University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Department of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology  

      The putative RNA silencing protein ERL‐1 is involved in chloroplast   ribosomal RNA processing in plants
       

Doctorate thesis  submitted by  DI Jutta Maria Helm                            March, 2011 
 

 

Declaration 
  I hereby declare that I have written this thesis independently. All results presented in  the result section have been obtained by my own work, probes and plasmids have  been shared by several lab members. Relevant results obtained by co‐workers are  only presented in the supplementary result section with proper citations. All intellec‐ tual property used for the preparation of this work has been cited properly.  The results obtained from transgenic N. benthamiana plants misexpressing ERL1 in‐ cluding crossing, light microscopy as well as photosynthetic analysis, and rRNA  cloning experiments have been described and discussed by Heiko Schumacher in  2009. However, all experimental procedures and plant maintenance have been exe‐ cuted by me. The chloroplastic localization, analysis of chloroplast‐related transcripts  and electron microscopy experiments have been executed independently by Heiko  Schumacher and me to prepare replicates of the findings.        March 2011, Vienna            DI Jutta Maria Helm 

  …my parents for letting me go and for giving me the feeling that I can always count  on them in case of need. despite any local distance between us.Acknowledgements  This work would not have been possible without the support of various people.  …Sergia Tzortzakaki. Evguenia. Eva Papadogiorgaki.  …Heiko Schumacher for teaching me a lesson for life.   …my friends back at home and around the world who did not forget me even from a  distance.  …the members of the Plant Developmental Genetics Laboratory in Vienna for wel‐ coming me so friendly before and after my stay in Greece. etc.  …Dr Marie‐Theres Hauser for giving me the opportunity to learn in her lab and for  all the support and good advice from far. and for spending their holidays  with me. Giorgos. Es‐ pecially I would like to thank…    …Dr Kriton Kalantidis for being a valuable teacher and still leaving me a great free‐ dom for my work and development. I will keep in mind the nice times we had.  …all members of the Plant Molecular Biology Laboratory in Crete for making it a  place to remember. Kallia and Ritsa who all provided valuable help.  …my sister Martina for always being there!   …Harald Zwilling for being Harald Zwilling!  5  . for keeping contact by Skype.  …my brother Andreas for constantly solving all my computer problems in no time. for some I am especially proud to call them friends. Kosmas Haralampidis and my students  Andreas.  …all the people who had been there and went the way in Crete along with me for a  while. email.

    6  .

 In‐ deed it could be shown that 5S rRNA is downregulated after transient and constitu‐ tive overexpression of ERL1 and elongated by two nucleotides at its 3’‐end in a frac‐ tion of the analyzed samples. The transgenic plant lines showed morphological and transcriptional altera‐ tions reminiscent of reported defects in chloroplastic ribosomal RNA biogenesis.8S rRNA processing. A putative endogenous  suppressor of silencing might be the 3’‐5’ exonuclease ERI‐1 (enhanced RNAi) and its  homologues in various species.  In this work the plant homologue termed ERL1 (ERI‐1‐LIKE 1) is analyzed. which specifically bind and degrade siRNAs. Also the Drosophila melanogaster homologue does not possess this  function suggesting two functionally distinct groups of ERI‐1 homologues. The severity of the bleaching corresponded to the expression levels of  ERL1.Abstract  During evolution eukaryotes have acquired a system using small RNA molecules  (siRNAs) as negative regulators of endogenous and exogenous RNA sequences  called RNA interference or RNA silencing. where  they catalyze the final step in 5. The result could be  confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing ERL1. The observed pheno‐ types reached from pale green. mosaic green and white to complete loss of  chlorophyll. Constitu‐ tive overexpression of ERL1 in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants manifested in  variegated phenotypes characterized by a bleaching of the plants. This mechanism is also used in the de‐ fense against pathogens that have therefore developed several strategies to counter‐ act it by expression of viral suppressors of silencing (VSRs). yellow. Re‐ cently an additional conserved role of ERI‐1 homologues has been identified. In addition a fraction of 16S rRNA has been elongated by one  nucleotide in Arabidopsis insertion mutants suggesting also a function in maturation  of this chloroplastic rRNA. The pro‐ tein localizes to the chloroplast and fails to exhibit any RNA silencing suppressor  activity. This finding is not surprising in this context since RNA silencing is restricted  to the cytoplasm. 7  . A putative ribonuclease has been proposed earlier to  assist in chloroplastic rRNA processing in a mutant background of  RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE 1 (RNR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana which may be  constituted by ERL1.

8  .

 Dieses Ergebnis ist insofern nicht überraschend. die an bereits be‐ schriebene Mängel in der Reifung ribosomaler RNAs in Chloroplasten erinnern. ERL1 könnte die mutmaßliche Ribonuklease sein.    9  . Diese sogenannte RNA‐Interferenz oder RNA‐Silencing wirkt  auch als Immunsystem gegen Krankheitserreger. da RNA‐ Silencing auf das Zytoplasma beschränkt ist. Außerdem zeigte auch die 16S rRNA in Arabidopsis‐Mutanten. wahrscheinlich existieren zwei unterschiedliche Gruppen  von ERI‐1 Homologen in Eukaryoten. das kleine RNA‐ Moleküle (siRNAs) als negative Regulatoren von endogenen und exogenen RNA‐ Sequenzen verwendet.  grün und weiß gesprenkelt bis zu komplettem Chlorophyll‐Verlust. Das homologe Drosophila Protein zeigt  ebenfalls dieses Verhalten.8S ribosomaler RNA. Ein mutmaßlicher eukaryotischer  endogener Silencing Suppressor könnte die 3ʹ‐5 ʹExonuklease ERI‐1 sein.  In dieser Arbeit wurde das Pflanzen‐Homolog ERL1 (ERI‐1‐like 1) analysiert. die spezi‐ fisch siRNAs binden und abbauen kann. dass die 5S rRNA Levels nach der Überexpression  von ERL1verringert sind und am 3’‐Ende eine häufige Verlängerung um zwei  Nukleotide besaßen. bei denen ERL1  unterdrückt war. Es  konnte tatsächlich gezeigt werden. Die transgenen Linien  zeigten morphologische und transkritptionelle Veränderungen. Überexpression von ERL1 in transgenen Ta‐ bak‐ und Arabidopsis‐Pflanzen resultierte in vielfältigen Phänotypen. um diesem Mechanismus durch die Ausbildung von viralen  Silencing Suppressoren (VSR) entgegen zu wirken. Außerdem katalysiert ERI‐1 den letzten  Schritt bei der Reifung von 5. eventuell besitzt ERL1  auch eine Funktion in der Reifung dieser rRNA. die durch ein  Bleichen der Pflanzen gekennzeichnet waren: es reichte von blassgrün. die der Ribo‐ nukleotidreduktase 1 (RNR1) bei der Verarbeitung von Chloroplasten rRNA assis‐ tiert. Der Schwere‐ grad des Phänotyps entsprach der Überexpression von ERL1. deshalb haben diese verschiedene  Strategien entwickelt. teilweise Verlängerungen um ein Nukleotid. über gelb.Zusammenfassung  Im Laufe der Evolution haben Eukaryonten ein System erworben. Das  Protein wird in Chloroplasten geschleust und besitzt keine RNA‐Silencing‐ Suppressor‐Aktivität.

  10  .

 pombe  11  . thaliana/At  A.Abbreviations  %  °C  β‐ME  μm   μM   μCi  μg  μJ  μL  3’  3’hExo  5’  7mG   A  Å   A. tumefaciens   aa   ACS  ADAR  Ago/AGO   AP‐conjugate  APS  ARC  Arg  Asp  ATP  RLI2   att sites  Aub   BLAST   bp  BSA   C  C. elegans/Ce  CBC  cDNA   Chp1  Percent  Degrees Celsius  β‐Mercaptoethanol  Micrometer(s)  Micromolar  Microcurie(s)  Microgram(s)  Microjoule(s)  Microlitre(s)  3 prime  3 prime histone exonuclease  5 prime  7‐methylguanosine  Adenosine   Ångström(s)  Arabidopsis thaliana  Agrobacterium tumefaciens  Amino acid(s)  Acetosyringone  Adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA  Argonaute protein  Alkaline phosphatase‐conjugate  Ammonium persulfate  ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF  CHLOROPLASTS  Arginine  Aspartate  Adenosine triphosphate  RNASE L INHIBITOR 2  Attachment sites  Aubergine  Basic Local Alignment Search Tool  Base pair(s)  Bovine serum albumin  Cytosine  Caenorhabditis elegans  Cap‐binding complex  Complementary DNA  Chromodomain protein in S.

Abbreviations  CHS   Ci   CLP  CLSY1   cm  cm²   CTAB  C‐terminus  D  D.g. rerio   dATP  DCL1‐4   DCP2  DCR  DCR‐1/2  dCTP  ddC  DDL  DGCR8  dGTP   DMSO   DNA  DnaQ  DNase  dNTP   dpi   DRB4   DRD1  DRM2  dsDNA   dsRBD  dsRNA   DTT   dTTP   Duf  E  E. coli  e.   CHALCONE SYNTHASE  Curie(s)  CASEINOLYTIC PROTEASE  CLASSY 1  Centimeter(s)  Square centimeter(s)  Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide  Carboxy‐terminus  Aspartate  Danio rerio  Deoxyadenosine triphosphate  DICER‐LIKE1‐4  De‐capping protein 2  Dicer  Dicer Related 1/2  Deoxycytosine triphosphate  Dideoxycytosine  DAWDLE  DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region  Deoxyguanosine triphosphate  Dimethylsulfoxide  Deoxyribonucleic acid  DNA polymerase III epsilon subunit  Deoxyribonuclease  Deoxynucleoside triphosphate  Days post‐infection/days post‐infiltration  DOUBLE‐STRANDED RNA‐BINDING PROTEIN 4  DEFECTIVE IN RNA‐DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1  DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2  Double‐stranded DNA  Double‐stranded ribonucleic acid binding domain  Double‐stranded RNA  Dithiothreitol  Deoxythymidine triphosphate  Domain of unknown function  Glutamate  Escherichia coli  exempli gratia  12  D. melanogaster/Dm Drosophila melanogaster  .

   EtBr   EXOIII  fmol  For/F  FoRTH  FRY1   G  g  GFP   GW182  h  H  H. sapiens  H2O   HC‐Pro   HEN1   HEPES  HRP  HYL1   i. Glycine  Gramm(s). 5’‐BISPHOSPHATE NUCLEOTIDASE/INOSITOL  POLYPHOSPHATE 1‐PHOSPHATASE  Guanosine. relative centrifugal force  Green Fluorescent Protein  Glycine tryptophan repeat protein 182  Hour(s)  Histidine  Homo sapiens  Water  Helper component proteinase  HUA ENHANCER 1  4‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)‐1‐piperazineethane‐sulfonic acid  Horseradish peroxidase  HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1  Id est  INVOLVED IN DE NOVO METHYLATION 2  Intergenic non‐coding transcript  Institute of Molecular Biology & Biotechnology  Isopropyl‐β‐S‐1‐thiogalactopyranoside  Lysine  Kilobase(s)  Knock‐down  Kilodalton(s)  Knock‐out  KATANIN  Kilovolt(s)  13  .   IDN2  IGN  IMBB  IPTG  K  kb  KD  kDa  KO  KTN  kV   Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid  Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E  Extensive local silencing spread  Enhanced RNAi 1  ERI‐1‐LIKE 1  Expressed sequence tag  and others  Ethidium bromide  Exonuclease (III) domain  Femtomole  Forward  Foundation for Research & Technology ‐ Hellas  3’(2’).Abbreviations  EDTA  eIF4E  ELSS   ERI‐1/Eri1   ERL1   EST   et al.e.

Abbreviations  L  LB  let‐7   lin‐4/14  LOQS  M  M. tabacum/Nt  NADP  NAT  nat‐siRNA   NCBI   NEP   ng  Ni‐NTA  nm   NPC  NRPD1a/b   nt  N‐terminus  O. crassa   N. benthamiana/Nb  Nicotiana benthamiana  . musculus   mA  MES  Met  mg  min  miRNA  miRNA*  mL   mM  mm  MMA  MOPS  mRNA  MS   N   N. sativa/Os  OD600   Liter(s)  Lysogeny broth/Luria broth/Luria‐Bertani broth  LEThal‐7  Abnormal cell‐LINeage‐4/14  Loquacious  Molar  Mus musculus  Milliampere(s)  2‐(N‐Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid  Methionine  Milligram(s)  Minute(s)  MicroRNA  MicroRNA passenger strand  Milliliter(s)  Millimolar  Millimeter(s)  MS/MES/acetosyringone  3‐(N‐Morpholino)propanesulfonic acid  Messenger RNA  Murashige & Skoog  Normal  Neurospora crassa  Nicotiana tabacum  Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate  Natural antisense transcript  Natural antisense transcript‐derived siRNA  National Center for Biotechnology Information  Nucleus‐encoded polymerase  Nanogram(s)  Nickel‐Nitriloacetic acid  Nanometer(s)  Nuclear pore complex  NUCLEAR RNA POLYMERASE D 1A/B  Nucleotide(s)  Amino‐terminus  Oryza sativa  Optical density at 600 nm  14  N.

 associated with DCR‐2  Rapid amplification of cDNA ends  Ras‐related nuclear protein  Repeat‐associated short interfering RNA  Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase.Abbreviations  OH  P. trichocarpa/Pt  PAA  PAGE   PAP  PAZ   P‐body  PCMP  PCR  PEP   pH  PIPES   piRNA   Piwi   PLMVd   pmol   PNK   Pol  Pol II/IV/V  PPR  PPV   pre‐miRNA   PRG‐1  pri‐miRNA   PSRP1  PSTVd   PTGS  QDE‐2   QIP   qPCR  Q‐rich  R2D2  RACE  Ran  rasiRNA  RBCL   RdDM  RDR1‐6/RdRP  Rev/R  Hydroxyl  Populus trichocarpa  Polyacrylamide  Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis  poly‐A polymerase  Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille  Processing body  Plant combinatorial and modular protein  Polymerase chain reaction  Plastid‐encoded polymerase  pondus Hydrogenii/potentia Hydrogenii  Piperazine‐N.N′‐bis(2‐ethanesulfonic acid)  Piwi‐interacting RNA  P element‐induced wimpy testes  Peach latent mosaic viroid  Picomole(s)  Polynucleotide kinase  Polymerase  RNA polymerase II/IV/V  Pentatricopeptide‐repeat  Plum pox virus  Precursor miRNA  Piwi‐related gene 1  Primary miRNA  PHLOEM SMALL RNA‐BINDING PROTEIN 1  Potato spindle tuber viroid  Posttranscriptional gene silencing  Quelling‐deficient 2  QDE‐2‐interacting protein  Quantitative PCR  Glutamine‐rich  Two dsRNA‐binding domains. large chain  RNA‐directed DNA methylation  RNA‐DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 1‐6  Reverse  15  .

 purpuratus   SAF  SAP  SDE3  SDN  SDS  SE   SGS3   SINE  siRNA  siRNase  SLBP  SLSS   snoRNA  Snp  snRNA  snRNP   SOB   sp. pombe  S.5‐bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase  Second(s)  Svedberg (sedimentation coefficient)  Sorghum bicolor  Schizosaccharomyces pombe  Strongylocentrotus purpuratus  Scaffold attachment factor  SAF‐A/B. bicolor   S.Abbreviations  Rf  rgs‐CaM   RISC  RITS   RNA  RNAi  RNase  RNasin  RNR1   RPB1  rpm  RPOB   RRF  rRNA  RT   RuBisCo   s/sec  S   S.  Nuclear restorer  REGULATOR OF GENE SILENCING CALMODULIN‐LIKE  RNA‐induced silencing complex  RNA‐induced transcriptional silencing  Ribonucleic acid  RNA interference  Ribonuclease  RNase inhibitor  RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE 1  RNA polymerase II large subunit  Rotations per minute  RNA POLYMERASE SUBUNIT BETA  RNA‐directed RNA polymerase family  Ribosomal RNA  Reverse transcription. Room temperature  Ribulose‐1. Acinus and PIAS  SILENCING DEFICIENT 3  SMALL RNA DEGRADING NUCLEASE  Sodium dodecyl sulfate  SERRATE  SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3  Short interspaced element  Small interfering RNA  Small interfering ribonuclease  Stem‐loop binding protein  Short‐range local silencing spread  Small nucleolar RNA  Snipper  Small nuclear RNA  Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein  Super optimal broth  Species  16  .

 laevis  X‐Gal   x‐ray  XRN1‐4   Y  Z. ‐B. ‐C  Transactivating response RNA‐binding protein  Tris(hydroxymethyl)‐aminomethan  Transfer RNA  Tobacco rattle virus  Unit(s)  Ubiquitin‐associated  Untranslated region  Ultraviolet  Volt(s)  Vitis vinifera  Volume per volume  VARICOSE  Viral suppressor of silencing  Watt(s)  Tryptophan  Weight per volume  Xenopus laevis  5‐Bromo‐4‐chloro‐3‐indolyl‐β‐D‐galactopyranoside  Roentgen rays  EXORIBONUCLEASE 1‐4  Tyrosine  Zea mays  17  .‐C  TRBP  Tris  tRNA  TRV  U  UBA  UTR  UV  V  V.Abbreviations  SPT5  SSC   ssDNA  ssRNA  T  TAE  Taq  TAS3   tasiRNA  TBE  TE  TEM   TEMED  TIC/TOC  Tm   TNRC6A.‐B. vinifera   v/v  VCS  VSR   W  W  w/v   X. mays/Zm  Suppressor of Ty insertion 5  Sodium chloride/sodium citrate buffer  Single‐stranded DNA  Single‐stranded RNA  Thymine  Tris/Acetate/EDTA  Thermus aquaticus  TRANS‐ACTING SIRNA 3  Trans‐acting siRNA  Tris/Borate/EDTA  Tris‐EDTA  Transmission electron microscopy  Tetramethylethylenediamine  Translocon at the inner/outer envelope membrane of chloro‐ plasts  Melting temperature  Trinucleotide repeat containing 6A.

    18  .

......................... 88  2................................7  Digest ..2..2............1................................................................ 88  2..................2.........1.....................................................2............................................... 61  1..... 69  2.............................2............................1  Instruments ............................................................................................2............................2........ 29  1.........................................................2  Specificities of chloroplastic RNAs . 38  1......................................................................1......... 49  1....................2.................................................................5  Peculiarities of plant miRNAs ..............9  ERI‐1 is an example for an endogenous suppressor of RNA silencing.................................1  Cis‐acting siRNAs mediate chromatin silencing in plants ........3.1..................................2.......................................................................4  Thesis objectives . 69  2.................................4.................. 88  2....................... 74  2................ 27  1...2.........1.2.............2......... 88  2............................... 89  19  ................................................................ 84  2........................Table of Content  1................... 46  1......... 84  2......................................5.. 85  2.........................................................2........7  Viral strategies to suppress RNA silencing in plants.............................1................................. 88  2..1  RNA molecules and their life between DNA and protein ........2...........2................. 64  1................................ 42  1.............. 87  2.........5...1  Cultivation..1..................................................2.....1..............8  Repressing the repressors ‐ endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing............................................................5... 88  2. 56  1..........................................2  Chemicals ........1...................1.. 85  2..............................1...........2.................................................. 85  2................2  Leaf‐Disc transformation..2  Trans‐acting siRNAs...............................................2.................................................. the plant homologue of ERI‐1 ..........1  siRNA‐mediated gene silencing.. 45  1.....................................................................6  Spreading of RNA silencing in plants resembles an immune system...............4........................................... 36  1........................4  Plasmid preparation...............5  Agarose gel....................2...............2  miRNAs modulate the expression of endogenous sequences............................................................................................................... 86  2... 62  1.......................... 69  2..2............ 85  2.........................................1........3  Bacterial strains..........1  Standard molecular biology methods ....  Materials and Methods ..................................................2  Plant transformation techniques .........................6  Gel extraction ...............................................1...............1......... 51  1...............................2  Size markers .............. 25  1................... 86  2....................................................... 44  1....................3  The piRNA pathway protects the germline from transposon activity.....................................................................................2  Methods ......1  Photosynthesis ............................................2.....5  Others ........................................................................4..........1  Plant cultivation........ 41  1. 76  2.............1  Materials ...............2  RNA silencing – new roles for the intermediate.....................................3  Natural antisense siRNAs .....1............................................................2..8  Ligation ...............2...............3  Consumables & kits ......  Introduction..................................................................................... 85  2.......2...............3.4  Plants possess a high diversity of siRNA molecules.... 66    2.1......................................... 32  1...1  Enzymes............................................ 50  1..2  Chemically competent cells ...................3  Chloroplasts .....2.........................................3  Transformation ....2................. 25  1.................................10  ERI‐1‐LIKE 1....2............................................................ 71  2.........................................4  Solutions .......................................

..................5......................4  Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)... 93  2.........................3  PAGE northern .............................. 94  2........ 92  2.................................................................. 94  2......... 95  2.................3.....................1  Random‐primed labelling ............................................2..4............................................7  rRNA cloning ......................... 96  2.........6. 117  3.........2.............................3........................................................................................................... 99  3.............................. 96  2..................................... 94  2........................5.....................................2............2. 93  2......3........1  Self‐Ligation ...... 110  3.......... 107  3..........Table of Content  2............................2..1  RNA extraction ...................................2  SDS‐PAGE ....8  Rapid Amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)..................  Results ..............6.........10  Protoplasts .4  Agroinfiltration.........................2..............................3................... 93  2....... 92  2.......................................................................................... 90  2.... 103  3...2..................................3  Floral Dip.........................................................................................4  Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants............... 91  2..........12  Fluorescence measurement.....3  Southern analysis .............................................................................2..........................2.. 94  2......................................... 89  2..................3........................3.............................2  Denaturing agarose/formaldehyde gels.........................................................................2..............4................1  Protein extraction ............ 92  2...................................... 91  2...................................................................5  Hybridization..................7...........2................. 95  2......... washes and developing ............................. 97  2......4  Western detection.....4............ 90  2.2............................2.....................7.... 104  3...........3  Capillary blot ............ 92  2............................................................. 91  2.......................................2.....2................................................................................................................................... 119  20  .........................................2  Linker‐Ligation ........................................1  Knock‐down of ERL1...2  Southern analysis ...5  Effect of ERL1 on silencing ........................3  Reverse Transcription (RT) ....3  Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants ......2....2............... 103  3..................................................................2..........................4................................2  RACE.............................................................................. 93  2......................2...........2..6  Western analysis.............................................. 115  3..7....2..............................2...4...........................................................................4  Northern analysis .............................. 91  2.......5....................4.................7.. 112  3............2.........4  Semi‐dry blot.................................................................................2................2..........................2  End‐labelling .. 96  2........................................................................................................................................3  Effect of ERL1 overexpression on the photosynthetic apparatus...... 93  2....................3  Electro‐blot .........2  Overexpression of ERL1 ...........2...................1  Knock‐down of ERL1.....................................2..............6.....................2...... 94  2...........3.. 90  2.......................1  DNA extraction......................................................2.........................................................1  Localization ................................................................2  Overexpression of ERL1 ................2  Effect of ERL1 overexpression on chloroplast mRNAs ...................................................2.....2...6........................................................3  Hybridization.....1  Microscopy .............................................................................2.. 99  3..2........................9  Quantitative real‐time PCR (qPCR) .................... 89  2..................... 115  3....... 101  3...........11  Preparation for microscopic analysis .................... 97    3.......2.............................................................3.........................2......................................................................................

Table of Content 
Crosses .............................................................................................................. 119  LNA159 ............................................................................................................. 120  3.6  Effect of ERL1 on ribosomal RNA .................................................................... 121  3.6.1  rRNA blots........................................................................................................ 121  3.6.2  Linker ligations ................................................................................................ 123  3.6.2.1  Effect on 5.8S rRNA .................................................................................... 123  3.6.2.2  Effect on chloroplastic rRNAs ................................................................... 124    4.  Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 129  4.1  Implications of plant ERL1 in RNA silencing processes ............................... 129  4.2  Involvements of ERL1 in chloroplast metabolism.......................................... 131  4.3  Severe phenotypic alterations after overexpression of ERL1 suggest an in‐ volvement in chloroplast development ........................................................................... 133  4.4  ERL1 is involved in chloroplastic ribosomal RNA processing..................... 135  4.5  Conclusions .......................................................................................................... 140    5.  References ...................................................................................................................... 143    6.  Supplements .................................................................................................................. 171  6.1  Supplementary methods .................................................................................... 171  6.1.1  Virus/viroid infections in Nicotiana sp. plants ............................................. 171  6.1.2  In vitro transcription........................................................................................ 171  6.1.3  Purification of recombinant ERL1 protein................................................... 171  6.1.4  In vitro assays for recombinant ERL1 protein............................................. 172  6.2  Supplementary results........................................................................................ 172  6.2.1  PSTVd‐derived siRNAs are suppressed upon ERL1 overexpression ..... 173  6.2.2  ERL1 fails to affect RNA silencing in Agrobacterium co‐infiltration assays   174  6.2.3  Exogenously induced silencing spread may be suppressed after ERL1  overexpression .............................................................................................................. 176  6.2.4  ERL1‐overexpressing plants are hypersensitive towards viral infection 177  6.2.5  In‐vitro experiments with ERL1..................................................................... 178  6.2.6  Preparation of a NbERL1 suppression construct and analysis of its effects  after transient and transgenic expression ................................................................. 179  6.3  Oligonucelotides.................................................................................................. 181  6.4  Vector maps.......................................................................................................... 183  6.4.1  At‐ERL1‐GFP.................................................................................................... 183  6.4.2  At‐leader‐GFP .................................................................................................. 183  6.4.3  At‐ERL1‐over ................................................................................................... 184  6.4.4  Nt‐ERL1‐hp ...................................................................................................... 184  6.5  Sequences.............................................................................................................. 185  6.5.1  Newly identified sequences........................................................................... 185  6.5.2  Published sequences used for in silico analysis and primer design ......... 186  6.6  Curriculum vitae (March, 2011) ........................................................................ 196 
21 

3.5.1  3.5.2 

Table of Content 
List of Figures:  Figure 1.1: Ghildiyal & Zamore, 2009................................................................................. 28  Figure 1.2: MacRea et al., 2006 ............................................................................................. 28  Figure 1.3: Argonaute proteins............................................................................................ 29  Figure 1.4: Okamura et al., 2007........................................................................................... 31  Figure 1.5: Carthew & Sontheimer, 2009............................................................................ 35  Figure 1.6: Zamore, 2010 ...................................................................................................... 38  Figure 1.7: Ghildiyal & Zamore, 2009................................................................................. 40  Figure 1.8: Matzke et al., 2009 .............................................................................................. 39  Figure 1.9: Allen & Howell, 2010 ........................................................................................ 43  Figure 1.10: Kalantidis et al., 2008 ....................................................................................... 47  Figure 1.11: Cheng & Patel, 2004......................................................................................... 51  Figure 1.12: Alignment of published ERI‐1 homologs..................................................... 56  Figure 1.13: Alignment of ERL1 homologues in various plant species......................... 57  Figure 1.14: Winter et al., 2007 ............................................................................................. 57  Figure 1.15: Winter et al., 2007 ............................................................................................. 58  Figure 1.16: Campbell et al., 1996 ........................................................................................ 63  Figure 1.17: Stern et al., 2010 ................................................................................................ 64  Figure 3.1: Localization of plant ERL1 ............................................................................. 100  Figure 3.2: Alignments of Nicotiana sp. ERL1 sequence................................................. 101  Figure 3.3: Analysis of presumable ERL1 suppressor plants........................................ 101  Figure 3.4: Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing ERL1 ............... 104  Figure 3.5: TEM analysis of phenotypes of Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpress‐ ing ERL1................................................................................................................................ 108  Figure 3.6: Phenotypic analysis by light microscopy of Nicotiana benthamiana plants  overexpressing ERL1 .......................................................................................................... 107  Figure 3.7: Northern analysis of selected chloroplast‐related genes ........................... 109  Figure 3.8: Determination of photosynthetic parameters in Nicotiana benthamiana  plants overexpressing ERL1 .............................................................................................. 111  Figure 3.9: Characterization of selected publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1  knock‐out plants .................................................................................................................. 116  Figure 3.10: Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing ERL1.................. 118  Figure 3.11: Effect of plant ERL1 on different molecules of the RNA silencing appara‐ tus .......................................................................................................................................... 117  Figure 3.12: Northern analysis of chloroplastic ribosomal RNAs and cytosolic 5.8S  rRNA following overexpression of ERL1 ........................................................................ 122  Figure 3.13: Alignment of cytosolic 5.8S rRNA from Nicotiana benthamiana plants  overexpressing ERL1 .......................................................................................................... 123  Figure 3.14: Alignment of chloroplastic rRNAs of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana  benthamiana plants misexpressing plant ERL1 ................................................................ 126  Figure 4.1: Secondary structures of chloroplastic rRNA (predicted by RNAfold; Gru‐ ber et al., 2008). ..................................................................................................................... 135 

22 

Table of Content 
Figure 6.1: Comparative agro‐infiltration time course in systemically PSTVd‐infected  tobacco. ................................................................................................................................. 174  Figure 6.2: Agrobacterium co‐infiltration assays in N. benthamiana line 16C to test ERL1  for RNA silencing suppressor activity ............................................................................. 175  Figure 6.3: Silencing of the ERL1 phenotype induced by agroinfiltration.................. 177  Figure 6.4: ERL1 overexpressor plants are hypersensitive towards infection by PPV ................................................................................................................................................ 178  Figure 6.5: Analysis of the suppression of ERL1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. ................ 180        List of Tables:  Table 1.1: predicted localization of plant ERL1 homologs .............................................. 58  Table 3.1: Segregation of Nicotiana benthamiana T2 plant lines transformed with a  hairpin construct designed for downregulation of ERL1.............................................. 104  Table 3.2: Summary of segregation and phenotypic pattern of Nicotiana benthamiana  T1 plant lines overexpressing ERL1 ................................................................................. 107  Table 3.3: Summary of characteristics of Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 knock‐down plant  lines........................................................................................................................................ 117  Table 3.4: Summary of sequence alterations in chloroplastic rRNA after ERL1 misex‐ pression in Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) and Arabidopsis thaliana (At) plants............... 125       

23 

   

24 

Introduction    Since its discovery DNA has been considered as a very stable molecule with the abil‐ ity to encode for an infinite number of proteins.  This general process is more complex in eukaryotes. lack‐ ing both the stability and the flexibility of the above mentioned key players. since nucleic acids are  required for protein synthesis while proteins are necessary for nucleic acid produc‐ tion. DNA has then developed as a more suitable molecule  for storage since its stability increased the maximum size of the hereditary molecules. It synthesizes a single‐stranded mRNA molecule in 5’‐to‐3’ direction  and stops the elongation when reaching the terminator sequence. The synthesized  25  . The transcription initiation re‐ quires the action of general transcription factors facilitating the binding to the pro‐ moter sequence and forming a transcription initiation complex. The intermediary form in this process is RNA.  1.. however. is a typical chicken‐and‐egg paradox.  This might have happened in parallel with the necessity for storage of increased  amounts of genetic information after accumulation of additional protein catalysts  (Alberts et al. which are factors with an unlimited  versatility for catalytic processes. The polymerase recognizes a certain promoter sequence where it binds to the  DNA strand. They possess three RNA poly‐ merases with Pol II being responsible for most protein coding genes and Pol I and  Pol III transcribing genes for other RNA molecules.1. An RNA polymerase guides the transcription of a defined genomic  stretch by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds between ribonucleo‐ tides. One hypothesis trying to overcome this paradox considers RNA as the molecule  both storing genetic information and catalyzing chemical reactions in primitive cells  of this so‐called “RNA world”. 2008).  This process.1 RNA molecules and their life between DNA and protein  mRNA (messenger RNA) is the first molecule involved in the information flow from  DNA to protein.

 U4. The relevant amino  acid is connected to the 3’‐end of the tRNA molecule by aminoacyl‐tRNA syntheta‐ ses. The necessary RNA molecules for this proc‐ ess are tRNAs (transfer RNAs) which are extensively structured L‐shaped adaptor  molecules with unusual bases organized into three single‐stranded loops. One of  them contains the anticodon which binds to the mRNA sequence.   The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA is translated into amino acids by codons con‐ sisting of three consecutive nucleotides.1. The poly‐A polymerase (PAP) then adds ap‐ proximately 200 adenosine nucleotides. The polypeptide chain is synthesized by the stepwise addition of amino acids to  its C‐terminal end that is activated by the binding to a tRNA molecule (which is then  called peptidyl‐tRNA).  The above described process takes place in the ribosomes. Only spliced mature mRNA with a 5’‐cap and a 3’‐poly‐A tail are ex‐ ported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs).  Eukaryotic protein coding gene stretches contain expressed sequences (exons) and  non‐coding intervening sequences (introns). the five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs U1. The removal of the latter from the pre‐ cursor mRNA strand is performed by the spliceosome. the final length of this poly‐A tail is deter‐ mined by poly‐A‐binding proteins.  26  .  The intronic sequence is circularized into a structure called lariat. Introduction  mRNA strand is modified at its 5’‐end by addition of a cap of 7‐methylguanosine  (7mG) which binds a protein complex called cap‐binding complex (CBC). U5 and U6) together with at  least seven proteins forming the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP).   Protein factors accompanying the transcribed mRNA molecule recognize the 3’‐end  of the strand and lead to its cleavage. U2. a catalytic machinery con‐ sisting of ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNAs (rRNA). They constitute up to 80  % of the total RNA of cells and are encoded in multiple rRNA genes which are often  arranged in tandems and transcribed by Pol I. excised and the  ends of the exons are then joined together to a continuous coding sequence.  Aberrant RNAs are degraded by the nuclear exosome consisting of 3’‐to‐5’ RNA ex‐ onucleases. They contain another type of  RNA.

 an enzyme of the  27  . also known as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). The mature ribosome contains four binding sites  for RNA. The prokaryotic 70S ri‐ bosome consists of a 50S subunit (with 5S and 23S rRNA) and a 30S (with 16S rRNA). where an  endogenous gene is downregulated after strong overexpression of the same se‐ quence.  The importance of RNA had been boosted significantly by the finding. 1998).. especially from ribosomal  proteins. one for mRNA and three for tRNA: the latter are bound at the A‐site. the  amino acids are then connected together at the P‐site and the empty tRNA finally  gets released at the E‐site.2 RNA silencing – new roles for the intermediate  For many years the central dogma of molecular biology was postulated by Francis  Crick. that double‐ stranded RNA is a trigger of gene silencing and therefore providing a negative feed‐ back mechanism which is independent of protein synthesis (Fire et al. This phenomenon called co‐suppression. The overexpression of CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS). Many other important observations  which finally lead to the discovery of the RNA silencing mechanism had also been  made in plants: after expression of antisense RNA the tobacco nopaline synthase was  inhibited (Rothstein et al.1. 2008). They are often  encoded in and further excised from intronic sequences.. 1987). stating that the genetic information only flows from nucleic acids to proteins.  The eukaryotic 80S ribosome consists of a 60S subunit (with 5S.. The nucleolus is a distinct structure in the nucleus where rRNA processing  and ribosome assembly take place.  The first observation of an RNA silencing mechanism was reported in 1928 when  newly emerging leaves of TRV‐infected Nicotiana tabacum plants were found to be  free of infection symptoms (Wingard.8S and 23S rRNA)  and a 40S subunit (with 18S rRNA). 1928). The major catalytic reactions are carried out by the rRNA  molecules which can be considered as ribozymes (Alberts et al. The two ribosomal subunits are then exported to  the cytoplasm where they join to form the mature ribosome.   1. 5. was discovered by two groups trying to increase the purple pigmentation of  petunia. Introduction  Long rRNA precursor molecules are extensively modified at positions that are speci‐ fied by guide RNAs.

 resulted in a large fraction of plants with white petals (Napoli  et al. Common features are the involvement of 18–35 nucleotide long small RNAs  which are complementary to target RNAs. 1990).. members of  the Argonaute/Piwi (AGO) protein families and the RNase III‐type protein Dicer  function in all silencing pathways. van der Krol et al. Introduction  anthocyanin pathway. They  are incorporated into the RISC and lead to target cleavage. In addition. the latter being restricted to the animal kingdom. Moreover. microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi‐interacting RNAs  (piRNAs).     Figure 1. 2009  (A) The siRNA pathway is characterized by a dsRNA which is processed by Dicer into siRNAs. (B) In the miRNAs pathway a hairpin‐ shaped precursor molecule is exported into the cytoplasm and processed by Dicer. 1990.1: Ghildiyal & Zamore. The miRNA is  loaded into the miRISC and leads to translational repression of the target. The major players in the RNA silencing mechanism are  small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Binding results in target repression either  by translational arrest or by cleavage of the target.. (C) In the piRNA pathway a  single‐stranded precursor RNA is cleaved by a PIWI‐protein into piRNAs which get methylated at the  3’‐end.  28  . chromatin remodeling  can occur in some species.1.  Several classes of small RNAs have been identified to result in various silencing pro‐ cedures. They may initiate the production of secondary piRNAs.

  They cleave their target approximately every 21 nucleotides into a double strand of  19 nucleotides and two nucleotide overhangs at the 3’ ends (Elbashir et al. It usually consists of six distinct domains. 2000). 1999). Hammond et  al. Drosophila has two Dicer  proteins with DCR‐1 being responsible for miRNA production (see chapter 1. some members lack  one or more of them.  2001).4)]. 2000)] domain  functions in binding of single‐ and double‐stranded RNA and DNA with a prefer‐ ence for single‐stranded RNAs molecules or single stranded 3’‐overhangs (Lingel et  al.. It is directly connected to the endonucleolytic RNase III domain responsible  for RNA cleavage (Robertson et al. Introduction  1. In Arabidopsis four different Dicer‐like  proteins have been identified [(Baulcombe. 2004). Vertebrates and nematodes  possess a single Dicer protein (Carmell & Hannon. 2003). The PAZ [(Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) (Cerutti et al... 2001a).  2006).1 siRNA‐mediated gene silencing  siRNAs were identified to direct endonucleolytic cleavage of the target RNAs in  plants (Hamilton & Baulcombe. Additional double‐stranded RNA binding  domains (dsRBDs) may function in the binding of double‐stranded RNA. 2006). the  strands possess a 5’‐phosphate and a 3’‐hydroxyl (Elbashir et al.. 2006)..2) and  DCR‐2 producing siRNAs (Lee et al.2.  29  . 1999) and animals (Zamore et al.. 2004a).. 2001) and a do‐ main of unknown function (Duf283) that may be involved in strand selection (Dlakić.... The N‐ terminus is comprised of a DExD helicase domain (Bernstein et al.1.. The family is classified into three classes with Dicer being a member of class III  (Nicholson et al..  which is a dsRNA‐specific ribonuclease of the RNase III family (Bernstein et al.2. Characterization of the Dicer homologue of Giardia intestinalis revealed that a  functional enzyme only requires the core protein consisting of PAZ and two RNase  III domains which dimerize and use a two‐metal‐ion mechanism for RNA cleavage  (MacRea et al. The length  of the produced small RNA is determined by the distance between the PAZ and the  RNase III domains (MacRea et al.  The number of Dicer proteins varies between species. 1968).2. 2001b). They are produced from long dsRNA molecules by the enzyme Dicer. 2000.. 2004) (see chapter 1.

