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From: LIVENGOOD.MIKE@A1GW.GENE.

COM (Mike Livengood)


Subject: Lesson: Soloing basics
We've all been there...you're jammin' with some dudes and in the middle
of the
tune the bass player gives you the nod to take your solo. What do you do?
Every moment you wait makes you look like more of an amateur. Quick, what
key
am I in? What are the chord changes? What scale? What mode? What's my
name?
What's the capital of South Dakota? Damn...damn...damn!
Well, let's make sure this never happens by preparing ourselves with
today's
lesson:
Soloing basics.
A few notes before we start.
If you have not mastered the art of note bending, slides, pull-offs and
hammer-ons, you will probably have a difficult time with some of the
topics
discussed here. But read on anyway.
I happen to have a personal disdain for the pentatonic scale. So while I
will
not dissuade anyone from using it nor dispute its usefulness, I will not
be
discussing it here.
Let's say that your makeshift band is jammin' on a simple three chord
warm up
progression, Dm-C-Bb-C.
It's your turn to solo and what are you going to do?
Based on the chord progression, we'll pick D minor as our soloing key of
choice.
I have always had luck memorizing a particular pattern and moving it
around
depending on the key. Here is the one that I use most and can use in any
key
major or minor. Here it is in our Dm position:
Pattern 1
E---l---l---l---l-x-l-x-l---l-x-l---l-r-l
B---l---l---l---l-x-l-R-l---l-x-l---l---l
G---l---l---l---l-x-l---l-r-l---l---l---l
D---l---l---l---l-x-l---l-x-l-x-l---l---l
A---l---l---l---l-r-l---l-x-l-R-l---l---l
E---l---l---l---l-x-l-x-l---l-x-l---l---l
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
The RR'sS represent the root of the major key (F) and the Rr'sS represent
the

root in the minor key (D).


Technically I suppose you could call this an F major scale in phrygian
mode
(beginning on the third, A). But I really don't. It's just a particular
set of
finger placements that are comfortable and reliable for soloing. Since
when I
solo I will be stressing the notes of the major and minor, the A phrygian
is
just a coincidence.
OK. Now we've got a scale to use. Notice that this scale contains all the
notes of the chords being played. Like so:
D minor scale
Dm chord
C chord
Bb chord

D-E-F-G-A-Bb-C
D-F-A
C-E-G
Bb-D-F

Now when we solo (which you will remember is supposed to be a story


within a
story, not just a bunch of licks) we can really play any note in the
scale and
it will fit. It won't always sound good, but it will fit in some way.
Here are two more positions of the same scale.
Pattern 2
(F major scale)
E---l---l-x-l---l-x-l-x-l---l---l---l---l
B---l---l-r-l---l-x-l-R-l---l---l---l---l
G---l-x-l-x-l---l-x-l---l---l---l---l---l
D---l-x-l-R-l---l-x-l---l---l---l---l---l
A-x-l---l-x-l---l-r-l---l---l---l---l---l
E-R-l---l-x-l---l-x-l---l---l---l---l---l
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Pattern 3
(D minor scale)
E---l---l---l(x)l---l-x-l-R-l---l-x-l---l
B---l---l---l(x)l-x-l---l-x-l---l-r-l---l
G---l---l---l-R-l---l-x-l---l-x-l---l---l
D---l---l---l-x-l---l-r-l---l-x-l---l---l
A---l---l---l-x-l---l-x-l-x-l---l---l---l
E---l---l---l-r-l---l-x-l-R-l---l---l---l
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16
(x) alternative fingerings to use if you want to stay in one position.
Notice that this is the D minor scale and that the D minor pentatonic
scale is
contained within this scale. Where did you think the pentatonic it came
from?
If you link patterns 1, 2 and 3 together starting with the F on the E
string
1st fret (pattern 2) you can move up and down the fretboard all the way
to the

