Come on 1 or 6!

Level: Focus: Materials: All Grammar:
1

1

die

 cards

with base form of verbs ( see 7a)  noisemaker Student Grouping: Description: Procedure: 2 teams For students to recall and practice using forms of irregular verbs. 1. Cut up the 1a verb grid and put all the verb cards in a pile. 2. Review the following forms: base form/simple past/past participle/present participle. 3. Divide the class into 2 teams. 4. Model the game. 5. Select a student from each team. 6. Tell the students what forms the numbers on the die represent. See 1b. 7. Ask student A to roll the die and pick up a verb card. 8. The first student to create a sentence using the verb uses the noisemaker (bike bell, clapper) to stop the game. 9. The student shares his/her sentence. 10. Teacher determines if the sentence is correct and awards a point to that team. 11. If the sentence is incorrect, the other student gets a chance to produce a sentence. 12. Begin game with 1 student from each team.

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Come on 1 or 6!
become began break bring

1a
buy

eat

fall

hear

Lose

put

run

sell

fight

forget

make

draw

dream

drink

drive

do

find

feel

feed

fight

fly

get

give

grow

go

keep

have

hear

hit

hold

hurt

leave

let

lose

lend

cut

make

meet

catch

read

sleep

spend

tell

understand

write

win

wake

wear

throw

think

take

swim

tell

ride

draw

see

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Come on 1 or 6!
Structure represented by the number on the die. Sample #1

1b

1 2 3 4 5 6

Score 1 point Base form of verb Simple Past Past Participle Present Participle Score 1 point

Sample #2

1 2 3 4 5 6

Score 1 point past form of should present form of should present form of must (necessity) past form of must (necessity) Score 1 point

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

You're giving me a COMPLEX!
Level: Focus: Intermediate Grammar: Language Function:
a

2

Complex Sentences Attending expressions: Oh, really! Oh, you don’t say.
That’s interesting. Hmm hmm Is that so? You’re kidding!

Materials:

deck of playing cards  conjunction grid indicating what each suit represents ( see sample 2a)  grid with numbers and verbs (see sample 2a) 2 teams Two students representing 2 teams take turns creating complex sentences using clauses from each other's sentences. 1. Review the components of a Complex Sentence. 2. Review the conjunctions you want the students to use. 3. Divide the class into 2 teams. 4. Display the 2 grids you have created. (document reader/overhead) 5. Model the game using students. 6. Select one student from each team to come to the front of the class. 7. Student from Team A selects a card. The suit determines the conjunction to be used. 8. The number on the card determines the verb phrase to be used from verb phrase grid. Student A must make a complex sentence with the selected conjunction and verb phrase. 9. Student B then uses an attending expression and creates another complex sentence using a different conjunction and the new clause provided by Student A. Student A selects 8 of hearts from deck of cards. Therefore, looking at the sample conjunction grid he must create a sentence using a time conjunction. and verb phrase “do my homework. Example: Team A Student: Before I eat dinner, I always do my homework. Team B Student: Oh really, after I do my homework, I watch TV. Team A Student: Is that so, when I watch TV, I check the TV guide. 10. The students continue until they have produced 2 sentences each. 11. While the students are producing sentences, the members of either team can stop the game when they think an error has been made. 12. If no errors are made, both teams get a point. 13. Begin game with 1 student from each team.

Student Grouping: Description:

Procedure:

EXAMPLE:

Variation:

Different conjunctions and sentence types can be practiced. Example: coordinate conjunctions and compound sentences Number of conjunctions given for each type can be reduced.

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

You're giving me a COMPLEX!
Sample Conjunction Grid

2a

TIME

CAUSE & EFFECT

OPPOSITION

CONDITION

after before when while since until

because since now that as in order that so

although though even though whereas while

if unless only if whether or not even if in case (that)

Sample Verb Grid
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Jack Queen King Ace
take the bus lose weight pass the exam talk on the phone win the lottery be late for school find a wallet be homesick eat dinner visit the USA return home late do homework bake a cake kiss my ...