 2004). The passenger  strand is destroyed (Matranga et al. (B) Resolved crystal structure  of the  Giardia Dicer with the N‐terminal platform domain  (blue). DUF283‐..     The double strand is separated depending on the relative thermodynamic stability of  the two ends of the duplex (Khvorova et al. Introduction  (A)  (B) Figure 1. 2005.. 2000)..3 a. Leuschner et al. the PAZ domain (orange) connected (red) to  the RNase IIIa domain (yellow). b): an N‐terminal domain. In contrast the Piwi clade consists of three proteins which are primarily ex‐ 30  .. the PAZ domain which binds ssRNA (Lingel  et al. 2003. Schwarz et al. 2006) and the guide strand  is incorporated into the RNA‐induced silencing complex (RISC). 2003). which has a bridge  (grey) to the RNaseIIIb domain (green). two RNase III and the  dsRBD domains and the minimal Dicer of Giardia  intestinalis with the PAZ and the two RNase III  domains.  The silencing component of Argonaute proteins can be subdivided into two groups:  the AGO clade consists of members that are similar to AGO1 of Arabidopsis thaliana.. PAZ‐.  They bind small RNAs derived from dsRNA in the RISC and are expressed ubiqui‐ tously.... 2003). 1997)] with an RNase H fold that functions as a ribonucle‐ ase and confers the cleavage of ssRNA. 2006  (A) Domain organization of human Dicer with  Helicase‐. It is characterized  by the guide strand that is bound to an Argonaute protein and auxiliary proteins de‐ pending on the species and the type of small RNA (Hammond et al. which is also named slicing (Song et al. 1995) and the Piwi [(P‐Element‐induced wimpy testis  domain) (Lin & Spradling.2: MacRea et al.   Argonaute proteins contain four domains with partly unidentified functions (see  Figure 1. the middle domain with resemblance to the sugar‐binding domain of the  lac repressor (Friedman et al..1.

1. Introduction 
pressed in gonadal tissues (see Figure 1.3 c): Piwi, the Drosophila P‐element‐induced  wimpy testes protein (Lin & Spradling, 1997), Aubergine (Aub) first identified by its  role in dorsoventral patterning (Schüpbach & Wieschaus, 1991) and Argonaute 3  (AGO3).  The incorporated siRNA binds to its target sequence and the respective Argonaute  protein cleaves the phosphodiester bond of the target between the tenth and eleventh  nucleotide of the bound guide strand. The cleaved target is then released of the ma‐ ture RISC (Elbashir et al., 2001b).  Humans possess eight Argonaute proteins but only Ago2 shows Slicer activity (Liu et  al., 2004; Meister et al., 2004), Drosophila melanogaster has five Argonaute proteins and  all of them possess the ability to slice (Miyoshi et al., 2005). Caenorhabditis elegans has  the largest number of Argonaute proteins with 27 different members (Yigit et al.,  2006). Arabidopsis thaliana possesses 10 Argonaute proteins [(Vaucheret, 2008) (see  chapter 1.2.4)].    
(A)  (C)

 

(B) 

Figure 1.3: Argonaute proteins  (A) Domain organization of human AGO2 with the N‐terminal PAZ‐domain, the Mid domain includ‐ ing the cap‐binding like MC domain and the C‐terminal cleavage‐competent PIWI domain (B) Crystal  structure of the Argonaute of Pyrococcus furiosus including the siRNA (purple) and mRNA (turquoise)  duplex. Active residues of the PIWI domain (a DDH motif) are shown in red. (Hutvagner & Simard,  2008) (C) Multiple sequence alignment revealed three clades of Argonaute proteins (Tolia & Joshua‐ Tor, 2007).  31 

1. Introduction 
1.2.2 miRNAs modulate the expression of endogenous sequences 
The first report of a microRNA gene was lin‐4 which had the ability to repress cell  proliferation in C. elegans (Chalfie et al., 1981). Although encoded by a gene, it was  later shown to be only transcribed into a non‐coding RNA with some complementar‐ ity to the 3’‐UTR of another mRNA transcript, lin‐14, which consequently became  downregulated (Lee et al., 1993). First considered as a unique phenomenon some  years later let‐7 was discovered to use the same mechanism (Reinhart et al., 2000).  Subsequently it was shown that miRNAs are an abundant class of small RNA mole‐ cules responsible for many intracellular regulation processes (reviewed in Carthew &  Sontheimer, 2009).  Animal miRNAs are highly conserved between species which has also been used for  their identification in the past (Ambros et al., 2003). Many new miRNAs have been  identified by deep‐sequencing technologies with now 15172 entries in miRBase re‐ lease 16, Sept 2010 (Griffiths‐Jones et al., 2008).  Genomic regions coding for miRNAs can be located in protein‐coding genes or in  intergenic regions. It was shown that they contain standard promoter elements. Con‐ sequently they are transcribed by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) (Lee et al., 2004b) into  primary miRNA (pri‐miRNA) transcripts which are usually highly structured (Lee et  al., 2002). The first maturation step is always located in the nucleus and executed by  the RNase III endonuclease Drosha (Lee et al., 2003) assisted in the Microprocessor  complex by a dsRNA‐binding protein [Pasha in flies (Denli et al., 2004) and DGCR8  in mammals (Gregory et al., 2004; Han et al., 2006)]. It results in the precursor miRNA  (pre‐miRNA) which is comprised of an imperfect hairpin structure (Lee et al., 2002).  In animals the molecule is subsequently exported into the cytoplasm by Exportin‐5  and the GTPase Ran (Yi et al., 2003). The second maturation step is executed by a  Dicer enzyme (Grishok et al., 2001; Hutvágner et al., 2001; Ketting et al., 2001) again  assisted by a dsRNA‐binding protein [in flies R2D2 for dsRNA (Liu et al., 2003) and  LOQS for structured loci (Förstemann et al., 2005; Saito et al., 2005) and TRBP in  mammals (Chendrimada et al., 2005; Haase et al., 2005)]. It generates a miRNA/ 

32 

1. Introduction 
miRNA* duplex of approximately 21 nt and 2 nt overhangs at the 3’ end. Although  resembling siRNAs in this step, they can be distinguished by the imperfect binding  between the two strands (Lee et al., 2002). The duplex is loaded into the RISC and the  miRNA* strand degraded by the respective Ago protein (Filipowicz et al., 2008).  5‐10 % of all miRNA genes with low expression are located in introns which fold into  short hairpins. These so‐called mirtrons are first processed by the splicing machinery  and then linearized by the lariat debranchase. They further fold into a hairpin similar  to pre‐miRNAs which are processed as described above (Okamura et al., 2007; Ruby  et al., 2007).  Recently a distinct biogenesis mechanism has been discovered in mice (Cheloufi et  al., 2010) and zebrafish (Cifuentes et al., 2010) for miR‐451 which possesses an un‐ usual secondary structure with a short stem of 17 nucleotides. The pre‐miR‐451 is  cleaved by Ago2 and the resulting intermediates are polyuridylated and further  processed by yet to be defined nucleases into the mature miRNA (Cheloufi et al.,  2010; Cifuentes et al., 2010).                   
Figure 1.4: Okamura et al., 2007 The canonical miRNA pathway consists of a Pol II  transcript which folds into a hairpin. This pri‐miRNA  is processed by the Drosha complex into the pre‐ miRNA hairpin. In the mirtron pathway, a short in‐ tron is spliced and branched into a hairpin. The pre‐ miRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm by Eportin‐5  and cleaved by Dicer. 

33 

1. Introduction 
Animal miRNAs bind their targets in a different manner than siRNAs: only a seed  region of approximately six nucleotides around the usual cleavage site requires per‐ fect complementarity to the 3’‐UTRs of their targets, the rest of the miRNAs pos‐ sesses mismatches and frequent non‐conventional base‐pairing (G:U wobbles) with  the targeted mRNA. The exact mechanism of suppression, however, is still under  investigation. The imperfect binding prevents target cleavage by Argonautes. One  model proposes competition with the cap‐binding protein eIF4E and subsequent in‐ hibition of the translation initiation. Another hypothesis accounts for the fact that  many miRNA‐regulated mRNAs are deadenylated. It proposes RISC to stimulate  deadenylation and subsequent mRNA decay. A third model uses the finding that  RISC has some binding affinity to the 60S ribosomal subunit and may therefore pre‐ vent the assembly of the ribosome (reviewed in Carthew & Sontheimer, 2009).   Argonaute proteins involved in the miRNA pathway interact with GW182 proteins  (Behm‐Ansmant et al., 2006). They contain frequent glycine (G) and tryptophan (W)  repeats (Eystathioy et al., 2002) organized in three distinct regions. The N‐terminal  GW‐repeat region is followed by a ubiquitin‐associated (UBA)‐like domain and a  glutamine‐rich (Q‐rich) region. The middle‐ and a C‐terminal GW‐repeat region are  separated by a RNA recognition motif (reviewed in Ding & Han, 2007; Eulalio et al.,  2007). While there exist three paralogues in vertebrates (TNRC6A, ‐B and –C), fungi  have no GW182 proteins and Drosophila possesses only one orthologue making it a  good model for studying their function (Behm‐Ansmant et al., 2006). The C. elegans  orthologues AIN‐1 and AIN‐2 contain only the N‐terminal GW‐repeat region but  function also in miRNA silencing (Ding et al., 2005; Zhang et al., 2007). Binding of  Argonaute by GW‐containing proteins has been also identified in plants (NRPD1b  and SPT5‐like transcription elongation factor) (El‐Shami et al., 2007; Bies‐Etheve et al.,  2009) and S. pombe [(Tas3) (Partridge et al., 2007; Till et al., 2007)].  GW182 proteins exhibit some intrinsic silencing activity (Eulalio et al., 2009a; Zip‐ prich et al., 2009). In addition loss of GW182 suppresses miRNA silencing (Rehwinkel  et al., 2005), but it acts downstream of miRNA processing and loading into the RISC 
34 

  Alternatively deadenylation and subsequent mRNA degradation might be induced.. The N‐terminal region is required for the  binding to AGO1 (Behm‐Ansmant et al. Miyoshi et al. 2009a..  2009. 2010).. 2009). 2006) and together with the Q‐rich region  responsible for localization to the P‐bodies [(processing bodies) (Eulalio et al.. 2007).  2009b)].    35  . 2009  miRNA‐dependent translational repression may be mediated by competition with cap or ribosome  binding..1. 2009). including  the decapping enzyme DCP2 and the main cytoplasmic 5’‐3’ exoribonuclease XRN1  co‐localize to the P‐bodies in the cytoplasm.      Figure 1. circularization may be blocked. A con‐ served motif of approximately 40 residues inside the middle GW‐repeat region has  recently been identified as a PolyA‐binding protein‐interacting motif (Fabian et al. All factors involved in 5’‐3’ exonucleolytic decay of mRNA. or the ribosomes could drop‐off after translation initiation.. They are not required for miRNA silenc‐ ing but can be formed as a consequence of it (reviewed in Eulalio et al. Introduction  (Eulalio et al.5: Carthew & Sontheimer.. which appears to be critical for miRNA‐mediated silencing  (Huntzinger et al. They are cytoplasmic granules where translationally repressed mRNAs can  concentrate.. Zekri et al.

  1. elegans are also piRNAs since they contain a 5’ uridine  (Ruby et al. small RNA  species similar to rasiRNAs but not derived from repeat and transposon‐sequences... Henke  et al. 2007. 2008) and a homologue has  also been identified in C. which is  deposited by an orthologue of the plant methyltransferase HEN1 (Kirino & Mourela‐ tos. There is evi‐ dence that the 21U‐RNAs of C. They all arise from chromosomal clusters and have a single‐ stranded RNA precursor (reviewed in Klattenhoff & Theurkauff. 2008) and they in‐ teract with the Piwi‐related gene PRG‐1 (Wang & Reinke.  In Drosophila piRNA populations can be matched to transposons. 2008). They have 2’‐O‐methylated 3’‐ends..  2001) and could later also be identified in zebrafish (Chen et al.. Ørom et al. 2007.    Under certain conditions the miRNA‐loaded RISC has been shown to activate trans‐ lation but the exact reason and mechanism is not clear (Vasudevan et al. 2009). 2008).  The newly identified family of small RNAs was further called Piwi‐interacting RNAs  [(piRNAs) (Malone & Hannon.  they were called repeat‐associated small‐interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs) (Aravin et al. In addition.. they suppress transposon mobility (Das et al. Ohara et al. Another control point is the regulation of miRNA processing.. 2006). 2007). 2008.3 The piRNA pathway protects the germline from transposon activity  In Drosophila melanogaster a large family of small RNAs with a length of 23‐26 nt was  identified to map to repetitive heterochromatic regions and transposable elements. These antisense piRNAs are bound by Piwi  and Aub whereas the sense‐orientated fraction interacts with AGO3.2. where many  factors have been already identified. in mammals.. 2009)]. 2010). The two classes  36  ... 2008). they have a strong bias for a 5’‐uridine resi‐ due and a Dicer‐independent biogenesis pathway resulting in a larger size compared  to the other small RNAs. Introduction  miRNAs themselves are very often under control of their targets in a negative feed‐ back loop. elegans (Chatterjee & Grosshans. 2005).   Piwi and its orthologues were shown to bind rasiRNAs and.1. A first report of exonucleases degrading  miRNAs comes from plants (Ramachandran & Chen. usually enriched  for sequences antisense to transposons. or the regulation of the effector proteins of the  miRISC (reviewed in Krol et al.

 In the latter the tran‐ scription of centromeric repeats leads to siRNAs which direct the AGO orthologue to  cleave target transcripts of this locus. 2009). 2007).4. 2007).2... Gunawardane et al. The reaction activates the RNA‐dependent  RNA polymerase complex which generates further siRNAs.1). They are all part of nuage..  2004).. This suggests a compartmentalization of piRNA bio‐ genesis and action (Lim & Kai. although the cycle there seems to be initiated by  sense piRNAs and is only present in the male germline (Aravin et al.. Finally these siRNAs  direct the modification of histones (Moazed.  2007. This results in secondary sense piRNAs which are bound by  AGO3 and direct the cleavage of antisense transposon sequences (Brennecke et al. reviewed in Klattenhoff & Theurkauff.  Additional factors have been identified to be required for the piRNA pathway.  C. suggesting processing by Piwi which had been  shown to cleave its target ten nucleotides from the 5’‐end of the guide strand (Saito et  al. an additional pathway of piRNA function has been dis‐ covered recently in somatic ovarian follicle cells. 2006) and Spindle E (Aravin et al.  In Drosophila mainly Aub‐ and AGO3‐associated piRNAs take part in the ping‐pong  cycle. 2008). The biogenesis and amplification of piRNAs follows the so called ping‐ pong cycle. The cycle  shares similarities with the silencing of heterochromatic regions by RNA‐directed  DNA methylation in plants and S. Gunawardane et al. Piwi‐associated piRNAs may only comprise the primary piRNAs in the germ‐ line‐specific cycle. 2008) and the germ‐ line function (Wang & Reinke. pombe (see chapter 1.  2007. depending exclusively on Piwi and  37  . 2007).. The same can be observed after a loss  of the putative helicases Armitage (Vagin et al. which is a germline‐specific perinuclear structure  implicated in RNA processing.. Introduction  of piRNAs have overlapping 5’‐ends separated by ten nucleotides (Brennecke et al.. However. 2006). elegans 21U‐RNAs are also required for fertility (Batista et al. 2007. Parts of this cycle have also been detected in zebraf‐ ish (Houwing et al.1. muta‐ tions in the putative nucleases Zucchini and Squash disrupt piRNA production and  release transposon silencing (Pane et al. 2007). 2007) and mice. 2008). It is initiated by primary antisense piRNAs which target the cleavage of  transposon mRNA..

 The latter proteins are both localized to cytoplasmic foci.2. 2010  In somatic cells piRNAs are synthesized by a PIWI‐dependent linear pathway without amplification.b). Introduction  the flamenco piRNA cluster (Malone et al..  2010). In armitage mutants no piRNAs accumulate  suggesting a function early in the pathway (Olivieri et al..4 Plants possess a high diversity of siRNA molecules  Plants display an astonishing variety of siRNA types and proteins which are needed  for their generation. Although initially more factors  had been identified.  Every member of the DICER‐LIKE protein family in Arabidopsis has distinct functions  although some redundancies have also been identified: DCL1 is the main Dicer in‐ 38  . Armitage and the putative helicase/  tudor domain protein Yb are required for silencing of the gypsy transposon in the  somatic cells. Arabidopsis thaliana has four Dicer‐like and ten Argonaute pro‐ teins with distinct molecular functions.  whereas in the germline the primary piRNAs are dependent on Aubergine and get amplified via the  so‐called ping‐pong cycle and Ago3. recent findings suggest the following proteins being indispensa‐ ble for the somatic piRNA pathway: Zucchini. discussed in Zamore. 2010.    1.    Figure 1. which maybe confers shuttling be‐ tween the cytoplasm and the nucleus.1. Piwi accumu‐ lates in the cytoplasm in the absence of Zucchini. 2009a.6: Zamore.

. 2002. Moreover.4. 2006. DCL1 can process  some nat‐siRNAs from endogenous inverted repeat sequences (Borsani et al..  AGO1 is the founding protein for the whole Argonaute protein family and its pleio‐ tropic defects have first been described in 1998 (Bohmert et al. It had later been  identified to act in RNA silencing (Fagard et al.  but it has been shown to preferentially interact with a 5’‐cytosine (Takeda et al. AGO5 is the third member of this group.  Bouché et al.2. 2006).2)]. Xie et al. 2006). 1998).. 2002. 2010).. 2005. Its exact function is not clear... Deleris et al..   Another clade of Arabidopsis AGO proteins contains AGO7 which is involved in the  TAS3 biogenesis pathway [(Montgomery et al. 2008). Introduction  volved in miRNA processing which cannot be compensated by the other members  (Park et al. Yang et al..  Katiyar‐Agarwal et al.. DCL3 produces 24‐nt  siRNAs which are mainly involved in chromatin silencing (Xie et al. 2005b) and in the production of miR822 and  miR839 (Rajagopalan et al. 2000).. AGO10 (originally termed PINHEAD/ZWILLE) is the closest  paralogue of AGO1 and partly shows redundant function in development (Lynn et  al. 2003). 2005). 2004). 2005. In addition. 2006)  Plants contain a high number of Argonaute proteins with ten members in Arabidopsis  thaliana and 19 members in Oryza sativa... The former will be discussed in more details  (reviewed in Vaucheret. AGO1 predominantly acts in  the miRNA pathway but it can also bind several classes of siRNAs (Baumberger &  Baulcombe. Recent studies implicate AGO10 as a negative regulator of AGO1 (Mallory  et al... Reinhart et al. Papp et al. 2005.. 2004)... DCL4 is  the main plant Dicer for the production of viral 21‐nt siRNAs (Dunoyer et al.1.. DCL2 also participates in the latter function and gener‐ ates 22‐nt siRNAs from virus sequences (Xie et al.. 2006). 2005. 2008a) (see chapter 1. 2006)... 2008). 1999). After processing by DCL proteins in plants the re‐ sulting small RNAs are methylated at their 3’‐ends by the S‐adenosyl‐dependent me‐ thyltransferase HUA ENHANCER 1 (HEN1) which protects them from uridylation  and further degradation (Li et al. AGO2  39  . It is itself regulated by a feedback mechanism through miR168  (Vaucheret et al. it is involved in tasiRNA metabo‐ lism (Gasciolli et al..

 AGO1 prefers uridine which is the predominant 5’ nucleotide  of plant miRNAs.  It has been shown that the 5’‐nucleotide of the small RNA species acts as a sorting  signal into the different AGO proteins in plants: AGO2 and AGO4 preferentially in‐ teract with adenosine.2.     Figure 1. the major protein involved in transcriptional  gene silencing [(Zilberman et al.. AGO6 has a partial re‐ dundant activity with AGO4 (Zheng et al. 2009  (A) In plants cis‐acting siRNA precursor molecules are transcribed by Pol IV and a dsRNA generated  by RDR2. The role of the other two proteins of  this clade. 2005). (B) In the tasiRNA pathway  a precursor molecule is subject to miRNA‐mediated cleavage. but their similarity suggests a redun‐ dant function. DCL3 cleaves the 24‐nt casiRNAs which associate with AGO4. Since the AGO8 expression is very low it has been suggested to be a  pseudogene (Takeda et al. Finally AGO5 binds small RNAs with a terminal cytosine (Mi et al.  The third clade is comprised of AGO4. 2003) (see chapter 1..7: Ghildiyal & Zamore.. RDR6 generates a dsRNA which is  processed by DCL4 into tasiRNAs which associate with AGO1/7..    40  . 2007). (C) natsiRNAs derive from overlap‐ ping transcripts which are processed into a dsRNA. Introduction  and AGO3 are highly similar proteins with currently unknown function. The former  is probably regulated by miR403 (Allen et al.1.1)].4.. AGO8 and AGO9.  2008). is still unknown. A dicer molecule then generates the natsiRNAs. 2008).

...  41  . In plants it is  responsible for 30 % of de novo methylation of cytosines in heterochromatic and some  euchromatic regions such as transposons (Cokus et al.  Their largest (NRPD1 and NRPE1) and second largest subunits (the shared subunit  NRPD2/NRPE2) are unique with the latter being also related to the largest subunit of  POL II (RPB1) (Wierzbicki et al.  After primary RdDM Pol IV transcribes the methylated template and downstream sequences which  result in secondary RdDM.1. 2009. This  methylation is deposited by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2  (DRM2). 2008). 2009  dsRNA is processed by DCL3/HEN1 into 24‐nt siRNAs which are loaded onto AGO4. Lister et al.2. 2008. 2008.. Wierzbicki et al. 2009). POL IV and POL V (Pikaard et al. In addition RdDM requires two plant‐specific POL II‐related RNA poly‐ merases. Ream et al. 2008).. Law & Jacobsen. Introduction  1. 2010)..4.1 Cis‐acting siRNAs mediate chromatin silencing in plants  RNA‐directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an epigenetic siRNA‐mediated modifica‐ tion in plants (reviewed in Matzke et al.. They act in complexes     Figure 1.8: Matzke et al. Pol IV transcribes the methylated  DNA which is further copied by RDR2 into dsRNA. 2008. Transcription  by Pol V facilitates de novo methylation at the siRNA‐targeted site..

. 2009).. 2008) identifies and maybe also transcribes  low‐abundance intergenic non‐coding transcripts (IGN) (Wierzbicki et al. 2005). 2008). 2009).. These are bound by AGO4 [(or  sometimes AGO6 (Zheng et al.2 Trans‐acting siRNAs   Trans‐acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) are a plant‐specific type of small RNAs generated  from specific TAS loci.1.  2010).. 2007). The RdDM mechanism is conserved in S. There exist four TAS families which can be further subdivided  into two classes: one consists of TAS1. 2004. Introduction  including SNF2‐like chromatin remodeling factors: POLIV together with CLASSY1  (CLSY1) is involved in the initiation of siRNA biogenesis by transcribing a long sin‐ gle‐stranded RNA. INVOLVED IN DE NOVO METHYLATION 2 (IDN2) may inter‐ act with the siRNA‐RNA duplex and recruit RDM2 (Ausin et al. The IGN transcripts are probably recog‐ nized by the AGO4‐bound siRNAs (Wierzbicki et al. 2007)] which can interact with POL V through a con‐ served GW/WG motif (El‐Shami et al.  RNA‐DPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2 (RDR2) produces dsRNA from the single‐ stranded POL IV‐dependent transcripts which are further processed by DCL3 into  24‐nt heterochromatic siRNAs (Mosher et al. Recently POL II‐ dependent non‐coding transcripts have been identified to also recruit RdDM factors  (Zheng et al. 2008).2. POL V together with DEFECTIVE IN RNA‐DIRECTED DNA  METHYLATION (DRD1) (Pikaard et al.4..... Vazquez et al. pombe as  well where it leads to heterochromatinization (reviewed in Moazed.. siRNAs also appear to guide active de‐ methylation (Zheng et al. The initial POL II transcripts are bound by the miRNA with  42  . They depend on the cleavage by miR173  (Yoshikawa et al..   1. 2004). consisting of three loci... TAS2 and TAS4 which require one miRNA‐ binding site for tasiRNA biogenesis. 2009). 2008). 2009). 2008). whereas TAS4 depends on the cleavage by miR828 (Ra‐ jagopalan et al..   The action of RDR2 may lead to the production of secondary siRNAs and further me‐ thylation spreading (Daxinger et al.. and TAS2 were the first identified TAS loci  (Peragine et al. 2006).  The TAS1 family. The other is compromised by the TAS3 family  which requires two miRNA‐binding sites for tasiRNA biogenesis (Allen & Howell.

. The dominant  phasing pattern can also drift for one or two nucleotides.... 2009). 2008b. 2004). 2004). In contrast in the  second pathway miR390 binds twice to the TAS3 transcript and guides its cleavage by AGO7 at the 3’‐ site.9: Allen & Howell.. 2004) and bound by SUPPRESSOR OF  GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) (Peragine et al. probably by the redundant      Figure 1. 2004. Vazquez et al.. It can interact  with the RNA‐DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6) (Kumakura et al.  43  .. 2004. Vazquez et al. 2009)  which synthesizes the complementary strand from the 3’‐end towards the 5’‐cleavage  site.1. The  transcript is cleaved by AGO1 (Vazquez et al. 2010  In the first pathway miR173/828 guides the cleavage of the TAS transcript by AGO1. The cleaved transcript is synthesized by RDR6 into a dsRNA which is processed by DCL4 into the  tasiRNAs. Felippes & Weigel. Introduction  unusual mismatches in the seed region. The resulting dsRNA is further processed by DCL4 from the miRNA cleavage  site into 21‐nt long siRNAs (Peragine et al. substitution of these mismatches abolishes  the production of tasiRNAs (Montgomery et al.

. 2006).. 2008). The TAS3 family consists of  three loci (Howell et al.  1. 2008). 2006.. 2008)..  RDR6. miR390 was shown to interact with  AGO7. In addition they are non cell‐autonomous and can create a  silencing gradient across neighboring cells (Chitwood et al. 2007). they may substantially contribute to the  small RNA population during stress conditions.   Factors required for the synthesis of the primary natsiRNAs are DCL2 and/or DCL1..   The tasiRNAs are sorted into the corresponding Argonaute proteins according to  their 5’‐nucleotide (Mi et al... SGS3 and POL IV (Borsani et al. 2008a). Katiyar‐Agarwal et al.. 2004).. Although  rather rare under physiological conditions.. 2007). Zhang &  Trudeau.. the binding of AGO7 to the 5’‐site is indispensable for tasiRNA produc‐ tion (Montgomery et al. 2006. 2006. They guide the cleavage of the complementary transcript. 2009). 2005). 2004. 2008). 44  . 2006) and Auxin  responsive factors (Allen et al. Adenot et al.. 2007). tasiRNAs can be considered as an amplification of  an initial silencing signal.. 2005. all characterized by two binding sites for miR390  which flank the tasiRNA‐producing sequence (Allen et al.1. 2005.2.. The 5’‐site possesses critical  mismatches and it is not clear if it is also cleaved.  Identified targets are Pentatricopeptide‐repeat proteins (Peragine et al.. Schwab et al.3 Natural antisense siRNAs  Natural antisense transcript‐derived siRNAs (natsiRNAs) have first been described  as a result of salt‐stress in Arabidopsis (Borsani et al.. Garcia et al. 2009.. 2005. since NAT pairs compromise more  than 7 % of all transcriptional units in Arabidopsis thaliana (Henz et al. Fahl‐ gren et al. While the cleavage at the 3’ site can be accomplished by another miRNA‐ AGO pair.. Introduction  function of other DCL proteins (Howell et al.4...  Vazquez et al. trans‐NATs are transcribed from different loci resulting in short and imper‐ fect complementarity of the double strand (Jin et al. In  contrast. MYB transcription factors (Rajagopalan et al. There exist two different  types of natural antisense transcripts (NATs): cis‐NATs have a high sequence com‐ plementarity since they are transcribed from opposing strands of the same locus. From these only the  3’‐site is cleaved and determines the resulting tasiRNAs. Williams et al.

5 Peculiarities of plant miRNAs  The first plant miRNAs have been identified in 2002 (Park et al. The first tran‐ sition to pre‐miRNAs takes place in nuclear processing centers (D‐bodies) where  DCL1 interacts with the double‐stranded RNA‐binding protein HYPONASTIC  LEAVES1 (HYL1) and the Zinc‐finger protein SERRATE (SE). The miRNAs are loaded into the Argonaute  protein AGO1 of the RISC which slices the mRNA targets between the tenth and  eleventh nucleotide (Rhoades et al. The pri‐miRNAs are  further processed by DCL1 into mature miRNAs in a two‐step process.2. 2008). Examples of evolutionary conserved miRNAs between animals and plants are  rare. The strand folds into an imperfect hairpin which is probably sta‐ bilized by the RNA‐binding protein DAWDLE (DDL).  Most plant MIR genes are located in intergenic regions. MIR genes are transcribed by POL II into pri‐ miRNAs which get capped at the 3’‐end and polyadenylated at the 5’‐end like  mRNA transcripts.1. Reinhart et al. 2006). After the second  processing step by DCL1. 2006).. Introduction  1. Yang et al. 2002).. Later a mechanism of translational repres‐ sion similar to the miRNA mechanism in animals has been identified in miRNA‐ 45  .. 2005. 2006).. 2007.. 2008).  2002). 2005). 2009). al‐ though other export mechanisms cannot be excluded (Park et al. there exist more than 100  families of related miRNAs which are usually conserved between angiosperms (Ax‐ tell & Bowman. 2002. the latter also having a  role in mRNA splicing (Fang & Spector. therefore it is believed that they evolved independently in the two genera (Ax‐ tell & Bowman. therefore less conserved and with a highly di‐ verse target range (Zhang et al. Another group of  miRNAs are evolutionary younger. Plant miRNAs consequently possess several special features  compared to animal miRNAs (reviewed in Voinnet. Kurihara et al.. The  miRNAs are exported into the cytoplasm by the nuclear pore complex HASTY. It also binds other mRNAs  and might be involved in siRNA biogenesis too (Yu et al. 2008).  The first identified mode of action of plant miRNAs is characterized by extensive  complementarity to their target mRNAs... 2008) and partly also back to moss (Garcia. the mature miRNA duplexes are stabilized by methylation  at their 3’‐ends which is transferred by HEN1 (Li et al..

 2003. For studying this phenomenon A. 2008). 2008)   46  .6 Spreading of RNA silencing in plants resembles an immune system  In plants RNA silencing acts as sort of an immune system providing resistance to  viruses.  Abundant transcription of short interspaced elements (SINE) RNA can compete for  the essential factor HYL1 (Pouch‐Pelissier et al. Qu et al. 2005a) which show a high degree of transcrip‐ tion factor binding sites (Megraw et al. 2006)].   1. it probably also requires the function of  AGO1 as well as a microtubule‐severing enzyme KATANIN (KTN) and the P‐body  component VARICOSE (VCS) which is required for mRNA decapping (Brodersen et  al. is the missing genomic information of Nicotiana sp. RDR6 and RDR1 are the major players in antiviral si‐ lencing mechanisms (Schwach et al. 2007). since they host a wide range of viruses and have a  lifecycle and size more favorable for studying the effects of viral infections..1. 2006. 2006). 2005. Diaz‐Pendon et al.. A major  disadvantage. suggesting a feed‐back regula‐ tion (Xie et al. Vaucheret et al. the host needs a mechanism transmitting the initial immunity of RNA silenc‐ ing to other leaves. Players of the miRNA path‐ way are frequently itself targets of miRNA regulation. Moreover single stranded miRNAs are  also subject to degradation by members of the SMALL RNA DEGRADING  NUCLEASE (SDN) family of exonucleases (Ramachandran & Chen. Their activity is stimulated by the  presence of aberrant RNA with missing 5’‐cap structures or 3’‐polyadenylation (Herr  et al..2.. Luo & Chen. thaliana is usually replaced by  Nicotiana sp. 2008).. resulting in 24‐nt products which are predominantly  sorted into AGO4 and therefore not available for the RISC (Vazquez et al. as a model organism. High DCL3 levels compete with  DCL1 for miRNA processing.. 2007.. 2008). Introduction  action deficient (mad) class III‐mutants.. Since viruses replicate rapidly and are able to spread throughout the whole  plant. The extent of miRNA expression is regulated on different levels: MIR genes  have their own promoters (Xie et al.. 2008).. 2004). Tissue‐specific differences in protein  expression can account for altered miRNA action..   The initiation of silencing is mediated by the overexpression of exogenous RNA  which is transformed into dsRNA by the action of RNA‐dependent RNA poly‐ merases [(RDRs) (Wassenegger & Krczal. however.

 2000.1... Bleys et al. After initiation of silencing in a cell the signal is trans‐ 47  . Schwach et al... Kumakura et al. 2001) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3). 2008  Examples of silencing spread of a GFP transgene: (A) not silenced (B) spontaneous short‐range local  silencing (C) induced short‐range local silencing (D) fully silenced (E) systemic silencing (F) extensive  local spread (left) and systemic silencing (right).       together with the co‐factors SILENCING DEFICIENT 3 (SDE3). 2003. 2003) and light (Kotakis et al.. 2009). 2005. a  coiled‐coiled domain protein (Mourrain et al.. Endogenous sequences cannot  serve as substrates for RDRs (Himber et al. Introduction  Figure 1..  Exogenous factors such as temperature (Szittya et al. a putative RNA heli‐ case (Dalmay et al.. Silencing  of DNA viruses and the RNA Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) additionally requires RDR2  (Donaire et al.10: Kalantidis et al. extensive local spread (ELSS) and systemic silencing...   The short‐range local silencing spread is not limited to exogenous RNA and can also  affect endogenous sequences.  The spreading of RNA silencing can be differentiated into three different stages. 2008).  2010) can influence the efficiency of silencing onset.  2005).  short‐range local spread (SLSS).

. 2006. It is restricted to sink tissues which  receive the signal from the source tissues of the leaves which had initially been chal‐ lenged with the exogenous RNA (Kalantidis et al. Several other proteins of the various RNA silencing mecha‐ nisms have been shown to be a prerequisite for the short‐range spread including  HEN1. DRB4.. Kalantidis et al. 1998). The signal  transmitting the silencing spread of viral sequences is believed to be an RNA mole‐ cule (Jorgensen et al. 2005. 2007. Mlotshwa et al..  Dunoyer et al.. Tournier et al. Schwach et al. 2005).. 2006. 2001)... but it  probably relies on passive diffusion through the plasmodesmata (Voinnet et al.. 2003. Yang et al. The exact nature of the signal could not be discovered yet. 2002. 2003). This multitude of in‐ volved proteins suggests an intensive cross‐talk of the distinct RNA silencing  mechanisms. 2003. it was proposed that a certain threshold  has to be exceeded to trigger a stronger reaction. Its action  might be executed by a virus‐specific siRNA‐RISC (Lakatos et al. 2006). It is unclear which factors  define the onset of extensive local spread. Other required factors appear to be DCL4  and the putative RNA helicase SDE3 (Dalmay et al.   The least understood mechanism is systemic spread which is probably accompanied  by the transport of the silencing signal through the phloem (Voinnet & Baulcombe. Smith et al. the POL IV subunit NRPD1a. 2007).. Adenot et al. 2006). Nakazawa et al.. RDR2 and its presumable inter‐ acting protein CLSY1 (Hiraguri et al.... 2007. 1998... It is accompanied by  amplification of the initial signal as a result of an RDR6‐dependent mechanism  (Himber et al... Several factors have been shown  to be indispensable for the short‐range spread: loss of DCL4 abolishes the mechanism  suggesting an involvement of 21‐nt siRNAs which are the products of DCL4 action  (Dunoyer et al.1.. Fagard & Vaucheret. 2006). 2006) with a mobility comparable to soluble pro‐ teins of 27‐54 kDa (Kobayashi & Zambryski.  1997. but it has been proven not to be of the size of siRNAs  48  .   Extensive local spread of silencing is characterized by the fact that the signal exceeds  the limit of 10–15 cells but does not spread to the whole plant. 2007). Introduction  ferred to 10–15 cells surrounding the initial source of silencing without amplification  (Himber et al. AGO1..  Himber et al. 2005). 2000.

 Several  other virus‐encoded proteins have been shown to possess viral RNA silencing sup‐ pressor activity with yet unknown mechanisms. 2007). Introduction  (Mallory et al. 2005. More than 35 VSR families  could be found in all plant virus types... Csorba et al. 2006.  2007. 2001). It interferes with methylation (Ebhardt et al.1. 2007).  49  . 2007) and the p23 protein which controls viral RNA accumulation (Sat‐ yanaryana et al. Shiboleth et al. 2006..  2007).. The poleoviral P0 is also a member of class I VSRs and appears to mediate the  degradation of AGO1 which abolishes intracellular RNA silencing processes (Pfeffer  et al.. Baumberger et al. They encode for proteins acting as viral sup‐ pressors of silencing (VSRs) in a very diverse manner.. such as the transcription factor  AL2/AC2/C2 (Trinks et al. 2002.  2005) and prevents RISC assembly (Merai et al. 2004). Vogler et al. Lu et al. 2002. 2004). 2003).   The class I suppressor potyviral helper component proteinase (HC‐Pro) is a multi‐ functional protein whose performance partly depends on its silencing suppression  activity (Kasschau & Carrington. However. they can be classified into three different  categories: class I VSRs suppress the local silencing of the viral RNAs. class II VSRs  suppress the local silencing spread and class III VSRs are the largest class suppress‐ ing the systemic spreading of silencing (reviewed in Díaz‐Pendón & Ding.. Yu et al... 2007. The tobamoviral protein p126 contains methyltransferase and helicase do‐ mains and is present in a complex with p183 (Komoda et al.. 2007) which has also been shown for p21 (Yu et al.. Pazhouhandeh et al. Another protein necessary for binding and facilitating the  movement of RNA molecules between cells has been discovered in cucurbits (Yoo et  al. 2006.. so far no homologues of this PHLOEM SMALL RNA‐BINDING  PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana or Nicotiana sp. Bortolamiol et al.  2007).. It binds duplex  siRNAs and interferes with methylation by HEN1 (Blevins et al. Yang et al...2.7 Viral strategies to suppress RNA silencing in plants  Viruses also possess strategies to counteract the RNA silencing mechanisms used for  their clearance from the plant genomes.   1.. 2006.... 2006). the translational enhancer P6  (Love et al.. 2008).

