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THE CHAPEL HILL HERALD | CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2012

CIVIL
FROM THE FRONT PAGE

Wallace has more space to display his pieces now. The book’s 109 pages are mixed with civil rights stories written by Paul Dickson, and include a timeline of civil rights in Chapel Hill from the 2009 exhibit “I Raised My Hand to Volunteer.” The book’s photos show police stuffing movement leaders into a police car, activists gatherings in churches, arrests, angry Klan members and thousands singing at the 1963 March on Washington. The pages are filled with photos of Franklin Street marches, sit-ins, police dragging protesters and picketers holding signs displaying “2-4-6-8 who in the Hell wants to integrate” and “the customer is always white at Colonial’s Lunch Counter’s booths.” “The major newspapers didn’t do extensive coverage of these civil rights issues at the time,” said Wallace, who graduated from UNC in 1964 with a journalism major. “But the Tar Heel thought it was impor tant because students couldn’t eat where they wanted to. So, most of the coverage was done by student journalists at the Tar Heel.”

Wallace said DTH staffers were stringers for other media outlets like Newsweek. “We covered the movement more deeply because we felt it was the right thing to do,” he added. “Major papers would only run a two-inch column on arrests in Chapel Hill.” Wallace spent most of his undergraduate career on assignment for the DTH rather than in class. The movement in Chapel Hill aimed to encourage the passage of a public accommodation ordinance in Chapel Hill, which allowed equal access to public facilities for all people. Wallace said Harr y’s restaurant, which stood where Four Corners exists today, is where many of his photo stor y ideas formed. He writes in his book, “Unlike most other businesses in town, owners Harry and Sybil Macklin set examples by welcoming all races.” Inside of Harr y’s and local black churches, movement leaders would inform DTH staff of protest activities, marches or sit-ins. Wallace, who was The Daily Tar Heel’s only staff photographer at the time, said at first, movement