24th fret (if you have one) without leaving the patterns. Like this: (In
TAB
form)
E------------------------------------8-10-12--l
B---------------------------5-6-8/10----------l
G-------------------2/3-5-7-------------------l
D-------------2-3-5---------------------------l
A-------1-3-5---------------------------------l
E-1-3-5---------------------------------------l
E-13-12-10----------------------------13-15-17/18-l
B----------13-11-10----------13-15-17-------------l
G-------------------10-12-14----------------------l
D-------------------------------------------------l
A-------------------------------------------------l
E-------------------------------------------------l
E--20-18-17----------------------------18-20-22/24l
B-----------20-18-17----------18-20-22------------l
G--------------------19-17-19---------------------l
D-------------------------------------------------l
A-------------------------------------------------l
E-------------------------------------------------l
Try playing this slowly and smoothly hammering-on each ascending note,
pulling-off each descending note, and sliding where notated. Stop at 20
if
you don't have the upper frets, or if you get tired.
Now, the nice thing about remembering patterns is that the pattern works
for
any key; just change the position. Pattern 1 above starts on the third of
the
major scale. (remember it's only a pattern, not a phrygian scale). So the
starting points on the low E string that I remember are:
C
D
E
F
G
A

major/A minor
major/B minor
major/C# minor
major/D minor
major/E minor
major/F# minor

open
2nd fret
4th fret
5th fret (as above)
7th fret
9th fret

We can find a few licks within each pattern that we can use to augment
our
solos. Like these:
Dm
E-----5-6-8-6-5---5-------l-8-----5--8-----5-8-10-l
B----6---------8-6--8-6-5-l--6---6----6---6-------l
G---7---------------------l---5-7------5-7--------l
D-------------------------l-----------------------l
A-------------------------l-----------------------l
E-------------------------l-----------------------l

E---------------------------5---5-6-5-6-8-6-8/10--l
B----------5--5-6-5-6-8-6-8---8-------------------l
G----7-5-7--7-------------------------------------l
D-------------------------------------------------l
A-------------------------------------------------l
E-------------------------------------------------l
Also notice as we put the patterns together and complete the major scale
up
the neck that the chords for the tune we're playing become available for
licks. Like this:
Dm
E-5--------13-10-----l
B--6-------------10--l
G---7----------------l
D----7---------------l
A-----5--------------l
E--------------------l
C
E-8--------15-12-----l
B--8-------------13--l
G---9----------------l
D----10--------------l
A-----10-------------l
E-------8------------l
Bb
E-10-------13-10-----l
B--11------------11--l
G---10---------------l
D-----8--------------l
A--------------------l
E--------------------l
We can use these triads in our solos to really accentuate the chords and
pull-off the triads in kind of a "Hotel California" "Sultans of Swing"
solo
kind of thing.
Find a pattern that you like and that feels comfortable for your fingers
and
playing style. Then play it a thousand times. Have a friend play the
chords
over and over and try it out. Or play along with a tune in each key.
Well, this should get you started on soloing in the major and minor keys.
I'll
continue more lessons later.
Any additions? Post 'em and we can discuss them.
M.L.

Soloing basics part II


OK...For those who missed part 1 we discussed soloing in major and minor
keys
and used a Dm-C-Bb-C progression as a starting point.
Let's delve into this enigma of soloing a little more and find out how to
do
it...shall we?
The easiest solo:
The easiest solo is one note...that's it. Now, a one note solo may state
a
particular emotion that fits the tune, but it does not state an awful
lot. I
suppose the second easiest solo would be two notes, followed by more
notes.
By the way the solo to "I wanna be sedated" by the Ramones is just eighth
notes of one tone....and hey, it works.
But if you have a chord change under your one tone (eighth notes or
whatever)
now you have developed an implied note change even though you are still
playing the same note. Let's see why.
In the Ramones tune the chord changes are E-A-B in quarter note strums,
each
chord being one measure (real fast tempo though). The solo is eighth note
open
high E's. When the solo starts it is playing the tonic (E) which gives a
particular consonant sound when played with the chord E. When the chord
changes to the A, the solo is now playing the 5th of the chord (still an
E)
which is another harmonious, albeit different tonal relationship from the
first note. Now the chord changes to B and the solo is playing the 4th of
the
chord (still E), another consonant tone. The note E is not in the B major
chord (B-D-F#), but the perfect 4th is still effective.
So what we have found is that your solo is a relationship between the
solo
notes you are playing and the chords that the rest of the band is
playing.
Hmmm...now you really don't want to be playing just a bunch of licks.
What about speed players? They can't sit around and wait for the rest of
the
band to catch up with their solo notes, so they must analyze specific
notes
or groups of notes in relation to the underlying chords. One way is to
think
about only the first and last note of a scalar passage, however long it
is.
Assuming we're playing in the proper key the notes will be alright, but
if