 2006).2. The tymoviral p69 appears to target plant silencing upstream of RDR‐ dependent dsRNA synthesis (Chen et al.. The  potexviral p25 is an RNA helicase that interferes with the plasmodesmata (Bayne et  al.   Most viral suppressors of silencing belong to class III. 2005. 2000)... A first report was the Ca2+ sensor protein REGULATOR OF GENE  SILENCING CALMODULIN‐LIKE (rgs‐CAM) which became upregulated upon HC‐ Pro expression. Ectopic overexpression of rgs‐CAM mimics the symptoms of HC‐ Pro‐containing viruses (Anandalakshmi et al. Introduction  Many viral movement proteins have been shown to be members of class II VSRs. Bayne et al. The tomoviral p19 binds short  dsRNA molecules with high affinity.. Laka‐ tos et al... 2007). 2007).. Ye et al.. Moissiard et al. 2000. 2003. 2004... p50 inhibits systemic spread of si‐ lencing (Yaegeshi et al. RNase L inhibitor 2 (RLI2) has  been found to be upregulated when transgenic plants are subject to RNA interference  (Braz et al. It blocks the production of RDR1‐dependent sec‐ ondary viRNAs (Cao et al.. the carmoviral p38 protein is able to replace p19 (Qu & Morris. 2004). Some viral coat proteins also  exhibit VSR function.... Omarov et al. 2007). 2007).1.. Yaegeshi et al. The cucumoviral 2b pro‐ tein may have a dual role since it weakly suppresses intracellular silencing in addi‐ tion to its potent inhibition of RNA silencing spread which allows long‐distance vi‐ rus movement (Guo & Ding.8 Repressing the repressors ‐ endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing  The power of the small RNA molecules and the presence of VSRs which specifically  sequester small RNAs suggest that there also exist endogenous suppressors of RNA  silencing. 2002). Later it has been shown that upon simultaneous overexpression it  reduces the amounts of siRNAs (Sarmiento et al.  2002). 2005)... 2006). 2003.. 2002. Pantaleo et al. The cytoplasmic exonuclease  XRN4 has been proposed as an endogenous suppressor of silencing since in the mu‐ 50  .. The sequestering of siRNA duplexes may pre‐ vent RISC functionality (Silhavy et al. it can selectively inhibit DCL4 and also suppress 22‐nt siRNAs which are  DCL2 products (Merai et al. Vargason et al.. The related p14 also binds dsRNA molecules  (Havelda et al. 2005. 2007). Merai et al. 2004). while p25 targets downstream of dsRNA synthesis  (Voinnet et al.   1. 2005. 2003.

 2002).. 2004). 2004)... The first identification of an endogenous inhibitor  of silencing in C.5’‐bisphosphate nu‐ cleotidase/inositol polyphosphate 1‐phosphatase FIERY1 (FRY1) has been identified  as a suppressor of virus‐ and transgene‐induced post‐transcriptional gene silencing  (PTGS) (Gy et al. 2002) exhib‐ ited a similar phenotype to eri‐1 mutants. Similar results have been obtained for the nuclear exonucleases  XRN2 and XRN3 (Gy et al.  It is an evolutionary conserved protein with nucleic acid binding properties (con‐ ferred by a SAP/SAF‐box domain) and a DEDDh‐like 3’‐5’ exonuclease domain. 2004). 2008) and C. In a  genetic screen eri‐1 null mutants were identified to possess enhanced sensitivity to  dsRNAs throughout the whole organism. rrf‐3 mutants (Sijen et al. overaccumulation of miRNA cleavage products could be detected  (Souret et al. 2001. elegans the loss of the putative RNA‐directed RNA polymerase RRF‐3 lead to  hypersensitivity to RNAi (Simmer et al. elegans (Chatterjee & Grosshans.. ERI‐1 is mainly  localized in the cytoplasm of developing somatic gonads and in a subset of neurons. It  partly degraded double‐stranded siRNAs with 2‐nt 3’‐overhangs in vitro.9 ERI‐1 is an example for an endogenous suppressor of RNA silencing  In Caenorhabditis elegans the neuronal cells are refractory to RNA interference.  For miRNAs it has recently been shown that they are specifically downregulated by a  family of exoribonucleases called SMALL RNA DEGRADING NUCELASE (SDN) in  plants (Ramachandran & Chen. 2004). 2007). 2009)  1.(2’). elegans was the protein RRF‐3 which is similar to RNA‐dependent  RNA polymerases RdRPs).  In addition.. 2007). For none of the above described pro‐ teins a specific effect on siRNAs has been proven and secondary effects cannot be  excluded. Introduction  tant background xrn4 RDR‐dependent silencing was increased (Gazzani et al.. In addition  eri‐1 mutants accumulated more siRNAs after ingestion of long dsRNAs or injection  of siRNAs (Kennedy et al.2.. In the same screen the 3’.  In C. The mutants were viable and showed a  weak phenotype except for sterility due to a defect in sperm function. Both proteins were found in a screen for DCR‐1 interacting pro‐ 51  . including the enhanced RNAi phenotype  (Timmons. Simmer et al..1.

  Asp298‐ and Met235 are indispensible for the enzymatic activity of 3’hExo. unless the  histone mRNA is protected by the stem‐loop binding protein SLBP (Dominski et al. The re‐ placement of Arg105 in the SAP domain eliminated binding to the stem‐loop. In addition two newly identified genes eri‐3 and eri‐5 were interacting with  DCR‐1. Introduction  teins. 3’hExo requires a terminal hydroxyl group and cannot process  RNAs terminating with a phosphate group (Dominski et al. Only the long isoform of ERL‐1 (ERI‐1b) could be detected in  DCR‐1 immunoprecipitates suggesting distinct molecular functions of the two iso‐ forms (Duchaine et al. 2006). The conserved stem‐loop sequence of histone mRNAs is necessary for its selec‐ tive degradation and confers the same reaction when introduced to other mRNAs at  their 3’ends.. 2003... They also showed an enhanced RNAi phenotype and promoted the DCR‐ 1/ERI‐1 interaction.1. Deletion of the SAP domain abolished binding of 3’hExo to the  stem‐loop RNA but the residual exonuclease exhibited enzymatic activity. 2006). 3’hExo contains a SAP (Kipp et al.  The crystallographic structure of the exonuclease domain of 3’hExo bound to rAMP.  a reaction product of the enzyme. The active site is comprised of the conserved  52  . 2005).. Asp234... It can remove the  2nt overhangs and the first nucleotide of the double‐stranded region of the siRNAs in  vitro (Yang et al.. 1999).6 Å in the  presence of Mg2+. 2005). The 3’hExo‐GFP protein predominately accumulated in the cytoplasm  and the nucleoli. Mutation of  the latter amino acid leads to global structural changes unable to bind the stem‐loop  (Yang et al. has been resolved at a resolution of 1.   A homologue of ERI‐1 had been described earlier by Dominski et al. twisted β‐sheet which is bracketed  by nine α‐helices (Cheng & Patel. It binds the 3’‐terminal ACCCA of the stem‐loop and degrades it. The structure is similar to DnaQ‐like 3’‐5’  exonucleases which usually bind to DNA and produce hydrolytic products releasing  a nucleotide 5’‐monophosphate and leaving a 3’‐hydroxyl on the penultimate nucleo‐ tide (Viswanathan & Lovett. 2000) and a 3’‐5’ exonuclease do‐ main. They iden‐ tified a protein binding the highly conserved stem‐loop structure of metazoan his‐ tone mRNAs. It is composed of a six‐stranded. 2004).  2003).

1. Acinus and PIAS)  DNA/RNA‐binding domain positions the 3’‐overhangs within the active site (Cheng  & Patel.  The exonuclease domain appears to lack a binding pocket accommodating RNAs  longer than dinucleotides. Snp is a more efficient nuclease  than 3’hExo toward histone stem‐loop RNAs since it can also cleave the double‐ stranded stem portion. Introduction  acidic DEDD motif which binds two magnesium ions. It does not require a 2’‐OH for substrate rec‐ ognition. catalysis or product release.12). It has a broad substrate specificity and de‐ grades in vitro single‐stranded and double‐stranded DNA and RNA with the re‐ quirement of a minimal 2‐5 nt 3’‐flank. One reason may be the absence of the SAP domain which  53  . Snp shares 31 % sequence identity with ERI‐1 and has  a characteristic DEDDh motif (compare Figure 1. 3’hExo and ERI‐1 share 38 % sequence identity  and 60 % sequence similarity. These two together with the  conserved Histidine are in direct contact with the monophosphate of rAMP.      Figure 1. 2004). Probably the SAP (SAF‐box.11: Cheng & Patel. a highly  active and promiscuous 3’‐5’ exonuclease. 2004  The positioning of the rAMP substrate in the 3’hExo reaction center requires two Magnesium ions  and is conferred by two hydrogen bonds.    The homologue of 3’hExo in Drosophila melanogaster is named Snipper (Snp).

.  54  . It  contains conserved SAP and DEDDh exonuclease domains and shows more than 30  % identity to C. suggesting that QIP is essential for functional  RNAi. but acting down‐ stream of QDE‐2. Snp can cleave DNA substrates and is also able to degrade the stem portion of  the DNA hairpin. It degrades dsRNA with 2‐nt overhangs and the RNA  moiety of RNA‐DNA hybrids. It is required for efficient processing of siRNA duplexes. Deletion of Eri1.1.  Chp1 and Tas3. QIP probably functions in the RISC activa‐ tion process by removing the nicked passenger strand from the siRNA duplexes  (Maiti et al. unlike siRNA duplexes from qde KOs. Introduction  might bind the stem in the other homologues and thereby protects it from degrada‐ tion. an Argonaute protein associated with  siRNAs and two Dicer proteins. pombe orthologue. The minimum length of the 3’‐flank for association in mobility shift  assays was found to be at least two nucleotides.  In Neurospora crassa RNAi is essential for the dsRNA‐ or transgene (quelling)‐induced  gene silencing. In  QIP KOs siRNA levels were significantly higher than in wildtype.  In fission yeast heterochromatin assembly requires the RNAi machinery and is initi‐ ated by siRNAs.. Homozygous Snp mutants showed  no increased RNAi function. 2007). In an electrophoretic mobility shift assay the SAP‐ domain efficiently bound dsRNA and RNA‐DNA hybrids but not ssRNA. suggesting that in qip KOs the  siRNAs had already been pre‐processed. dsDNA or  ssDNA. the single S. Loss of Eri1 which predominately localizes to the cytoplasm did not affect  normal cellular growth but the overexpression of Eri1 caused a severe growth defect. elegans ERI‐1. it also does not play a major role in the clearance of  apoptotic DNA in Drosophila (Kupsco et al. They are derived from heterochromatic regions and processed by  the RNA‐induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex which contains Ago1. The hypothetical protein QIP co‐purified with QDE‐ 2 and contains a 3’‐5’ exonuclease domain belonging to the DEDDh superfamily. 2006). siRNA duplexes from qip KOs were less stable and single‐stranded  at 57 °C. its components are QDE‐2. causes an increase in  siRNAs associated with the RITS complex and enhances heterochromatic silencing. Gene silencing  was impaired in the absence of QIP.

. suggesting a common ancestor for this function in  animals and fungi. At least one additional nucleotide at the 3’‐ end could be detected in all mutant worms.8S rRNA in eri‐1 null  mutant worms is longer than in wildtype. but  only ERI‐1b was functional in RNAi rescue while it also failed to rescue the rRNA  processing in vitro.1. Both ERI‐1 isoforms rescued the 5. 2008).  In vivo substrates of ERI‐1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Schizosaccharomyces pombe  have long been poorly understood until the discovery that 5.8S is paired with the 5’‐end of the 25‐28S rRNA. (Hong et al. Mutations in H317 and D321  completely disrupted the function of C.8S rRNA length in vivo. reminiscent  of the histone mRNA stem‐loop and siRNA structures. Newly generated siRNAs can also recruit heterochromatin proteins  and initiate de novo silencing in trans.. with maxima in spleen.  Suppression of the mouse orthologue of ERI‐1 increased the effect of RNAi. ERI1  was found to bind independently to each ribosome subunit (40S and 60S). Introduction  The amount of centromeric siRNAs was considerably greater than in wildtype cells  (Iida et al. Under  stringent lysis conditions only 5. It  is present in the cytoplasm. In Eri1 KO mice the 3’‐ends of 5. pombe eri‐1 KOs where the 5.  In mice ERI1 is ubiquitously expressed.8S rRNA had two to  eight additional 3’ nucleotides. The birth  weight of Eri1 KO mice is reduced and this remained significant in the 10 % surviv‐ ing adult mice. In the mature ri‐ bosome the 3’‐end of 5. but this in trans silencing is strongly inhibited  by Eri1 (Bühler et al. 2006). mouse ERI1 and ADAR1  (adenosine deaminases acting on RNA which convert adenosine into inosine) tran‐ script levels are increased. nucleus and slightly enriched in the nucleolus.8S rRNA was able to co‐immunoprecipitate with  endogenous ERI1. 2005). elegans ERI‐1 (Gabel & Ruvkun. maybe leading to the observable rebound after the initial  RNAi‐induced target suppression. After  introduction of high amounts of exogenous siRNAs. a substantial fraction contained two to  four.8S rRNA were variable with 1‐ or  2‐nt 3’‐extensions. 2006). Point mutations showed that the catalytically inactive D130 and E132  55  . thymus and testis. Most rRNA processing occurs in the nucleolus. Growth defects were also observed for cells cultured in vitro. The same was found for S.

 Altschul et al.8S rRNA of purified ribosomes in vitro. elegans H. laevis D. melanogaster S. 1997) identified a single homo‐ logue in Arabidopsis thaliana encoded on the third chromosome at the locus  At3g15140. musculus D. laevis D. musculus D. 2008). melanogaster S.. rerio X. Wildtype ERI1 was able to  convert the abnormal 5. The SAP and linker domains have supportive function in rRNA  binding but are not crucial for 5. pombe Consensus C. musculus D. rerio X. laevis D. musculus D. laevis D. elegans H. The N.10 ERI‐1‐LIKE 1. elegans H. melanogaster S. musculus D. pombe Consensus (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (99) (83) (79) (69) (80) (20) (27) (101) (196) (176) (172) (164) (175) (113) (92) (201) (277) (256) (252) (244) (255) (205) (192) (301) (376) (331) (327) (319) (330) (274) (262) (401) 1 100 MSADEPSPEDEKYLESLRDLLKISQEFDASNAKQNDEPEKTAVEVESAETRTDESEKSIDIPREQQLLPSERVEPLKSMVEPEYVKKVIR--QMDTMTAE -------MEDPQSKEPAGEAVALALLESPRPEGGEEPPR--PSPEETQQCKFDGQET-----KGSKFITS----SASDFSDPVYKEIAITNGCINRMSKE -------MEDERGRE---RGGDAAQQKTPRPECEESRP---LSVEKKQRCRLDGKET-----DGSKFISS----NGSDFSDPVYKEIAMTNGCINRMSKE -------METKEKSR------------KPPNKTPQSEG-----DQEDQPCPDTSCEK-----NEDQEPSSP---KQGEFSDPVYKEIALANGAINRMNRE -------MEEQKENRP-LDTEDSVVEEDLCKKLSRNLD----LVGVKQRCRFDGQED-----NGTSTVSS----NTSDFSDPVYKEIAIANGCVNRMTKD ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------MALIKLARQLGLIDTIYVD --------------------------------------------------------------------------MESPVQILVWPFPCDEMNQKTPSTVE MED Q CR D E ISS SDFSDPVYKEIAI NG INRMTKE 101 * * 200 QLKQALMKIKVSTGGNKKTLRKRVAQYYRKENALLNRKMEPNADKTARFFDYLIAIDFECTCVEIIY---DYPHEIIELPAVLIDVREMKIISEFRTYVR ELRAKLSEFKLETRGVKDVLKKRLKNYYKKQ--KLMLKESNFADS---YYDYICIIDFEATCEEGNPP--EFVHEIIEFPVVLLNTHTLEIEDTFQQYVR ELRAKLSEFKLETRGVKDVLKKRLKNYYKKQ--KLMLKESSAGDS---YYDYICIIDFEATCEEGNPA--EFLHEIIEFPVVLLNTHTLEIEDTFQQYVR ELRAKCTELKLDTRGVNDVLRKRLKSYYKKQKLMHSPAAEGNSDM---YFDYICVVDFEATCEENNPP--DYLHEIIEFPMVLIDTHTLEIVDSFQEYVK ELKAKLVEHKLDTRGVKDVLRKRLKNYYKKQKLTHALHKDSNTDC---YYDYICVIDFEATCEAGNSL--DYPHEIIEFPIVLLNTHTLEIEDVFQCYVR GARPDPNNDPEESFNEDEVTEANSVPAKSKK-------SRKSKRLAMQPYSYVIAVDFEATCWEKQAPPEWREAEIIEFPAVLVNLKTGKIEAEFHQYIL EIRIALQELGLSTNG-----------------------NK---------R-YLLIVDVEATCEEGCGF--SFENEIIELPCLLFDLIEKSIIDEFHSYVR ELRAKL E KLETRGVKDVLRKRLKNYYKKQ D YYDYICIIDFEATCEEGN DF HEIIEFPVVLLNTHTLEIED FQ YVR 201 * * 300 PVRNPKLSEFCMQFTKIAQETVDAAPYFREALQRLYTWMRKFN-------------------LGQKNSRFAFVTDGPHDMWKFMQFQCLLSNIRMPHMFR PEINTQLSDFCISLTGITQDQVDRADTFPQVLKKVIDWMKLKE-------------------LGTK-YKYSLLTDGSWDMSKFLNIQCQLSRLKYPPFAK PEVNAQLSEFCIGLTGITQDQVDRADAFPQVLKKVIEWMKSKE-------------------LGTK-YKYCILTDGSWDMSKFLSIQCRLSRLKHPAFAK PVLHPQLSEFCVKLTGITQEMVDEAKTFHQVLKRAISWLQEKE-------------------LGTK-YKYMFLTDGSWDMGKFLHTQCKLSRIRYPQFAR PEINPQLSEFCVNLTGITQDTVDKSDTFPNVLRSVVEWMREKE-------------------LGSK-YKYAILTDGSWDMSKFLNMQCRISRLKYPRFAK PFESPRLSAYCTELTGIQQKTVDSGMPLRTAIVMFNEWLRNEMRARNLTLPKMN--------KSNILGNCAFVTWTDWDFGICLAKECSRKGIRKPAYFN PSMNPTLSDYCKSLTGIQQCTVDKAPIFSDVLEELFIFLRKHSNILVPSVDEIEIIEPLKSVPRTQPKNWAWACDGPWDMASFLAKQFKYDKMPIPDWIK P INPQLSEFCI LTGITQDTVDKA F QVLKKVIEWMR KE LGTK YKYAFLTDGSWDMSKFL QCKLSRIKYP FAK 301 * 400 -SFINIKKTFKEKFNGLIKGNGKSGIENMLERLDLSFVGNKHSGLDDATNIAAIAIQMMKLKIELRINQKCSYKENQRSAARKDEERELEDAANVDLTSV -KWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRS---QTKLTIMLEKLGMDYDGRPHCGLDDSKNIARIAVRMLQDGCELRINEKMHAGQ---------------------LMSV -KWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRS---QTKLTIMLEKLGMDYDGRPHSGLDDSKNIARIAVRMLQDGCELRINEKILGGQ---------------------LMSV -KWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRT---QTKLICMLENLGMEYDGRPHCGLDDSRNIARIAIHMLKDGCQLRVNECLHSGE---------------------PRSV -KWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRT---QTKLTTMLEKLGMTYNGRLHSGLDDSKNIARIAAHMLQDGCELRVNERMHAGQ---------------------LMTV -QWIDVRAIYRSWYKYRPCN-----FTDALSHVGLAFEGKAHSGIDDAKNLGALMCKMVRDGALFSITKDLTPYQ------------------------GPFVDIRSFYKDVYRVPRT-----NINGMLEHWGLQFEGSEHRGIDDARNLSRIVKKMCSENVEFECNRWWMEYE------------------------KWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRT QTKLT MLEKLGM YDGR HSGLDDSKNIARIAIKML DGCELRINEKL GQ L SV 401 473 DISRRDFQLWMRRLPLKLSSVTRREFINEEYLDCDSCDDLTDDKVKHLHSCDIYEIFDEKTSASFTDSKCLIC SSSLPIEGTPPPQMPHFRK-----------------------------------------------------SSSLPVEGAPAPQMPHSRK-----------------------------------------------------PISAPIEGAPAPQPPKKRD-----------------------------------------------------SSSLPFEGAPVPQNPHLKN----------------------------------------------------------------QLNPRFVL--------------------------------------------------------K-NGWIPNRSYPPYFAS----------------------------------------------------S P EG P PQ P R Figure 1.8S rRNA.ncbi. pombe Consensus C. While the N‐ and C‐terminal re‐ gions vary . the plant homologue of ERI‐1  So far no plant homologue of ERI‐1 has been characterized.nlm.     1. but efficient processing involves interaction with  other features of the ribosome (Ansel et al. sapiens M.8S rRNA interaction.a higher level of conservation is present in the exonuclease domain. pombe Consensus C. The conserved  DEDDH motif is indicated with asterisks (*). laevis D. BLAST search  (http://blast.1. Introduction  mutants still bound 5. whereas linker region mutants K107 and K108 showed  impaired binding.gov/Blast.nih..2. elegans H.cgi. melanogaster S. sapiens M. The naturally occur‐ ring 5.12: Alignment of published ERI‐1 homologues  The sequences share a total identity of 7 % and a similarity of 54 %. sapiens M.8S‐28S duplex is sufficient. crassa QIP protein has been excluded due to  higher sequence variability. sapiens M. It codes for a 337 amino acid protein with 50 % similarity to the C. melanogaster S. elegans H.  C. sapiens M. rerio X. rerio X. rerio X. pombe Consensus C. elegans  56  .

 In  addition the sequence is not annotated completely at the N‐terminus since it lacks a  57  . but a second splice variant lacking the N‐terminal region cannot be ex‐ cluded (http://www.ncbi. trichocarpa Consensus A. trichocarpa (83) Consensus (101) A. 1997). sativa (81) S. vinifera O.      Highly conserved plant homologues of ERL1 could be identified in the fully se‐ quenced plant genomes and the EST collections of many other plant species. bicolor Z. benthamiana (88) V.  A.nlm. bicolor homologue which possesses a deletion inside the exonuclease domain and also a  shortened N‐terminus. According to plant nomenclature conventions the protein is termed ERI‐1‐ LIKE 1 (ERL1). which is indicated with asterisks (*).gov/IEB/Research/Acembly/. vinifera O. mays P.nih. bicolor (16) Z. The gene is currently annotated to result in one transcript assembled  of six exons. sativa S. elegans ERI‐1. sativa S. sativa S. but  it lacks the N‐terminal SAP domain like the Drosophila melanogaster ERI‐1 homologue  Snipper (Kupsco et al.13: Alignment of ERL1 homologues in various plant species  The plant homologues show a very high degree of conservation in the C‐terminal exonuclease do‐ main. Introduction  protein. thaliana N. The protein contains the characteristic conserved DEDDh ex‐ onuclease domain where it also shares higher similarity with the C. trichocarpa Consensus (182) (188) (164) (181) (106) (176) (183) (201) (280) (286) (262) (248) (171) (274) (283) (301) Figure 1. Oryza  sativa probably contains several ERL1 homologues. mays P. An excep‐ tion is the S. mays (76) P. trichocarpa Consensus (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) 1 100 MASAFSAFRVSLSRISPFRDTRFSYPATLALAHTKRIMCN--------------SSHSVSPSPSPSDFSSSSSSSSSSPSTFSLMETSEN-----ARWRP ------SSHKTRHRILHFFFRKLTPQGSRLIPMATGFCRVPLLRRFLVSPPVLPFSYSLQPSRK-ISISASRSTTEESTSSLIQPTPSR------TRWKP ---------MAFYRVSPFRYGSLS-S---LIPYVS-------------SP-----SSLSPPVRT-FTLSASISTPHPSPPSLLTASPKAS-----DRWRP ---------MALARVSPPAFSSPFLIHSLLRPFSSPSSVLRPR---------VTRVPHHRGFAIAAALSQASPLPSADGDGAVMEAPPRPS--SRRPWKP ---------------------------------------------------------------------------SAASSATVRASGSVG------------------MALARVSPSSLANLIPPLLQSFFRPFSSDFPIR-------------NSRRRSSPVAAAFSLTSQSAHAAREGLVMEAPRPSS---RYPWKP ----MSFPRIPLSRVPSYLHNSNN--CFHLLHPPFIPVSKTP------------SLPTYQTARTYTDFNSQTQTQPPLSLPSLIPSPPVNNPNATHRWKP MALARVSPF LI S SASS T AS VM SP RWKP 101 * * 200 MCLYYTHGKCTKMDDPAHLEIFNHDCSKELRVAAADLERKKSQEFNFFLVIDLEGKVEILEFPILIVDAKTMEVVDLFHRFVRPTKMSEQAINKYIEGKY TCLYFTQGKCTKMDDPMHIDKFNHNCSLELMQNAAGLKNLRQQELEYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVLLFDAKTMDVVNFFHRFVRPTKMHEDRINEYIEGKY MCLYYTQGKCTKMDDPTHLETFNHNCSRELQVNAANFQHLQSQHLDFFLVLDLEGKIEILEFPVLMINAKTMDVVDLFHRFVRPSEMSEQRINEYIEGKY TCLYYTQGKCTMLNDTLHLEKFNHNLPTDLPVNYSAADKVKSQKLDYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVVMIDAQSMEFVDSFHRFVHPTAMSEQRIREYIEGKY ----------CHMNDAMHLEKFGHNLKMDLPVNASATDKFKPQKLEYFLILDLEGRVEILEFPVVMIDAQSTEFIDSFHRFVRPTAMSEQRTTEYIEGKY TCLYYTQGKCTMMNDAMHLEKFSHNLKMDLPVNASATDKSKPQKLEYLLILDLEGRVEILEFPVMMIDAQNREFVDSFHRFVRPTAMSEQRTTEYIEGKY MCLYHTHGKCTKIDDPVHVERFNHDCSRDFQVSAADFERKRPQDFDFFLVFDLEGKVEILEFPVLIIDAKTMGVVDLFHRFVRPTAMSEERVNEYIYNKY CLYYTQGKCTKMDDPMHLEKFNHNCS DL VNAAA DK K Q LDYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVLMIDAKTMEVVD FHRFVRPTAMSEQRINEYIEGKY 201 * * 300 GELGVDRVWHDTAIPFKQVVEEFEVWLAEHDLWDKDTDWGLNDAAFVTCGNWDIKTKIPEQCVVSNINLPPYFMEWINLKDVYLNFYG--REARGMVSMM GKLGVDRVWHDTAIPFGEVIEQFEVWLGERQLWRNEPGGCLNKAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPQQCKVAGTKLPPYFMEWINLKDVFLNFYK--RRAKGMLSMM GKLGVDRVWHDTSIPFKEVIQQFEAWLTQHHLWTKEMGGRLDQAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPQQCKVSKMKLPPYFMEWINLKDVYLNFYK--RRATGMMTMM GKFGVDRVWHDTAIPFMEVLQEFEDWIEHHKFWKKEQGGALNSAAFITCGNWDLKTKVPEQCRVSKIKLPSYFMEWINLKDIYLNFYN--RRATGMMTMM GKFGVDRVWHDTAVPFKEVLQEFEDWLGNHNLWKKEQGGSLNRGAFVTCGNWDLKT-----------------------------------KATGMMTMM GKFGVDRVWHDTATPFKQVLQEFEDWLGNHNLWKKEQGGSLNRGAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPEQCKVSKINLPTYFMEWINLKDIYLNFYN--RRATGMMTMM GKFGVDRVWHDTALPFNEVLQQFESWLTQHNLWEKTRGGRLNRAAFVTCGNWDVKTQVPHQCSVSKLKLPPYFMEWINLKDVYQNFYNPRNEARGMRTMM GKFGVDRVWHDTAIPFKEVLQEFE WLGNHNLWKKE GG LNRAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVP QC VS I LPPYFMEWINLKDVYLNFY RRA GMMTMM 301 * * 358 RQCGIKLMGSHHLGIDDTKNITRVVQRMLSEGAVLKLTARRSKSNMRNVEFLFKNRIK RELQMPLLGSHHLGIDDAKNIARVLQHMLSDGALVQITARRNPHSPEKVEYLFEDRIV KELQIPLLGSHHLGIDDTKNIARVLQRMLADGALLQITARRNADSPENVEFLFKNRIR RELQMPIVGSHHLGIDDAKNIARVVQRMLADGAVMQITAKRQS-ATGDVKFLFKNRIR RELQLPIIGNHHLGIDDSKNIARVVQRMIADGAVIEITAKRQ-STTGNVKFLFKDRIR RELQLPIVGNHHLGIDDSKNIARVVQRMLADGAVIQITAKRQ-SATGDVRFLFKDRIR SQLKIPMVGSHHLGLDDTKNIARVLLRMLADGAVLPITARRKPESPGSVNFLYKNRIRELQIPLLGSHHLGIDDTKNIARVLQRMLADGAVL ITARRN S V FLFK RIR A. mays P. all amino acids of the DEDDh motif are present. vinifera O. benthamiana V. Thierry‐Mieg &  Thierry‐Mieg. 2006). vinifera (64) O. thaliana N. benthamiana V.1. The Sorghum bicolor sequence  contains a prominent deletion of 33 amino acids inside the exonuclease domain.. bicolor Z. thaliana N. bicolor Z. thaliana (82) N. benthamiana V.

 2004)  chloro  none  mito  chloro  none  mito  mito    WoLF  PSORT     (Horton et  al. In fully developed tissues the expression drops by a factor of ten  (compare Figure 1. nucl = nuclear. bicolor  V. 2007)  chloro  chloro  chloro  chloro  chloro  chloro  mito  A. in the reproductive organs pollen and stigmata as well  as in imbibed seeds. vinifera  N. truncatula. An exception is the Sorghum se‐ quence but it cannot be excluded to be targeted to the chloroplast as well because of  its incomplete annotation (compare Table 1.. Introduction  Methionine. thaliana  P. trichocarpa  O. sativa  Z. Winter et al.15).13). 2007). benthamiana    ERL1 expression levels have been obtained from publicly available microarray data  of Arabidopsis thaliana (http://www.ca/. whereas in Populus it is detected in the seedlings (compare Figure 1. the absolute ex‐ pression levels are higher than in Arabidopsis.14 & Figure 1.14).  Expression data is also available for P.1). but comparable in relation to ALPHA‐ TUBULIN. mays  S. chloro = chloroplastic.    Table 1.1....  Caption: mito = mitochondrial..  58  .1: Predicted localization of plant ERL1 homologues  Five prediction algorithms calculate a chloroplastic localization of plant ERL1 homologues in 60 % of  all cases. none = none of the above          iPSORT   BaCelLo       (Bannai et  (Pierleoni  al. The same is true for the poplar sequence but an upstream start codon  could be identified possibly leading to the full length protein (compare Figure 1. In Medicago the highest expression is also observed in the vegetative tis‐ sue..bar. 11 % predict other or no subcellular localization. trichocarpa and M. The highest ERL1 expression could  be detected in the shoot apex. 2002)  et al.utoronto. 2001)  chloro  chloro  chloro  chloro  none  chloro  chloro    Predotar    (Small et  al. 29 % predict a mitochondrial localization. The gene is  found to be ubiquitously transcribed at very low levels (for comparison ALPHA‐ TUBULIN is expressed at 40 times higher values).  Subcellular localization prediction algorithms revealed a potential chloroplast signal  peptide of the individual plant ERL1 homologues. 2006)  mito  chloro  mito  mito  mito  mito  mito  chloro  chloro  chloro  chloro  nucl  chloro  chloro    PCLR     (Schein et  al.

 thaliana shows increased ERL‐1 expression in the shoot apex and im‐ bibed seeds. In P..14: Winter et al. Introduction        Figure 1.1. trichocarpa ERL1 is mainly transcribed in etiolated and light‐grown seedlings.  59  . 2007  The developmental map of A.

   60    .. 2007  A more detailed expression map of A. Introduction  Figure 1.1. ovaries and during early pollen development. thaliana shows ERL1‐expression maxima in the  shoot apical meristem.15: Winter et al.

 They can serve as  storage plastids for starch (amyloplasts) or lipids (elaioplasts). All of them contain the same genomic information  but they are able to differentiate into different plastid types. Leucoplasts are plastids which. 2009). Another plastid type  are chromoplasts which store the pigments of flower petals or fruits. although they depend on the supply with energy and pre‐ cursor metabolites by the plant cell (Bräutigam & Weber..  As a rule of thumb the chloroplastic ribosomal and transfer RNAs and photosyn‐ thetic proteins are still encoded in the chloroplasts. but the larger enzyme complexes  and ribosomal proteins usually contain also nuclear proteins (Alberts et al. They contain inner  membrane structures with a yellow chlorophyll precursor. are the chloroplasts. Introduction  1. 2008). Plastids have various  functions ranging from photosynthesis for energy supply.  The most prominent plastids. therefore most of their proteins are now encoded in  the nucleus and imported by a special import complex.3 Chloroplasts  Chloroplasts develop from proplastids which are small precursor plastids with a  double membrane present in all immature plant cells. 2010). storage of energy‐ containing molecules to metabolic tasks such as synthesis of nucleotides. The replication of chloroplastic DNA  is independent from the S‐phase of the cells. 2008). Evolutionary evidence  suggests their origin in photosynthetic bacteria which had been endocytosed by the  eukaryotic cell. They are inherited from the  ancestor plants into the zygote.  These are imported into the chloroplasts through the TOC (translocon at the outer  envelope membrane of chloroplasts) and TIC (translocon at the inner envelope mem‐ brane of chloroplasts) complexes (Inaba.. certain  amino acids and fatty acids (Alberts et al. which is able to convert to  normal chlorophyll in the case of light exposure. but it is regulated in a way that the  61  . The metabolic functions can also be  performed by proplastids. They possess their own genome coding for approximately 120 genes  and protein synthesis machinery.  unlike chloroplasts.1. however. can also be found in epidermal plant cells.  Etioplasts are developed when a plant is grown in the dark. During evolution gene transfer from the chloro‐ plast into the nucleus took place.

 where the absorbed light energy has  also resulted in oxidized chlorophyll a molecules which now get reduced.. The electrons residing in the primary electron acceptor are further trans‐ ported via several molecules to photosystem I.   1. 2008).   In photosystem II the chlorophyll a molecules of the reaction center transfer their  high energy electrons onto a primary electron acceptor. To return back to its initial  state it gets reduced by electrons originating from water which had been photolyzed.1 Photosynthesis  Photosynthesis consists of two different reaction types: the light reactions. Introduction  number of chloroplasts has doubled before cell division to ensure a constant amount  of plastids in the daughter cells (Alberts et al. 1999). Both are comprised of a  light‐harvesting complex formed by several hundred pigment molecules which chan‐ nel the absorbed light energy to a reaction center.. the membranes  themselves are organized in stacks which are called grana and contain the photosyn‐ thetic systems of the chloroplasts (Alberts et al. The pri‐ 62  .  The most prominent is chlorophyll a consisting of a light absorbing porphyrin ring  and a hydrophobic phytol group anchoring the molecule in the membranes. moreover  the latter have a function in protecting chlorophyll from excessive light energy.. together with chlorophyll b and caroti‐ noids the wavelength which can be used for photosynthesis is broadened.  In the development from proplastids their inner membrane folds and gets constricted  leading to the thylakoid membranes inside the chloroplasts (Vothknecht & Westhoff. The division of chloroplasts is  controlled by ARC (ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF CHLOROPLASTS)  genes (Marrison et al. where carbon dioxide is fixed into sugar molecules.  2001). They form an internal compartment called the thylakoid space. 2008). where  sunlight is transformed into electric energy and the consecutive synthesis reactions of  the Calvin cycle.  Photosynthesis is performed in two distinct photosystems.  The thylakoid membranes contain different pigments which are able to absorb light. It has  absorption maxima at 430 nm and 662 nm.  The resulting protons can be used for ATP‐synthesis and in addition oxygen is re‐ leased.3.1.

1.16: Campbell.  63  .5‐bisphosphate by the enzyme ribulose‐1. The energy gets transported via the cyto‐ chrome complex and Photosystem I to the NADP+ reductase for the production of NADPH.5‐bisphosphate carboxylase.  Alternatively photosystem I can also produce extra ATP by the cyclic electron trans‐ port where the primary electron receptor reduces the reaction center of the photosys‐ tem.  This reaction mechanism is called non‐cyclic electron transport resulting in equimo‐ lar amounts of ATP and NADPH. The reac‐ tion products function in the subsequent Calvin cycle which leads to the synthesis of sucrose. 1996   Graphic representation of the photosynthetic reactions in the chloroplast.      Figure 1. The in‐ stable product dissociates and gets further phosphorylated and reduced to glyceral‐ dehyde‐3‐phosphate which can be used for the production of sucrose and starch. The absorbed energy then leads to the chemiosmotic production of ATP. Light energy is absorbed in  photosystem II and leads to the production of ATP and O2. 1996).  In the first phase of the subsequent Calvin cycle carbon dioxide is attached onto ribu‐ lose‐1. In a  last step the carbon dioxide acceptor is regenerated (Campbell. Introduction  mary electron acceptor of photosystem I leads to the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH.