of course would welcome ability to walk into a resmore. taurant at Chapel Hill and CABJ Co-president Eliz- eat at the counter.” abeth Wan’gu said MonIn addition to spreading day’sRELEASE DATE—Sunday, February 12, 2012 event should be full awareness of 1960s activof stories about integration ists’ impact, Puzzle Los Angeles Times Sunday Crossword he plans to inEdited Carolinas. and Joyce Nicholshonor those who fought the by Rich Norris Lewis 89 Castaway’s “The public 16 Embarrassed for civil rights in the town. 119 Make the grade “KINDA, SORTA” 48 R&B-influenced 86 Not-so-subtle should confines 120 Pasty-faced By BONNIE L. flock genre performer 90 Vocal style that 121 Green-egg GENTRY managers? 50 How actorspeople had the 88 “Lost in expect good conversa“These mimics an layers 17 Almond-flavored should appear Translation” instrumental ACROSS liqueur 51 It’s opened go director Sofia tion 122 Autumn bloom and an opportunity courage toand out and, if solo 1 Involuntary jerk 123 Carpet layers 18 Kia minivans shut 89 Syr. neighbor 91 Had office hours 6 Put into words 24 Don’t hold 52 to learnwork on themChapel Hillin theyDumpster about couldn’t 90 San Diego-to-a get into 11 Amazon.com ID 92 Metal in 25 Good at one’s emanation Tijuana dir. Montana’s DOWN 15 Educational TV job 53 Sandcastle spot 91 Recoup at the history, and especially how restaurant, they would motto spots, perhaps 1 Forensic 30 Enzyme suffix 57 Fall colour casino 93 Hold a surprise intertwined with the some 60 In __: up the the door, take 19 Fail to recycle 32 Feature of it is evidence resist, block 93 DDE rival party for 20 Unappealing collector Mary Janes creek 94 Calvary letters Scorsese? music Ryan’s daughter 33 said. 61 Ratings giver 95 Ebert’s cohort events2 of today,” she LP player abuse from people cursing 97 Topiarist’s tools 3 Former Colt .45 34 Like an extra 21 Politician’s 63 Classic pops 96 Charlie Brown’s 99 Grant-providing 4 Directions pursuit eater Wallace agreed.36 sock Dynasty at 64 When, ingetII,arrested and them, Act 98 kite from org. detail: Abbr. 22 World-weary Qing Macbeth Far 100 Overwords 5 Court shoes, general of soliloquizes, their record, “I want to make people have it dagger“Is 101 friendly often on ...” Said too embellished 23 “Listen up, casually culinary fame this a 103 D.A.’s research Madrid!”? Org. the purpose of 65 Turn blue? 102 “Rubber that aware6 of with “Trick- 38 Stranded at some toatthis day, so Duckie” aides or-Treat” 26 You might draw O’Hare, 68 Room the Muppet show donation boxes one on a target 104 Take the the book,” he said. “I want perhaps hacienda Hanauma Bay people could105 site somedo on the Appropriated 27 Forest sticker 39 __-mo replay 69 Colombian Submitted photo road tell 7the story of Chapel thing as simple106 Caterer’s a 107 Dork 28 Banjo parts 8 Altoids 40 Exceed an capital to ascarriers buying Travelers’ 29 Corner-office infraction limit, 70 Bronx“Courage in the Moment: The Civil Rights Struggle, 109 options: Abbr. and how the move- Coke,” he said.107 “Curses!” 1961- Hill, 9 containers occupant Versatile in basketball Manhattan st. 111 Elevator 30 Last Olds Scrabble tile 41 73 Limo riders, 108 “If wishes __ 1964” is a collection of 100 photos of the civil rights move- ments such as (the Ultimatum innovator 31 Capable of 10 Agent ending often horses ...” public CABJ Public Relations 112 “My stocks are spontaneous 11 “There __ ‘I’ in 43 Provides 76 Mysterious 110 Capt. ment in Chapel Hill shot by Jim Wallacemovement, as was a down! My when he going accommodation move-for Chairman Johnny saluters ‘team’” personnel matters 112 Abbr. in old Ubristocks are going 12 Tres y tres cells 44 Like some retro 78 Faded in the dates photographer at The Daily Tar Heel. down!”? ment) spread and fostered 13 Baby baskets 33 Washington lamps stretch Issuer of Cardona said113 digitknows he nos. nine116 “__ we forget ...” 14 Unknown power 45 Display that’s figure 79 Peace Prize 35 “Let yourself in!” 117 “High Hopes” 15 Poet movement that both tasteful students are eager to learn city 114 Cleveland__, a national aNeruda lyricist 37 “... and that’sthe ownwith Nobel and 80 Vladimir’s villa OH leaders did not want phoWallacewhy I ate if of 118 Lingeringled to civil rights.” ostentatious? about Chapel Hill’s past. said all look Prize 83 Notches 115 Winery vessel tographers to attend their ers knew your favoriteviolence theire.g.? cookies,” Wallace, who is also a “We like to showcase 42 events or protests. “But could be “Give __ rest!” documented, member of the School of diversity in media in the 43 Arranges logically later, as we continued to they were less likely to Jour nalism’s board of journalism field,” he said. 46 Dirt clump 47 Dairy case publish [stories and pho- attack protesters. choice advisers, also hopes to “We feel like there are a 48 Concordes, tos] of the inequalities Wallacefamiliarly speak at a educate people who were number of minority stuwill 49 Bleachers level they were fighting against, free, public event 6 p.m. not alive to witness the dents who are doing great 50 Cinema name Give the they invited us,” said Wal- Monday52in theboot to Freedom movement. 53 NYC gallery things in journalism and district lace. “They came to under- Forum Conference Center 54 Certain alphabet “The younger genera- with Jim coming, we will stand that the photos were in Carroll opener Cain UNC’s tion often looks at photos tie in diversity and culture Hall 55 Whither on fled important to them, and so campus.56The event is co- and says things like, ‘I’ve with journalism, histor y A whole lot 58 “I don’t get it” 59 Carolina Assowere the photographers. hosted byDecide with always heard about things and the Chapel Hill commoney 62 Murmur If they were going to have ciation of Black Journalists like this, but I have never munity.” 63 At a minimum 66 Five-spot a sit-in in a restaurant, and UNC-Chapel Hill’s actually seen what they “Jour nalism is cur67 Put Armor All on they would let the Tar School of tires? TV Journalism and looked like,’” said Wallace. rent histor y,” said Wal71 Color pioneer Heel staf f know on the Mass Communication. “I hope one of the things lace. “Whatever you write 72 More-than-onehit Wonder side where they would be CABJ Co-President Jas- we aim at doing to give or photograph now will 74 Maestro’s gift 75 Fair-haired so that we could not only mine Nesi said they are them a feeling and appre- become histor y lessons 77 Cacophony 78 Put one’s feet cover it, but help prevent hoping forupabout 50 com- ciation for what their par- for students later. That’s 81 Carefree, in violence from restaurant munity members, faculty ents and grandparents did why we like it. That’s why Calais 82 Rip to attend, but owners.” and students asunder in order to give them the we do it.” 83 Dirty Harry’s
org. 84 Mount rising above the Vale of Tempe 85 Sailing hailings 87 Native Canadian 88 Toon collectibles