we're playing pretty fast the listener can't really discern them anyway,
but
they will the last note. This note is where you were going with that
scalar
run; your destination. How you got there (fast or slow) is not important,
this is the statement you wanted to make. This brings us to:
Resolutions
When listening to a piece of music, the ear always wants to return to a
stable
place. This place is either the tonic (root) of the piece, or the tonic
of the
underlying chord. This "return" is called its resolution. A flurry of
notes
that don't adequately resolve, while technically impressive, leave the
listener uncomfortably misdirected.
In our previous example using a Dm-C-Bb-C chord progression, the
listener's
ear will always want the solo sequence to return to the D note. Not only
that,
the return (or resolution) should be on the beat. There is also
resolution to
the underlying chord. So if you resolve to the C when the C major chord
is
playing, there is resolution. However when the chord then changes to he
Bb,
the resolution is lost.
Playing in a minor pentatonic scale over a I-IV-V progression yields many
opportunities for resolution. This is because of the notes in the scale,
(root, m3, p4, p5, m7) three of them resolve to the underlying chords,
and
the others resolve with a small bend. This is one of the reasons the
pentatonic scale is so easy to use.
Now that we have established that rule...break it. Play a little solo
melody
and leave it unresolved. Go ahead, rules are meant to be broken. Resolve
to
the "C" while the tune is still on the Dm, but hold it until the band
catches
up.
Let's get really wild and play notes that are not in the scale! Let's add
passing tones to our scales like this:
Play real fast in Dm
Pick the asterisked notes and pull-off the rest.
*
*
*
*
*
*
E--8-6-5-6-5---6------------------------B------------8---8-6-8-6-5-6-5---5------G------------------------------7---7-6-5D---------------------------------------A---------------------------------------E----------------------------------------

Notice the passing tone inserted between the "D" and the final "C" note?
This
lick resolves to the C, however, if you hold the C for a moment and then
hammer-on or slide to the D at the seventh fret, we have a nice
resolution to
the tonic.
Remember that your main goals in soloing are:
1
2
3
4

Entertain the listener


Add to the song
Take the song someplace that the lyrics can't
Reinforce the melody or chord structure

Listen to some of your favorite solos and pick out the resolutions. They
will be very obvious as you listen to each tune. Listen also to those
spots
where resolution is delayed, or not there.
If you have a recording of Yngwie's first album with Alcatrazz, check out
the
way he incorporates speed with resolution.
For kicks also listen to "The Four Seasons" by Vivaldi and pick out the
resolutions in the melody, or try "La Gazza ladra" (The Thieving Magpie)
by
Rossini.
For blues scale resolution, check out David Gilmour's solo in Comfortably
Numb from The Wall.
OK...that resolves that. I hope this helps in your melody writing and
soloing.
Any comments or additions are welcome.
Sorry if I got a little wordy.

M.L.

Subject: Lesson: Soloing Basics III (Harmonizing)


Here is the third in a series on Soloing Basics.
I'm sure you are all tearing up the fretboard now and are in no need of
any
more instruction, however since this is a free Internet I will submit
today's
lesson on: Dum-da-da-dum...
Harmonizing:
One of the things that is a side effect of the shredding movement is the
single
note solo thing. Don't feel bad...Almost all my live solos are single
note runs
and I seem to get along fine. However when I do plan ahead a little and
add
some harmony (either with another guitarist or myself or a prerecorded
track)
my solos and melodies really evolve.
Let's look at what harmony is. The dictionary says that harmony is "...A
combination of musical sounds considered to be pleasing." So what we get
from
this is that to have harmony we must have more than one sound. Well, we
already
have that, because the rest of the band is playing stuff that we are
harmonizing with...well hopefully...but I'm not considering that. I'm
talking
about harmonized melody lines.
The easiest type of harmony to do between two guitarists (or vocalists or
whatever) is in unison. Each instrument plays the same melody in the same
pitch. This can be a really nice effect, especially if the two
instruments
have complimentary tones. A chorus effect pedal kind of does this.
The next type of harmony would be octaves. Each instrument plays the same
melody but one plays it an octave higher. Octave divider pedals can do
this
too. However it usually sounds better when two separate instruments
perform it.
When harmonizing in octaves (or fourths or fifths) the melody stays
exactly the
same because the intervals are all perfect (neither major nor minor).
The real type of harmonizing I'm getting at is harmonizing in thirds.
When
harmonizing in thirds the melody changes because of the changing major
and
minor intervals in the melody. Just to get started let me run through a
quick
example:
Here I am harmonizing a descending A-minor scale in thirds:

Root (Am)
A G F E D C B A G F E D C B A
E-----------------------------------B-10-8-6----------------------------G---------9-7-5---------------------D----------------9-7-5--------------A-----------------------8-7-5-------E------------------------------8-7-5Up a third (C)
C B A G F E D C B A G F E D C
E--8-7-5----------------------------B---------8-6-5---------------------G----------------7-5-4--------------D-----------------------7-5-3-------A------------------------------7-5-3E-----------------------------------Harmonized
E--8-7-5-----------------------------B-10-8-6--8-6-5----------------------G---------9-7-5--7-5-4---------------D----------------9-7-5--7-5-3--------A-----------------------8-7-5--7-5-3-E------------------------------8-7-5-Notice how the intervals change? This is the tricky part of harmonizing
in
thirds. In the above example the intervals are:
A-C
B-D
C-E
D-F
E-G
G-B

m3
m3
M3
m3
m3
M3

So how did I figure this out you ask? Well, let's take a look.
Admittedly harmonizing in Am is pretty easy; no accidentals to worry
about.
But we'll use it to get started.
We know what a third is, right? It is an interval of either three
semitones
(minor third, 3 frets) or four semitones (Major third, 4 frets). Thirds
are
very instrumental in chord construction, as you know from the other
lessons we
have been through (did we all do our homework?)
We know that the interval between two adjacent strings on the guitar is a

fourth, or a M3 between the G


a
note on the low E string (say
string
(A string) one fret back (4th
One
more fret back (3rd fret...C)

and B strings. So to find the third up from


A at the fifth fret)...we go to the next
fret...C#). This gives us our major third.
gives us our minor third. Like this:

E---]---]---]---]---]---]--B---]---]---]---]---]---]--G---]---]---]---]---]---]--D---]---]---]---]---]---]--A---]---]-C-]-C#]---]---]--E---]---]---]---]-A-]---]--^
^
^
m3 M3 R
Also:
E---]---]---]---]---]---]--B-C-]-C#]---]---]---]---]--G---]-A-]---]---]---]---]--D---]---]---]---]---]---]--A---]---]---]---]---]---]--E---]---]---]---]---]---]--So, to figure out what the harmony is, just count up three notes in the
scale
to find the third. In keys other than C-Am we have to make sure that the
proper
notes are sharped and or flatted.
If you have two guitarists it will take a while to work out the proper
harmony
lines, but it is well worth the effort.
Another trick is to slowly play a scale and have another guitarist play
the
same scale but start on the first note when when you get to the third
note.
Try this with a digital delay too.
Here is a descending D major scale with the harmony up a third:
E-14--12--10--9---7--5--3--2--0---B-15--14--12--10--8--7--5--3--2--3G--------------------------------4D---------------------------------A---------------------------------E---------------------------------Another way to harmonize is to play harmonizing melodies. Two different
melodies that share common tones. Try playing an ascending A minor scale
at a
slow tempo, and have another guitarist play a descending A minor scale.
This
will give the following harmonic intervals:
A-A
B-G

Octave
m6

C-F
D-E
E-D
F-C
G-B
A-A

P4
M2
m7 (inverted)
P5 (inverted)
M3 (inverted)
Octave

As you dick around with these things you will find a lot of Allman
Brothers,
Night Ranger, Queensryche, Eagles, Thin Lizzy, Bach, Mozart, Vivaldi
etc...
If you have two guitarists try this lick. Or try recording part A
playing
part B over it.

and

The lick is a two-hand-tapped triad. Part A is a G major (G-B-D-G) and


Part B
is up a third Bm (B-D-F#-B).
Hammer on the first three notes and tap the fourth note at the 12th fret.
Part A (G major)
E-----------------------B-----------------------G--0--4--7--12--7--4--0-D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Part B (Bm)
E-----------------------B--0--3--7--12--7--3--0-G-----------------------D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Play this a few times then change to Gmaj7 and Bm7
Part A (Gmaj7)
E-----------------------B-----------------------G--0--4--7--11--7--4--0-D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Part B (Bm7)
E-----------------------B--0--3--7--10--7--3--0-G-----------------------D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Or to Em and G major

Part A (Em)
E-----------------------B-----------------------G--0--4--9--12--9--4--0-D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Part B (G major)
E-----------------------B--0--3--8--12--8--3--0-G-----------------------D-----------------------A-----------------------E-----------------------Whee! Fun stuff.
So the trick to harmonizing is knowing your scales and key signatures.
After
that it's a snap to harmonize.
I do recommend typing up a fretboard graphic just to make sure that you
have
the notes right, it saves a lot of time.
Here's one.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14
E--F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]
B--C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]
G--G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]
D--D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]
A--A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]
E--F-]-F#]-G-]-G#]-A-]-A#]-B-]-C-]-C#]-D-]-D#]-E-]-F-]-F#]
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14
Hope you enjoyed this lesson. Stay tuned for my next one.
M.L.