 After intercistronic cleavage the resulting transcripts are edited by  PPR proteins and spliced into functional RNAs.3.2 Specificities of chloroplastic RNAs  The chloroplast genome of land plants encodes components required for chloroplast  protein synthesis (rRNA. In land plants the transcript starts with the 16S rRNA. tRNAs. followed by two                                            Figure 1. Introduction  1.1.  The chloroplastic rRNA genes are highly conserved between plant species and or‐ ganized in the ribosomal RNA (rrn) operon which is transcribed into a polycistronic  molecule.17: Stern et al. 2010  Chloroplastic genes expression involves the transcription of a polycistronic precursor which gets  processed at its 5’‐ and 3’‐ends..  64  . ribosomal proteins and RNA polymerase subunits)  and for photosynthesis.

 Bellaoui et al... in plants  they are mainly participating in chloroplast RNA metabolism in processes such as  RNA trimming. Lurin et al. 4.  Also the other rRNA molecules need further endo‐ and exonucleolytic processing  until the mature rRNAs are ready (Kössel et al. Lurin et al. 2000.18 a)]. PPR genes are usually short  since most of them do not contain introns and they generally have a low expression  rate (Lurin et al. 2000. Another conserved  feature is a C‐terminal E motif.. 2010). 2005.1. Additional endonucleolytic cleavage generates the 16S and 5S rRNA. pentatricopeptide proteins are able to bind RNA  and DNA in a sequence‐specific manner (Saha et al.. 2007).5S rRNA intermediate requires 3’‐maturation before the  final processing into the monocistronic rRNAs takes place already in the ribosome. 2004). Nishimura et al. Most of them are also influenced by heli‐ cal repeat proteins (reviewed in Stern et al. The first processing of the primary precursor involves the excision of the  tRNAs.. 2004).. Bisanz et al. E and E+ or E.. 2004) (compare Figure 1. 2003.5S rRNA and finally 5S rRNA and another tRNA (Harris et al.... 2010). Introduction  tRNAs.. E+ and DYW stretch which is present  in a large fraction of PPR proteins (Lurin et al. translation and editing (compare Figure 1. Unlike tetratricopeptide proteins from  which their name was derived of. 23S rRNA. The  resulting dicistronic 23S–4.  They are mostly targeted to organelles [(chloroplasts and mitochondria) (Small &  Peeters. stabilization. 1985.  2003. 2004).  In contrast to the prokaryotic RNA metabolism. 2004)] and can be grouped into two subfamilies: classical  PPR proteins with only the above described motifs and plant combinatorial and  modular proteins (PCMPs) containing also short (31 amino acids) and long (35‐36  amino acids) motifs [(Lurin et al.  Although there are reports for functions in mitochondria in other species.18 b). Bollenbach et al..  1994). They  65  . chloroplastic RNAs possess introns  and pass through many RNA editing steps..  Plants possess a large gene family with more than 450 members in Arabidopsis which  encode for proteins with pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs) It is a degenerate 35‐ amino‐acid motif which is often arranged in tandem of 2‐27 repeats per peptide  (Small & Peeters.

2. 2004). Introduction  are involved in chloroplast translational control.     (A)  (B) Figure 1. In contrast.  66  .4 Thesis objectives  The initial aim of this work was the characterization of the plant homologue of the 3’‐ 5’ exonuclease ERI‐1 (enhanced RNAi) in the two model plants Arabidopsis thaliana  and Nicotiana benthamiana. So far. embryogenesis and organ develop‐ ment as well as the restoration of male fertility through modification or silencing of  cytotoxic mitochondrial transcripts (Saha et al. (B) Functions of PPR pro‐ teins in (1) Translation.10.1. Due to the complete genomic  sequence information.18: PPR proteins  (A) Domain organization of PPR and PCMP proteins (Lurin et al. (3) RNA splicing and (4) RNA stability (Schmitz‐Linneweber  & Small. ERL1.. 2007). therefore it should also be identi‐ fied in the course of this work. 2008)..  no scientific publication describes this plant protein. only partial sequence in‐ formation was available for the Nicotiana homolog. Mitochondria‐encoded cyto‐ plasmic male sterility can be overcome by nuclear restorer (Rf) genes which are usu‐ ally PPR proteins (Schmitz‐Linneweber & Small.  1. 2008). 2007). Rf‐homologous genes have  been shown to generate siRNAs and might be under gene‐silencing regulation them‐ selves (Howell et al. in vitro characterization of the Arabidopsis homologue is possi‐ ble and has been presented in chapter 1. The protein is further called ERI‐1‐LIKE 1.  The in silico predicted chloroplastic localization of the  Arabidopsis protein should be proven in vivo as well. (2) RNA editing..

 the effect of ERI‐1 on plant ribosomal RNA mole‐ cules should have been examined in more detail.8S rRNA should be  explored in more details.  Involvement of ERL1 in plant RNA silencing processes.  67  .8S rRNA had been identified as a new substrate of  ERI‐1 and its homologues.1.    Summarized the following question should be addressed:  • • • • In vivo characterization of ERL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly.  In vivo characterization of ERL1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. but it contains four chloroplastic ribosomal RNA  species. Introduction  Since the nematode protein is suggested to suppress RNA silencing in Caenorhabditis  elegans.  Involvement of ERL1 in ribosomal RNA processing. Hence. the chloroplast is be‐ lieved to be free of RNA silencing. the effect of ERL1 in plant RNA silencing processes should be investigated. The effect of plant ERL1 on these and the homologous 5. In  the course of the work cytosolic 5.

68  .

 Germany  Eppendorf 5810R. Germany   Centrifuges          Confocal microscope  Developer  Digital Camera    Electron Microscope  Fluorescence measurement  Gel documentation system  Hybridization bottles    Hybridization oven  Ice machine  Eppendorf 5415D. Heraeus.1. Nikon.. Eppendorf.  2. Leica. AGFA. Germany  Kubota 5800. Thermo Scientific. USA  Brema Ice makers. Nikon. Greece   Owl B2 EasyCast.1 Instruments  Agarose gel electrophoresis    Blotting Device  A. Japan  JEM‐100C. Germany  Curix 60. JEOL Ltd. USA  SD20 Semi Dry Midi.  Kubota. Materials and Methods    2.2. Germany  Biofuge 15R.  UK    Mini Trans‐Blot® Electrophoretic Transfer  Cell. Cleaver Scientific. USA  Shel Lab Model 1004. Bio‐Rad. USA  Shel Lab. Hansatech Instruments. Thermo Scientific. Germany  Biofuge Stratos. Japan  Leica TCS SP. Japan  Handy PEA. alternative suppliers are possible in some cases. UK  UVT‐28 MP. Heraeus. Belgium  Coolpix 990. Eppendorf. Kabbalos. Italy  69  . Herolab. Japan  Coolpix 5600. Germany  Hybaid.1 Materials  The used materials of this work are presented below together with their standard  supplier.

 Heraeus Instruments. handheld  Vortex mixer  Stratalinker 1800. Qiagen. USA  70  . Gilson.  Germany    Biocyt 180 NF X44201. Bio‐Rad. Agilent. Beckman. USA  Laminar Flow Hood  ESI Flufrance Ariane 18 UV. Renner  GmbH. USA  Blak‐Ray B‐100AP/R.  UK    Microcomputer Electrophoresis. USA  DNA Engine PTC‐200 Gradient. Germany  Pipetman. Bio‐Rad.  USA    Thermocycler  Lambda 2. GE Healthcare.  Thermo Scientific. Germany  Scintillation System LS 1701. Perkin Elmer. USA  Vortex‐Genie 2. UVP. Germany  Ρωμαίος. Japan  Local electronic supplier  Mini‐Protean® 3. Germany  qPCR machine  Scintillation counter  RG‐3000A Rotor‐Gene. Germany  Forma Incubated Console Orbital Shakers.  USA  Spectrophotometer  NanoDrop ND‐1000. Bio‐Rad. Nikon. Jouan GmbH. Thermo Scientific. Greece  PowerPac Basic. Ger‐ many  Magnetic stirrer/heater  Microlitre pipettes  Microscope (optical/fluorescent)  Microwave oven  PAA gel electrophoresis    Power supply    IKAMAG® RET. Jouan GmbH. Germany  Pharmacia ECPS 3000/150.2.  Germany  UV crosslinker  UV lamp. USA  Eclipse E800. IKA® Werke. Materials and Methods  Incubator    B‐5060. Scientific Industries.

 R. Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich. Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich. USA  2. Wobser  GmbH & CO. Scientific Co. Lauda Dr. Germany  C. England  pyranoside (X‐Gal) [C14H15BrClNO6]  Bromophenol blue [C19H9Br4O5SNa]  Bovine serum albumine (BSA)  Calcium chloride [CaCl2]  Cefotaxime [C16H17N5O7S2]  Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide  (CTAB) [C19H42BrN]  Chloroform [CHCl3]    71  Sigma‐Aldrich. USA  Local pharmaceutical supplier  Merck. Germany  . USA  Sigma‐Aldrich. USA  Perkin Elmer. USA  Perkin Elmer. USA  Lonza.2 Chemicals  [α32P]‐dATP [C10H16N5O12P3]  [α32P]‐dCTP [C9H16N3NaO13P3]  [γ‐32P]ATP [C10H16N5O13P3]  Acetic acid [CH3COOH]  Acetosyringone (ACS) [C10H12O4]  Acrylamide [C3H5NO]  Agar‐agar [(C12H18O9) x]  Agarose [(C12H18O9) x]  Agarose. Germany  Merck. USA  Merck. Germany  Bristol‐Myers Squibb. USA  Duchefa. KG. Switzerland  Sigma‐Aldrich. Materials and Methods  Water bath    X‐ray cassettes  Lauda A100.S. USA  Merck. Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich. USA  Merck. USA  Merck. Germany      5‐Bromo‐4‐chloro‐3‐indolyl‐β‐D‐galacto‐  Melford Laboratories. Netherlands  Merck.2.1. USA  Sigma‐Aldrich.B. low‐melting [(C12H18O9) x]  Ammonium nitrate [NH4NO3]  Ammonium persulfate [(NH4)2S2O8]  Ammonium thiocyanate [NH4SCN]  Ampicillin [C16H19N3O4S]  6‐Benzylaminopurine (BAP) [C12H11N5]  Boric acid [B(OH)3]  Perkin Elmer.

 Germany  Biomol GmbH. USA  Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)  Merck. Switzerland  Fluka. Germany  [C10H16N2O8]  Formaldehyde [HCOH]  Formamide [CH3NO]  Glucose [C6H12O6]  Glycerol [C3H5(OH)3]  Glycine [C2H5NO2]  Guanidinium thiocyanate [C2H6N4S]  Hydrochloric acid. Germany  Merck. Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich. Germany  . Germany  Merck. Germany  Fluka. Germany  Biomol GmbH. Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich. Fermentas. fuming [HCl]  4‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)‐1‐piperazineethane‐  sulfonic acid (HEPES) [C8H18N2O4S]  Kanamycin [C18H36N4O11]  Magnesium chloride [MgCl2]  Magnesium sulfate [MgSO4]  Manganese chloride [MnCl2]  β‐Mercaptoethanol [C2H6OS]  Methanol [CH3OH]    72    Merck. absolute [C2H6O]  Ethidium bromide (EtBr) [C21H20BrN3]  Merck. USA  Sigma‐Aldrich. Germany  Merck. Materials and Methods  Coomassie Brillantblue G 250   [C47H48N3O7S2Na]  Deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) set    Dimethylformamide (DMF) [C3H7NO]  Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) [C2H6OS]  Dithiothreitol (DTT) [C4H10O2S2]  DNA oligos    Ethanol. Germany  Merck.2. Germany    Sigma‐Aldrich. Lithuania  Bioron. Switzerland  Merck. USA  Merck. Germany  Merck. Germany  IMBB Microchemistry. Germany  Merck. Greece  Metabion. Germany  Merck. USA  Merck. Germany    MBI.

2. Materials and Methods 
N,N’‐methylenebisacrylamid (BIS)  [C7H10N2O2]  2‐(N‐Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid   (MES) [C4H8ONC2H4SO3H∙H2O]  Merck, Germany    Sigma‐Aldrich, USA   

3‐(N‐Morpholino)propanesulfonic acid   Merck, Germany  (MOPS) [C7H15NO4S]  Murashige & Skoog macroelements  Murashige & Skoog microelements  Murashige & Skoog vitamins  α‐Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA)  [C12H10O2]  Phenol crystals [C6H5OH]  Piperazine‐N,N′‐bis(2‐ethanesulfonic  acid) (PIPES) [C8H18N2O6S2]  Polysorbate 20 (Tween® 20) [C58H114O26]  Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP‐40)  [(C6H9NO)n]  Potassium acetate [CH3COOK]  Potassium chloride [KCl]  Potassium hydroxide [KOH]  Potassium nitrate [KNO3]  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Sigma.Aldrich, USA  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Fluka, Schwitzerland  Merck, Germany    Duchefa, Netherlands  Duchefa, Netherlands  Duchefa, Netherlands  Duchefa, Netherlands 

Potassium phosphate, dibasic [K2HPO4]  Merck, Germany  Potassium phosphate, monobasic  [KH2PO4]  2‐Propanol (isopropanol) [C3H8O]  Rifampicin [C43H58N4O12]  Silwet L‐77  Skimmed milk powder  Sodium acetate [CH3COONa]  Merck, Germany    Merck, Germany  Duchefa, Netherlands  OSI Specialities, USA  Local market  Merck, Germany 
73 

2. Materials and Methods 
Sodium carbonate [Na2CO3]  Sodium chloride [NaCl]  Sodium citrate [Na3C6H5O7]  Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)  [C12H25NaO4S]  Sodium hydroxide [NaOH]  Sodium hypochlorite [NaClO]  Sodium phosphate, dibasic [Na2HPO4]  Sodium phosphate, monobasic   [NaH2PO4]  Sodium thiosulfate [Na2S2O3]  Sorbitol [C6H14O6]  Spectinomycin [C14H24N2O7]  Sucrose [C12H22O11]  Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED)  [C6H16N2]  Tris(hydroxymethyl)‐aminomethan  (TRIS) [C4H11NO3]  Triton® X‐100 [C14H22O(C2H4O)n]  Tryptone   Urea [(NH2)2CO]  Water, nanopure  Xylene cyanol FF [C25H27N2O6S2Na]  Yeast extract     Merck, Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Merck, Germany  Millipore  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Biomol GmbH, Germany  Merck, Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA    Merck, Germany  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Sigma‐Aldrich, USA  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany  Merck, Germany 

2.1.3 Consumables & kits 
anti‐Rabbit AP‐conjugate  Blotting paper  Promega, USA  Whatman 3MM, UK 

Fermentas Maxima™ SYBR Green qPCR   ThermoFischer Scientific, USA  Master Mix (2X) 
74 

2. Materials and Methods 
Gateway® LR Clonase® II Enzyme Mix,   Invitrogen, USA  HRP SuperSignal West Pico Chemilumi‐  ThermoFischer Scientific, USA  nescent substrate  Illustra MicroSpin™ S‐200 Spin Columns  GE Healthcare, UK  Laboratory film  Membrane  Pechiney ParafilmTM ‘M’, Pechiney, USA  ProtranTM Nitrocellulose 0.22 μm,  Whatman, UK    NucleoBond® Xtra Midi Kit  NucleoSpin® Extract II  Pasteur glass pipettes  Petri dishes ø 10 cm  pGEM®‐T Easy Vector System  Pipette tips  Nylon 0.45 μm, Nytran® N, Whatman, UK  Macherey‐Nagel, Germany  Macherey‐Nagel, Germany  Volac, Poulten & Graf Ltd., UK  Sarstedt, Germany  Promega, USA  Sarstedt, Germany & Greiner Bio One,  Germany  Platinum® Taq DNA pol. High Fidelity   Polypropylene tubes, 15/50 mL  RadPrime DNA Labeling System  Reaction tubes, 0.2/0.5/1.5/2 mL  Gloves  Invitrogen, USA  Sarstedt, Germany   Invitrogen, USA  Sarstedt, Germany  Digitil N powderfree, Hartmann, Ger‐ many  Scalpel blades  Syringe 1 mL  Syringe filters  TaKaRa 3’‐Full RACE Core Set   TOPO® TA Cloning® Kit  X‐ray films Fuji Super RX    Paragon, UK  HMD Healthcare Ltd., Horsham, UK  Pall Corporation, USA  TaKaRa, Japan  Invitrogen, USA  Fujifilm, Japan   

75 

2. Materials and Methods 
2.1.4 Solutions 
30 % (w/v) acrylamide mix (29:1)      40 % (w/v) acrylamide mix (38:2)      Binding Buffer        Blocking buffer        Church hybridization buffer          Coomassie destaining solution        Coomassie staining solution          40 % (v/v) methanol  10 % (v/v) acetic acid  50 % (v/v) water  0.1 % (w/v) Coomassie  15 % (v/v) ethanol  10 % (v/v) acetic acid  75 % (v/v) water  0.5 M phosphate buffer pH 7.2  1 % (w/v) BSA  1 mM EDTA  7 % (w/v) SDS  1x PBS  1 % (w/v) skimmed milk powder  0.05 % (v/v) Tween‐20    1x PBS  2 % (w/v) skimmed milk powder  0.05 % (v/v) Tween‐20  38 % (w/v) acrylamide  2 % (w/v) N, N’‐methylenebisacrylamide  29 % (w/v) acrylamide  1 % (w/v) N, N’‐methylenebisacrylamide 

76 

8 M sodium citrate  1. autoclave  .03 % (w/v) bromophenol blue  10 mM dATP  10 mM dCTP  10 mM dGTP  10 mM dTTP  2 % (v/v) glutaraldehyde  2 % (w/v) paraformaldehyde  0.1 M cacodylate buffer  0.4 M NaCl  1 % (w/v) PVP‐40 (Mw = 40 000 g/mol)  10 mM Tris pH 7. Materials and Methods  CTAB buffer 2x            DNA loading dye 6x          dNTP mix          Fixing buffer        High Salt Solution 2x      LB            77  2 % (w/v) CTAB  100 mM Tris‐HCl pH 8.2 M NaCl  1 % (w/v) tryptone  0.0‐7.0  20 mM EDTA pH 8.5 % (w/v) yeast extract  1 % (w/v) NaCl  adjust pH to 7.2.4 with NaOH.6  60 mM EDTA  60 % (v/v) glycerol  0.0  1.

 autoclave  MS  1 % (w/v) agar‐agar  250 mM Tris‐HCl pH 6.7  200 μM acetosyringone  1x Murashige & Skoog macroelements  1x Murashige & Skoog microelements  adjust pH to 5.7 with KOH.2.01 % (w/v) Bromophenolblue    .5 % (w/v) agar agar  MS  10 mM MES pH 5. Materials and Methods  LB‐agar      LB Rif      LB Rif‐agar      MMA        MS        MS‐agar      Laemmli Buffer 4x            LDM Base      MS  1x Murashige & Skoog vitamins  3 % (w/v) sucrose  78  LB  1.8  8 % (w/v) SDS  40 % (v/v) glycerol  20 % (v/v) β‐mercaptoethanol  0.5 % (w/v) agar agar  LB  120 μg/mL Rifampicin  LB Rif  1.

 pH 7.4 M MOPS  0.7 with KOH.1 M sodium acetate  10 mM EDTA  adjust pH to 7. temper to 30 °C prior to use    0.7 with KOH. low‐melting  autoclave.1 mg/L NAA  adjust pH to 5.7 with KOH. Materials and Methods        LDM I          LDM II            LDM III            Low‐melting agarose 1 % (w/v)      MOPS 10x.0            79  0.7 with KOH.0 with NaOH pellets  . autoclave    LDM I  250 μg/mL Cefotaxime  200 μg/μL Kanamycin  adjust pH to 5. autoclave  add the antibiotics after cooling to 55 °C  LDM Base  250 μg/mL Cefotaxime  200 μg/μL Kanamycin  adjust pH to 5. autoclave  add the antibiotics after cooling to 55 °C  1 % (w/v) agarose.2.8 mg/L BAP   0. autoclave  LDM Base  0.8 % (w/v) agar  adjust pH to 5.

4. autoclave  20 mM HEPES pH 7.4 M NaCl  27 mM KCl  100 mM Na2HPO4  18 mM KH2PO4  adjust pH to 7.5 % (v/v) Tween‐20  5 % (v/v) glycerol  1 % (v/v) protease inhibitors  0.075 (v/v) TEMED  1.0375 % (w/v) APS  0.74 % (v/v) formaldehyde  8‐15 % (w/v) acrylamide mix (38:2)  8 M urea  1x TBE  0. Materials and Methods  MOPS running buffer      PAGE northern gel            PBS 10x            Protein extraction buffer              Protein running buffer 5x        Protoplast extraction buffer      MS  0.5 % (w/v) SDS  .2.4 M sucrose  2 mM CaCl2  80  1x MOPS  0.2 % (w/v) PMSF  125 mM Tris  96 mM glycine  0.9  150 mM NaCl  0.

0  81  25 mM MES pH 5.27 % (v/v) formaldehyde  4 mM EDTA pH 8.0  20 % (v/v) glycerol  0.5x        Resolving gel            RNA extraction buffer            RNA loading dye 5x              Sequencing dye 2x    98 % (v/v) formamide  10 mM EDTA pH 8.03 % (w/v) bromophenolblue  . Materials and Methods          RadPrime Buffer 2.1 M sodium acetate pH 5.8 M guanidine thiocyanate  0.1 % (w/v) APS  38 % (v/v) phenol  0.5 mM MgCl2  25 mM β‐mercaptoethanol  375 mM Tris‐HCl pH 8.1 % (w/v) SDS  0.4 M ammonium thiocyanate  0.8  10–15 % (w/v) acrylamide mix (29:1)  0.5 % (w/v) macerozyme  125 mM Tris‐HCl pH 6.0  5 % (v/v) glycerol  4x MOPS  31 % (v/v) formamide  0.8  12.01 % (v/v) TEMED  0.2.7  1 % (w/v) cellulose  0.

03 % (w/v) xylene cyanol FF  2 % (w/v) tryptone  0.5  .5 M NaCl  0. Materials and Methods        SOB medium              Solution I        Solution II      Solution III      Southern Denaturation      Southern Depurination    Southern Neutralization        82  0.5 % (w/v) yeast extract  10 mM NaCl  2.2 M NaOH  1 % (w/v) SDS  3 M KCH3COO  11 % (v/v) glacial acetic acid  1.0 and autoclave  50 mM glucose  10 mM EDTA  25 mM Tris pH 8.5 M NaCl  1 M Tris pH 7.03 % (w/v) bromophenol blue  0.2 M HCl  1.2.5 mM KCl  1 mM MgCl2  adjust pH to 7.5 M NaOH  0.0  0.

01 % (v/v) TEMED  0.7  15 mM CaCl2  250 mM KCL  55 mM MnCl2  freshly prepared.2.1 % (w/v) APS  0.71 % (v/v) glacial acetic acid  50 mM EDTA pH 8.3 M sodium citrate  adjust pH 7.5 % (w/v) sodium hypochlorite  0.0 with HCl and autoclave  125 mM Tris‐HCl pH 6.1 % (w/v) SDS  0. sterilized by filtration  .03 % (v/v) Silwet L77  2 M Tris  5.9 M Tris  0.9 M boric acid  20 mM EDTA pH 8. Materials and Methods  SSC 20x        Stacking gel            Sterilization solution      Sucrose dipping solution      TAE 50x        TB            TBE 10x      0.05 % (v/v) Tween‐20  5 % (w/v) sucrose  0.0  10 mM PIPES pH 6.0  83  3 M NaCl  0.8  4 % (w/v) acrylamide mix (29:1)  0.

 pH 8.0  1 mM EDTA pH 8. PstI. KpnI. USA  Restriction endonucleases: BamHI.1 % (w/v) SDS  2x SSC  0.1.   inotech. EcoRI.  M HindIII. USA  Invitrogen. Switzerland  Duchefa.0      Transfer Buffer 1x        Wash I      Wash II      Wash III      Washing Buffer    1x PBS  0. UK  84  .05 % (w/v) Tween‐20  0. Materials and Methods  TE 1x.. Netherlands  Sigma‐Aldrich. Netherlands  Roche.0  2.5x SSC  0.1 % (w/v) SDS  25 mM Tris  150 mM glycine  20 % (v/v) methanol  10 mM Tris pH 8.1.5 Others  2. NotI.2.1 Enzymes  Cellulase   DNase I   Macerozyme   Protease inhibitor cocktails  (P9599)  Proteinase K   Duchefa.5.1 % (w/v) SDS  1x SSC  0. XbaI. XHoI  Reverse transcriptase   USA  HT Biotechnology Ltd. Greece & New England Biolabs.

2.   broad range (161‐0318)  2.1.2.1 Cultivation  Unless stated otherwise bacteria were grown in LB medium. Greece  Promega. USA  HT Biotechnology Ltd. Heraklion. USA  Minotech. Greece  2.5.1. USA  Invitrogen.1 Standard molecular biology methods  2. USA  New England Biolabs. Materials and Methods  RNase A   RNase H  RNase inhibitor  (RNasin)  Taq DNA polymerase   T4 DNA Ligase   T4 Polynucleotide kinase (PNK)  T4 RNA Ligase   Klenow Fragment   2.5. Germany  Qiagen.. USA  New England Biolabs.2.2 Methods  The following methods were used to obtain the results presented in chapter 3. USA  Invitrogen. USA  New England Biolabs. if necessary. USA  Minotech. Agilent.2.3 Bacterial strains  Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1   Escherichia coli DH5α®     IMBB. PstI‐digested   Prestained SDS‐PAGE standard.  85  . Germany  Invitrogen. antibiotics  were added as selective markers to a final concentration of 100 μg/ mL. Greece  Stratagene.1.2 Size markers  1 kb DNA Ladder     100 bp DNA Ladder     Lambda DNA. UK  Minotech. USA  New England Biolabs. Greece  Bio‐Rad.

 heat‐shocked at  86  .  250 mL SOB medium in a 2 L Erlenmeyer flask were inoculated with a single colony  of recently streaked DH5α cells and incubated at 18 °C with vigorous shaking at 250  rpm.2 Chemically competent cells  • Escherichia coli DH5α® cells  Chemically competent cells were prepared with an adapted protocol from Inoue et  al.8 had been reached the flask was left on ice for 10 min  and the cells were subsequently harvested by centrifugation at 2500x g for 10 min at  4 °C. left on ice for 10 min  and harvested as described above. The cells could be stored at ‐80 °C for several months. The cells  were then quick‐frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at ‐80 °C.8 had been reached. The flask was left on ice for 10 min and the cells were sub‐ sequently harvested by centrifugation at 2500x g for 10 min at 4 °C. The pellet was resuspended in another 20 mL ice‐ cold TB and DMSO was added to a final concentration of 7 % (v/v). Materials and Methods  Liquid cultures were grown in a vessel at least three times the culture volume on an  orbital shaker. 2 mL of the starter culture were  used to inoculate 50 mL LB Rif and the cells were grown as above until an OD600 of  0.1.2.5 % (w/v) agar‐agar.6‐0.  2.2. After another  incubation on ice for 10 min the cells were aliquoted and quick‐frozen in liquid ni‐ trogen. 1990.. The pellet was gently resuspended in 80 mL ice‐cold TB.2.  2. The pellet was  resuspended gently in 1 mL ice‐cold 20 mM CaCl2 solution and aliquoted.6‐0. When an OD600 of 0. The mixture was left on ice for 20 min. nutrient plates contained 1.3 Transformation  • Escherichia coli DH5α® cells  50‐100 μL of chemically competent DH5α® cells were thawed on ice and mixed with  the desired amount of DNA.  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 cells  For the preparation of competent Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells 5 ml LB Rif were  inoculated with a single colony of recently streaked C58C1 cells and incubated over  night at 28 °C with vigorous shaking at 250 rpm.1.

 The mixture was left on ice for 10 min.  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58C1 cells  Agrobacteria cells were transformed with an adapted protocol from Höfgen &  Willmitzer.  Bacterial cells of a 5 mL LB over night culture were pelleted by centrifugation at  maximum speed and resuspended in 100 μL Solution I.4 Plasmid preparation  Plasmid DNA was extracted by alkalic lysis as described in Sambrook & Russel.1. air‐dried and resuspended in water. 250 mL LB were  added and the cells incubated for 4 h at 28 °C with vigorous shaking at 250 rpm. After 5 min incubation on ice 150 μL Solution III were  added.  2001.  100 μL of chemically competent C58C1 cells were thawed on ice and mixed with the  desired amount of DNA. The cells  were then streaked on selective LB‐agar plates and incubated over night at 37 °C. Materials and Methods  42 °C for 45 sec and quick‐chilled on ice for 1 minute.  Large‐scale plasmid preparations were performed with a NucleoBond® Xtra Midi Kit  according to the manufacturer’s protocol. quick‐frozen in liq‐ uid nitrogen for 1 min and afterwards incubated at 37 °C for 10 min. The cell debris was pelleted by  centrifugation and the supernatant precipitated with 0. 200 μL Solution II were  added and mixed gently. The  cells were then streaked on LB Rif‐agar plates containing the selective antibiotic and  incubated for 2 days at 28 °C. 1988. The  pellet was washed with 70 % (v/v) ethanol.  2.   87  . mixed well and left on ice for another 10 min.2.2. the supernatant was extracted prior to precipitation with  an equal volume of phenol and then chloroform or in a single step with a phe‐ nol/chloroform 1:1 mixture. 250 mL LB were added and the  cells incubated for 45‐60 min at 37 °C with vigorous shaking at 250 rpm. If a  higher purity was desired.7 volumes of isopropanol.

2. Nucleic acids were visualized under UV light. The  extracted samples were mixed in a molar ration of 1:3 of vector to insert and incu‐ bated with 1 U T4 DNA ligase in 1x ligase buffer at 16 °C over night.1.2.  Approximately 2 weeks post germination green seedlings were transferred onto pot‐ ting soil and covered with plastic bags. seeds were spread on MS‐agar plates containing kanamy‐ cin at a final concentration of 50 μg/mL for Arabidopsis thaliana seeds or 200 μg/mL  for Nicotiana benthamiana seeds. perlite and fertilizer.2.1 Plant cultivation  For selection purposes seeds were sterilized for 3 min in sterilization solution and  subsequently washed three times with sterile water.2.  2.2.01 % (w/v) ethidium bromide  added before casting. Materials and Methods  2.7‐ 2.2.7 Digest  For site‐specific cleavage 1‐10 μg of DNA were incubated at 37 °C for 1‐2 hours with  1‐10 U of the respective restriction enzyme in its corresponding 1x buffer.1.   2.2 Plant transformation techniques  2.2.1. plants were further re‐ potted to fresh soil.0 % (w/v) agarose were melted in 1x TAE and 0.8 Ligation  Vector and insert DNA sequences were cut by restriction enzymes.  2. The gels were run in 1x TAE at 20‐120 V depending on the size  of the gel tank and the application.5 Agarose gel  0. The bags were opened gradually to acclima‐ tize the seedlings to greenhouse humidity levels.  88  . Nicotiana sp. After addition of 250 μL 1 %  (w/v) low‐melting agarose.0 % (w/v) agarose gels in 1x TAE and extracted out of them as described above.2. containing peat moss. separated on 0.7‐2.6 Gel extraction  DNA fragments separated on agarose gels in 1x TAE were cut under UV light and  extracted with NucleoSpin Extract II according to the manufacturer’s protocol.1.  2.

2. After 2 days the leaf discs were transferred to  LDM II plates and changed repeatedly to fresh plates once a week until shoot forma‐ tion started.2. The shoots of the plants. The pellet was resuspended in sucrose  dipping solution and the OD600 was adjusted to 0. The plants were stored horizontally in the  dark for 2 days and then stored under normal growth conditions until maturity. were dipped into the  solution for 2 min with slight shaking.  Young leaves were sterilized for 10 min in sterilization solution and consecutively  washed three times with sterile water.8.2 Leaf‐Disc transformation  Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants were created by leaf disc transformation us‐ ing an adapted protocol from Horsch et al.. The leaf discs were rinsed in fresh MS and transferred to LDM I plates  with  the stomata facing towards the air.2. The cells  were harvested by centrifugation at 2500x g.2.. 1997. They were har‐ vested by centrifugation at 2500x g for 10 min at 4 °C and resuspended in 20 mL MS  medium.  5mL LB Rif and the appropriate selective antibiotic were inoculated with a single  colony of recently streaked Agrobacteria and incubated at 30 °C with vigorous shak‐ ing. Materials and Methods  2.  89  .4 Agroinfiltration  The method is based on Schoeb et al. 1985. Shoots from independent calli were transferred to LDM III and after  rooting in the presence of 200 μg/mL kanamycin plantlets were put in soil and  moved to greenhouse conditions. About 60 leaf discs were cut and soaked in the Agrobacteria suspension for  20 min.2. Agrobacteria were grown in LB Rif containing  the appropriate selective antibiotic to an OD600 of approximately 0.3 Floral Dip  Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants were created by floral dip transformation based  on Clough & Bent.2.  2.  2. The overnight culture was further used to inoculate 300 mL LB medium in a 2 L  Erlenmeyer flask and incubated again at 30 °C with shaking at 180 rpm.2. 1998.7. which  had been prepared previously by removing all ripe siliques.

 The ex‐ tracted DNA was treated with RNase A and used for PCR.7 was reached. For Southern Analysis the  amounts were up‐scaled accordingly.  2.2.2. the samples were again vortexed vigor‐ ously and afterwards centrifuged at maximum speed. Prior to load‐ ing the sample volume was decreased by isopropanol precipitation.2 Southern analysis  2 μg (Arabidopsis thaliana) or 20 μg (Nicotiana benthamiana) of genomic DNA were di‐ gested with 10‐30 U restriction enzyme in its appropriate 1x buffer.3 Southern analysis  2.3.  Approximately 20 mg of finely ground plant tissue were resuspended in 200 μL 2x  CTAB buffer by vigorous vortexing and incubated at 65 °C for at least 5 min. After repeating this  washing step twice. After 2 hours a small aliquot was  separated on a gel to test if the digestion had been already completed. The reactions  were incubated at 37 °C for approximately 3 hours. The gel was depurinated until the bromophenol blue of  90  . The  cells were incubated at 28 °C with vigorous shaking of 250 rpm until an OD600 of ap‐ proximately 0. The pellet was resuspended in 5 mL of MMA and incu‐ bated in a shaker at 28 °C for at least 2 hours. The solution was  infiltrated with a syringe into the leaf through a previously made small puncture.  The volumes could be adjusted according to the amount of necessary leaves.7 volumes of isopropanol.1 DNA extraction  DNA was extracted with an adapted protocol based on Rogers’ and Bendich’s (1985)  CTAB‐based protocol. The samples (in  1x DNA loading buffer) were loaded on a 0. The agrobacteria were harvested by centrifugation at  2500x g for 10 min at 4 °C. After  addition of an equal volume of chloroform.  2. Materials and Methods  5 mL LB Rif and the appropriate antibiotic were inoculated from a glycerol stock.2.2. The clear supernatant was  transferred to a new tube and precipitated with 0. the OD600 was adjusted to approximately 0.7 % (w/v) agarose gel and run at ap‐ proximately 20 V over night.25. The bacteria were pelleted by centrifu‐ gation as above and resuspended in 2 mL of 10 mM MgCl2.3.

2. two gel‐size Whatmans. a gel‐sized membrane and four whatman papers were equilibrated in 10x  SSC. 200 μL chloroform were added  to the cleared supernatant and the samples were again vortexed and incubated for 15  min at room temperature.   Approximately 100 mg of finely ground plant tissue were resuspended in 1 mL RNA  extraction buffer by vigorous vortexing and incubated at room temperature for at  least 5 min.3. the gel. The  nucleic acids were crosslinked on the membrane by applying UV radiation of 100x  1200 μJ/cm2. After pelleting and removing cell debris.01 % (w/v) ethidium bromide.  2.4. two more Whatman papers  and a 10 cm thick tissue paper stack on top of the sandwich.  2. The blot was assembled by a Whatman paper submerged in 10x SSC acting as a  bridge.  air‐dried and resuspended in water.1. The dried membrane was stored at room‐temperature until detection. The gels were pre‐run at 100 V in 1x MOPS  91  .4 Northern analysis  2.2.4.4.3 Capillary blot  The gel. the  upper phase was used for a modified isopropanol precipitation.1 RNA extraction  Total RNA from plants was extracted using an adapted protocol from Chomczynski  & Sacchi.  2. the membrane. Materials and Methods  the loading buffer changed to yellow.2. After separation of the two phases by centrifugation.2 % (w/v) agarose gels in 1x MOPS containing 0.2 Denaturing agarose/formaldehyde gels  For detection of RNA molecules longer than 200 bases 10‐20 μg of total RNA were  separated on 1.2. by adding 1x high  salt mixture to the isopropanol. 1987.2. The volumes of the liquids  should be at least two times the gel volume to ensure complete covering.7 % (v/v) formalde‐ hyde and 0. The nucleic acids were  blotted onto the membrane by applying constant pressure from top over night. then denatured for 30 min and finally neutral‐ ized with the corresponding solutions from chapter 2. The RNA pellet was washed with 70 % (v/v) ethanol.

 The samples were run at 100 V for at least 3 hours.2.5. Gels  were run at 10‐25 Watt for keeping a constant gel temperature of 50 °C. followed by the equilibrated gel facing the cath‐ ode.  The wells were rinsed with 1x TBE to remove released urea prior to loading. The dried membrane was stored at room temperature until detection.2. The gels were  stained in ethidium bromide and equilibrated in 1x TBE until the transfer. 10 mM dGTP.1 Random‐primed labeling  100 ng of purified DNA template were denatured by boiling for 3 min and subse‐ quent quick‐chilling. the blot consisted of five gel‐size  Whatman paper soaked in 1x TBE. 10 mM dTTP.3 PAGE northern  For detection of RNA molecules shorter than 200 bases 20‐50 μg of total RNA were  separated on 8‐15 % (w/v) denaturing polyacrylamide (PAGE northern) gels. After  polymerization the gels were pre‐run in 1x TBE until they reached a temperature of  50 °C. then the membrane facing the anode and another layer of five Whatman papers. Prior to use the  probe was denatured by boiling for 3 min and subsequent quick‐chilling.  2.2. After an incubation of 60  min at 37 °C the labeled probe was purified from unincorporated nucleotides with a  MicroSpin S‐200 column according to the manufacturer’s protocol.4 Semi‐dry blot  The RNA was blotted with a SD20 Semi Dry device. 20 μCi α32P‐dATP  and 20 μCi α32P‐dCTP.  92  .5 Hybridization  2. The RNA was boiled in 1x RNA loading dye and quick‐chilled before  loading. Materials and Methods  running buffer. as well as 20 U Klenow Fragment.2. The typical reaction volume was 50 μL. The RNA was boiled in 1x sequencing dye and quick‐chilled before loading.  2.4. 3 μg random primers. consisting of 1x Rad‐ Prime Buffer.  A constant amperage of 3 mA per cm2 membrane area was applied for 30 min and  the RNA was subsequently crosslinked on the membrane by UV radiation of 100x  1200 μJ/cm2.  2.2. The gels were rinsed in  water and used for capillary blotting as described above.4.