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Hmm, I wonder why...
Level: Focus: Intermediate and above

3

Grammar: Indirect Questions & Statements Language Function: Asking for & giving information Indirect Questions: Indirect Statements: Do you happen to know why...? Well, I have no idea why, but Can you tell me why...? I am not sure, but I think Do you know why...? Hmm, that`s a great question, I imagine…
 paper

Materials: Student Grouping:

3 teams: 2 teams to play 1 team acts as judges to choose the best answers The judges write indirect questions about something they've always wondered about, but do not know the answers to. Students from 2 teams make up creative answers to the questions. The judges select the best answer, and the team scores a point. 1. Review indirect questions and indirect statements. 2. Divide the class into 3 teams: 2 teams playing and 1 team judging 3. Ask the students in the judging team to write indirect questions about something they've always wondered about that they don't know the answers to. Encourage the students to be creative. Provide some examples. See examples below. 4. Model the game. 5. Select 1 player from each of the 2 playing teams. 6. One member of the judging team asks the 2 players one of the questions. 7. Each player confers with the members of their team and gives an answer. 8. The judges choose the best answer. 9. The student who gave the best answer throws a die to determine how many points the team gets. 10. Begin game with 1 student from each team. Could you tell us why the world is round? we yawn? water is blue? milk is white? you cry when you cut onions? we put candles on birthday cakes? turtles have shells? people fall in love? zebras have stripes? fish live in water? blood is red? we dream?

Description:

Procedure:

Sample Questions:

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Picture it!
Level: Focus: Materials: All Grammar: Any grammar structure
 paper 

4

to draw on & markers

timer

Student Grouping: Description:

3 teams First in groups students write sentences in target structure. Then students draw pictures of the sentences. 1. Review target grammar structure. 2. Divide class into teams. (minimum of 4 students on each team) 3. Model the game. 4. Select 1 student from each team. 5. Show the students a sentence containing the target structure. Example: I have just eaten a pizza. 6. Ask the students to return to their groups and draw pictures to elicit the sentence from their team members. The students who are drawing can`t speak or write. 7. Tell the class which structure the sentence contains. In this case it’s the PRESENT PERFECT. Ask student to guess what the sentence is, based on the picture. 8. Tell the students they have 3 minutes to draw and guess the sentence. 9. When a team thinks they have a correct answer, they stop the game by using a noisemaker and sharing their guess. If they are wrong, the game continues until the time is up. 10. When the time is up, each group shares their guesses and the teacher selects the closest answer. 11. Begin game with 1 student from each team.

Procedure:

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Come on! Give me a break!

5

Level: Focus:

Intermediate Grammar: Mustn’t prohibition Language Functions: stating prohibition responding to statements of prohibition Expressions: Are you kidding? Come on. Give me a break. No fair. Really? Honestly? Are you sure? Really? That’s news to me!
1 

Materials:

deck of cards for each group

grid showing what situation each suit represents

Student Grouping: Description: Procedure:

teams of 4 Students practice making and responding to statements with mustn’t. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Review modal of prohibition: mustn’t. Review expressions responding to prohibition. Divide the class into groups of 4. Model the game with 1 group. Display the card suit grid. See 5A Assign one student to be scorekeeper. One student selects a card from the deck. Example: 5 of spades Student must produce 5 statements with mustn’t that are appropriate to the situation spades represents (store) 9. The other 2 playing students respond with an appropriate statement. 10.The scorekeeper awards points as follows: The student producing the sentences gets 1 point for each correct statement. (the number of statements they need to produce is the number on the card) The scorekeeper at his discretion assigns 1 point to each of the other 2 players for their responses. 11. Begin game.

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Come on! Give me a Break!

5a

Sample #1

AIRPORT
Sample #2

WORK

CLASSROOM

STORE

HOME

DOCTOR’S PUBLIC OFFICE TRANSPORTATION

PARTY

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Grammar Wink!
Level: Focus: All levels Grammar: Language Function Expressions:

6

Verb tense: Have you ever… Asking for information; ending a conversation Wow, look at the time. I`ve got to go. It was nice talking with you. Well, see you. Take care! Sorry. I`ve got to run now. I have to leave now.

