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Decision Making Questionnaire

Please show how often each of the following applies to you by circling the number that you think applies. 1=very infrequently or never, 2=infrequently, 3=quite infrequently, 4=quite frequently, 5=frequently, 6=very frequently or always.
Very infrequently or never Very frequently or always

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Do you enjoy making decisions? Do you rely on gut feelings when making decisions? Do you like to consult with others? Do you stick by your decisions come what may? When you find one option that will just about do, do you leave it at that? Do you remain calm when you have to make decisions very quickly? Do you feel in control of things? How often are your decision governed by your ideals regardless of practical difficulties? Do you make decisions without considering all of the implications? Do you change your mind about things? Do you take the safe option if there is one? Do you prefer to avoid making decisions if you can? Do you plan well ahead? When making decisions do you find yourself favouring first one option then another? Do you carry on looking for something better even if you have found a course of action that is just about OK? Do you find it difficult to think clearly when you have to decide something in a hurry? Do you make up your own mind about things regardless of what others think? Do you avoid taking advice over decisions? Do you work out all the pros and cons before making a decision? In your decision making how often are practicalities more important than principles? Is your decision making a deliberate logical process?

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

1. 2. 3.

Scoring System Score 'very infrequently'=1 to 'very frequently'=6 for items: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21. Score 'very infrequently'=6 to 'very frequently'=1 for items: 3, 5, 9, 12, 16, 20. Compute scale scores as follows: Thoroughness=Q9+Q13+Q19+Q21 Control=Q1+Q6+Q7+Q12+Q16 Hesitancy=Q10+Q11+Q14 Social resistance=Q3+Q17+Q18 Optimising=Q5+Q15 Principled=Q8+Q20 Instinctiveness=Q2+Q4

Ergonomics. 1993 Jun;36(6):627-44

Decision-making style, driving style, and self-reported involvement in road traffic accidents.
French DJ, West RJ, Elander J, Wilding JM. Psychology Department, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, University of London, UK. In an exploratory postal survey of 711 drivers stratified by age, sex, annual mileage, and accident involvement, decision-making style was measured using a DecisionMaking Questionnaire (DMQ) and driving style was assessed using a Driving Style Questionnaire (DSQ). Responses to 21 items of the DMQ formed seven independent and internally coherent dimensions according to a principal components (PC) analysis. These were labelled: control, thoroughness, instinctiveness, social resistance, hesitancy, perfectionism, and idealism. PC analysis also revealed that responses to 15 items of the DSQ formed six independent dimensions of driving style. These were labelled: speed, calmness, social resistance, focus, planning, and deviance. Multiple regression analysis indicated that drivers of 60 years and under who scored lower on thoroughness were at greater risk of a traffic accident and that this relationship was mediated by faster driving. This relationship was independent of age, sex, annual mileage and all other factors measured. In the drivers over 60 years, lower thoroughness, greater hesitancy, and faster driving were independently associated with higher accident rates independent of all other factors measured. The results provide preliminary support for the view that people import aspects of their general decisionmaking style into the driving situation, and that in so doing they put themselves at differential risk of having a road traffic accident.