6.5.6 Western analysis  2. Materials and Methods  2.  2.2. The  membrane was rinsed at room temperature with Wash I and then washed at hybridi‐ zation temperature according to the following protocol: two washes for 15 min with  excess Wash I. Signals could be detected by developing the film after 1‐10 day exposure  at ‐80 °C depending on the amount of the targeted nucleic acid.2.1 Protein extraction  100 mg finely ground leaf powder was mixed with at least four volumes of protein  extraction buffer and vortexed thoroughly. The clear supernatant was  transferred to a new tube and stored at ‐20 °C.5.  2. washes and developing  The membranes were pre‐hybridized for at least one hour in Church hybridization  buffer.2 End‐labeling  8 pmol DNA oligo were end‐labeled by incubation with 20 U T4 PNK containing 40  μCi of γ32P‐ATP in 1x PNK reaction buffer at 37 °C. two washes for 10 min with excess Wash II and in the case of random‐ primed probes two additional washes for 5 min with excess Wash III.2.2.2.5  mL stacking gel were prepared with a BioRad casting device.2 SDS‐PAGE  SDS‐Polyacrylamide gels of 10‐15 % (w/v) consisting of 7. The hybridization temperature depended on the length of probe and sample  and was usually set to 42 °C for small RNAs <50 nt and 65 °C for long RNAs and  DNA. sealed in plastic bags und subsequently exposed on  X‐ray films. The samples were  93  . After 30 min incubation on ice the sam‐ ples were centrifuged at full speed for 15 min at 4 °C. Finally the  membrane was rinsed in 2x SSC.5 mL resolving gel and 2.  2. The boiled probe was added and the membrane hybridized over night. After 45 min the labeled probe  was purified from unincorporated nucleotides with a MicroSpin S‐200 column ac‐ cording to the manufacturer’s protocol. Prior to use the probe was denatured by boil‐ ing for 3 min and subsequent quick‐chilling.3 Hybridization.6.2.

2.6.7 rRNA cloning  2. 2005).  5 μg total RNA were self‐ligated with 20 U T4 RNA Ligase 1 in 1x RNA ligase buffer  and reverse‐transcribed as described below. loaded and run at 70‐140 mA in 1x protein running  buffer. After three washes the membrane was incu‐ bated with secondary antibody anti‐Rabbit AP‐conjugate diluted 1:2500 in binding  buffer for another hour.  2.6. four gel‐size whatman papers and the nylon mem‐ brane were equilibrated in 1x transfer buffer. 5S rRNA and 4. After three final washes the membrane was incubated with  HRP substrate and exposed on X‐ray film until protein bands appeared. The blot was assembled by two  Whatman papers followed by the gel facing the cathode and the membrane facing  the anode and another two Whatman papers and one sponge on each side.3 Electro‐blot  The gel as well as two sponges.5S rRNA were determined  by a modified circular RT‐PCR protocol as described before (Bollenbach et al.. comprised of serum from ERL1‐injected rabbits (Vlatakis. The obtained cDNAs were amplified by  PCR and separated on 8 % (w/v) acrylamide gels in 1x TBE. The pro‐ tein was blotted by applying 90 mA constant amperage over night at 4 °C. The correct products  were eluted from gel slices by incubation in 300 mM NaCl over night at 4 °C with  constant rotation. The released DNA was purified by phenol/chloroform extraction. Materials and Methods  boiled in 1x Laemmli buffer. 2010) diluted  1:20000 in binding buffer  for one hour.2.2.1 Self‐Ligation  The precise 5’ and 3’ ends of 5.4 Western detection  The membrane was blocked in blocking buffer for at least one hour and washed three  times for 5 min with washing buffer.7.  precipitated and further amplified in a second PCR reaction.2. It was again purified by  94  .2.  2. The membrane was incubated with primary  antibody.  2.8S rRNA. The gels were stained with Coomassie staining solution and destained in de‐ staining solution until the protein bands were visible.

 Materials and Methods  phenol/chloroform extraction and precipitated with isopropanol.5 mM MgCl2.  2. annealing for 15‐30 sec at 45‐60 °C (depending on the nature of the  primers) and extension for 30 sec per kb at 72 °C.4 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)  For specific amplification of a DNA fragment a reaction containing 1x Taq buffer. 1 U  Taq polymerase and the appropriate amount of template DNA depending on the  application were incubated in a thermocycler. The reaction was carried out in 1x  T4 RNA ligase buffer containing 10 % (v/v) DMSO and 1 U RNasin.2. A typical program consisted of an ini‐ tial denaturation step at 95 °C for 3 min.  For a more specific amplification of the linker‐ligated RNAs a touch‐down protocol  was used. 200  pmol 3’‐ddC‐modified linker were phosphorylated with 1 U PNK and ligated with  20 U T4 RNA ligase 1 to the 3’‐ends of total RNA.  2. 200 μM of each dNTP.3 Reverse Transcription (RT)  1‐5 μg total RNA were incubated with 1μM first‐strand primer at 70 °C for 10 min.2.2.2 Linker‐Ligation  To verify the position of the additional nucleotides of chloroplastic rRNA species.  1.25‐2. The products were  cloned and sequenced using vector‐specific primers. It started with a high annealing temperature of the corresponding primer  melting temperature plus five degrees Celsius (Tm + 5 °C) which was reduced gradu‐ 95  .7. The reaction was terminated by a final incubation at 85 °C for 5 min. 1 mM  of each dNTP.  2.2. followed by 35 cycles of denaturation for 15‐ 30 sec at 95 °C. 0.  The cDNA was synthesized by supplementing the reaction with 1x RT buffer.7.2 μM forward and reverse primer.7. The product was  then reverse‐transcribed with a linker‐specific primer. The purified PCR products were  cloned and sequenced using vector‐specific primers. The obtained cDNA was am‐ plified by PCR and gel‐extracted with NucleoSpin. 1 U RNasin and 2 U reverse transcriptase and incubated at 42 °C for  45‐60 min.

    2.8 Rapid Amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)  3’‐RACE was performed with 1 μg total RNA using the TaKaRa 3’‐Full RACE Core  Set according to the manufacturer’s protocol.2. 15‐30 min at 50 °C.   2.  The resulting curves were analyzed with the Rotor‐Gene Version 6 program by com‐ parison with a standard curve of known template amounts. less than 1 mm wide slices. 81 °C and 84 °C. 10 μL were used  for PCR. The resulting amount of fluorescence was recorded at 72  °C. cloned and sent for sequencing. The melting curve was recorded by increasing the temperature  to 94 °C in 1. The cDNA was treated with 1 U RNase H to remove RNA/DNA hy‐ brids.2. The reaction was then diluted one to ten and 5 μL were used for a qPCR with  the Fermentas Maxima™ SYBR Green qPCR Kit according to the manufacturer’s  documentation.   96  . Materials and Methods  ally until an annealing temperature of the corresponding primer Tm – 5 °C was  reached.5 μM Oligo(dT) re‐ verse primer. Intact protoplasts floated on top and could  be used directly for microscopic analysis. fol‐ lowed by 40 cycles of denaturation for 5 sec at 94 °C. The reaction was incubated for 10 min  at 30 °C. 5 min at 95 °C and finally 5 min at 5 °C. The samples were incubated for ap‐ proximately 5 hours at room temperature with slight shaking at 50 rpm.2.  2.10 Protoplasts  Young Nicotiana benthamiana leaves were submerged in protoplast extraction buffer  and cut into thin. The RT reaction was performed as above with 2. annealing for 5 sec at 55 °C and  extension for 12 sec at 72 °C.9 Quantitative real‐time PCR (qPCR)  Total RNA was treated with 10 U DNase I in 1x DNase buffer to remove traces of  genomic DNA.  A typical program consisted of an initial denaturation step at 94 °C for 10 min.2. The program cycled at this temperature 25 times as described above. The samples  were filled into long tubes with a small diameter and left for sedimentation at 4 °C  for some hours or preferably over night.0 °C steps and holding each temperature for 2 sec.

 stained with 1 % (w/v) OsO4 and sec‐ tions prepared for electron microscopy. After a  dark adaptation of 15 min the leaf discs were excited with light and the resulting  fluorescence measured with a Handy‐PEA fluorometer.    97  .2. The fixed tissue was washed. Materials and Methods  2.12 Fluorescence measurement  Leaf discs of Nicotiana benthamiana plants were cut and left on wet Whatman papers  in a petri dish.11 Preparation for microscopic analysis  Nicotiana benthamiana leaves were submerged in fixing buffer and infiltrated by ap‐ plying vacuum. After analysis transverse leaf sections were  stained with 1 % (w/v) toluidine blue and used for optical microscopy. this humid chamber was then covered with aluminum foil.2.2.  2. The results were analyzed  with the BiolyzerHP3 software.

98  .

 As soon as the GFP  expression could be observed as green fluorescence under a handheld UV lamp. The cytoplasm and vacuole were free of GFP fluorescence. two exceptions are Medicago truncatula and Sorghum bi‐ color.  In contrast.  This corresponds to the localization of the integrated GFP in this line.2. Plain GFP infil‐ trated into a different spot on the same leaf was used as a control for the specificity of  chloroplast import. Protoplast preparations of Nicotiana benthamiana line 16C with  stably integrated GFP served as a positive transgenic GFP control. the green fluorescence was excluded  from the chloroplasts and could only be detected in the cytoplasm (Figure 3. These organelles could be identified as chloroplasts by  detection of the red auto‐fluorescence of chlorophyll in the second channel since both  showed a perfect overlap. Results    3.  Expression of the ERL1:GFP construct resulted in a strong GFP signal detectable in  defined spots inside the cells.1 a). In  protoplasts prepared from leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana line 16C strong green fluo‐ rescence could be detected throughout the Endoplasmatic Reticulum (Figure 3. but the latter sequence can be considered as incomplete since it starts with Ser‐ ine instead of Methionine.1 b). when plain GFP was infiltrated.1 e).  To verify the predicted chloroplastic localization of Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1. as has been  99  .3.10 plant ERL1 sequences possess an N‐terminal sequence  motif possibly leading to the import of the protein sequence into chloroplasts. Nicotiana bentha‐ miana wildtype tissue was used as a negative control. This  leader peptide is present in various plant varieties including mono‐ and dicotyledo‐ nous species (Figure 3.1 d). pro‐ toplasts were prepared and analyzed with a confocal microscope.  all expressed ERL1:GFP was targeted to the chloroplast (Figure 3.1 Localization  As described in chapter 1. its full‐ length cDNA was fused to the N‐terminus of GFP (ERL1:GFP) and transiently over‐ expressed by agroinfiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves.

trichocarpa S. M.1: Localization of plant ERL1  (A) An alignment of the N‐terminal ERL1  protein regions reveals differences be‐ tween plant species. (D) Infil‐ tration of plain GFP results in green fluo‐ rescence which is excluded from chloro‐ plasts and only detectable in the cyto‐ plasm. (C) Fusion of the ERL1  leader sequence to GFP shows the same  effect as above and identifies the leader to  be capable of chloroplast import.benthamiana O.    (A)  A. its cDNA was fused to GFP (leader:GFP) and infiltrated as  above. The expression pattern was identical to the result obtained with the ERL1:GFP  construct (Figure 3.sativa P.  100  . similar    (B)  GFP  Chlorophyll  Merge      10 μm  10 μm  10 μm (C)  10 μm  10 μm  10 μm (D)  10 μm  10 μm  10 μm (E)    5 μm    5 μm   5 μm Figure 3.vinifera Z.truncatula N. (E) Protoplast preparations of N.  benthamiana line 16C where the GFP pro‐ tein is localized in the Endoplasmatic Re‐ ticulum..thaliana M. 1999). While the S. Results  described before (Voinnet et al. Protoplast preparations of wildtype showed  no detectable green fluorescence and confirmed the specificity of the detected sig‐ nals.mays (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) 1 100 MASAFSAFRVSLSRISPFRDTRFSYPATLALAHTKRIMCN--------------SSHSVSPSPSPSDFSSSSSSSSSSPSTFSLMETSEN-----ARWRP ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SSHKTRHRILHFFFRKLTPQGSRLIPMATGFCRVPLLRRFLVSPPVLPFSYSLQPSRK-ISISASRSTTEESTSSLIQPTPSR------TRWKP ---------MAIARVSPPAFS--SPFLIHSLLRPFSSPSSVL-------RPRVTRVPHHRGFAIAAALSQASPLPSADGDGAVMEAPPRPSSR--RPWKP ----MSFPRIPLSRVPSYLHNSNN--CFHLLHPPFIPVSKTP------------SLPTYQTARTYTDFNSQTQTQPPLSLPSLIPSPPVNNPNATHRWKP ---------------------------------------------------------------------------SAASSATVRASG-SVG-----------------MAFYRVSPFRYGSLS-S---LIPYVS-------------SP-----SSLSPPVRT-FTLSASISTPHPSPPSLLTASPKAS-----DRWRP ---------MALARVSPSSLANLIPPLLQSFFRPFSS-------------DFPIRNSRRRSSPVAAAFSLTSQSAHAAREGLVMEAP-RPSSR--YPWKP   Caption: identical.bicolor V. bicolor  ERL1 sequence is incomplete.   To determine whether the predicted leader peptide was able to drive the import of  proteins into chloroplasts.3. (B)—(C) Confocal micros‐ copy of protoplast preparations from  leaves agroinfiltrated with GFP‐ containing constructs: (B) Fusion of ERL1  to GFP cDNA proves perfect co‐ localization of ERL1 with the chlorophyll  of chloroplasts.1 c). In addition. trunca‐ tula ERL1 does not contain a chloroplast  signal peptide. 2007) therefore an accessible N‐ terminal leader sequence is indispensable for chloroplast import. fusion of GFP to the 5’‐end of ERL1 resulted in  strong GFP fluorescence in the cytoplasm (Eckhardt.

 The obtained consensus  sequence corresponded to EST EB681897.1).2 % and BP529372. Nb_ERL1 = ERL1 of N. thaliana  ERL1 cDNA. thaliana ERL1 protein sequence and the translated N.1) both ESTs could be the result of transcription of  two individual genes. benthamiana sequence on the length of the already pub‐ lished stretch.3. in the exonuclease domain (highlighted  by an arrow) the sequences are even more related sharing 68. as well as 53.  There exist two published ESTs from Nicotiana tabacum in the DFCI Tobacco Gene  Project (http://compbio. benthamiana sequences identifies EST EB681897. but the  sequence comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 cDNA suggests a nearly com‐ plete 5’‐end of the ESTs.3% identity and 76.2 % identity and 64. The sequences share 53.1 as the corresponding EST. From the latter only the first 800 nucleotides are depicted. The two ESTs share 75. ERL1 sequence  (A) Alignment of the published N.1 shares 32.   When aligned with Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 cDNA.harvard.1 together with A.2 RACE  Until now no complete sequence information is available for ERL1 of Nicotiana sp. Results  3. whereas their 3’‐ends are more  dissimilar.2 %. 3’‐RACE identified an additional stretch of 362 nt.2: Alignments of Nicotiana sp.3.1 and At_ERL1 37.9% similarity.edu/tgi/cgi‐bin/tgi/Blast/index. an alignment of the gained se‐ quences is provided in Figure 3. The resulting product showed 55.2% similarity. They have an iden‐ tity of 75 % with their 5’‐ends being almost identical.2 %  similarity on the protein level. The obtained Nicotiana benthamiana sequences are presented  in the supplementary result section (chapter 6. Since Southern analysis revealed two copies of the ERL1 gene in Nicotiana  benthamiana (compare chapter 3. tabacum ESTs EB681897. it  has 98% identity with the newly identified N. bentha‐ miana cDNA.2% identity and 64.2 a).2 %  sequence identity with At_ERL1. both ESTs have an identity of  more than 70 % on a stretch of 30 % of the sequence (Figure 3. EB681897.1 and BP529372.dfci.2 b and c:    Figure 3. The latter is incomplete at the 5’‐end which can be concluded from a missing methion‐ ine. benthamiana    101  . (B) The consensus of obtained 3’‐RACE sequences and its alignment  with the later cloned N.  5’‐RACE could not be performed successfully.cgi) with the ac‐ cessions EB681897 with 732 nt and BP529372 consisting of 632 nt. none of the cloned sequences corresponded  to EST BP529372 at the 3’‐end.5.  Caption: At_ERL1 = ERL1 of A. thaliana. corresponding to the length of  the ESTs. (C) Alignment of the A.3 % identity with  Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 on the nucleotide level.   To identify the ERL1 sequence in Nicotiana benthamiana RACE experiments were per‐ formed.

1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (100) (101) (101) (1) (200) (201) (201) (48) (300) (301) (301) (148) (400) (401) (401) (248) (500) (501) (501) (348) (600) (601) (601) (448) (700) (701) (701) (548) (733) (801) (801) (648) (733) (901) (901) (748) (733) (1001) (1001) 1 100 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GACTCAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAACTCACTCCTCAAAGGAGCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTACGGGATTTT GCCCTTAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAACTCACTCCTCAAGGGAGCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTACGGGATTTT GCCCTTAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAACTCACTCCTCAAGGGAGCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTACGGGATTTT 101 200 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GTAGGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGGTTCCTTGTATCTCCGCCGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCAGCCCAGCCGTAAAATCAGTATCTCCGCCTCTCT GTAGGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGGTTCCTTGTATCTCCGCCGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCAGCCCAGCCGTAAAATCAGTATCTCCGCCTCTCG GTAGGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGGTTCCTTGTATCTCCGCCGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCAGCCCAGCCGTAAAATCAGTATCTCCGCCTCTCG 201 300 -----------------------------------------------------CCCGTTGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACT TTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTCCTTCCCTAATTCAGCCCACAACTTCCCGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACATGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACT TTCTACCACCGAAGAATTTACTTCTTCCCTAATTCAGCCCACACCTTCCCGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACT TTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTTCTTCCCTAATTCAGCCCACACCTTCCCGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACT 301 400 AAGATGGATGATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGCTGCGGGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGT AAGATGGATGATCCTACGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAGTTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGTTGCGGGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGT AAGATGGATGATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGCTGCGGGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGT AAGATGGATGATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGCTGCGGGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGT 401 500 TGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCAACTTTTT TGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCGAGTTTTT TGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCAACTTTTT TGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTCGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCAACTTTTT 501 600 CCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTGGCATGAT CCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTAACATGAT CCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTGGCATGAT CCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTGGCATGAT 601 700 ACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAAGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGGGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACCGGGCGGCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTG ACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAAGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGTGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACTGGGCGGCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTG ACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAAGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGGGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACCGGGCGGCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTG ACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAAGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGGGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACCGGGCGGCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTG 701 800 CCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGACTAAAGTTCCTCAGCAATGCAAAGTAGCAGGGACGAAATTGCCACCGTATTTCATGGAATGGATTAA CCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGA------------------------------------------------------------------CCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGACTAAAGTTCCTCAGCAATGCAAAGTAGCAGGGACGAAATTGCCACCGTATTTCATGGAATGGATTAA CCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGACTAAAGTTCCTCAGCAATGCAAAGTAGCAGGGACGAAATTGCCACCGTATTTCATGGAACGGATTAA 801 900 TTTGAAGGATGTGTTTTTGAACTTCTACAAGAGGAGGGCCAAAGGAATGCTTTCAATGATGAGGGAACTCCAGATGCCTTTGTTAGGGAGTCATCACCTT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TTTGAAGGATGTGTTTTTGAACTTCTACAAGAGGAGGGCCAAAGGAATGCTTTCAATGATGAGGGAACTCCAGATGCCTTTGTTAGGGAGTCATCACCTT TTTGAAGGATGTGTTTTTGAACTTCTACAAGAGGAGGGCCAAAGGAATGCTTTCAATGATGAGGGAACTCCAGATGCCTTTGTTAGGGAGTCATCACCTT 901 1000 GGAATAGATGATGCAAAAAACATAGCAAGAGTACTGCAACACATGCTTAGTGATGGTGCCCTTGTGCAAATCACAGCTAGAAGAAACCCTCATTCTCCTG ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GGAATAGATGATGCAAAAAACATAGCAAGAGTACTGCAACACATGCTTAGTGATGGTGCCCTTGTGCAAATCACAGCTAGAAGAACCCTCATTCTCCTGA GGAATAGATGATGCAAAAAACATAGCAAGAGTACTGCAACACATGCTTAGTGATGGTGCCCTTGTGCAAATCACAGCTAGAAGAAACCCTCATTCTCCTG 1001 1097 AAAAAGTTGAATATCTTTTTGAGGATCGCATTGTATAACTAGTTTCTTCTGAACCATTTTGTTATCACCTAAACATTTTTAGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------AAAAGTTGAATATCTTTTTGAGGATCGCATTGTATAACTAGTTT----------------------------------------------------AAAAAGTTGAATATCTTTTTGAGGATCGCATTGTATAACTAGTTT---------------------------------------------------- 102  .1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 (142) ATGAATATCTCAGCCTCTCTTTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTTCTTC--C-----C---TAATTCAGCCCACACCTTCCCGT--------ACCCGT---EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 (180) ATCAGTATCTCCGCCTCTCTTTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTCCTTC--C-----C---TAATTCAGCCCACAACTTCCCGT--------ACCCGT---301 400 At_ERL1_cDNA (291) ATGCAAGGTGGAGACCCATGTGCTTGTATTACACCCACGGAAAGTGTACAAAGATGGATGATCCTGCCCATTTGGAGATTTTTAACCACGATTGTTCAAA BP529372. Results  (A)  At_ERL1_cDNA BP529372.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 (550) ATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTAACATGATA--CAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAAGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTG 701 800 At_ERL1_cDNA (689) GCTGAGCATGACTTGTGGGATAAAGATACAGATTGGGGTCTGAACGATGCAGCTTTTGTAACCTGTGGAAACTGGGATATAAAGACAAAGATTCCTGAGC BP529372.1 (412) TTTCCAGTTCTCCTCTTTGATGCTAAAACCATGGATGTGGTTGACTTGTTCCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCAACAAAAATGCACGAAGAAAGAATAAACGAAT EB681897.1 (258) --------TGGAAGCCAACATGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACTAAGATGGATGATCCTACGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAGTTGCTCCCT 401 500 At_ERL1_cDNA (391) GGAACTTCGAGTGGCTGCTGCTGATCTTGAGAGAAAGAAGTCACAAGAATTCAATTTTTTCTTGGTTATTGACTTGGAAGGAAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAG BP529372.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 (600) GC-------GCCTTTTGGT-TCTATATGAAGAATTGCATG-----------------------------------------------------------EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.3.1 (450) TTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCGAGTTTTTCCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAAT 601 700 At_ERL1_cDNA (591) ACATCGAAGGCAAGTATGGGGAACTCGGGGTTGATCGTGTGTGGCATGACA--CAGCTATTCCATTTAAGCAAGTTGTTGAGGAGTTTGAAGTTTGGTTA BP529372.1 (350) TGAGCTTATGCAAAATGTTGCGGGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGTTGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAG 501 600 At_ERL1_cDNA (491) TTTCCTATTTTGATCGTAGATGCCAAAACCATGGAAGTCGTAGACTTATTCCACAGGTTTGTAAGACCCACCAAAATGAGCGAGCAAGCAATTAACAAAT BP529372.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 (512) ATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAACTAGGAGTTGATCG-GTATGGTATCTAATTCAGTAGTTCGAAATA--CAA----TTCAGCAGTTGGAACTT-----A EB681897.1 Nb_ERL1_1 Nb_ERL1_2 3'RACE EB681897.1 At_ERL1_cDNA BP529372.1 (220) --------TGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTACTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACCAAGATGGATGATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCGCT EB681897.1 (312) GGAGTTTATGCAAAATGCTGCGGGACTTGAGAATTTGCGGAAGCAGGAGTTGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAG EB681897.1 1 100 (1) --------AGTTCCCAGTCCCTGTACTCGAAAGGA-AGATCTTCATCTTCAATCTTCATGCTAATCGACGAAAATGGCGTCCGCATTCTCTGCATTTAGG (1) ----------------------------------------CTTCTTCAGGAAAACTCATAC----CTCAGAGA--GCCGTTCAATTCCAATGGCTAT-GG (1) GACTCAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAAC-TCACTC----CTCAAAGGA-GCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTAC-GG 101 200 (92) GTTTCGTTGTCCAGAATCAGTCCTTTCCGTGATACCCGGTTCTCTTATCCCGCCACGTTGGCTTTAGCTCATACCAAACGAAT-CATGTGCAACTCTTCG (54) GATTT----TCTAGGGTCC--CCTTGCTGCGG----CGTTTCCTTGGTATCTCCTC--CGGTACTACCTTCTTCGTACTCACTTCAGGCCCAACCGTAAA (94) GATTT----TGTAGGGTCC--CCTTGCTGCGG----CGGTTCCTTG-TATCTCCGC--CGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCA-GCCCAGCCGTAAA 201 300 At_ERL1_cDNA (191) CATTCTGTATCTCCATCTCCTTCTCCCTCTGACTTTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTCCTTCTACTTTTTCGTTAATGGAAACAAGTGAAA BP529372.1 EB681897.1 (648) GGTGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACTGGGCGGCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTGCCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGA---------------     (B)  3'RACE EB681897.

 The stable  integration was used to study the effect of ERL1 during the whole lifecycle of the  plants. not only macroscopically but also when observed with the light  and electron microscope (data not shown).3 Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants  Agrobacterium tumefaciens‐mediated leaf disc transformation was used to produce  transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants which were misexpressing ERL1. conserved. similar.3 a).3. four out of the six lines did not produce any seeds or if.  . Results  (C) At_ERL1 Nb_ERL1 At_ERL1 Nb_ERL1 1 100 (1) ---------MASAFSAFRVSLSRISPFRDTRFSYPATLALAHTKRIMCNSSHSVSPSPSPSDFSSSSSSSSSSPSTFSLMETSENARWRPMCLYYTHGKC (1) SSHKTRHRILHFFFRKLTPQGSRLIPMATGFCRVPLLRRFLVSPPVLPFSYSLQ---PSRKISISASRSTTEESTSSLIQPTPSRTRWKPTCLYFTQGKC 101 200 (92) TKMDDPAHLEIFNHDCSKELRVAAADLERKKSQEFNFFLVIDLEGKVEILEFPILIVDAKTMEVVDLFHRFVRPTKMSEQAINKYIEGKYGELGVDRVWH (98) TKMDDPMHIDKFNHNCSLELMQNAAGLKNLRQQELEYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVLLFDAKTMDVVNFFHRFVRPTKMHEDRINEYIEGKYGKLGVDRVWH EXOIII 201 300 At_ERL1 (192) DTAIPFKQVVEEFEVWLAEHDLWDKDTDWGLNDAAFVTCGNWDIKTKIPEQCVVSNINLPPYFMEWINLKDVYLNFYGREARGMVSMMRQCGIKLMGSHH Nb_ERL1 (198) DTAIPFGEVIEQFEVWLGERQLWRNEPGGCLNKAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPQQCKVAGTKLPPYFMEWINLKDVFLNFYKRRAKGMLSMMRELQMPLLGSHH 301 346 At_ERL1 (292) LGIDDTKNITRVVQRMLSEGAVLKLTARRSKSNMRNVEFLFKNRIK Nb_ERL1 (298) LGIDDAKNIARVLQHMLSDGALVQITARRNPHSPEKVEYLFEDRIV Caption: identical.1).3: Analysis of presum‐ able ERL1 suppressor plants  (A) Slight  bleaching  in  young  plants (B) wildtype‐like phenotype  in adult leaves (C) Southern analy‐ sis  revealed  the  same  ERL1 copy  number  in  wildtype  (wt)  and  the  transformed  plants  (–)  suggesting  no presence of the ERL1 hairpin.   The plants showed resistance to kanamycin and slight bleaching in a young stage  (Figure 3. In  addition. Five out of these six lines had a segrega‐ tion pattern most likely corresponding to a single insertion (compare Table 3. ERL1 mRNA by  RNA silencing. This phenomenon reverted to a wildtype‐like phenotype after some  weeks (Figure 3.3 b).1 Knock‐down of ERL1  Six individual lines were created by transforming Nicotiana benthamiana leaves with a  hairpin designed from Nicotiana tabacum EST EB681897 (Schumacher. then at a very late  (A)  (B)  (C)  wt – 103  Figure 3.3. 2009). Exonuclease domain   3. This con‐ struct was supposed to downregulate the endogenous Nicotiana sp.   3.

7  1:3.3.0  1:4.5  1:5. The pres‐ ence of the ERL1 hairpin.3 c). Results  stage and only in small amounts. Therefore all plants were transferred to soil and their ERL1 expres‐ sion levels determined by Northern analysis. Finally Southern hy‐ bridization with an ERL1 probe showed the same two copies of the ERL1 gene as in  wildtype (Figure 3. The plants were therefore considered as transgenic. From this data the segregation ratio  could be calculated (compare Table 3. Crossing of these lines with Nicotiana benthamiana  wildtype in both directions showed.3.2). that the male sexual organs were not functional. could not be proven. qPCR analysis showed the same  ERL1 expression level as in wildtype leaves (data not shown). Northern analysis failed to  detect the hairpin or small RNAs resulting from it.5  3.8  1:4.1: Segregation of Nicotiana benthamiana T2 plant lines transformed with a  hairpin construct designed for downregulation of ERL1   line  ERL1 KD1  ERL1 KD2  ERL1 KD3  ERL1 KD4  ERL1 KD5  ERL1 KD6    segregation  1:4.5  1:18. The observed phenotype is not  considered as a result of downregulation of ERL1. but there  was probably no downregulation of ERL1 present. that the construct designed by a prior lab member was not  correct. RNA of 344 plants was analyzed  and revealed a direct relation of the ERL1 expression level and the severity of the  104  .2 Overexpression of ERL1  an Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 cDNA construct driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S  promoter was used to transform leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana.  In the resulting twelve lines the plants showed already in the first leaves multi‐ faceted phenotypes which were sometimes not easy to distinguish from susceptibil‐ ity to kanamycin. In total.    Table 3. Further sequence analysis of the  original vector proved. however.  whereas the plants produced seeds when pollinated with wildtype pollen.

 but not tested. it cannot be distinguished whether the green patches are a result of  endogenous ERL1 transgene silencing or possessed wildtype characteristics.    • Some bleach plants with a strong phenotype entered a pathway of ERL1  transgene silencing and reverted to a wildtype‐like phenotype.4 f). Most transgenic lines showed more than one of the different  phenotypes.  The size of the plants and their life cycle showed no difference when com‐ 105  . the macroscopic phenotypes  could be subdivided into four distinct groups:    • The term “Bleach” was used for a phenotype varying from plants with leaves  which were slightly brighter than wildtype to plants with an almost complete  loss of chlorophyll and white leaves.3. It is possible. The  reversion of the bleach phenotype could also be observed which may have  been triggered by environmental factors. bleach plants appeared to have a prolonged lifecycle compared to wild‐ type. Therefore they cannot be attributed solely to the number and location of  the insertions into the Nicotiana benthamiana genomes. Results  phenotype (Figure 3. Only the strongest bleach plants of  distinct lines showed this behavior but the phenomenon was inheritable and  appeared in consecutive generations. In addi‐ tion. that the endoge‐ nous ERL1 expression is also silenced in this line.4 d and e). These plants contained com‐ pletely white and green tissue which could be collected independently.    • “Mosaic” plants had a phenotype with speckled leaves of green and white  patches. The line was further named “Self‐ silencer” (Figure 3. In general. Compared to wildtype they reached the maturity  state strongly delayed and produced only few seeds (Figure 3.4 b). Its progression  was comparable to systemic silencing spread. The latter showed a stunted growth with  matching small sized leaves. but they are considered to be a  direct consequence of ERL1 overexpression.

8 kDa  28.4 c). 7 = self‐silencer green  tissue. In consecutive generations individuals of this line exhibited mild  bleaching of some leaves. but nei‐ ther the morphology nor the life‐cycle of the plant differed to wildtype.  The degraded signal in self‐silencing lines could be  due to silencing of the ERL1 mRNA (G) Western  analysis of plants overexpressing ERL1 lead to a  strong band of approximately 42 kDa.4: Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing ERL1   (A) Mosaic phenotype (B) Bleach phenotype (C) No  phenotype (NP) (D. 8 = self‐silencer white tissue    106  . therefore the phenomenon was attributed to positional effects (Figure  3.4 a and f). 5 = no phenotype (NP) . 2‐4 = agroinfiltrated ERL1+FLAG of an unsuccessful pull‐down experiment. In mosaic  and white tissue the strong signal might result from  two bands as in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines. These plants  showed an ERL1 expression comparable to mosaic and bleach plants.1 kDa    34. Results  pared to wildtype although they showed strong overexpression of ERL1  (Figure 3.    (A)  (B) (C) (D) (E)  (F) mosaic  (G)  bleach  no phenotype  self‐silencer     49.9 kDa  M 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Figure 3.  Caption: M = Bio‐Rad Prestained SDS‐PAGE standard. 1 = wildtype. E) Self‐silencing phenotype (F)  Northern analysis of transgenic plant lines revealed  strong overexpression of ERL1 in most individuals.    • The ”No phenotype” (NP) line was the exception to the above mentioned rela‐ tion of ERL1 transgene expression and the bleaching phenotype.3.  Coomassie staining is depicted as a loading control. There  was only one line that showed this behavior (in contrast to the other pheno‐ types). 6 = mosaic.  in self‐silenced tissue the signal was very weak.

 The  spongy layer also contains the vasculature cells. In   107  .4  1:2.7  3.7  1:5.3  1:3.3.6 a) can be described as  following:    • the epidermis.8  1:3.1  Microscopy  To better describe the macroscopically observed phenotypes leaf sections were pre‐ pared and the organelle structure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy  (TEM).2. bleach  mosaic.6  no data  1:11.  The morphology of a wildtype leaf (as depicted in Figure 3.    • the mesophyll which is assembled of two distinct chloroplast‐rich cell types:  the upper palisade layer with elongated cells arranged in parallel and the  lower spongy layer with rounder cells and larger intercellular spaces.8  1:0. bleach  no phenotype  bleach.2: Summary of segregation and phenotypic pattern of Nicotiana benthamiana T1 plant lines  overexpressing ERL1  line  ERL1 over1  ERL1 over2  ERL1 over3  ERL1 over4  ERL1 over5  ERL1 over6  ERL1 over7  ERL1 over8  ERL1 over10  ERL1 over11  ERL1 over12  ERL1 over13  phenotype  bleach  bleach  bleach. Results  Table 3.3. one layer of chloroplast‐free cells covering the upper and the  lower side of the leaves.1  1:1.    Wildtype chloroplasts are oval‐shaped organelles with intercellular membranes (thy‐ lakoids) which are arranged in stacks (grana) and responsible for photosynthesis. self‐silencing  no overexpression  bleach. self‐silencing  mosaic. Some of these sections were then stained with toluidine blue and the leaf  morphology further analyzed by light microscopy.4  1:0. self‐silencing  no overexpression bleach  mosaic. bleach  segregation  1:8.3  no data  1:1.

 Leaves from bleach plants were also thinner compared to wildtype  (Figure 3.6 b). they contain lipid droplets named plastoglobuli and starch granules which  serve as storage compound for excess energy (Figure 3. White tissue caused by strong ERL1 overexpression  showed a slightly disordered transverse leaf structure when observed in the light  microscope.3.5 a). lower) and green tissue (right cell. chl = chloroplasts.  In ERL1‐overexpressing transgenic plants several structural alterations could be ob‐ served which did not only influence the leaf architecture but distorted the whole or‐ ganization of the chloroplasts. up‐ per) in neighboring cells. st = starch granules. which are assembled by more than ten thylakoid membranes. (D)  Mosaic plants show the characteristics of white tissue (left cell.5 μm cw pla gra  cyt Figure 3. An even more dramatic effect could be observed in the electron micro‐ 108  . cyt = cytoplasm. (C) Chloroplasts in green tissue of self‐silencing plants possess roundish chloro‐ plasts filled with grana stacks. (B) Undifferenti‐ ated proplastids in bleach plants show only unorganized intercellular membrane structures and no  storage molecules. Up to ten thylakoid membranes are packed per granum.8 μm 0. but the number of plastoglobuli appears to be normal. The palisade cells were less elongated and lost their parallel organiza‐ tion pattern. Usually  there are no starch granules detectable.5: TEM analysis of phenotypes of Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing ERL1  (A) In wildtype plants chloroplasts are oval‐shaped and contain storage molecules packed into starch  granules and plastoglobuli.7 μm pla chl cyt  (C) (D) pg cyt  chl  st cw  chl  gra  pg  cyt  0. Results  (A) cyt (B) cw  st  pg  gra  cw  0. pl =  plasma membrane    addition. gr = granum.  Caption: cw = cell wall.

 When examined in greater detail      (A)  pal  chl  spo  mes epi (B)  epi mes epi 50 μm  (C)  pal  epi chl mes spo vasc  epi 50 μm  50 μm vasc (D)  pal chl  50 μm epi epi spo  mes epi Figure 3.3. In addition the leaf diameter is significantly decreased compared  to wildtype. (C) In green tissue the mesophyll organization is partly restored with more elongated  palisade cells. no starch granules could be detected as  there was no excess energy present (Figure 3. (D) Mo‐ saic plants show a mixture of white (margins) and green (middle) characteristics. It consists of the upper palisade layer with tightly  packed elongated cells arranged in parallel and the spongy layer with rounder cells without organiza‐ tion.  Caption: epi = epidermis (lower and upper). vasc = vasculature. Results  scope.6 c). which could also be observed macroscopically  when a green patch developed within a white leaf. a normal number of chloroplasts and a leaf diameter comparable to wildtype. The cells possessed only few plastids which resembled undifferentiated pro‐ plastids of meristematic tissues. The palisade cells had the usual elongated  shape with sometimes slightly enlarged spaces between them. spo = spongy  mesophyll. The leaf thickness was  similar to wildtype (Figure 3. (B) In bleach tissue the organization of the mesophyll is lost. They contained only undeveloped thylakoid mem‐ branes which were dispersed inside the stroma without organization. pal = palisade mesophyll. Consistent  with the inability for proper photosynthesis.6: Phenotypic analysis by light microscopy of Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpress‐ ing ERL1  (A) In wildtype two layers of epidermal cells without chloroplasts cover the mesophyll cells with  many chloroplasts aligned along the cell walls. chl = chloroplast    109  . mes = mesophyll.  Green tissue in areas with silenced ERL1 expression resembled wildtype sections  when observed in the light microscope. there is no palisade layer detectable  and the cells contain no chloroplasts.5 b).