Materials: Student Grouping: Description:

1

deck of playing cards

Whole class Students mingle in the classroom asking each other questions in the target structure and completing a class survey. Amongst the students is a “murderer”. Conversation carries on as the murderer kills players one by one by catching their eye and winking at them. When a student is `killed` he must end the conversation and sit down. The person who correctly guesses who the “murderer” is wins. 1. Review the structure you want the students to practice. 2. Review expressions used to end a conversation. 3. From a deck of cards, sort out enough playing cards so that each student in the class gets a card. Make sure to include the Ace of Spades. 4. Distribute a card to each student telling them NOT show their cards to their classmates. 5. Tell the students to look at their cards. Tell the students that the student who has the Ace of Spades is the murderer. The murderer is going to kill each of the players by winking at them one by one. 6. Handout a copy of the survey to each student. See sample survey 6A. 7. Tell the students that while they are walking around, talking with their classmates and completing the survey, the murderer will wink at the students. 8. Tell the students when the `murderer` winks at them, they must end their conversation using an appropriate expression and sit down. 9. Whenever a student thinks they know who the murderer is, they use a noisemaker (bike bell, clapper) to stop and state their guess. 10. If they are incorrect, they must sit down. 11. The game continues until someone guesses who the “murderer” is or everyone is killed.

Procedure:

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Grammar Wink!
Samplle Cllass Surrvey Samp e C ass Su vey

6a

Find someone who has… 1. drunk champagne 2. taken a limousine 3. broken a leg/arm 4. had a hangover 5. won a prize 6. lost keys 7. baked a cake 8. never told a lie 9. been to Africa 10. lost their temper 11. been in a hospital 12. broken a promise 13. kept a diary 14. gone to Europe 15. met someone famous
Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

Student’s Name

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Yeah, right! As if!
Level: Focus:

7

Advanced Grammar: Subjunctive Verbs: ask/command/demand/insist/propose/recommend/request/suggest + that Expressions: It is desirable/essential/important/necessary/vital + that Language Functions: expressing requests/commands/suggestions Agreeing/disagreeing Agreeing: Well, ok. (if you insist) Disagreeing: What? Are you kidding? I guess so. Yeah, right! As if! Ok. (This time only!) Nope, not going to happen. Certainly/Of course No, I’m sorry. Yes, sir/ma’am. Absolutely not!
1

Materials: Student Grouping: Description:

deck of playing cards

2 teams Students give commands/make suggestions/requests which are appropriate to the situation. Students respond to the commands/suggestions/requests. If the response is grammatically correct and appropriate, they respond with an expression of agreement. If the response is incorrect, they respond with an expression of disagreement. 1. Review the subjunctive. 2. Review expressions used to agree and disagree. 3. Divide the class into 2 teams. 4. Display what situation each suit represents. See 7a. 5. Model the game. 6. Select 1 student from each team to come to the front of the class. 7. Ask one student to pick a card from a deck of cards. 8. Ask the student to give a command/suggestion/request appropriate to that situation. 9. Tell the other student if the statement is grammatically correct and appropriate, he should respond by using an expression of agreement. If the command is not grammatically correct and or appropriate he should respond by using an expression of disagreement. Student A selects a card: Example: It’s a spade. = retail situation Student A says: I insist that the manger give me a refund. Student B agrees or disagrees. (He should agree because the statement is grammatically correct and appropriate. 10. It is possible for each member of the team to score a point. 11. Begin game with 1 student from each team.

Procedure:

Example:

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Yeah, right! As if!
Sample:

7a

FAMILY WORK FRIENDS RETAIL

SCHOOL/ WORK

SOCIAL EVENT

SPORTS/ RECREATION

PUBLIC PLACES

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Can I come, too?
What's the connection?

8

Level: Focus: Language Functions:

Intermediate Grammar: "going to" and "will" expressing intentions/offers & accepting/refusing Accepting: Of course. Certainly. That would be great. Sure, absolutely! Refusing: I’m afraid not! Sorry! No! I’m sorry. I don’t think so.