Subject: LESSON: Soloing Basics IV [Arpeggios]


Today's lesson revolves around an oft misunderstood entity known
as...the arpeggio. The first quesion that pops into everyone's mind at
the mention of this enigmatic term is, "What's an arpeggio?" The fact
that it sounds like a type of pasta does not diminish in the least its
tremendous usefullness in the world of soloing.
What's an arpeggio?
An arpeggio is essentially a chord that is played one note at a time.
Simple as that. See, this isn't so tough. If we analyze this to the nth
degree we can say that a strum is also a chord played one note at a
time...just with very little time between each note. My response to this
is that if the time interval between the notes does not fall to within a
quantized amount (16th note, 32nd note, 64th note etc) then we call it a
strum. You can differ on that point if you like...but let's continue.
Let's start with some examples of easy arpeggios to get a better idea of
what one is. Here are a few in TAB form:
D major
E--2------B----3----G------2--D--------0A---------E---------A minor
E--0---------B----1-------G------2-----D--------2---A----------0-E------------Bm7
E--2--------B----3------G------2----D--------4--A----------2E-----------E major
E---------4B-------5--G-----4----D---6------A-7--------E-----------

Em7/11 (I didn't say they had to difficult)

E-----------0-B---------0---G-------0-----D-----0-------A---0---------E-0-----------Am13
E-------------7B---------5-6--G-------5------D-----5--------A---5----------E-5------------The current shredding movement has made the use of arpeggios seem a
daunting task. What with full 6 and 7 note arpeggios played with a
single sweep at blazing speed. But we needn't think of arpeggios in
these terms. Arpeggios can be played slowly and deliberately to make a
wonderful statement and outline the underlying chords. Arpeggios can
also be just a few notes. A simple triad arpeggiated during a solo can
be most effective and can really help soloists get away from the
diatonic or pentatonic scale runs. Compare two descending runs:
Fast descending pentatonic run (triplets over eighth notes)
Am
E
1
+
2
+
3
+
4
+
1
E--8-5---5-----------------------------------------]--B------8---8-5-8-5---5-----------------------------]--G------------------7---7-5-7-5---5-----------------]--D------------------------------7---7-5-7-5---5-----]--A------------------------------------------7---7-5-]-7E--------------------------------------------------]---

Apeggiated Chords
Am
Am7
Amsus4
E
1
2
+
3
+
4
+
1
E---8----8--5--------------------------------]---B--------------5-----8--5--------------------]---G-----------------5--------5-----7--5--------]---D-----------------------------7--------7-----]---A-----------------------------------------5--]-7-E--------------------------------------------]---C
C A E C G E C A D C A D
E
Now both
third of
heard in
It makes

these examples are totally useful. Each starts high on the


the scale (C) and ends on the fifth (E). The first one has been
a thousand tunes and is in every blues/rock players repertoire.
a statement of speed and destination..."I'm up, and I'm showing

you how fast I can get down..."


The second example uses an arpeggiated A minor chord with a few
variations. It is played more slowly so that the sound of the underlying
A minor chord may be heard, and therefore complimented.
Notice how an arpeggio is just a scale with some of the notes missing?
Hey...good for you. Just like a chord is made up of selected notes from
the scale (Root, third, fifth, seventh etc...) So an arpeggio will just
be selected notes from a scale too.
In fact...look at the example of the arpeggio for the Am13 chord above.
Can you see the scale for that chord? That's right...it's:
A--B--C--D---E--F---G
r--9--3--11--5--13--7
(2)
(4)
(6)
remember that 9=2, 11=4 & 13=6.
So just playing an A minor scale is arpeggiating an Am13 chord!
Let's look at a few more arpeggios.
An obvious arpeggio sequence would be the opening chords to Stairway to
Heaven. We all know it but I'll write it out anyway for example.
(Actually I stole from the NET this morning)
Am
*Am
C
Bm7
Fmaj7
E-------5-7-----7-|-8-----8-2-----2-|-0---------0-----|----------------|
B-----5-----5-----|---5-------3-----|---1---1-----1---|-0-1-1----------|
G---5---------5---|-----5-------2---|-----2---------2-|-0-2-2----------|
D-7-------6-------|-5-------4-------|-3---------------|----------------|
A-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|-2-0-0---0--/8-7|
E-----------------|-----------------|-----------------|----------------|
*Am= Am/maj7add9
A good soloing example is in David Gilmour's solo in "Mother" from "The
Wall". The final line of the solo is a Gsus4 kind of arpeggio that goes:
E--8-7-8-7--------------B----------8------------G------------7----------D--------------10-9-----A-------------------10--E-----------------------C B C B G D C B G
Another example is in Mark Knopfler's first solo in Sultans of Swing.
(Selected arpeggios)