POSTS
FROM THE FRONT PAGE

2/12/12

xwordeditor@aol.com

Democrat along with Pelissier and Yuhasz, also said she plans to run for the board, and will challenge Yuhasz for his District 2 seat. Pelissier is running for an at-large seat. Pelissier, 61, grew up in New Jersey except for a short residency in Syria and has lived in Orange County for more than 35 years. She believes that during the past three and a half years while she was on the board, the commissioners have been successful in setting up the infrastructure for eco-

nomic development and has helped changed the perception in the county for the need for more economic development. The county was able to engage various partners, including the two school boards, to work toward improving plans for economic development in the county, Pelissier said. Pelissier added that to her, economic development doesn’t mean just tr ying to bring in light industr y and retail, but also means suppor ting agriculture in Orange County, she said. “Agriculture and farming is ver y impor tant,” Pelissier said.

Farming also preserves the r ural character of Orange County, she said. “I will continue to encourage a sense of common-cause community where all sectors of the county, rural and urban, cooperate towards achieving common community goals,” Pelissier said in a printed statement. Yuhasz, 60, also noted his work on economic development in the county. “The county is headed in a new direction with regards to economic development,” Yuhasz said. “That the biggest thing I’ve done. We’ve set the county in a new direction.” The county has also

maintained services with fewer people and without raising proper ty taxes, Yuhasz said. Pelissier came to Chapel Hill to study at UNC and received her doctorate in sociology in 1980. She specialized in evaluation of mental health programs in the community and in prison settings. Pelissier was chief of research at the Federal Correctional Institution in Butner and retired in 2006. During that time she was the project director for multi-center national projects evaluating drug treatment and sex offender programs. Pelissier has ser ved

on numerous boards and commissions, including the Orange County Planning Board, Commission for the Environment, Special Transit Advisory Committee, Shaping Orange C o u n t y F u t u r e Ta s k Force, the Carolina North Leadership Advisor y Council, and the Community Leadership Collaboration.

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

2/12/12

NOTICE
The Carrboro Board of Aldermen have canceled the meeting scheduled for February 14th, 2012.

Closet seeks formal wear
PITTSBORO — For the second year, Cinderella’s Closet will provide formal wear, make-up and prom accessories to Chatham County girls who could not otherwise attend prom. Girls in grades 11 and 12 in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools and Chatham County Public Schools will be referred by social workers for appointments on March 23 and 24 at Evergreen United Methodist Church, 11098 US 15 501 Hwy N Chapel Hill. Organizers are collecting prom accessories, formal dresses, and neveropened, sample-size makeup. For more information, contact Kathy Hotelling at (919) 265-3390 or email kathyhotelling@gmail.com.

THE HERALD-SUN | www.heraldsun.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 11:00AM -2:00PM

OPEN HOUSE

because you haven’t been to the dentist?
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FEELING GUILTY

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Diane Hourigan, DDS, PA

1002 E. Highway 54, Durham, NC 27713 • (919) 484-8518
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