3. Results   
in the electron microscope one could observe some differences between wildtype and  green tissue. They contained a comparable amount of chloroplasts with drastically  enlarged grana in the latter, consisting of more than double the amount of thylakoid  membranes than in wildtype. Since green and white tissues were collected from the  same leaf, the increased amount of photosynthetic compartments in green areas  probably compensates for the white sectors. The fact that green tissue is able to re‐ generate from white tissue supports the hypothesis of plastids in white areas being  meristematic proplastids which can further differentiate into chloroplasts when nor‐ mal ERL1 levels are restored (Figure 3.5 c).  Mosaic tissue combined both of the above described phenomena. In green patches  the leaves were organized normally whereas in white patches they showed the dis‐ torted palisade mesophyll. Chloroplasts from green tissue had enlarged grana stacks  next to cells containing chloroplasts with randomly dispersed thylakoids (Figure 3.6  d and Figure 3.5 d).  3.3.2.2 Effect of ERL1 overexpression on chloroplast mRNAs  The strong effect of ERL1 overexpression on chloroplasts was further investigated by  Northern analysis of chloroplast‐related gene transcripts. For this purpose green and  white tissue was again collected independently and used for RNA extraction. The  mRNA levels were compared to Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype total RNA, in addi‐ tion, some of the genes were also investigated in wildtype plants after infiltration  and consecutive transient ERL1 overexpression. As negative controls for transient  overexpression served wildtype material infiltrated with GFP or the erroneous ERL1  hairpin construct (see chapter 3.3.1), as negative control for transgenic plants and  constitutive gene misexpression served a line which had also been transformed with  the wrong ERL1 hairpin construct (compare chapter 3.3.1).   ERL1 overexpression was investigated in wildtype, green and white tissue; from  these only the latter showed detectable expression of ERL1. Several other genes  which are also encoded in the nucleus and transcribed by Pol II had been investi‐ gated for their transcript levels (Figure 3.7 a). The Nicotiana gene PFTF codes for the 
110 

3. Results 
homologue of the metalloprotease FTSH2 from Arabidopsis thaliana which is respon‐ sible for the turnover of photosystem II components by proteolytic degradation  (Summer & Cline, 1999). The expression of the gene was slightly increased in white  tissue but even further upregulated in green tissue. This increase could correspond  with the higher amount of photosynthetically active membranes in green tissue  (compare Figure 3.5 c). In contrast, its antagonist CLPC showed comparable expres‐ sion in green and wildtype tissue, but slight upregulation in tissue overexpressing  ERL1. Misexpression of unrelated genes lead to the same upregulation of CLPC,  therefore this result was not considered as specific. Finally the level of the nucleus‐   
Figure 3.7: Northern analysis of  selected chloroplast‐related genes  ERL1  (A) Chloroplast‐related proteins  (A) transcribed in the nucleus by RNA  PTFT  Nucleus‐encoded Polymerase II (POLII). All three  POLII transcripts genes of this group tested here  CLPC  (PTFT, CLPC and NEP) showed a  slightly stronger expression in  NEP  white tissue compared to wildtype.  There was no clear trend in green  (B) CLPP  tissue. (B) mRNA levels of chloro‐ Plastid‐encoded  plastic genes transcribed by the  NEP transcripts  PEP  chloroplast‐imported nuclear‐ encoded RNA polymerase (NEP)  (C) RBCL  were strongly upregulated in white  Plastid‐encoded  tissue, all other samples showed an  PEP transcripts  PSB expression comparable to wildtype.  (C) The mRNA levels of two genes  (RBCL and PSB) transcribed by the  rRNA  plastid‐encoded RNA polymerase  (PEP) were strongly impaired in  white tissue. Since chloroplastic  rRNAs were almost missing (com‐ pare the rRNA loading control),  translation of the upregulated PEP  transcript had been low and PEP‐ dependent genes were probably not      1   2   3  4   5    6  7 transcribed normally. Due to the  problems with the transgenic plants supposedly suppressed for ERL1 (see text) the tissue from these  plants is regarded as control. Caption: 1 = infiltrated GFP overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype plants, 2 = infiltrated  ERL1 hairpin in Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype plants, 3 = presumable transgenic ERL1 suppressor  plants, 4 = Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype plants, 5 = self‐silencer green tissue, 6 = self‐silencer white  tissue, 7 = infiltrated ERL1 overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants  111 

 

3. Results 
encoded polymerase (NEP) which is transcribed and translated outside of the  chloroplast and then imported therein was assessed as well. It was marginally  upregulated in white tissue but the same amount of upregulation could also be de‐ tected in plants being transgenic for an unrelated gene; therefore this result was not  considered as specific for constitutive ERL1 overexpression.  NEP‐dependent transcripts were also investigated (Figure 3.7 b), one of them is the  plastid‐encoded polymerase (PEP) which is the second active RNA polymerase in the  chloroplast. Its expression was strongly upregulated in white tissue when compared  to wildtype. Another gene, CLPP, which is coding for a protease subunit considered  as indispensible for chloroplast development (Shikanai et al., 2001), showed an inter‐ esting transcription pattern in white tissue: instead of a single band a second larger  one could be detected with both signals being stronger than in all other analyzed tis‐ sues which showed approximately equal expression.  Finally PEP‐dependent transcripts were also investigated (Figure 3.7 c). These tran‐ scripts are mainly compromised of photosynthesis‐related genes and showed a se‐ verely reduced expression in white tissue. All other samples had a comparable ex‐ pression with the only exception of green tissue showing upregulated levels of the  Ribulose‐1,5‐bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) being responsible for  the first step of carbon fixation in the chloroplasts .   The fact that chloroplastic ribosomal RNAs are nearly absent in white tissue resulted  in reduced total protein levels in these lines (compare Figure 3.4 g where in lane 8 the  otherwise prominent RuBisCO protein band of 52.7 kDa is almost missing).  3.3.2.3 Effect of ERL1 overexpression on the photosynthetic apparatus  Since overexpression of ERL1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants macroscopically leads  to a loss of chlorophyll and microscopically results in chloroplast alterations, its ef‐ fect on the photosynthetic apparatus was investigated in more detail. Leaf discs of  Nicotiana benthamiana ERL1 overexpressors and wildtype plants were cut and dark‐  adapted in a humid chamber. After at least 15 minutes the fluorescence of chloro‐ 

112 

3. Results 
(A)  (B)

(C) 

(D)

Figure 3.8: Determination of photosynthetic parameters in Nicotiana benthamiana plants overex‐ pressing ERL1  The values are normalized to wildtype tissue, which is depicted as the circle in black. (A) The meas‐ ured fluorescence values of green tissue almost correspond to wildtype tissue except for TF(max), which  is significantly lower. (B) In contrast, no phenotype tissue shows more differences, the most promi‐ nent being Sm , N and PI(csm). (C) White tissue shows no similarity with wildtype tissue, with major  peaks for TF(max), F0/Fm, PHI(D0) and DI0/CS0. (D) Mosaic tissue looks like a mixture of white and green  or wildtype tissue which is not easy to interpret, but the most prominent parameter is PI(csm) which is  almost not existent. 

   phyll a was measured with a Handy‐PEA fluorophotometer. The results are shown  in Figure 3.8; only the altered parameters are discussed explicitly (for further infor‐ mation please refer to Busotti et al., 2007).   Parameters resulting from wildtype tissue were used as a reference and defined as  value 1.0. As expected, white tissue from a self‐silencing plant did not share any 
113 

 showed more differences than the reverted green tissue (Figure 3.3. green tissue of the same leaf showed an almost wildtype‐like photosyn‐ thetic behavior. Sm. Since  the maximal fluorescence Fm and the number of chlorophyll a molecules (which  could be concluded from parameter F0. The latter  even showed an enhanced photosynthetic activity. Together with the results from above (see Figure 3.7) it can be  stated that the chlorophyll a molecules of green sectors show an enhanced photosyn‐ thetic activity compared to wildtype.  Interestingly.  Not only the basic fluorescence F0 but also the maximal fluorescence Fm were slightly  decreased.8 c). All parameters differed signifi‐ cantly and it was therefore assumed that no part of the photosynthetic apparatus was  functional in white tissue (Figure 3.  were higher than in wildtype. although macroscopically not distinguishable from wild‐ type tissue. the number of reactions until the maximal fluorescence is reached. described by the parameter TF(max) (Figure 3.  114  . the energy which is needed for a complete reduction of all reaction  centers and N. this extended period must have been the result of an‐ other intrinsic factor. with one significant exception: the maximal fluorescence was  reached later than in wildtype.8 b). The photosynthetic performance was lower than in  wildtype. Bleach and mosaic did not show  any normal photosynthetic behavior.  Summarized it can be stated that the photosynthesis was less efficient in NP plants  overexpressing ERL1 than in green tissue with silenced ERL1 expression. Most prominent  was the parameter PI(csm) which had been completely lost. this parameter describes  the photosynthetic performance per leaf area (Figure 3.  No phenotype (NP) tissue. the fluorescence in the dark‐adapted state)  were comparable to wildtype.8 d).  Mosaic tissue had been analyzed as well but its results were difficult to interpret its  result since it contains a mixture of white cells with chaotic fluorescence parameters  and green tissue with probably normal photosynthetic behavior.8 a). Results  similarity with photosynthetic behavior of wildtype.

 SALK_579265 and  SALK_544378) generated by vacuum infiltration of A. this line did not segregate at all.  None of these lines showed any macroscopic phenotype compared to their back‐ ground line Col‐0. Line CS834430 contains  the T‐DNA in an intron of the ERL1 gene and segregated with a ratio of 1:5. observable as bleaching of the first leaves  and consecutive death of the seedlings.  The T‐DNA insertions reside in different positions of the ERL1 sequence and showed  a distinct segregation behavior: in line SALK_579265 the insertion lies in the pro‐ moter of the ERL1 gene and showed a segregation of 1:2. 2001) contains the BAR gene coding for phosphinothricin  acetyl transferase.. thaliana ecotype Columbia  (Col‐0) were received from NASC.7. 2003) contain the NPTII gene coding for neomycin  phosphotransferase. a selective marker providing resistance to the antibiotic kana‐ mycin. a selective marker providing resistance to the herbicide BASTA®. 115  .. Line CS834430 was germi‐ nated on soil and transgenic individuals were selected by spraying the seedlings  with 100 μg/ml of BASTA® on two consecutive days. but lines SALK_579265 and SALK_544378 revealed increasing si‐ lencing of the kanamycin resistance gene. Results  3.3. which also  corresponds to the promoter of the next gene.3).1 Knock‐down of ERL1  Three individual T‐DNA insertion lines (named CS834430.  The two SALK lines (Alonso et al.  3. homozygosity was further veri‐ fied by PCR analysis in the surviving plants.4. the European Arabidopsis Stock Centre.5.4 Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants  Arabidopsis thaliana plant lines misexpressing ERL1 were used to confirm the results  which had been obtained before in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (compare chapter  3. Line  CS834430 (McElver et al. Line  SALK_544378 has the insertion in an exon of the ERL1 DNA sequence. Since this effect prevented the segregation on  a selective medium seeds of these transgenic lines were grown on plates without an‐ tibiotics and selected by PCR analysis of the insertion site. Presumable knock‐out lines had been ordered from public seed collections and  the overexpressing lines were created by floral dip transformation.

 there is a possible second band but due to the segregation pattern this is unlikely. Based on this analysis line SALK_579265 contains a single in‐ sertion.3.99894. for the further determination of the copy number this band was subtracted  in these two mutant lines. wt = wildtype    Southern analysis was used to determine the copy number of the inserted T‐DNA  sequences. In the case of kanamycin resistance a contaminating band could be detected in  wildtype. In the case of ERL1 the standard curve possesses an R2  value of 0. SALK_544378 and wildtype  DNA probed for the NPTII gene.  Line SALK_544378 shows three strong bands corresponding to three copies of the kanamycin resis‐ tance gene.5 (B) Quantitative real‐time  analysis of ERL1 expression in mutant and wildtype plants compared to the expression of TUB9. Due to the very low expression rate of  ERL1 the threshold had to be set very high. there was no contamination of BAR DNA ob‐ servable in wildtype. In the mutant  plant eight bands could be detected while the wildtype DNA is free of background here. line CS834430 and wildtype DNA are probed for the BAR gene. 378 = SALK_544378. the probes were specific for the corresponding resistance‐providing  genes.99924. In contrast. SALK_544378 and CS834430 with a probe specific for the  respective resistance gene. In the right. 430 = CS834430.  Caption: 265 = SALK_579265. There was a single line of background hybridization detectable in  wildtype which is considered as plasmid contamination.3. Exact quantitation  is provided in the text and Table 3. in the case of TUB9 the standard curve has an R2 value of 0. line SALK_544378 three insertions and line CS834430 eight insertions (com‐ 116  . melt‐ ing curve. In line SALK_579265 one additional band  can be detected.9: Characterization of selected publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 knock‐out  plants  (A) Southern analysis of lines SALK_579265. Results   (A)  (B)  265   378    wt        430   wt    ERL1 expression TUB9 expression    Figure 3. quantitation curve and standard curve are shown. The high  copy number does not correspond to the detected segregation rate of 1:5.  The left picture shows lines SALK_579265.

 The plants showed resistance to kanamycin  which was determined by germination and consecutive segregation on selective  plates and PCR analysis of the NPTII gene.  but is not analyzed yet.3: Summary of characteristics of Arabidopsis thaliana ERL1 knock‐down plant lines  Line  SALK_579265  SALK_544378  CS834430    Segregation  1:2.9 b).4. Plants of the T1 generation of the 16 individual Arabidopsis thaliana lines suppos‐ edly overexpressing ERL1 were pooled for RNA extraction. Slightly unequal loading could be observed in the former  117  .10 a). Cross‐hybridization cannot be excluded in the latter case since the  line was subject to segregation. Results  pare Figure 3. the former having a remaining ERL1 expression of 13 % and  the latter 6 % compared to wildtype. From these the lines named 1.  Lines SALK_579265 and CS834430 were analyzed for the exact amount of downregu‐ lation of ERL1 by qPCR. Out of these 16 lines four did not show any detectable  ERL1 expression.  The overexpression levels of ERL1 were determined by Northern and Western analy‐ sis. radioactively labeled  ERL1 DNA served as a probe.9 a). seven lines showed weak overexpression and five lines were con‐ sidered as strong overexpressors (Figure 3. Few individuals out of three lines exhib‐ ited some bleaching and a slightly stunted growth when compared to wildtype  (Figure 3. An ERL1‐hairpin‐ expressing line has been created by floral dip transformation at the end of this work.3.2 Overexpression of ERL1  Agrobacterium tumefaciens‐mediated floral dip transformation was used to produce 16  individual transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines constitutively overexpressing ERL1  with the strong CaMV 35S‐promoter. but no complete knock‐out (Figure 3. therefore it was not excluded from further analysis.10 c).7  ‐  1:5.5  Insertions  1  3  8  Downregulation  13 % of wt  no data  6 % of wt  3. Therefore the obtained lines only provided a  reduced ERL1 activity. 2 and  4 were further propagated. 15 μg of total leaf RNA  were separated on a gel and investigated by Northern analysis.    Table 3.

 The latter line was still seg‐ regating since there was no expression of ERL1 detectable in plant 4‐1.  which showed approximately the same expression levels.  Caption: 01‐16 = T1 lines.    (A)  (B)     49. arrows) and a delayed growth compared to wildtype (right plant). (B) Lines 1.  2 and 4 were propagated to the T2 generation and their ERL1 expression level was investigated with  Western blotting. 1‐1 & 1‐2 T2 lines of 1. 4‐1 & 4‐2 T2 lines of 4.10  b). The strongest overexpression could be detected in  line 1. followed by line 2 and 4. but both  had also shown the above described phenotype and were therefore chosen as well for  further analysis.10: Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing ERL1  (A) Northern analysis of 16 Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing ERL1 revealed detectable ERL1  levels in twelve lines.9 kDa      01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10      11 12 13 14 15 16    (C)              wt   1‐1   1‐2   2‐1   2‐2   4‐1   4‐2   M      Figure 3. These two bands most likely correspond to plant  ERL1 before and after maturation. consequently containing or missing the approxi‐ mately 8 kDa leader peptide.8 kDa 28.3. The trans‐ genic overexpression of ERL1 resulted in two distinct protein bands. a major band of approximately 42  kDa and a minor band of approximately 35 kDa. lower).1 kDa   34. M = Bio‐ Rad Prestained SDS‐PAGE standard  118  . as a loading control served Coomassie staining of the gel after transfer. Results  two when compared to the other 14 lines (compare Figure 3. a major band of  approximately 42 kDa and a minor band of approximately 35 kDa with less than half  of the expression of the other band.  2‐1 & 2‐2 T2 lines of 2. Line 1 was found to be the strongest overexpressor. (C) A sample plant of Arabidopsis thaliana line 1 overexpressing ERL1 shows slight bleaching in  the leaf tips (left plant.  The progeny of these three lines was again selected for overexpression and the char‐ acteristics of ERL1 overexpression further identified by Western analysis (Figure 3.10 a. Transgenic  overexpression of ERL1 resulted in two bands detectable in all lines. as a loading control served Ethidium bromide‐staining of 28S rRNA.

5 Effect of ERL1 on silencing  The Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of ERL1 was first described to have an effect on  RNA silencing. Results  3. in addition..  A = tissue collected after transient ERL1 overexpression by agroinfiltration.4  revealed that there was no effect of ERL1 overexpression on siRNA‐mediated RNA silencing in plants. G = green tissue of “Self‐silencer” plants. ERL1‐overexpressing  Nicotiana benthamiana plants were crossed with the GFP‐expressing line 6.11: Effect of plant ERL1 on different molecules of the RNA silencing apparatus. 2006). probably leading to the smeary signal which can be observed above  the detected band.8S cytoplasmic rRNA is depicted as a loading control.  2008). Line 6. systemic  silencing spread could be observed leading to a completely silenced plant in the background of the  right picture with a single branch in the foreground still expressing GFP.5. (B) Northern analysis of 20  μg total RNA and hybridization with miRNA‐159 LNA showed a similar signal in all analyzed plant  lines.  Spontaneous silencing onset (red spot in the left picture) was not influenced.4 that had  been created and described earlier by our lab (Kalantidis et al.   Caption: wt = wildtype.1 Crosses  To test the involvement of ERL1 in RNA silencing processes. another mole‐ cule of the silencing pathways. the effect of exonucleases on the degradation of miRNAs.  (A) Two individual crosses of ERL1 overexpressing plants with the metastable GFP‐expressing line 6.  3.4 shows  frequent spontaneous silencing of its GFP transgene which usually also leads to sys‐ temic GFP silencing spread.    119  .3.9 of the introduction). was published recently (Ramachandran & Chen. The slightly weaker signal in green tissue was not considered as specific since there was high  resistance in this part of the gel.     (A)  (B) wt G   W   A Figure 3. hence its name ERI1 (enhanced RNAi 1)  (compare chapter 1. Therefore it can be used as a reporter line for testing the  effect of other factors on RNA silencing. EtBr staining of 5.2. W = white tissue of “Bleach” plants. therefore ERL1 was investigated for both phenomena.  In addition. Neuronal cells which are usually RNAi‐recalcitrant could be sub‐ jected to RNA silencing in eri1 mutants.

 total RNA of plants  overexpressing ERL1 was investigated for the expression level of miR159. Interestingly.4 before cross‐ ing with ERL1 overexpression.11 a shows two examples of GFP silencing identical to line 6. in another  experiment overexpression of ERL1 was able to quench the amounts of viroid‐related  siRNAs (see supplementary results. The  introduction of ERL1 into the reporter line did not alter its silencing characteristics.4 (without in‐bred ERL1) which were grown in  parallel. Results  Two individual crosses in both directions (lines 6. In both overexpressing tissues miR159 expression  seemed to be even a bit stronger than in wildtype.2 LNA159  To test for the possibility of ERL1 having an effect on miRNAs. Out of  five N. did not result in suppression of transgene silencing.11 b. in contrast to the identified viral silencing suppres‐ sor P19. but the low quality of the  hybridization signal for this sample does not allow drawing safe conclusions.4 x ERL1+ and ERL1+ x 6.  The results are depicted in Figure 3. In the “green” tissue miR159 lev‐ els appear to be marginally reduced compared to wildtype.   Figure 3.5. Schumacher. 2009)  3..  120  .4) were  performed and their F1 generation was selected for expression of both transgenes. where ERL1. all showed onset of GFP silencing.3. three of them already in early stages. All plants of the six double‐homozygous F2 plant  crosses showed onset of GFP silencing.  therefore the gene was considered to have no effect on endogenous gene silencing in  plants. The same result had been observed after transient overexpression in co‐ infiltration assays. the expression was comparable in white  tissue constitutively overexpressing ERL1 and wildtype tissue transiently overex‐ pressing ERL1 by agroinfiltration. an abun‐ dant miRNA family repressing MYB‐domain containing transcription factors (Mette  et al. benthamiana plants of line 6. In  F2 double homozygous plants were selected and monitored for their GFP silencing  behavior. three of them already in early stages. 2002).

 while  it was unaffected after ERL1 overexpression (Figure 3.8S rRNA did not show any effect after transient ERL1 overexpression  (Figure 3. other plant miRNAs had not been tested  since there was no effect expected either.1 rRNA blots  In a first approach the expression levels of small plant rRNAs were assessed by com‐ paring Northern hybridizations of Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype tissue with tissue  overexpressing ERL1 (green tissue of self‐silencing plant lines.7.12 a. 16S rRNA appeared to have been lost after GFP expression. As the expression after ERL1 overexpression was comparable on the  121  . preventing an excessive loading of the resid‐ ual RNAs due to the almost total lack of chloroplastic RNA. white tissue of bleach  plants and wildtype tissue after transient overexpression of ERL1). Since it was reported that homologues of ERI1 take part in 5. Since overexpression of  GFP should not have an effect on chloroplastic 16S rRNA this result was not consid‐ ered as specific.  3.8S  rRNA ripening in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mus musculus this effect was also inves‐ tigated in plants. In addition ribosomal  RNA of transgenic plants misexpressing ERL1 were analyzed by cloning analysis. Two different approaches were used: the immediate effect of tran‐ sient ERL1 overexpression was detected by Northern analysis. Chloroplastic 4. how‐ ever. middle & c).12 a.  Cytoplasmic 5.6.  3.3. One should note  that in the case of white tissue the amount of loaded RNA was reduced by an empiri‐ cally determined arbitrary factor of 0. was not only almost lost in white tissue but also showed decreased expression  levels in tissue where ERL1 was transiently overexpressed by agroinfiltration (Figure  3.12 a. right & d).12 e). left & b). Results  Summarized it can be stated that ERL1 overexpression did not have a significant  negative effect on the expression of miR159.6 Effect of ERL1 on ribosomal RNA  In bleach plants strongly overexpressing ERL1 an impaired ribosomal RNA pattern  could be detected.  Chloroplastic 5S rRNA.5S rRNA was significantly reduced in white  tissue  but did not show any alterations in expression levels for the other tissues  when compared to wildtype (Figure 3.

 W = white tissue of  self‐silencer and bleach plants.8S rRNA following  overexpression of ERL1  In the upper panel the hybridization with the respective rRNA probe is depicted. However. (E) Chloroplastic 16S rRNA was not affected after transient ERL1 overexpression but could  not be detected after GFP overexpression which was probably due to a problem in Northern hybridi‐ zation. A = overexpression of ERL1 by agroinfiltration  122  . Results  first and fifth day after infiltration.  in the right GFP overexpression is depicted: (B) Chloroplastic 4. G = RNA of green tissue of self‐silencing plants.5S  (E)  D1  D5  ERL1  5S D1  D5  GFP  D1  D5  ERL1  5. (F) Chloroplastic 23S rRNA showed upregulation after overexpression of ERL1.    (A)    wt    (B)  G  W  4. (D) Cytosolic 5. D5 = fifth day after agroinfiltration. White tissue showed no expression of chloroplastic 4.  unequal loading is visible in the loading control.8S  A    D1    D5  D1    D5    ERL1  GFP    4.12: Northern analysis of chloroplastic ribosomal RNAs and cytosolic 5.8S  D1  D5  GFP  (F)   D1    D5  D1    D5    ERL1  GFP    16S  D1  D5  D1  D5  ERL1  GFP  23S    Figure 3. 23S  rRNA seemed slightly upregulated after ERL1 overexpression which can probably be  attributed to unequal loading of these samples (Figure 3. (C) 5S rRNA had a decreased expression level on the fifth day  after transient ERL1 overexpression. wt = RNA of wild‐ type Nicotiana benthamiana tissue.  Caption: D1 = first day after agroinfiltration. an effect of ERL1 on 16S rRNA is unlikely. in the lower panel  28S mitochondrial RNA is used as a loading control.3.8S rRNA showed no effect after transient overex‐ pression.12 f). (B) –  (F) Agrobacteria overexpressing ERL1 or GFP (acting as a control construct) were infiltrated into Nico‐ tiana tabacum leaves and tissue was collected after one and five days.5S and 5S rRNA. in  addition wildtype tissue after transient overexpression of ERL1 had decreased levels of 5S rRNA.   (A) Total RNA of tissue overexpressing ERL1 was separated on a Northern gel and probed for the  corresponding small rRNA.5S rRNA was not affected by the tran‐ sient overexpression of any construct. therefore it is considered to be unaffected. In the left ERL1 overexpression.5S  A  wt  (C)     G  5S  W  A  wt  (D)   G  W  5.

8s-01c Nb_ERL1-OE_5..6.8s-03t Consensus (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) 98 CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT CGATGGTTCACGGGATTCTGCAATTCACACCAAGTATCGCATTTCGCTACGTTCTTCATCGATGCGAGAGCCGAGATATCCGTTGCCGAGAGTCGTTT Figure 3.  c = constitutive overexpression. the role of its ortholo‐ gous genes in animals in cytoplasmic 5.8s-04 Nb_wt_5.8s-04c Nb_ERL1-OE_5.8s-02 Nb_wt_5. benthamiana wildtype. benthamiana wildtype and overexpressing  ERL1 plants and subsequent cloning.  Ansel et al. This linker  was then specifically ligated to the 3’‐ends of total rRNA extracted from Nicotiana  benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.8S rRNA from Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing  ERL1  5. 2008) prompted us to address this issue also in plants.8s-02c Nb_ERL1-OE_5.  Caption: Nb_wt = N. There was no  effect detectable in seven sequences derived from plants either transiently or consti‐ tutively overexpressing ERL1 (compare Figure 3. benthamiana. it had to be cloned  without imposing bias on the cloned ends (as would be the case through direct PCR).6.  3.8S rRNA  Although ERL1 was found to be targeted to the chloroplasts.1 Effect on 5.13). Results  3.8s-06 Nb_ERL1-OE_5.8S rRNA was analyzed by self‐ligation of total RNA of N.8S rRNA metabolism (Gabel & Ruvkun.  For this reason two different approaches were used: to test for a general effect the  total RNA was self‐ligated and the resulting product was cloned and sequenced to  see an extension at the ends.8s-01t Nb_ERL1-OE_5.8s-03 Nb_wt_5.2. 2008.8s-03c Nb_ERL1-OE_5. Neither the sequence of the mutant with a severe phenotype nor  the sequence cloned after transient overexpression showed any differences compared to wildtype.8s-05 Nb_wt_5.3. t = transient overexpression  123  . It was modi‐ fied at its 3’‐end with dideoxy‐Cytosin to protect this end from ligation.2 Linker ligations  To determine alterations in the sequence of ribosomal RNAs. To specifically determine the 3’‐location of the exten‐ sions linker fragments were designed and synthesized using non‐plant sequences (in  this case the bilbo transposon sequence from Drosophila melanogaster). Nb_ERL1‐OE = overexpression of ERL1 in N.   1 Nb_wt_5.8s-02t Nb_ERL1-OE_5.   To test if plant ERL1 has 5.13: Alignment of cytosolic 5.8S rRNA as a substrate it was analyzed by self‐ligation  and subsequent cloning with specific primers for this ribosomal RNA.8s-01 Nb_wt_5.

 This was due to the fact that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overex‐ pressing ERL1 and Nicotiana benthamiana plants suppressing ERL1 were not available  at the time of the analysis.6. Several sequence alterations could be detected.8S rRNA is located in the cytoplasm and the enzyme is supposed to be tar‐ geted to the chloroplast (see chapter 3. The obtained results are summarized in  Table 3. this corresponded to 33 % of the sequences (Figure 3. There was no effect in ERL1‐KD Arabidopsis  124  .3.  3.1) it is concluded that the plant homologue is  unlikely to possess the same substrate as in the animal kingdom.14 c).1 the strongest effect of ERL1 overexpression  could be detected in 5S chloroplastic rRNA (Figure 3. Results  Since 5.2.  Overexpression of ERL1 showed stronger effects than the knock‐down of ERL1  which only had consequences on 16S rRNA processing.  predominantly in chloroplastic 5S rRNA. Interest‐ ingly. Two out of six 16S rRNA  sequences showed an extra Thymidine at their 3’‐end compared to the cloned wild‐ type sequences.6.14 b).  As already described in chapter 3. but cloning of 16S rRNA from Nicotiana  benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana total RNA of wildtype plants proved that the  correct 16S rRNA sequence in our experimental setup did not contain these two  Thymidines at its 3’‐end. the effect of ERL1 overexpression was only assessed in Nicotiana bentha‐ miana plants. whereas the effect of ERL1 suppression could only be assessed in Arabi‐ dopsis thaliana plants. 5S rRNA sequences could  be roughly divided into two groups: one with additional nucleotides derived from  the 5S precursor sequence which were presumable not trimmed properly and one  with additional novel nucleotides. It should be noted that the published 16S rRNA sequence  contains two extra Thymidines at its 3’‐end.12 e). overexpression of ERL1 did not have any effect on 16S chloroplastic rRNA  (compare Figure 3.4.2 Effect on chloroplastic rRNAs  Since plant ERL1 is targeted to the chloroplast its effect on all four chloroplastic  rRNAs was tested. Transient overexpression was used as well in order to prevent the  detection of artifacts due to the detrimental effects of strong consecutive overexpres‐ sion of ERL1 in Nicotiana benthamiana.

 In Nicotiana benthamiana plants constitutively overexpress‐ ing ERL1 five out of eight sequences showed an addition of novel nucleotides at the  3’‐end of the rRNA. The summarized description of this sequence alteration is an  125  . in ones case it could not be concluded from  the sequencing data whether the first of the additional nucleotides was an Adenosine  or a Cytosine.3.    Table 3. In one case there were three extra nucleotides detected. comprised of  an extra –ACC motif. Results  thaliana plants detectable.5S  5S  16S  23S  In three cases this was a clear extra –AC.4: Summary of sequence alterations in chloroplastic rRNA after ERL1 misexpression in  Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) and Arabidopsis thaliana (At) plants  rRNA  Type of ERL1  Species  species  misexpression  constitutive  overexpression  transient over‐ expression  constitutive  knock‐down  constitutive  overexpression  transient over‐ expression  constitutive  knock‐down  constitutive  overexpression  transient over‐ expression  constitutive  knock‐down  constitutive  overexpression  transient over‐ expression  constitutive  knock‐down  Total:      Nb  Nb  At  Nb  Nb  At  Nb  Nb  At  Nb  Nb  At    Number of  Type of   Number of  Ratio analyzed  alteration  alterations  clones  5  4  4  8  12  9  10  no data  6  4  no data  6  68  none  none  none  extra –  A/C C (C) extra –CC extra –GA none  none  no data  extra ‐T  deletion  of –CT  no data  none    0  0  0  5  1  3  0  0  no data  2  1  no data  0  12  0 %  0 %  0 %  63 %  8 %  25 %  0 %  0 %  no  data  33 %  25 %  no  data  0 %  18 %  4.

14: Alignment of chloroplastic rRNAs of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana  plants misexpressing plant ERL1  Chloroplastic rRNAs of wildtype plants as well as plants misexpressing ERL1 were ligated to a modi‐ fied linker sequence at their 3’‐end.5s-02 At_ERL1-KD_4. Nb_ERL1‐OE = overexpression of ERL1 in Nicotiana  benthamiana. this deletion is not considered as specific for ERL1 misex‐ pression. For better visu‐ alization only the last 100 nucleotides of the sequences are depicted. AT_ERL1‐KD  = knock‐down of ERL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.5s-01 At_ERL1-KD_4. In  addition.14 a). One plant constitutively overexpressing ERL1 had a two  nucleotide deletion at the 3’‐end.  In 23S chloroplastic rRNA only one sequence from constitutively overexpressing  ERL1 plant tissue showed a sequence alteration by missing two nucleotides at the 3’‐ end compared to the wildtype sequence (Figure 3.5s  14 113 4. (D) Six sequences with downregulated ERL1 and four se‐ quences overexpressing ERL1 were analyzed for chloroplastic 23S rRNA and showed a single se‐ quence alteration compared to wildtype.3. From eight plants constitutively overexpressing ERL1 five sequences showed an  extra –A/C C (C) sequence motif.5S rRNA and did not show any sequence alterations compared to wildtype.  (A) Four sequences with downregulated ERL1 and nine sequences overexpressing ERL1 were ana‐ lyzed for chloroplastic 4. c = constitutive overexpression.  There was no effect of plant ERL1 detectable on the processing of chloroplastic 4. Nb_wt = Nicotiana benthamiana wildtype. three wildtype sequences were analyzed and showed a two nucleotide deletion compared to  the published sequence.14 d). The other three altered sequences possessed an extra –GA which corresponds to  the precursor sequence of 5S chloroplastic rRNA.  Since one of them is a wildtype sequence. Two sequences showed a single deletion. nine sequences with downregulated ERL1 and twenty sequences over‐ expressing ERL1 were analyzed for chloroplastic 5S rRNA.5S  rRNA (Figure 3. In total 68 cloned sequences had been analyzed and showed  sequence alterations in 18 % of all cases.5s-01 (1) ------------------------------------------------TAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC 126  . Of the analyzed plants with downregulated ERL1 none showed a sequence alteration com‐ pared to wildtype.   (B) Five wildtype sequences. They are compared to the published sequences of the respective  rRNA plus the linker sequence (named according to the corresponding rRNA+linker). t = transient overexpression    (A) 4. From twelve plants transiently overexpressing ERL1 four sequences  possessed an extra two‐nucleotide motif which was either –CC or –GA. Compared to this sequence two sequences with downregulated ERL1 pos‐ sessed an extra Thymidine at their 3’‐end. (C) Six sequences with down‐ regulated ERL1 and ten sequences overexpressing ERL1 were analyzed for chloroplastic 16S rRNA.    Figure 3. Results  extra –A/C C (C). From twelve sequences derived after transient overexpression of  ERL1 four exhibited sequence alterations.  Caption: At_wt = Arabidopsis thaliana wildtype.5s-04 Nb_wt_4.5s+linker (14) TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAACATCGTCACAACAAATGGCATC (14) (14) (14) (14) TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC At_ERL1-KD_4. One of the sequences showed the same  behavior as the constitutively overexpressing plants by containing an extra –CC mo‐ tif.5s-03 At_ERL1-KD_4.

5s_04c (1) ---------------------------------------------GCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_05c (14) TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_03c (14) TTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGATGTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_01t (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_02c (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_04t (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC   (B) 5s  19 119 5s+linker (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT---ATCGTCACAACAAATGGCATC (6) (15) (9) (9) (17) (17) (17) (16) (1) ACTTGGTGGGTTAAACTCTATCTGCGGTGACGATGCTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGCGTCGACGCTAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTC-TGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGAAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTC-TGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTKGGTTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTCGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTC-TGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT-------------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--- At_ERL1-KD_5s-01 At_ERL1-KD_5s-02 At_ERL1-KD_5s-03 At_ERL1-KD_5s-04 At_ERL1-KD_5s-05 At_ERL1-KD_5s-06 At_ERL1-KD_5s-07 At_ERL1-KD_5s-08 At_ERL1-KD_5s-09 Nb_wt_5s-01 (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGA---Nb_wt_5s-02 (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCG-AAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_wt_5s-03 (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_wt_5s-04 (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_wt_5s-05 (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-01c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATACNb_ERL1-OE_5s-02c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATMCNb_ERL1-OE_5s-03c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATACNb_ERL1-OE_5s-04c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATACNb_ERL1-OE_5s-05c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGA---Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-06c (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATACC Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-07c (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGAGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCTACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-08c (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CT-CGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-01t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-02t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-03t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-04t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATGANb_ERL1-OE_5s-05t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-06t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCTGGATCCNb_ERL1-OE_5s-07t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TTGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-08t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATGANb_ERL1-OE_5s-09t (1) -----------TAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGATGANb_ERL1-OE_5s-10t (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-11t (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT--Nb_ERL1-OE_5s-12t (16) ACTTGGTGG-TTAAACTCTA-CTGCGGTGACGAGACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCCGCGGAAAAATAGC-TCGACGCCAGGAT---   (C) 16s  182 281 16s+linker (182) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTTATCGTCACAACAAATGGCATC (174) (182) (161) (182) (182) (162) (182) (182) (182) (182) (182) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTGCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCTTGCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGNGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGTCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGGAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGCAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT— At_ERL1-KD_16s-01 At_ERL1-KD_16s-02 At_ERL1-KD_16s-03 At_ERL1-KD_16s-04 At_ERL1-KD_16s-05 At_ERL1-KD_16s-06 At_ERL1-OE_16s-01 At_ERL1-OE_16s-02 At_ERL1-OE_16s-03 At_ERL1-OE_16s-04 At_ERL1-OE_16s-05 At_wt_16s-01 (166) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-Nb_wt_16s-01 (182) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-Nb_wt_16s-02 (95) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT— Nb_ERL1-OE_16s_01c Nb_ERL1-OE_16s_02c Nb_ERL1-OE_16s_03c Nb_ERL1-OE_16s_04c Nb_ERL1-OE_16s_05c (182) (182) (161) (125) (182) GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGAAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGGAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT-GCCGAAGGCAGGGCTAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCCT--   (D) 23s  198 297 23s+linker (198) CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCTATCGTCACAACAAATGGCATC (198) (198) (198) (198) (198) (198) CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGGATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT At_ERL1-KD_23s-01 At_ERL1-KD_23s-02 At_ERL1-KD_23s-03 At_ERL1-KD_23s-04 At_ERL1-KD_23s-05 At_ERL1-KD_23s-06 Nb_wt_23s-01 (198) CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT Nb_ERL1-OE_23s_01c Nb_ERL1-OE_23s_02c Nb_ERL1-OE_23s_03c Nb_ERL1-OE_23s_04c (198) (198) (198) (198) CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGACGAGTGCTCTC-CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT CGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCACCCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT   Caption: identical.3.5s_01c (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4. linker 127  . Results  Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_03t (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4.5s_02t (1) -------------------------------------------------AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC Nb_ERL1-OE_4. conserved.

      128  .

2. Iida et  al. 2009. Discussion  4. This ubiquitous involvement certainly raises  the question about the endogenous control of RNA silencing. This hypothesis was initially supported by several hints (Schumacher.4. 2006.1 Implications of plant ERL1 in RNA silencing processes  In the past years RNA silencing mechanisms have proven to be involved in the regu‐ lation of numerous cellular pathways.2. One of the first observations had been the  significant reduction of viroid‐derived siRNAs in PSTVd‐infected plants after over‐ expression of ERL1.2. A single lo‐ cus could be identified in Arabidopsis which shares significant homology to the al‐ ready described ERI‐1‐like proteins and contains the ERI‐1_3’hExo_like EXOIII do‐ main. So far only viral sup‐ pressors of silencing have been identified to specifically counteract the silencing  mechanism of their hosts in order to circumvent its function as antiviral immune sys‐ tem.  An exception presents the protein ERI‐1 from C. 2006) and therefore suppressing the extent of  silencing in diverse tissues in vivo. the observed effects upon their loss‐of‐ function are mainly secondary and not the result of a specific loss of the suppression  of RNA silencing suppression..  Although there have been several reports of endogenous suppressors of silencing  (compare chapter 1. one cannot exclude the possibility that the strong overexpression level  which prevails after agroinfiltration would have the same effect with any other ex‐ 129  . They follow various strategies.. one being the specific sequestering of siRNAs.1.8 of the introduction). This implicated a specific sequestering of siRNAs by ERL1.  However.. which has been termed ERI‐1_3’hExo_like  EXOIII domain. The proteins are characterized by an exonuclease  domain with a functional DEDDh motif..4).  So far no plant homologue of ER1‐1 has been described in the literature. Yang et al.2.  supplementary results 6. Therefore a similar function in plant RNA silencing processes has been impli‐ cated. elegans and its homologues which  have been shown to specifically degrade siRNAs in vitro (Kennedy et al. 2006. 2004. 6.3 & 6. Kupsco et al.

 benthamiana plants overexpress‐ ing ERL1 showed a hypersensitivity to infection by Plum pox virus which usually has  only mild symptoms in planta.  130  .. however.4. nor its spread including the systemic spread of silencing are  negatively influenced by the overexpression of plant ERL1 (compare chapter 3.. 2009).  Two distinct mechanisms are exploited. 2009.2. Discussion  onuclease.  Despite these findings several other results contraindicated an implication of plant  ERL1 in RNA silencing: agroinfiltration assays have earlier been described as a  method for the description of RNA silencing suppressor activity (Brigneti et al. the additional overexpression of a GFP  transgene into a GFP‐expressing plant line leads to co‐suppression by using the in‐ trinsic RNA silencing pathways.1). In the  case of ERL1 no effect could be detected after its transient overexpression by co‐ infiltration with the respective GFP construct (Schumacher. 2006). supplementary re‐ sults 6. Another finding had been the fact that N. Therefore another approach has been used by  crossing ERL1‐overexpressing N. 1998).5. The strongest result impli‐ cating an effect of plant ERL1 on RNA silencing processes is the fact that the systemic  silencing of the ERL1‐overexpression by introducing an ERL1‐hairpin by agroinfiltra‐ tion is only successful in 50 % of the plants.2). One has to note.  The resulting crosses. that these assays are rather insensitive and  have a low tempo‐spatial resolution. therefore pro‐ viding a more sensitive system to investigate any mild silencing suppressor effects. The rest fails to maintain systemic silenc‐ ing and reverts back to the bleach phenotype typical of ERL1‐overexpression  (Schumacher. benthamiana plants with line GFP 6.4 which is de‐ scribed by initiation of spontaneous GFP silencing and subsequent systemic GFP si‐ lencing spread (Kalantidis et al. Taking into account the weak constitution of the se‐ vere ERL1‐overexpressing plants this hypersensitivity might not specifically be a re‐ sult of ERL1‐overexpression but rather a secondary effect. however. The use of a GFP‐suppressing hairpin circumvents  the necessity of RNA silencing amplification by RDR‐dependent mechanisms. did not show any differences in GFP silencing. The onset of this GFP silencing is probably  characterized by overcoming a threshold of aberrant transgene RNA. nei‐ ther the initial onset.

 The SAP domain. maybe explaining  the fact that it is not involved in plant RNA silencing processes.g.4.  In conclusion. elegans. 2006). in contrast  to other nuclear mRNAs. In this group I all  members with described effects of ERI‐1 on RNA silencing are included. 2009). 2008). humans and also a yet to be analyzed protein of  sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). from the already published ERI‐1 homologues also  Snipper in Drosophila did not show an enhanced RNAi phenotype upon its loss‐of‐ function. Interestingly.. which confers binding  to nucleic acids. The second group (group II) is character‐ ized by the Drosophila Snipper protein.  4. the Arabidop‐ sis homologue would also associates with the group II proteins. is only present in a subset of ERI‐1 homologues. In general.. Both groups contain the ERI‐1_3’hExo_like EXOIII  domain with a high degree of conservation. 2008). other yet to be analyzed homologues origi‐ nate from Tribolium.  is the distorted systemic silencing in ERL1‐overexpressing plants. Interestingly. e. it can be stated that the protein likely does not have an effect on sup‐ pression of RNA silencing in plants but rather a distinct function compared to ERI‐1  in other species. It can possibly be  accounted to the fact that the levels of DCL‐1 and DCL‐4 transcripts are. homo‐ logues which are found in C. sea urchin and humans (Tomoyasu et al. Up to now there is no clear explanation whether this is a specific  result of ERL1 overexpression or a secondary effect of the poor constitution of the  plants. a complete loss of a gene is hard to accomplish either with insertion  mutants or with hairpin constructs. Based on phylogenetic analysis two distinct subclasses of ERI‐1  homologues have been identified in a study for RNAi‐related proteins in Tribolium  castaneum (Tomoyasu et al.2 Involvements of ERL1 in chloroplast metabolism  Due to the low expression of plant ERL1 a minor regulatory impact in vivo is imagin‐ able. therefore it probably also possesses a function apart from RNA silencing  (Kupsco et al. Discussion  The only result pointing towards an involvement of ERL1 in RNA silencing in plants. severely downregulated in plants which overexpress ERL1  (Schumacher. Snipper has not  proven to be involved in RNA silencing processes in vivo.. since some transcripts may always escape the  131  .

 Therefore this chloroplastic localiza‐ tion is considered as an additional proof for ERL1 having a function apart from RNA  silencing in plants. Due to  its chloroplastic localization and its exonuclease activity it is likely that ERL1 is a  player in this post‐transcriptional editing of chloroplastic RNAs. Therefore  our approach used the overexpression of the gene in addition to the incomplete  knock‐out. chloroplasts still contain a fully functional gene expression machinery  which is mostly encoded in the chloroplast itself. Discussion  downregulation.  After constitutive overexpression the resulting transgenic plants showed a distortion  in the chlorophyll levels.4.. In addition.  Almeida et al. In  addition.3.  during evolution chloroplasts have transferred most of their genes to the nucleus. This has been proven by pre‐ paring a carboxy‐terminal fusion to GFP followed by confocal microscopy. The gene expression retained many prokaryotic character‐ istics leading to polycistronic transcripts which are mainly regulated post‐ transcriptionally. but first conclusions to the influenced pathways can be drawn. in order to identify possible targets of the protein. The maturation of chloroplastic transcripts includes several endo‐  and exonucleolytic cleavage steps (compare chapter 1. chloroplasts contain many eukaryotic proteins independent of the chloro‐ plast prokaryotic origin. Strong effects following  overexpression of ERI‐1 homologues have been reported earlier (Bühler et al.4. 2005). Subsequent in silico analysis of the protein revealed a possi‐ ble chloroplast targeting signal at its amino‐terminus. they code for photo‐ synthesis‐related proteins. Interest‐ ingly the chloroplast is considered as an intracellular compartment which is free of  RNA silencing processes (Hegeman et al.2 of the introduction)...  132  . 2006). Secondary effects of this overexpression cannot be excluded of  course.  Ever since the endosymbiotic incorporation of photosynthetically active prokaryotes.  Nevertheless.1 of the result section). 2005. The corresponding proteins are imported into the chloro‐ plasts by several import mechanisms and take part in their regulatory pathways. In the case of low gene transcription a detectable effect of this  knock‐down is hardly obvious (compare chapter 3.

 cells usually contain either canonical or dis‐ torted plastids in the variegated phenotypes. trichocarpa contain a chloroplast targeting signal. However. In addition.4. this behavior could also be seen in our experiments al‐ though due to the greenhouse conditions it cannot be stated if intense light or higher  temperature or both caused the more intense bleaching in the summer months. In the case of P.  133  .3 Severe phenotypic alterations after overexpression of ERL1 suggest  an involvement in chloroplast development  The overexpression of ERL1 resulted in various phenotypes with a slow and stunted  growth. This variegation has been described before as a result of mutations  in photosynthesis‐related and other plastid genes. 2003). trichocarpa this is  not the case but since the complete genomic sequence of poplar is available. the up‐ stream region of the annotated gene was analyzed and a possible chloroplasts target‐ ing signal immediately upstream of the annotated ERL1 sequences could be identi‐ fied. In the case of sorghum this is already obvious from the fact that an amino‐ terminal methionine is missing from the sequence. therefore making pure coincidence unlikely.13 of the introduction) they were  probably added independently after splitting into the different plant lineages. The variegation pattern had been  shown to be influenced by environmental factors such as light and temperature (re‐ viewed in Sakamoto. The resulting leaves contain nor‐ mal green sectors and white sectors with non‐canonical chloroplasts resembling un‐ differentiated proplastids. it is interesting that both major plant lineages of monocoty‐ ledons and dicotyledons contain members which possess a predicted chloroplastic  localization of ERL1. all phenotypes were characterized by the partial or full bleach‐ ing of the plants. Although this may represent  a functional diversification of plant ERL1 proteins. Due to the fact that the chloroplast targeting signals show no conservation be‐ tween the different plant species (compare Figure 1. Discussion  From published EST collections probably all plant ERL1 sequences except S. bicolor  and P. Since chloroplasts are not synthesized from scratch after  plant cell division but rather divide. incomplete annotation cannot be  excluded. There‐ fore it cannot be excluded that ERL1 proteins from sorghum and poplar serve dis‐ tinct functions.  4.

6 of the introduction). 1993. amongst others. Rodio et al. There‐ fore there is an accumulation of PEP transcript detectable.4 & Figure 3.  In addition to the morphological phenotype the transcription of chloroplastic genes  is distorted in the mutant plant lines. Bellaoui & Gruissem.7 of the results). 2004.. However. The pos‐ sible reversion of the phenotype is also interesting. benthamiana is silenced as well in this phenotype. The commonly observed phenomenon of phenotype reversion back to wild‐ type phenotype was accompanied by the degradation of the ERL1 mRNA (compare  Figure 3. responsible for tran‐ scription of the second polymerase.4. comparable to systemic silencing of a trans‐ gene (compare chapter 1.2. Interestingly.  immature rRNAs are considered to be non‐functional for ribosome assembly. it is not clear whether the  endogenous ERL1 of N. the plastid‐encoded RNA polymerase (PEP). Two individual polymerases are responsible for  chloroplastic gene transcription: the nucleus‐encoded plastid RNA polymerase  (NEP) is imported into the chloroplasts and.2 and  3. accompanied by a lack of  ribosomal RNAs which are themselves a product of PEP transcription. Bisanz et al. It has to be noted that PEP‐dependent tran‐ 134  .  the hyperactive photosynthetic apparatus might be a result of loss of ERL1. 2003. in the case if endogenous ERL1 is silenced as well.3 of the results section). 2007).. Inter‐ estingly.2. 2005. distorted chloroplastic rRNAs have previously been reported to cause varie‐ gated phenotypes (Barkan.3..3.  The two sequences do not share an identical stretch of 21‐nt which would result in  siRNAs able to silence the endogenous sequence too.2. Bol‐ lenbach et al. since the  Arabidopsis sequence had been used for the preparation of the overexpressing plants. either to compensate for the residual plant which is still  characterized by white leaves or. since it suggests that chloroplast  development is only blocked reversibly in white tissue and not lost in these cells. green tissue ap‐ pears to have an enhanced photosynthetic activity (compare chapter 3. In addition. The  transcription by the former is independent of chloroplastic molecules whereas the  translation of the gene products depends on the ribosomes of the chloroplasts. Discussion  The analysis of ERL1 transcript levels in the mutant plant lines revealed that the se‐ verity of the bleaching clearly corresponds to the amount of ERL1 present in the  plants.

5 & Figure 3.. Another scenario could be a mutation in the chloroplast leader signal  preventing an import into the plastids. This fact maybe accounts  for the observation that white tissue is able to recover when the ERL1 expression is  silenced by the plant. It is  believed that the SAP assists in the interaction. elegans. a disturbance in  chloroplastic rRNA generation has been attributed to be the cause of the phenotype  (Rodio et al. De Santis‐MacIossek et al. Intriguingly. It belongs to the group of Avsun‐ viroidae which replicate in the chloroplast. this was explained by posi‐ tional effects.. in subsequent generations the line  showed an increasing amount of bleaching reminiscent of the other lines with high  transgene expression. but when a mutant version of ERI‐1  135  .. 2008. 1996. 2007). as  well as the transcriptional alterations which could be detected after constitutive  overexpression of ERL1 in N. musculus frequently showed a 2‐nt ex‐ tended version of the ribosomal RNA (Ansel et al.. 1994. pombe and M. Wang et al. 2008). 1999. In the beginning it did not show any  phenotype albeit having a high expression level of ERL1..7 of the result section)  (Hess et al. Gabel & Ruvkun. However.  4.6 of the result section)  (Reiter et al.8S rRNA. 1997. ERI‐1 knock‐ out mutants of C.. The PC‐C40 strain leads to peach calico. Another example of the observed phenotype is the infection of peach with a  variant of the peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd).. Discussion  scription is not completely lost in the overexpressing tissue. Babiychuk et al. 1993. 2000)]. Zubko & Day.4 ERL1 is involved in chloroplastic ribosomal RNA processing  In addition to their involvement in RNA silencing processes ERI‐1 homologues have  later shown to be involved in the 3’‐processing of cytosolic 5.  One line presented an exception to the direct connection between the severity of the  phenotype and the ERL1 overexpression levels.4. These symptoms are associated with a stable sec‐ ondary structure which is comprised of a 3’‐stem loop. Chatterjee et al. Allison et al. benthamiana [(compare Figure 3.  Literature search revealed several examples of mutants with the observed morpho‐ logical phenotypes [(compare figure Figure 3. S.. a  severe chlorosis of the leaf lamina. 1996..  2002)].

 Discussion  without SAP domain has been overexpressed in mice the enzyme was still able to  interact with ribosomal proteins (Ansel et al. Another  identified substrate. Unfortunately there are no re‐ sults available for the transient suppression of ERL1. Indeed. 2003. Drosophila Snp has also been shown to process substrates with  3’‐overhangs of minimum two nucleotides (Kupsco et al.  Taken together with the result that plant ERL1 localizes to the chloroplasts. 2008). it is localized in the cytoplasm and in addition it shows a  slightly different folding compared to its animal counterpart with an extended 3’‐ overhang in plants.  From initial experiments with probing for the rRNA levels after transient overex‐ pression of ERL1 by agroinfiltration. in contrast to other species. As expected from the initial transient assays  the strongest effect could be seen in 5S rRNA. Since this function of ERI‐1 seems  to be conserved.. 2005).  The other chloroplastic rRNAs either possess extended overhangs or do not fold into  a 3’‐terminal stem at all (compare Figure 4.4. 2006).1). chloro‐ plastic ribosomal RNAs have been considered as a likely substrate for the processing  activity of ERL1. is the short 3’‐terminal stem‐ loop of histone mRNA which is processed by human 3’hExo (Dominski et al...4 of the result section). interestingly only after ERL1 overex‐  136  . In silico prediction of their secondary structures reveals that only 5S  rRNA has a precursor structure comparable to other substrates of ERI‐1 homologues.  Dominski et al. This structure resembles the structure of siRNAs. probably does not provide a suitable sub‐ strate for plant ERL1.. an involvement of ERL1 in similar plant pathways has been consid‐ ered as likely. A more detailed picture could  be obtained after mapping the exact ends of the rRNAs by a cloning approach (com‐ pare Table 3. alterations at the 3’‐ends could be de‐ tected in 18 % of all analyzed samples.   5.8S rRNA. albeit not being verified in vivo.8S rRNA in vivo binds to 28S rRNA leading to a double‐stranded stem fol‐ lowed by a 2‐nt overhang. only 5S rRNA showed a detectable downregula‐ tion already after some days of ERL1 overexpression.  Despite apparent differences the two identified in vivo substrates share a major simi‐ larity: 5.

 2008)  (A) 4. Gruber et al. (B) 5S rRNA ends with a 3’‐terminal stem leaving  any additional precursor nucleotides available for ERL1 processing. (D) 23S rRNA possesses only a two nucleotide double‐strand before  the 3’‐end probably being too short for a presumable substrate of ERL1. a full length 16S structure  prediction gives a similar result..5S rRNA does not possess a 3’‐terminal stem.1: Secondary structures of chloroplastic rRNA (predicted by RNAfold. Discussion  (A)  3’  (B) 3’  (C)  3’  (D) 3’ Figure 4. For visualization only the last 161 nt are depicted. Again only the last 150 nt are  depicted.     137  .4. (C) 16S rRNA has an extended  single‐stranded 3’‐end.

. the second  base being always cytosine. these extensions  belonged to two distinct groups: in one third of the altered sequences the extension  corresponded to the precursor of 5S rRNA.   138  . this type of extension could only be de‐ tected after transient overexpression..  In addition. Discussion  pression but not upon its suppression in transgenic A. After  constitutive overexpression only the non‐templated extension could be detected. A  similar effect had been observed earlier in loss‐of‐function mutants of the  RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE 1 (RNR1) in Arabidopsis.  untemplated addition of a similar motif has been reported for tobacco chloroplast  transcripts (Zandueta‐Criado & Bock. with the first base being comprised of either adenosine or cytosine. there is no explanation why overexpression of ERL1 would result in addi‐ tional nucleotides of 5S rRNA. However. 2005). in two thirds of all extended 5S  rRNA versions the extension corresponded to an untemplated extra –A/C C (C) mo‐ tif. Surprisingly. Intriguingly. The authors by then proposed an unknown 3’‐5’  exonuclease to act redundantly in the 3’‐end maturation of these rRNAs (Bollenbach  et al. This suggests that  ERL1 probably only acts redundantly to other proteins in 5S rRNA maturation. The scenario with transient overexpression of  ERL1 represents the early steps of the pathway. It can only be speculated how additional ERL1 might  interfere with 5S rRNA processing. 2000). 2004) and mitochondrial transcripts in maize  (Williams et al. In 45 % of all  cases an addition of two nucleotides had been present. The rnr‐1 mutant shows a  strong phenotype with extensions in 4.  So far. even in the mutant background more than half of all sequences corre‐ spond to the correct wildtype versions of the ribosomal RNA. It  can be hypothesized that the additional nucleotides are added after the normal proc‐ essing of the 5S rRNA precursor has been disturbed. in rare cases a third cytosine could occur. This may mean that  misexpression of ERL1 first influences the canonical processing of 5S rRNA.4. thaliana plants.5S and 5S chloroplastic rRNA parallel to wild‐ type versions of these molecules. all altered sequences corresponded  to templated extensions coming from the precursor sequence.

 Nevertheless. have proposed a dsRNA‐specific ribonuclease to destabilize  5S rRNA in the rnr‐1 mutant background (Sharwood et al.4. Since this could be detected in all wildtype and most mutant sequences  this shortened version had been considered as the wildtype setup. The extra –T cor‐ responds to the 16S rRNA precursor sequence.  In the case of 23S rRNA a 3’‐deletion could be detected in one case.  However. this function could be rescued by the PPR protein. ERL1 misses a motif providing  binding to RNA. 5S rRNA was not the only chloroplastic rRNA molecule showing sequence  alterations at their 3’‐ends. it is hard to interpret at this  time point since.2 of the introduction). In the Arabidopsis genome the ERL1 gene lies imme‐ diately upstream of a sequence coding for a PPR protein whose promoter is part of  the ERL1 sequence. it is impossible to argue that the elongated 16S rRNA is  specific for the suppression of ERL1. Sharwood et al. so far.. it had not been observed repeatedly. the genomic relation of the ERL1  and PPR gene are an interesting aspect. it is imaginable that  ERL1 might exert this function. It can therefore not be excluded that a mutation could influence  both transcripts. there‐ fore making it an unlikely substrate of ERL1. since the relative distance of genes might also  be an indicator for a function in similar processes.3. In two out of six of the tested  sequences they possessed an extra thymidine compared to the wildtype sequences. 2011). 16S rRNA was the only molecule with sequence altera‐ tions in the Arabidopsis erl1 suppression background. It  has to be noted at this point that the sequenced wildtype clones in our experimental  setup showed a two‐nucleotide deletion at their 3’‐ends compared to the published  sequence. The fold of the 16S rRNA precursor  does not suggest it to be a suitable substrate for ERL1 and a side effect of the inser‐ tion mutant cannot be excluded. However. The secondary structure  predicts one of the deleted nucleotides to be bound in a double‐stranded stem. Although this  behavior would be in accordance with the expected function of ERL1 by showing a  deletion in the case of overexpression of the exonuclease. Discussion  Recently. If the level of the PPR transcript is influ‐ enced in the mutant line. it cannot be excluded that in  139  . PPR proteins are implicated in editing of chloroplastic transcripts  (compare chapter 1.

 Reports from other species suggest an involvement of ERI‐ 1 homologues in rRNA processing and 5S rRNA is clearly influenced by the misex‐ pression of ERL1 in plants. Homologues  140  . These proteins might be indispensable for its func‐ tion also in vitro and need to be identified by immuno‐coprecipitation. The protein is likely to localize to the chloroplast in vivo. So far all attempts  with plant ERL1 have been unsuccessful.4.  The fact that 4.    4. The analyzed insertion mutants of Arabidop‐ sis thaliana still possess a detectable residual ERL1 transcript level. especially 5S  rRNA are not purely random but a specific result of ERL1 misexpression. It will be important to  create and analyze plant lines with minimal residual ERL1 expression. In addition. Discussion  the mature ribosome additional double‐stranded RNA stems could form between  different RNA species. However. they  do not show a clear phenotype. which specifically support an involvement of plant ERL1 in  RNA silencing processes. since it lacks a SAP motif. a major disadvantage is the unavailability of  data of complete knock‐outs of the gene. There have  been no results obtained. In addition. the specific elongation of chloroplastic 16S rRNA still  needs to be proven by analysis of the PPR transcript levels. Several possible reasons for this can be ad‐ dressed: one may be that the full length protein has been used for protein production  and purification. unpub‐ lished results). This sequence possesses a chloroplastic leader signal which will be  cleaved in vivo after the import. The leader signal might interfere with substrate bind‐ ing and processing in the in vitro experiments. Preliminary results with the mature protein  in shifting assays show binding to dsRNA with 2‐nt overhangs (Vlatakis. It is  very likely that it works in cooperation with a protein providing binding to nucleic  acids.5S rRNA has not been changed in any of the tested sequences suggests  that the observed sequence alterations in the other chloroplastic rRNAs. a mature protein without the leader  peptide should therefore be expressed. ERL1 might require other factors for its function.5 Conclusions  Many hints point towards a contribution of plant ERL1 in the processing of chloro‐ plastic 5S rRNA.  The proposed substrate should also be proven by in vitro assays.

 elegans (Duchaine et al.  2010). 2008).. However. 2005)  and with ribosomal proteins in mice (Ansel et al.     141  . Discussion  of ERI‐1 have been shown to interact with Dicer in C. it was not possible to regenerate these lines (Vamvaka.  A last question to address is.4.. Another approach had been  the generation of transgenic plants overexpressing the mature protein without the  leader peptide. It will be interesting to address if this is repeatable and therefore maybe a toxic  effect of the overexpression of ERL1 in the cytoplasm. whether plant ERL1 would have the ability to degrade  siRNAs if it did not localize to the chloroplast? This could be tested in the above  mentioned in vitro assays with the respective co‐factors.

        142  .

 Karnes M. Semin Cell Dev Biol. Shinn P. Lamperti ED.16(9):927‐32.  Anandalakshmi R. Nucleic Acids Res.  Allen E. A calmodulin‐related protein that suppresses posttranscrip‐ tional gene silencing in plants. Hazari N. miRNAs in the biogenesis of trans‐acting siRNAs in higher  plants. 2008 May. Wolf C. Lewis J. Bartel B. Marathe R. Allshire RC. Carrington JC. Deletion of rpoB reveals a second distinct tran‐ scription system in plastids of higher plants. Garland Science. References    Adenot X. Mulholland C. Choy N. 2003 Mar.  Allison LA.  Zimmerman J. Mouse Eri1 interacts with the ribosome and catalyzes 5.25(17):3389‐402. Cell. Roberts K. Molecular biology: silencing unlimited. Fifth edition.  Bowman L. RNA. Schmid M.16(16):R635‐8.290(5489):142‐4.  Hom E. microRNA‐directed phasing during  trans‐acting siRNA biogenesis in plants. Crosby WL. Ansari Y.  Gapped BLAST and PSI‐BLAST: a new generation of protein database search pro‐ grams. 2006 Aug 22. Tahiliani M. Pastor WA. Taylor & Francis Group. Rath N. Marchand T. Schäffer AA. Kremmer E. Mallory A. Chen H.  143  . Parker H.  Alberts B.15(11):2802‐9. Simon LD. Schmidt I. 2005 Apr 22. Guzman P. 2006 May 9. A uni‐ form system for microRNA annotation. Genome‐wide insertional mutagenesis of  Arabidopsis thaliana. Vance VB.  Altschul SF. Epub 2010 Mar 30. Marshall M. Lauressergues D. Curr  Biol. Lapan AD.8S rRNA proc‐ essing. Dreyfuss G. Rao A. 2008. ISBN:0‐8153‐ 4105‐9. Maliga P. Howell MD. Miller W. Chen X. 2003 Aug 1. Heller C. Matzke M. Ndubaku R. 1997 Sep 1. Smith LC. Kim CJ. Glasmacher E. Deen H.  Vaucheret H. P. 1996 Jun 3. 2000 Oct 6. Weigel D. Stevenson DK. Zhang Z. Burge CB. Prednis L. Herr JM Jr. Ellwart JW. Berry CC. Ecker JR.  Almeida R. Bartel DP. Elmayan T.  Zeko A.5. Brogden D.  Ambros V. Pruss G. Lipman DJ. Carter DE. Madden TL. Science.  Alonso JM.  Ansel KM. Zhang J.9(3):277‐9. Johnson A. Molecular biology of  the cell. Buscaino A.301(5633):653‐7.15(5):523‐30. Gustafson AM.21(8):798‐804.  Allen E. Walter. Carrington JC. Ge X. Aguilar‐ Henonin L. Nat Struct Mol Biol. Gasciolli V. Leisse TJ. He‐ issmeyer V. Bouché N. Shi Y. EMBO J. Cheuk R. Tuschl T. Curr Biol. Geralt M. Boutet S. Barajas P. DRB4‐dependent TAS3 trans‐acting siRNAs control leaf morphology  through AGO7. Raff M. Stepanova AN.121(2):207‐21. Papa‐ dopoulou N. Epub 2008 Apr 27. Mau C. Jeske A. Griffiths‐Jones S. 2010 Oct. Koesema E. Gadrinab C.  Meyers CC.  Eddy SR. Science. Xie Z. Ruvkun G. Risseeuw E.

 2008 Jul. Rozovsky YM.  Barkan A.  Behm‐Ansmant I.20(14):1885‐98.316(5825):744‐7. Lie M. Duan S.  Double‐stranded RNA‐mediated silencing of genomic tandem repeats and transpos‐ able elements in the D. Plant Cell. 1993 Apr. Evolution of plant microRNAs and their targets. 2005  Nov. IDN1 and IDN2 are required for de  novo DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Girard A. 2001 Jul 10.102(33):11928‐33.  Baulcombe D. 2008 Jul 11. Cavalli G. Morozov SY. PRG‐1 and 21U‐RNAs interact to form the piRNA complex required  for fertility in C. Fahlgren N.  144   .5.  Bayne EH. Epub 2005 Aug 4. Schroth GP. Mello CC. Nat Struct Mol Biol. Izaurralde E. mRNA  degradation by miRNAs and GW182 requires both CCR4:NOT deadenylase and  DCP1:DCP2 decapping complexes. Arabidopsis ARGONAUTE1 is an RNA Slicer that  selectively recruits microRNAs and short interfering RNAs. Inzé D. Epub 2006  Jun 30.94(23):12722‐7. Luo S. Genes Dev. Vagin VV.  Baumberger N. Gu W.16(12):1325‐7.  Aravin AA. Epub 2008 May 22. 2007  May 4.24(15):6742‐50. Havecker E. Epub 2009 Nov 15. Kasschau KD. Science. Fuangthong M.  Baumberger N.11(13):1017‐27. Gvozdev VA. Plant J.18(2):298‐305. References  Aravin AA. Sachidanandam R.  Batista PJ.44(3):471‐82. 2006 Jul 15. Curr Biol.17(18):1609‐14. Chiang R.  Ausin I. Baulcombe DC. Doerks T.  Babiychuk E.5(4):389‐402. Kushnir S. Mol  Cell Biol. Epub 2008 Jun 19. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S  A. Baulcombe DC. Stark A. 2005 Aug 16.  Aravin AA. Vagin VV. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Bowman JL. Mol Cell. Hannon GJ. Tsai CH.  Bannai H. 2004 Sep 16. Van Montagu M. Conte D Jr. Trends  Plant Sci. Rehwinkel J. 2004 Aug. Baulcombe DC. Chaves  DA. Klenov MS. Bartel  DP. Miyano S.  Axtell MJ. Dissec‐ tion of a natural RNA silencing process in the Drosophila melanogaster germ line. Vasale JJ. Tamada Y. 2002 Feb. Bork P. Fejes‐Toth K. Cell‐to‐cell movement of  potato potexvirus X is dependent on suppression of RNA silencing. Mockler TC. Chory J. The Polerovirus si‐ lencing suppressor P0 targets ARGONAUTE proteins for degradation. Efficient gene  tagging in Arabidopsis thaliana using a gene trap approach. Rakitina DV. melanogaster germline. 2009  Dec. Nature. Maruyama O. elegans. Bantignies F. Developmen‐ tally regulated piRNA clusters implicate MILI in transposon control. Nuclear Mutants of Maize with Defects in Chloroplast Polysome Assem‐ bly Have Altered Chloroplast RNA Metabolism.  2007 Sep 18.13(7):343‐9.31(1):67‐78. Curr Biol. Nakai K. Carrington JC.431(7006):356‐63. Jacobsen SE. Extensive feature detection  of N‐terminal protein sorting signals. Bioinformatics. RNA silencing in plants. Claycomb JM. Naumova NM.  1997 Nov 11. Gvozdev VA. Ruby JG. Tulin AV. Epub 2007 Apr 19.

 Gutierrez R. 1998 Jan  2. Cooke R. 2004 Sep. References  Bellaoui M. Epub 2009 Aug 25. Vazquez F. Hannon GJ.34(21):6233‐46. EMBO J. The Arabidopsis nuclear DAL gene encodes a chloroplast protein which is  required for the maturation of the plastid ribosomal RNAs and is essential for  chloroplast differentiation.219(5):819‐26. Proteomic analysis of the proplastid envelope membrane  provides novel insights into small molecule and protein transport across proplastid  membranes. RNA‐ directed DNA methylation requires an AGO4‐interacting member of the SPT5 elon‐ gation factor family. 2009 Nov. Zhu J. Depicker A. Carol P. Gruissem W. Bellini C. Plant Mol Biol. Bligny M. Epub 2004 Jun 10. 2003  Nov.  145   . Benning C. Verslues PE.  Mache R. Gasciolli V. Robertson D. Pooggin MM. Pazhouhandeh M. Role for a bidentate ribonucle‐ ase in the initiation step of RNA interference. Van Houdt H. Epub 2009 Apr 3. Keddie JS. Hammond SM.  Bleys A. Si‐Ammour A.  Bortolamiol D. Viral suppression of RNA si‐ lencing by destabilisation of ARGONAUTE 1.12(9):1633‐9.53(4):531‐43. Meins F Jr. Stern DB. Bégot L. Sunkar R. 2006 Sep.17(1):170‐80.  Borsani O. Nucleic Acids  Res. Picart C. Lagrange T. Vaucheret H. Vega D.  Blevins T. Perez P. 2005 Dec 29. Bouchez D.10(6):649‐54. 2006. Epub 2006 Nov 7. Rajeswaran R.  Bollenbach TJ.  Bisanz C. Gruissem W.51(5):651‐63. Plant Mol Biol. Beknazariants D. Weber AP. Lerbs‐Mache S. AGO1 defines  a novel locus of Arabidopsis controlling leaf development. Pesey H. Nucleic Acids Res.  Bies‐Etheve N. Ziegler‐Graff V. Caboche M. DCL is a plant‐specific protein required for  plastid ribosomal RNA processing and embryo development. a  3ʹ‐5ʹ exoribonuclease belonging to the RNR superfamily. 2001 Jan 18. RNA. Gagliardi D.  Cell.5. Gallois JL.409(6818):363‐6.2(6):1247‐61. EMBO Rep. catalyzes 3ʹ maturation of  chloroplast ribosomal RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Shivaprasad PV. Lahmy S. Altered expression of the Arabidopsis orthologue of DCL  affects normal plant development.  Bellaoui M. Erhardt M. Endogenous siRNAs derived  from a pair of natural cis‐antisense transcripts regulate salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. Planta.3(9):657‐ 9.  Bräutigam A. 2005 May  12. EMBO J.  Bohmert K. Epub 2006 Jun 29. 2008 Sep. Hohn T. Zhu JK. Lauressergues D.  Bernstein E. Caudy AA. Camus I. Down‐regulation of endogenes mediated by a  transitive silencing signal. RNR1. Plant Signal Behav. Mol Plant. Park  HS. 2003 Mar. 2006 Jul 26.25(14):3347‐56.  Bouché N. Lange H. 2009 Jun. Pontier D. Four plant Dicers  mediate viral small RNA biogenesis and DNA virus induced silencing.123(7):1279‐91. An antagonistic function for  Arabidopsis DCL2 in development and a new function for DCL4 in generating viral  siRNAs.33(8):2751‐63. Nature.

 2005  Oct.  Chalfie M.17(22):6739‐46.  Cerutti L. Xiao Q. Schaub M. J Virol. 2007 Mar 23.125(5):873‐86. Mühlemann O. Zhong X. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. Zhou P.5. A plant orthologue of RNase L in‐ hibitor (RLI) is induced in plants showing RNA interference. Origins and Mechanisms of miRNAs and siRNAs. Bateman A. Li Y. The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company Inc. Transcriptional silencing of nonsense  codon‐containing immunoglobulin minigenes. Sachidanandam R. Voinnet O.  Cell. Kohn R. Cell.  Carmell MA. Garosi P. Epub 2008 May 15.136(4):642‐55. Biology.   Cao X.  Campbell NA. Correa P.11(3):214‐8. Sontheimer EJ. RNase III enzymes and the initiation of gene silencing. 2004 Mar. Li WX. Findlay K. Moazed D. Sakvarelidze‐Achard L. elegans. Identification of an  RNA silencing suppressor from a plant double‐stranded RNA virus. Cell. Sparvoli S. Cell.  Brigneti G. 2006 Jun 2. Strasser RJ.320(5880):1185‐90.  Brennecke J. Verdel A. Martin C. References  Braz AS. Trends Bio‐ chem Sci. Mol Cell. 1996 Aug 15. 2000 Oct. Epub 2007 Jan 29. Epub 2007 Mar 8. Photosynthetic behavior of woody species under  high ozone exposure probed with the JIP‐test: a review. Mian N.25(10):481‐2.79(20):13018‐27. 1998 Nov 16. Maguire M.  Discrete small RNA‐generating loci as master regulators of transposon activity in  Drosophila. Ding SW. a gene  required for chloroplast differentiation and palisade development in Antirrhinum  majus.24(1):59‐69. Dus M. Epub 2006 Oct 10.  Bussotti F. 2005 Apr 29. Kellis M. EMBO  J.128(6):1089‐103. J Mol Evol. Bruun‐Rasmussen M. 2008 May 30. 2007 Mar  23.354(4):1040‐4. Mutations that lead to reiterations in the cell  lineages of C. Widespread translational inhibition by plant miRNAs  and siRNAs. 2004  Jul. Synaptic neurotransmission protein UNC‐ 13 affects RNA interference in neurons. Zhang X. Ding B. Aravin AA. Finnegan J. Sieburth L. 1981 Apr. 2007  Jun.  Bühler M.  Bühler M. Baulcombe DC. EMBO J. Zhu S. 2009 Feb 20. Ji LH. Dunoyer P.  Brodersen P.15(16):4194‐207.147(3):430‐7. Hannon GJ. Stark A. Edmunds C. Science.  Chatterjee M.18(3):307‐17. Tethering RITS to a nascent transcript initiates  RNAi‐ and heterochromatin‐dependent gene silencing. Horvitz HR. Yamamoto  YY. Waterhouse P. Hannon GJ. DAG.  Nat Struct Mol Biol.59(1):20‐30.  Chapin A. Domains in gene silencing and cell differentiation  proteins: the novel PAZ domain and redefinition of the Piwi domain.  Carthew RW. Margis R. Sulston JE. Voinnet O. Mohn F. Environ Pollut. Stalder L. Viral pathogenicity  determinants are suppressors of transgene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana. 1996.  146   .