A
Dm
C
E-------5--9--12b(13)--]--10-----------]-/13-12--------------------]
B-----5----------------]-----10--------]--------13-----------13-13-]
G---6------------------]--------10-----]-----------12--14p12-------]
D-7--------------------]-----------12--]---------------------------]
A----------------------]---------------]---------------------------]
E----------------------]---------------]---------------------------]
Bb
C
E----------------]---------------]
B-----3--6--3----]-----5--6/8-6--]
G---3------------]---5-----------]
D-3--------------]-5-------------]
A----------------]---------------]
E----------------]---------------]
And of course his arpeggios from the outro solo
Dm
Bb
C
E--13p10----10--]--13p10----10--]--15p12----12--]
B--------10-----]--------11-----]--------13-----]
G---------------]---------------]---------------]
D---------------]---------------]---------------]
A---------------]---------------]---------------]
E---------------]---------------]---------------]
Here are a few more examples of arpeggiated chords.
() = an optional note
Dm7

(D-F-A-C)

E----------5--8--5----------B--------6---------6--------G--(5)-7--------------7-(5)-D---------------------------A---------------------------E----------------------------

Emaj7 (E-G#-B-D#)

tp
E----------4--(7)--(12)-B--------4--------------G------4----------------D----6------------------A--7--------------------E------------------------

Asus4 (A-C#-E-D) or (Aadd11)


E----------------B--15p14---------G--------14------D-----------14---A--------------12E----------------Dadd9 (D-F#-A-E)
tp
E---------5--(10)-B-------7---------G-----9-----------D---7-------------A-5---------------E-----------------D minor (D-F-A)
E--5h6p5--------B--------6------G----------5/7--D---------------A---------------E----------------

(play Bb as grace note)

Arpeggios don't have to be played on different strings. In fact a good


example of single string arpeggios would be the final tapping sequence
in Eruption.
Here Eddie just plays a series of arpeggiated triads
C# minor
A major
D#dim
B major
E---------]----------]----------]----------]
B--2^5^9--]--2^5^10--]--4^7^10--]--4^7^12--]
G---------]----------]----------]----------]
D---------]----------]----------]----------]
A---------]----------]----------]----------]
E---------]----------]----------]----------]
C# E G#
C# E A
D# F# A
D# F# B
E major
C major
Em7
D major
E-----------]----------]----------]----------]-B--5^9^12---]--5^8^13--]--5^8^15--]--7^10^15-]-G-----------]----------]----------]----------]-D-----------]----------]----------]----------]-A-----------]----------]----------]----------]-E-----------]----------]----------]----------]-E G# B
E G C
E G D
F# A
F#m7
E major
Em7
E-----------]----------]----------]----------]-B--7^10^17--]-9^12^17--]-12^15^17-]-..etc...-]-G-----------]----------]----------]----------]-D-----------]----------]----------]----------]-A-----------]----------]----------]----------]-E-----------]----------]----------]----------]--

F# A E

G# B E

B D E

As your playing gets more complex, so too can more intricate arpeggios
be worked into your solos. Here are a few: (Try playing them forwards
and backwards) (Try modifying them with altered notes to make new
chords).

Am
E---------------------8-12--]
B-----------------10--------]
G-----------5--9------------]
D---------7-----------------]
A-------7-------------------]
E-0-5-8---------------------]
E A C E A C E A
C E
E7
E------------11-]
B--------12-----]
G---------------]
D---------------]
A----11---------]
E-12------------]
E G# B
D
C6/9b5
E----------------]
B----------10-12-]
G-------11-------]
D----14----------]
A-15-------------]
E----------------]
C E Gb A B
E9
E----------------]
B----------3--7--]
G-------4--------]
D----6-----------]
A-7--------------]
E----------------]
So there you have it. See, that wasn't such a chore. Notice that we
haven't even touched the myriad of arpeggios available in classical
music. But check them out for your own research.
Figure out your own arpeggios and try them. Just take the chord formula

that you want to arpeggiate and figure out a way to finger it.