Description: Procedure:

Students must guess what a list of items have in common. 1. Review the uses of "going to" for stating plans or intentions and "will for offers. 2. Review expressions for accepting and refusing. 3. Model the game. Teacher thinks of items that have something in common. Example: things that are red 4. Teacher says to the class: Next weekend, I am going to go to Niagara Falls, and I'm going to take some strawberries. 5. Teacher asks each student "What about you? Student 1 says: I'll bring … Can (may) I come? If the item is red, teacher says: Yes! Of course! If the item is NOT red, teacher says, I’m sorry, you can't come. 6. Each student continues offering until one student guesses what all the items have in common. 7. The student who guesses correctly starts a new game. The teacher can provide some suggestions to the student who starts the new game. 1. items that have the same number of syllables 2. items that are the same color 3. items that begin/end with the same letter 4. items that begin with the same letter as the name of the student conducting the game 5. items that have double letters 6. count/non-count items 7. items that are made of the same materials: glass/metal/wood/gold 8. items of the same category: fruits/vegetables/animals/clothing/objects in a home/objects found in a classroom 9. items that are the same shape: round/flat/square 10. same number of letters in the word

Suggestions:

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Tic Tac Toe!
Level: Focus: Materials: Student Grouping: Description: Procedure: All Grammar: All
a

9

grid with 9 squares

2 teams Students review grammar structures to play Tic Tac Toe. 1. Review a grammar structure. See 9A for samples. 2. Display a Tic Tac Toe grid with a grammar structure in each square. 3. Divide the class into 2 teams, designating one as Team X and the other as Team O. 4. Have each team choose a captain. 5. Toss a coin to determine which team goes first. 6. The team selects a square and works together to produce a grammatically correct sentence using the structure from the chosen square. The captain informs the teacher when the team has a sentence. The captain chooses one of his teammates to write the sentence on the board. 7. The student writing the sentence on the board can not talk to his teammate while he/she is writing the sentence on the board. 8. The opposing team looks at the sentence and decides if it is correct. If it is correct, the team that wrote the sentence wins that square by marking it with their team letter, X or O. If it is incorrect, the opposing team wins that square if they can tell the teacher why it is incorrect. 9. Repeat. The first team to get 3 letters in a row wins.

Variation:

Human Tic Tac Toe: Place nine chairs in a TIC TAC TOE formation in the centre of the classroom. Play as above; however, instead of marking the squares with an X or O on the board. Have students sit in the chairs. Students cross their arms in front of them for X`s and make a circle with theirs arms for O`s.

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Tic Tac Toe!
Sample #1: Reviewing Verb Tense: Past Perfect
come hit watch

9a

eat

laugh

sleep

clean

make

read

Sample # 2: Reviewing Modals
past form of should past of must deduction present of must deduction present of should

past form of must necessity

past negative of must deduction

past of could possibility

must prohibition

present of might

Sample #3: Reviewing Time Expressions
many years ago some day soon

since I was a child

for many years

usually

right now

next week

recently

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Board Games!
Level: Focus: Materials: Student Grouping: Description: Procedure: All Grammar: All
 Board

10

Games 10a, 10b, 10c, 10d, 10e, 10f, 10g

teams of 4 Students review grammar structures by playing a board game. 1. Review the grammar structure appropriate to the board game. 2. Form groups of 4 consisting of 3 players and 1 scorekeeper. 3. Ask each player to place a coin on the START SPACE. 4. The order of players is determined by the denomination on their coin. The smallest goes first, then the second smallest goes 2nd etc. 5. Player #1 rolls the die and moves his/her coin the number of spaces shown on the die. 6. Player 1 follows the instructions on the space. 7. Scorekeeper will award each correct answer 1 point. No points are given for moving forward or backwards. 8. Players take turns rolling the die and moving. 9. The game is over when 1 player reaches the FINISH space. The player with the most points is the winner.

Grammar Games: Developing Learner Independence & Excellence TESOL 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

©TIna Intini & Irene McKay George Brown College, Toronto, Ont.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful