain bikers in the hills west of Santa Fe
What: The 2012 International Mountain Bicycling
Association’s World Bike Summit offers attendees a
chance to solve problems together and experience Santa
Fe’s trails during prime riding season. Delegates will spend
part of the day contemplating how to balance recreation
and conservation, how to build low-impact trails and how
to make mountain biking in Santa Fe more attractive to
tourists and locals alike. By 3 p.m., delegates will head to
the Sangre de Cristo Mountains for guided rides of any
skill level they desire. Evenings will be a time to unwind
over locally brewed beer, bike-centered art, and short
bike-themed films. A ride on the Winsor Trail and a BBQ
meal will wrap up the event on Saturday.
When: Oct. 10-13, preconference activities on Oct. 8 and
9, including epic rides in Taos-Angel Fire and Los Alamos
Where: Santa Fe Community Convention Center
To register contact IMBA at www.imba.com/world-
summit or 888-442-4622.
To schedule a ride during the summit, contact the Santa Fe
Fat Tire Society at http://santafefattiresociety.org.
we’ll wait for you | los esperamos
IF YOU GO
124 2012 Bienvenidos
Fiestas de Santa Fe
September 6-9
The burning of Zozobra —a giant
marionette representing Old Man Gloom
—kicks off Fiestas de Santa Fe. Nowin
its 300th year, the fiesta commemorates
the relatively peaceful resettlement of
Santa Fe by the Spanish after the Indian
revolt of 1680. Highlights include several
parades, a craft fair, food booths on the
Plaza and a candlelight procession.
Native Treasures
Collectors’ Sale
September 15-16
Aspecial sale of Native American art
—in almost every medium—fromthe
homes of top collectors is held at the
Laboratory of Anthropology on Museum
Hill and benefits the Museumof Indian
Arts &Culture.
Santa Fe to Buffalo
Thunder Half Marathon
September 16
The race route starts in the city, runs
uphill for a couple of miles, then begins
a gradual 1,300-foot descent to its finish
at the Buffalo Thunder Resort &Casino
at Pojoaque Pueblo. The resort also
hosts a 5Krun and fitness walk. This
year’s special guest is legendary Olympic
medalist Billy Mills.
Santa Fe
Wine &Chile Fiesta
September 26-30
The five-day event, held in city hotels
and restaurants, includes seminars,
tastings, wine luncheons and dinners,
workshops and auctions with local and
national chefs and vintners. Agrand
tasting under tents on the Santa Fe
Opera grounds provides a festive wrap-
up to the fiesta.
Harvest Festival at
El Rancho de las
Golondrinas
October 6-7
Help costumed villagers bring in the
harvest, crush wine grapes by foot, string
chile ristras, make bread and tortillas
and participate in other traditional
fall activities at this 200-acre Spanish
colonial living-history museumjust
15 minutes outside Santa Fe.
International Mountain
Biking AssociationWorld
Summit
October 8-13
The conference features a bicycling trade
fair and organized trail rides designed
to help attendees experience Santa Fe’s
outstanding mountain biking terrain.
Winter IndianMarket
November 24-25
Sponsored by the Southwestern
Association for Indian Arts, the
Thanksgiving weekend showand sale
features more than 100 Indian Market
artists, demonstrations, a silent auction
and raffle, and a Native fashion show.
Winter SpanishMarket
December 1-2
More than 100 artists bring their
traditional Spanish colonial work to
the Santa Fe Community Convention
Center. The market is a special
source of authentic tinwork, retablos,
strawapplique and other historically
significant arts and crafts.
Las Posadas
mid-December
December 9
The annual re-enactment of the Holy
Family’s search for shelter features a
candlelight procession, acoustic guitar
and Spanish folk songs, devils on the
rooftops of the buildings surrounding the
Plaza, and cookies and hot cocoa in the
courtyard of the Palace of the Governors.
CanyonRoad
Christmas Eve Walk
December 24
Farolitos (candles in brown paper bags)
and luminarias (bonfires) light Canyon
Road and illuminate paths to galleries
and private homes. Hot cider, caroling,
dogs wearing antlers and kids in strollers
make this annual event one of the most
popular in Santa Fe.
The pueblos
Anumber of dances, feasts and
processions take place at Northern New
Mexico pueblos between mid-November
and early January. Visit http://santafe.
org/Visiting_Santa_Fe/Things_to_Do/
Indian_Pueblos/Eight_Northern_
Indian_Pueblos/ for a complete listing.
los esperamos | we’ll wait for you
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Inspired by Northern New Mexico and infused with local and
organically sourced ingredients, Chef Charles Dale’s new menu
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to create a new twist on Contemporary American Cuisine.
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