 Baulcombe DC.  Cheng Y. a  DEDDh family member. Montgomery TA. Epub 2005 Jun 22.343(2):305‐12. Epub  2007 Aug 22. Giraldez AJ. Pradhan S. Gaidatzis D. Nishikura K. Epub 2010 May 6. Jacobsen SE. Nature. Tuschl T. A novel miRNA processing  pathway independent of Dicer requires Argonaute2 catalytic activity. Science. Carrington JC. 2009 Sep 24. Hannon GJ. Kumaraswamy E. 1987 Apr.  Cifuentes D. The p122 subunit of Tobacco Mosaic Virus  replicase is a potent silencing suppressor and compromises both small interfering  RNA‐ and microRNA‐mediated pathways. Epub 2008 Feb 17. Sacchi N. Chong MM. J Mol Biol.  Chen J. Anal Biochem. Burgyán J. 2008 Mar  13. Bovi A. Sheridan R. Russo JJ.  Shiekhattar R. 2009 Mar  1.19(11):1288‐93. Xie D. Single‐step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidin‐ ium thiocyanate‐phenol‐chloroform extraction.  147   . EMBO J.  Chitwood DH. 2005 Aug 4. 2005  Jun 1.  Chen PY. 2001  Apr 17. Ding SW. Plant J. Chen Z. Grosshans H. Plant Cell.  Clough SJ. Lawson ND. Crystallographic structure of the nuclease domain of 3ʹhExo. Feng S. J Virol.162(1):156‐9. Haudenschild CD. Nogueira FT. Dalmay T. Li WX.  Marks DS.16(5):1302‐13. References  Chatterjee S. Slanchev K.  Dalmay T. 2004 May. Mane  S.  Nelson SF. Cooch N. Shotgun bisulphite sequencing of the Arabi‐ dopsis genome reveals DNA methylation patterning. Patel DJ. Norman J.  Cokus SJ. Ju J. bound to rAMP. Dos Santos CO. John B. Bent AF. Nature.  Chendrimada TP. Taylor DW. The developmental  miRNA profiles of zebrafish as determined by small RNA cloning. SDE3 encodes an RNA  helicase required for post‐transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis.  Csorba T. Nature.436(7051):740‐4. Pattern formation via small RNA mobility. Peng JR.23(5):549‐54. Hannon GJ. Sander C. Xue H. Mishima Y. 1998 Dec. Gregory RI.452(7184):215‐9. A dicer‐independent miRNA  biogenesis pathway that requires Ago catalysis. TRBP recruits the Dicer complex to Ago2 for microRNA processing  and gene silencing. Cheloufi S. Pellegrini M. 2010 Jun 3.81(21):11768‐80. 2004 Oct 15. Active turnover modulates mature microRNA activity in  Caenorhabditis elegans. 2007 Nov. Genes Dev. Merriman B.328(5986):1694‐8.16(6):735‐43. Zavolan M. Howell MD. Patnode H.5.461(7263):546‐9.465(7298):584‐9. Chien M. Manninga H.  Chomczynski P. Wolfe SA. Braunstein TH.  Cheloufi S. Epub 2004 Apr 20. Genes Dev. Floral dip: a simplified method for Agrobacterium‐mediated  transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana.20(8):2069‐78. Horsefield R. Ma E. Zhang X.  Timmermans MC. Viral virulence protein suppresses RNA  silencing‐mediated defense but upregulates the role of microrna in host gene expres‐ sion. 2010  Jun 25. Epub 2009 Sep 6. Nature.

 2006 Jul 7. Piwi and piRNAs act upstream of an endogenous siRNA path‐ way to suppress Tc3 transposon mobility in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline. Epub 2007 Jun 22. Han M. Targeted disruption of the plastid RNA poly‐ merase genes rpoA.313(5783):68‐71. Epub 2007 Sep 4. B and C1: molecular biology. Goldstein LD. Yang XC.  Matzke M.  Epub 2004 Nov 7.  De Santis‐MacIossek G. References  Das PP. Lehrbach NJ. 2008. Epub 2008 Jun 19. A 3ʹ exonuclease that  specifically interacts with the 3ʹ end of histone mRNA.  Diederichs S. Direct and indirect roles of viral suppressors of RNA  silencing in pathogenesis. Mol  Cell. Matzke AJ. Ketting RF. Suppression of antiviral silencing by cucum‐ ber mosaic virus 2b protein in Arabidopsis is associated with drastically reduced accu‐ mulation of three classes of viral small interfering RNAs. Voinnet O.432(7014):231‐5. Bock A. 1999 Jun. Nature.  Denli AM. elegans. Naumann U. A stepwise pathway for biogenesis of 24‐nt secondary siRNAs and  spreading of DNA methylation. Miska EA.  Hierarchical action and inhibition of plant Dicer‐like proteins in antiviral defense. Berezikov E. Matthews N. Dadlez M. Tops BB. 2006 Nov 15. The developmental timing regulator AIN‐1  interacts with miRISCs and may target the argonaute protein ALG‐1 to cytoplasmic P  bodies in C. Mol Cell. Li WX.28(1):48‐57.131(6):1097‐108. Stark R. Marzluff WF.46:303‐26. Koop HU. Han M. Herrmann RG.17(8):411‐6. Spencer A. Ding SW. Howe KL.  Ding L. 2003 Aug. Wanner G. Epub 2008 Dec 11. Woolford JR. Gallego‐Bartolome J. Bioinformatics. Epub 2006 Jun 1. Hannon GJ.  Science. Bu‐ hecha HR.5. Ding SW. Rüdi‐ ger W. Bagijn MP. Kofer W. Kaygun H.  Díaz‐Pendón JA. Gilchrist MJ.  148   . Haber DA. 2007 Aug. Cell.12(2):295‐ 305.  Daxinger L. Trends Cell Biol.  Tavaré S. Bao J. 2007 Dec  14. biochemistry and ultrastructure. Kasschau KD. 2007  Jun. Epub 2006 Sep 5. van der Winden J.19(4):437‐47.18(5):477‐89.19(6):2053‐63. Morita K. Kanno T. GW182 family proteins are crucial for microRNA‐mediated gene  silencing. Dual role for argonautes in microRNA processing and  posttranscriptional regulation of microRNA expression.  Plant J. Processing of primary  microRNAs by the Microprocessor complex. DUF283 domain of Dicer proteins has a double‐stranded RNA‐binding  fold. Maier RM. Schoch S. 2005 Aug 19.  Ding L. 2004 Nov 11. Plasterk RH. 2008 Jul 11.31(1):79‐90. Plant Cell. Sapetschnig A. Carrington JC. Annu Rev Phytopathol. EMBO J. Bucher E. Ketting RF.  Deleris A. 2009 Jan 7.  Diaz‐Pendon JA.  Dominski Z. Mol Cell.22(22):2711‐4. Li F.  Dlakić M.

 Martínez‐García B. P bodies: at the crossroads of post‐ transcriptional pathways. RNA interference is mediated by 21‐ and 22‐ nucleotide RNAs.  Duchaine TF.39(7):848‐56. Lagrange T. 2006 Jan 27. Himber C.  Elbashir SM.  Eckhardt S. Cell. Lendeckel W. Tuschl T. Ruvkun G. Pontier D. Functional pro‐ teomics reveals the biochemical niche of C. 2007 Oct 15. Fritzsch C. Tuschl T.  Genes Dev. Braun L.102(38):13398‐403. Extensive 3ʹ modification of plant small  RNAs is modulated by helper component‐proteinase expression. RNA. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2001b Dec 3. Genes Dev. The GW182 protein family in animal cells: new  insights into domains required for miRNA‐mediated gene silencing. 2007 Jul. Pagán I. Izaurralde E. Lahmy S. Llave C.82(11):5167‐77. Brownell  DR. 2005 Sep 20. 2007 Jan.  Dunoyer P. Differences and similarities between  Drosophila and mammalian 3ʹ end processing of histone pre‐mRNAs.37(12):1356‐60. Nat Genet.  Donaire L. 2009b  Aug. Mello CC.11(12):1835‐47.  Structural and genetic requirements for the biogenesis of tobacco rattle virus‐derived  small interfering RNAs. Alioua A. Jacobsen  SE. Mitani S. Helms S. Nat Genet. 2005 Dec. Behm‐Ansmant I. Yang XC. Harding S. Tritschler F.  Eulalio A. Thi EP.20(23):6877‐88. Barajas D. Purdy M. Functional  anatomy of siRNAs for mediating efficient RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster embryo  lysate. Yates JR 3rd. Bei Y.  Dunoyer P. Unrau PJ.  149   . Martinez J.  El‐Shami M. 2008 Jun. Functional Analysis of ERI‐1. Epub  2009a Apr 21. Proc Natl Acad Sci  U S A. Conte D Jr. RNA. Izaurralde E. Ruiz‐Ferrer V. A C‐terminal silencing do‐ main in GW182 is essential for miRNA function. Lendeckel W. EMBO J. Patkaniowska A. Epub 2005 Oct 26.15(2):188‐200. DICER‐LIKE 4 is required for RNA interference  and produces the 21‐nucleotide small interfering RNA component of the plant cell‐ to‐cell silencing signal. Reiterated WG/GW motifs form functionally and evolu‐ tionarily conserved ARGONAUTE‐binding platforms in RNAi‐related components.15(6):1067‐77. Intra‐ and intercellular  RNA interference in Arabidopsis thaliana requires components of the microRNA and  heterochromatic silencing pathways. Marzluff WF.15(8):1433‐42. 2007.8(1):9‐22. Vega D. Voinnet O.21(20):2539‐44. Epub 2007 Jun  10. Epub 2008 Mar 19. Martínez‐Priego L.  Elbashir SM. Epub 2005 Nov 6. RNA. Pang K.  Eulalio A. Cooke R. Kassel University. 2001a Jan 15. elegans DCR‐1 in multiple small‐RNA‐ mediated pathways. Wohlschlegel JA. References  Dominski Z.  Eulalio A. 2009 Jun. Fauser M. Epub 2005 Sep 12. Wang MB. Voinnet O. Izaurralde E. Hakimi MA.5. Kennedy S. Picart C.124(2):343‐54. Epub 2009 Jun 17. Himber C. J Virol.  Ebhardt HA. 2005  Dec.

 Denli AM. 2007 May 1. Montgomery MK. 1995 Jun 23.5. Systemic silencing signal(s).97(21):11650‐4. Doudna JA. Science.8S  rRNA processing and RNAi.43(2‐ 3):285‐93. Crystal structure of lac repressor core  tetramer and its implications for DNA looping. Shyu AB. Svitkin YV.10(3):264‐70. Tenenbaum SA. and RNA interference in animals. Yates JR 3rd.35(6):868‐80. Mathonnet G. Xu S. Alexander AL. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 2002  Apr.  Filipowicz W. Griffith K.  Fagard M.  Rivas F. Jinek M. Nature.13(4):1338‐51. Curr Biol. Chan EK. Curr Biol. Spector DL.15(5):531‐3. a double‐stranded RNA‐binding domain protein. Potent and spe‐ cific genetic interference by double‐stranded RNA in Caenorhabditis elegans. References  Eystathioy T. Dvorak SK. 2008  Feb. 2000 Jun. associates with a unique population of  human mRNAs within novel cytoplasmic speckles. Driver SE. Wohlschlegel J. and RDE‐1  are related proteins required for post‐transcriptional gene silencing in plants. Mol Biol Cell. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.  Förstemann K. Vaucheret H. Zipprich JT.  Friedman AM. QDE‐2. Ruvkun G. Bellini C. Mammalian miRNA RISC  recruits CAF1 and PABP to affect PABP‐dependent deadenylation.17(9):818‐23. Identification of nuclear dicing bodies containing proteins for  microRNA biogenesis in living Arabidopsis plants.  Fagard M. Epub 2005 May 24.  1998 Feb 19.  Gabel HW. Sundermeier T. Steitz TA.  Fire A. Duchaine TF.  PLoS Biol. Montgomery TA. Vagin VV.  Epub 2007 Apr 19. Fritzler MJ. 2005 Jul. Weigel D. Mol Cell. Epub 2008  Apr 27.3(7):e236. Fischmann TO.  Felippes FF. 2006 May  9. Mathys H. Bratu DP. AGO1. A phos‐ phorylated cytoplasmic autoantigen. 2008 May. Howell MD.  Fabian MR. 2009 Mar. Triggering the formation of tasiRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana:  the role of microRNA miR173.  Theurkauf WE. EMBO Rep. 2009  Sep 24.391(6669):806‐11.  150   . Mechanisms of post‐transcriptional  regulation by microRNAs: are the answers in sight? Nat Rev Genet.9(2):102‐14. Du T.  Carrington JC. The exonuclease ERI‐1 has a conserved dual role in 5. Keene JD.  Fahlgren N. Plant Mol Biol. Zamore PD. Sonenberg N. 2000 Oct  10.  Fang Y. Epub 2009 Aug 27. Klattenhoff C. quell‐ ing in fungi. Sonenberg N. Mello CC.268(5218):1721‐7. Epub 2009 Jan 30. Vaucheret H.  Hannon GJ. Allen E. Filipowicz W. Tomari Y.16(9):939‐44. Boutet S. Regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 by TAS3 ta‐siRNA af‐ fects developmental timing and patterning in Arabidopsis. Bhattacharyya SN. GW182. Normal microRNA maturation and germ‐line stem cell  maintenance requires Loquacious. Morel JB. Chen CY. Kostas SA.

20(6):1203‐7. Epub 2007 Nov 9. Chendrimada T. 2007 Mar 16. Science. Neuböck R. Pasquinelli AE. Parrish S.315(5818):1587‐90. Plant Cell. Amuthan G. Nishida KM.6(10):961‐7. Partially redundant functions of  Arabidopsis DICER‐like enzymes and a role for DCL4 in producing trans‐acting  siRNAs. Li N.  Haase AD.  Vaucheret H.19(11):3451‐61. Epub 2008 Jul 30. A viral protein inhibits the long range signaling activity of the  gene silencing signal.  Gregory RI. Zhang H. The Microprocessor complex mediates the genesis of microRNAs.  Hamilton AJ. Gombert J.  Gasciolli V. Saini HK.The Vienna RNA  websuite. Baillie DL. 2007 Nov. Sablowski R. A species of small antisense RNA in posttranscrip‐ tional gene silencing in plants. Byrne ME. Gatignol A. Siomi MC. Ding SW.  2004 Nov 11. Woodward C. Lorenz R.  Griffiths‐Jones S. Lauressergues D.19(6):586‐95.  Cell. Specification of leaf polarity in  Arabidopsis via the trans‐acting siRNA pathway. Ru‐ vkun G. A link between  mRNA turnover and RNA interference in Arabidopsis.5.  Gunawardane LS. Lawrenson T. Genes and mechanisms related to RNA interference regulate ex‐ pression of the small temporal RNAs that control C. miRBase: tools for mi‐ croRNA genomics. Vaucheret H. Proux F. Mallory AC. Lainé S. Nucleic Acids Res. Shiek‐ hattar R.  Gazzani S. Morel JB. Collier SA. Nucleic Acids Res. Epub 2007 Feb 22.432(7014):235‐40. Mallory AC. Yan KP. Bartel DP. a regulator of cellular PKR and HIV‐1 virus expression. EMBO Rep.16(9):933‐8. Gasciolli V. Conte D.  Garcia D. interacts with Dicer  and functions in RNA silencing.21(3):398‐407. Saito K.36(Database issue):D154‐8. Arabidopsis FIERY1. Curr Biol. 2008 Jul 1. Science.  Grishok A. Miyoshi K. Mello CC. Fire A. Epub 2007  Nov 8. 1999 Oct 29. Nature. A versatile binary vector system with a T‐DNA organisational structure  conducive to efficient integration of cloned DNA into the plant genome. XRN2.15(16):1494‐500. Epub 2004 Nov 7. 1992 Dec.306(5698):1046‐8. References  Garcia D. Bernhart SH. 2005 Aug 23.  Gleave AP. Semin Cell Dev Biol. Jaskiewicz L.  Gy I. Science. 2006 May 9. Enright AJ. and XRN3 are endogenous  RNA silencing suppressors. 2008 Dec. Plant Mol  Biol. Martienssen RA.  151   . Headon D.  Gruber AR. Sio‐ mi H. Cooch N. 2008 Jan. Hofacker IL. 2005 Oct.  TRBP.36(Web Server issue):W70‐4. Kawamura Y. Epub 2008 Apr  19. Sack R. 2004 Nov  5. A slicer‐mediated mechanism for repeat‐associated siRNA 5ʹ end  formation in Drosophila. 2002 Feb 1. EMBO J. Doratotaj B. Filipowicz W.106(1):23‐34. A miRacle in plant development: role of microRNAs in cell differentiation  and patterning. van Dongen S. Baulcombe DC. 2001 Jul 13. elegans developmental timing. Ha I. Nagami T.286(5441):950‐2.  Guo HS. Proux C. Curr Biol.

 Epub 2008 Nov 20.  2006 Oct 10. Nomura Y.  Han J. Song Y. Fieder B. Itoh R.103(41):14994‐5001. EMBO J. Epub 2006 Sep 28. 2005 Mar 8.  152   . Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.33(5):1454‐64. EMBO J.  Harris EH.16(20):9877. Boynton JE.77(10):6082‐6.  Schmid M. References  Hammond SM.  Herr AJ. Aizawa D.12(2):563‐71. Nucleic Acids Res. Defective RNA processing enhances  RNA silencing and influences flowering of Arabidopsis. Kondo N. Prombona A. Siemering KR. Beach D. Zheng J. Nature. Rhee JK. Yeom KH. Chloroplast rps15  and the rpoB/C1/C2 gene cluster are strongly transcribed in ribosome‐deficient plas‐ tids: evidence for a functioning non‐chloroplast‐encoded RNA polymerase. Crescenzi A.27(24):3300‐10. Fukuhara T. Hannon GJ. Voinnet O.  Höfgen R.  Havelda Z. Bernstein E. Gillham NW. Plant Mol Biol. Niep‐ mann M. Nam JW.  Nucleic Acids Res. Lohmann JU. Seki M.94(6):2122‐7. Kasschau KD. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Molnàr A. Cumbie JS.  Microbiol Rev. Subramanian AR. Cell.144(3):1247‐55. Burgyán J. Dunoyer P. 2007 Jul. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis. Moissiard G. Cho Y. Sohn SY. Jones A. Börner T. 2000 Mar  16. Haseloff J.  1993 Feb.404(6775):293‐6. Distinct expression patterns of natural antisense transcripts in Arabidop‐ sis.  2005 Jan. Koiwa H. Heo I. Expression of complementary  RNA from chloroplast transgenes affects editing efficiency of transgene and endoge‐ nous chloroplast transcripts. Prasher DC.  Hegeman CE. Molecular basis for the recognition of primary microRNAs by the Drosha‐ DGCR8 complex. Carrington JC. Kim  VN. Hornyik C. 1997 Mar 18. 2003  Sep 1. Lee Y.  2008 Dec 17. Hodge S. Fehr C. Ritzenthaler C. Epub 2007 May 11.   Henke JI. Schüttler CG. microRNA‐122 stimulates translation of hepatitis C virus RNA. EMBO J.57(2):173‐88. Transitivity‐ dependent and ‐independent cell‐to‐cell movement of RNA silencing. 1988 Oct 25.125(5):887‐901. Goergen D.  Henz SR.  Himber C. Storage of competent cells for Agrobacterium transformation. Specific interactions between Dicer‐like proteins and  HYL1/DRB‐family dsRNA‐binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Halter CP. Murai Y. 2006 Jun 2. Willmitzer L. 1994 Dec.  Hess WR.58(4):700‐54. Plant Physiol. J Virol.  Shinozaki K. Jünemann C. An RNA‐directed nuclease me‐ diates post‐transcriptional gene silencing in Drosophila cells. Hanson MR. Owens TG. 2003 May. Weigel D. Removal of a cryptic intron and  subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein are required to mark transgenic  Arabidopsis plants brightly. Zhang BT.5. In situ characterization of Cymbi‐ dium Ringspot Tombusvirus infection‐induced posttranscriptional gene silencing in  Nicotiana benthamiana.  Hiraguri A.22(17):4523‐33. Baulcombe DC.

 Epub 2010 Nov 9. Eri1. Science. Harada H. Nucleic Acids Res. Chapman EJ.29(24):4146‐60. Braun JE. Park KJ. Cronembold D. Cell. Bálint E. 2008 Jan 14. Genome‐wide analysis of the RNA‐DEPENDENT RNA  POLYMERASE6/DICER‐LIKE4 pathway in Arabidopsis reveals dependency on  miRNA‐ and tasiRNA‐directed targeting. Givan SA. Okayama H.19(3):926‐42. High efficiency transformation of Escherichia coli  with plasmids. Adams‐Collier CJ. Fahlgren N.  Inoue H. 2010 Dec  15.74(3):471‐6. Fujita N. Science. Lonardi S. 2006 Jul 25. 1990 Nov 30. Zhu JK. Berezikov E.129(1):69‐82. An RNA‐based information su‐ perhighway in plants. Min T. Moens CB.  Inaba T. Epub  2007 Mar 30. Biochem J. Shen S. Blaser H.  Hutvágner G. Simard MJ.16(14):1459‐64. Epub 2007 May 21. Nat  Rev Mol Cell Biol. Cumbie JS. 1985 Mar  8.5.  Hutvágner G. Hoffmann NL.35(Web  Server issue):W585‐7. 2001 Aug 3.9:6. Gene. Small RNAs and the regulation of cis‐ natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis. Carrington JC.  Epub 2006 Jun 22. Argonaute proteins: key players in RNA silencing.  WoLF PSORT: protein localization predictor.  Jorgensen RA. Eichholtz D. Lucas WJ. Plant Cell. Girard A. A cel‐ lular function for the RNA‐interference enzyme Dicer in the maturation of the let‐7  small temporal RNA.9(1):22‐32.293(5531):834‐8. Fry JE. Curr Biol.96(1):23‐8.  Jin H. Hannon GJ. 2007 Mar. Kass‐ chau KD.  2010. A simple and  general method for transferring genes into plants. Kamminga LM. Draper BW. Nakai K. Xu J. 2007 Apr 6. Qian Z. Forster RL. References  Hong J.  Iida T. Epub 2001 Jul 12. Nakayama J.  153   . 2005 Sep 15. BMC Mol Biol. Vacic V. EMBO J. Girke T. Epub 2010 Mar 7. McLachlan J.279(5356):1486‐7. High doses of  siRNAs induce eri‐1 and adar‐1 gene expression and reduce the efficiency of RNA  interference in the mouse. Fraley RT.  Huntzinger E.  Horton P. negatively regu‐ lates heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast. Filippov DV. Tuschl T. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. Zekri L. Izaurralde E.  Ketting RF. Kawaguchi R. Bilateral communication between plastid and the nucleus: plastid protein  import and plastid‐to‐nucleus retrograde signaling. Two PABPC1‐binding  sites in GW182 proteins promote miRNA‐mediated gene silencing. 2007 Jul. Zhao Y.227(4691):1229‐31. Zamore PD. Science.  Houwing S.390(Pt 3):675‐9. Raz E. 1998 Mar 6. Rogers SG. A role for Piwi and piRNAs in germ cell maintenance and transposon  silencing in zebrafish. Conserved ribonuclease.  Howell MD. Sullivan CM. Atkinson RG. Huang W. Heimstädt S. 2008 Jan. Plasterk RH. Tan C. Obayashi T. Nojima H. van den Elst  H.  Horsch RB. Pasquinelli AE.

  Klattenhoff C. Strittmatter G.  Structure and expression of rRNA operons from plastids of higher plants.15(20):2654‐9. elegans. Przybylski M. 7(5):193‐5. Marinou E. Plasterk RH. Fischer SE. van Drunen CM.  Ketting RF. Identification  of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate of tomato mosaic virus RNA replication complex  formation.50(4):597‐604. RNA. Tabler M. 2007 Sep. Jayasena SD.  Katiyar‐Agarwal S.13(9):1397‐401. Dicer func‐ tions in RNA interference and in synthesis of small RNA involved in developmental  timing in C. Hannon GJ. GATEWAY vectors for Agrobacterium‐mediated  plant transformation.  Karimi M. Theurkauf W.  Khvorova A. Alexiadis T. Epub 2007 Apr 5. elegans. Cell.103(47):18002‐7. Carrington JC. Borsani O. Dahlbeck D. Mawatari N. Mourelatos Z. Virp1 is a  host protein with a major role in Potato spindle tuber viroid infection in Nicotiana  plants.  Kössel H. Tsagris M.285(1):71‐81. Ishikawa M. 2002 May. Tzortzakaki S. Villegas A Jr. 2001 Oct 15. Sijen T. Hagiwara‐Komoda Y. A conserved siRNA‐degrading RNase negatively  regulates RNA interference in C. Naito S. Biol Cell. J Virol. 2007 May. Epub 2007 Nov 21. 2007 Mar.  Kobayashi K. Genes Dev.81(23):12872‐80.  Kalantidis K. References  Kalantidis K. Gozdzicka‐Jozefiak A.  Komoda K. Morgan R. Biogenesis and germline functions of piRNAs.135(1):3‐9.  Staskawicz BJ. J Virol.20(20):7480‐9. Epub 2007 Sep 26. Plant J. Natt E. 2008 Jan. Virology. Ruvkun G. Molecular  154   .45(6):1006‐16. Tsagris M. Devel‐ opment. Denti MA. Trends Plant Sci. SAF‐Box.5. Tabler M. Spontaneous short‐range silencing of a GFP  transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana is possibly mediated by small quantities of siRNA  that do not trigger systemic silencing. 2007 Dec. Helm JM. Depicker A.427(6975):645‐9. RNA silencing movement in  plants. RNA silencing and its cell‐to‐cell spread during Arabi‐ dopsis embryogenesis. Przybyl D. Schumacher HT.  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Fritzsche E. Plant J.  Kasschau KD. Inze D. The mouse homolog of HEN1 is a potential methylase for  Piwi‐interacting RNAs. Wang D. Epub 2006 Oct 27. Zambryski P. Bernstein E.  Kipp M. 2008 Jan. A pathogen‐inducible endogenous siRNA in plant immunity.  Kirino Y. 2006 Nov 21. Long‐distance movement and replication maintenance  functions correlate with silencing suppression activity of potyviral HC‐Pro.100(1):13‐26. van Driel R.115(2):209‐16. Reynolds A.  2001 Jun 20. Epub 2006 Nov 15. Mol Cell Biol.  Fackelmayer FO. 2004 Feb 12. Functional siRNAs and miRNAs exhibit  strand bias. Nature. Jin H. 2000 Oct.81(6):2584‐91. 2006 Mar.  Kennedy S. Zhu JK. Ostendorp T. a conserved protein domain that specifically recognizes  scaffold attachment region DNA. Epub 2007 Jul 24.  Kalantidis K. 2003 Oct 17. Göhring F.

 2010 Feb 9.583(8):1261‐6. Lee S. BMC Plant  Biol. Han J.  Law JA. Kim J. 2010 Sep. MicroRNA genes are  transcribed by RNA polymerase II.  Kupsco JM. Kim VN.23(20):4051‐60. López‐Moya JJ. Feinbaum RL. 2006 Jun  21. Takeda A. Functional analysis of plant ERI1: ERL1 (ERI1‐LIKE1). Liu YP. Light inten‐ sity affects RNA silencing of a transgene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Csorba T. 2009. Takashi Y.  Calvino LF. RNA. 1993 Dec 3. EMBO J. Ambros V.23(4):876‐84. Establishing. G.  Kumakura N.11(9):597‐610. Nat Rev Genet. Han J. Tsagris M. Jacobsen SE. maintaining and modifying DNA methylation  patterns in plants and animals.75(5):843‐54.21(17):4663‐70. EMBO J. Kim VN. Takano R.  Lakatos L. Lee JT.12(12):2103‐17. Pantaleo V. Vrettos N. New York: Plenum Press. The widespread regulation of microRNA biogene‐ sis. Loedige I. Cell. 2006 Feb. Motose H. Provost P. Dolja VV. Kotsis D. Kim M. 2004b Oct 13. function and decay. L. Watanabe Y. The interaction between DCL1 and HYL1 is  important for efficient and precise processing of pri‐miRNA in plant microRNA bio‐ genesis. elegans heterochronic gene lin‐4 encodes  small RNAs with antisense complementarity to lin‐14. Fujioka Y. Marzluff WF. Baek SH. Epub 2004 Feb 19. Watanabe Y.S. Kalantidis K. 2003  Sep 25. Lee J. University of  Crete.  Lee RC. Burgyán J. Yeom KH. Kim S. Szittya G. The nuclear RNase III Drosha initiates microRNA processing. 2004 Feb  25. Genetic and biochemical  characterization of Drosophila Snipper: A promiscuous member of the metazoan  3ʹhExo/ERI‐1 family of 3ʹ to 5ʹ exonucleases. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to  suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors. Epub 2006 May 25.P. 183–198  Kotakis C.  Kim VN. RNA. Ahn C.  Lee Y.5. eds).25(12):2768‐80. Wu MJ.  155   .. Filipowicz W. Molecular mechanism of RNA silencing  suppression mediated by p19 protein of tombusviruses.425(6956):415‐9. and  Hall.. The C.  Krol J. 2010 Oct 12. T. 1985 pp.  Lee Y. Chapman EJ.12(2):206‐12. Epub 2004  Sep 16. SGS3 and  RDR6 interact and colocalize in cytoplasmic SGS3/RDR6‐bodies. Epub 2010 Jul 27. Epub  2006 Oct 24. Nat Rev Genet. Jeon K. EMBO J. Thapar R. Rådmark O. Burgyán J. EMBO J. 2009 Apr  17. Nature.  Lee Y. Kim S.10:220. Silhavy D. 2002 Sep 2.C. References  Form and Function of the Plant Genome (van Vloten‐Doting. Duronio RJ. Groot. Kotzabasis K.11(3):204‐220. Carrington JC. FEBS Lett. Epub 2009 Mar 28. Choi H.  Kurihara Y. Yim J.  Lagiotis GD.  Lakatos L. 2006 Dec. MicroRNA maturation: stepwise processing  and subcellular localization.

 Cauliflower mosaic  virus protein P6 is a suppressor of RNA silencing. 2005 Aug 23.  Lister R.88(Pt  12):3439‐44. Bellaoui M. Science.  Luo Z.305(5689):1437‐41. Hammond SM. Epub 2007 Mar 23. Le Ret M. J Gen Virol. Gregory BD.  Li J. Szurek B. Nakahara K. Carthew RW. Carmell MA. Sontheimer EJ. Unique germ‐line organelle.  Liu J. Simon B.  Lurin C.117(1):69‐81. Chen Z. Tonti‐Filippini J. 2007 Apr  17. Gualberto J. Marsden CG. Distinct  roles for Drosophila Dicer‐1 and Dicer‐2 in the siRNA/miRNA silencing pathways. 1997  Jun. Structure and nucleic‐acid binding of the  Drosophila Argonaute 2 PAZ domain. Dawson WO.  Lu R. Pham JW. Song JJ. 2008 May 2. Chen X. Martin‐Magniette ML. Falk BW. Millar AH.5. Liu J. Kalidas S. Hamilton AJ. Development. R2D2. 2007  Mar.104(16):6714‐9.15(16):1501‐7. Yu B. 2004 Nov 2. Hoffmann B.  Joshua‐Tor L. Du F. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Aubourg S. Peeters N. Sadanandom A. Milner JJ. Kim K. Holt J. Li WX. Berry CC. De‐ bast C. Laird J.  Leuschner PJ. Shintaku M. Lecharny A. Smith DP.  Science. Cleavage of the siRNA passenger  strand during RISC assembly in human cells. Small I.7(3):314‐20. Wang X.  Lingel A. 2006 Mar. Epub 2007 Apr 11. Bitton F.  2003 Sep 26. Epub 2004 Jul 29.101(44):15742‐7. Izaurralde E. Plant Cell. Sattler M.  Cell. 2007 Dec.133(3):523‐36. Improperly terminated. 2004a Apr 2. References  Lee YS. Renou JP. Kueng S. Martinez J. Proc  Natl Acad Sci U S A. EMBO Rep. Ding SW. Rand TA. 2004 Sep 3. Thomson JM. unpolyadenylated mRNA of sense trans‐ genes is targeted by RDR6‐mediated RNA silencing in Arabidopsis. functions to repress selfish ge‐ netic elements in Drosophila melanogaster. Yang Z. Ameres SL. a bridge be‐ tween the initiation and effector steps of the Drosophila RNAi pathway. OʹMalley RC. Kai T. Methylation protects miRNAs and siRNAs from a  3ʹ‐end uridylation activity in Arabidopsis. Nature. Curr Biol.  Cell. Genome‐wide  156   .124(12):2463‐76. Kim HE. Three  distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by a 20‐kb viral RNA genome. Epub  2003 Nov 16.19(3):943‐58. Epub  2006 Jan 20. Argonaute2 is the catalytic engine of mammalian RNAi.301(5641):1921‐5.  Love AJ.  Lin H. A novel group of pumilio mutations affects the asymmetric  division of germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovary. Highly integrated single‐base resolution maps of the epigenome in Arabidopsis. Taconnat L. 2003 Nov 27.  Lim AK. Folimonov A. Epub 2004 Oct 25.426(6965):465‐9. Rivas FV. Spradling AC. He Z. Hannon GJ. Bruyère C. nuage. Ecker  JR.  Liu Q. Andrés C.  Mireau H. Caboche M.

 Bouché N. Insertional mutagenesis of genes required for seed development in Arabidopsis  thaliana. Science. Cell.136(4):656‐68. Vaucheret H.21(3):367‐76. Bartel DP.311(5758):195‐8. Epub 2009 Feb  23. Gasciolli V. Passenger‐strand cleavage  facilitates assembly of siRNA into Ago2‐containing RNAi enzyme complexes. 2009b May 1. Ashby C. Li F. Repic A. Hinze A. Plant J.21(5):590‐600.5. Lister C.35(1):82‐92. Laux T. Curr Opin Cell Biol. Robertson EJ. Leech RM. Cushman MA.  Matzke M. Nickle T. Matzke AJ.126(3):469‐81. Epub 2009 Sep 18.137(3):522‐35.  McElver J. Smith K. Dus M. Aida M. Rutherford SM. Thomas C. 2001 Dec.16(8):2089‐103. Brennecke J. Zhou K. Masson P. Mlotshwa S. Plant Cell.  2005 Nov 18.  Genes Dev. Zamore PD.  Matranga C. 2004 Aug.  Structural basis for double‐stranded RNA processing by Dicer. Vance VB. 1999  Feb. Sachidanandam R.159(4):1751‐63. McCombie WR. Dean C. Rogers R. Sedbrook J.  157   . Adams PD.  Hannon GJ. Shin C. The  PINHEAD/ZWILLE gene acts pleiotropically in Arabidopsis development and has  overlapping functions with the ARGONAUTE1 gene. 2003 Jul.  Malone CD. Patton  D. Huettel B. Stark A. Tasaka M. Law M. Cell. Tzafrir I. RNA‐mediated chromatin‐ based silencing in plants. 2007 Mar 1. Aux G. QIP. Kanno T. Epub 2007 Feb 20. PLoS Genet. 2009 Sep. Specialized piRNA pathways act in germline and somatic tissues of the  Drosophila ovary.  Zhou Q. Lee HC.  Macrae IJ.  Malone CD. Epub 2004 Jul 21. Barton MK.  Lynn K.18(6):651‐62. Elmayan T. Doudna JA. Bowman LH. Levin JZ.  Maiti M. Genetics. Plant J. Cande WZ. Jauvion V. Development. Laur‐ essergues D. Brooks AN. Epub 2005 Nov 3.5(9):e1000646.  Mallory AC. Redundant and specific roles of the  ARGONAUTE proteins AGO1 and ZLL in development and small RNA‐directed  gene silencing.123(4):607‐20. Small RNAs as guardians of the genome. The dis‐ tinctive roles of five different ARC genes in the chloroplast division process in Arabi‐ dopsis. Meinke D. Fernandez A. References  analysis of Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat proteins reveals their essential role in  organelle biogenesis. Daxinger L. The capacity of transgenic to‐ bacco to send a systemic RNA silencing signal depends on the nature of the inducing  transgene locus. interacts with the Neurospora  Argonaute protein and facilitates conversion of duplex siRNA into single strands. 2009 Jun. 2009a Feb  20. 2006 Jan  13.  Marrison JL. Cell. Tomari Y. Tossberg J.  Mallory AC. a putative exonuclease. Liu Y. Epub 2009 Apr 23. Tucker MR. Hannon GJ. Schetter A. 1999 Jun.

 Hodges E. Molnár A. Parizotto EA. Dorsett Y. Epub 2007 Jun 25. Epub 2008 Mar 13. Carrington JC. Landthaler M. Burgyán  J. Kertész S. Zhou H. Plant Cell. Slicer function of Droso‐ phila Argonautes and its involvement in RISC formation. Fahlgren N.5. 2002  Sep. Baev V.13(8):1268‐78.  Mette MF. Mol Cell. Siomi H. Epub 2009 May 18. Plant Physiol. RNA.133(1):128‐41.80(12):5747‐56. Cai T.133(1):116‐27. 2006 Sep.  Montgomery TA.19(23):2837‐48.  Mlotshwa S. Silhavy D. Chen S. 2002. Sorting of small RNAs into Arabidopsis argonaute complexes is  directed by the 5ʹ terminal nucleotide.  J Virol. J Virol. Havelda Z.  Vance VB. Kerényi Z. Rusinov V. Short RNAs can identify new  candidate transposable element families in Arabidopsis. Nagami T. Li S. Jensen ST. Specificity of ARGONAUTE7‐miR390  interaction and dual functionality in TAS3 trans‐acting siRNA formation.130(1):6‐9.15(7):1282‐91. Barta E. Aureusvirus P14 is an efficient RNA silencing suppressor that binds  double‐stranded RNAs without size specificity. Válóczi A. Li D. RNA silencing and the mobile silencing signal. Hatzigeorgiou AG. van der Winden J. Matzke M. Epub 2005 Nov 14. Epub 2008 Mar  13.  Moissiard G. Double‐stranded  RNA binding may be a general plant RNA viral strategy to suppress RNA silencing. RNA. 2007  Aug. Chap‐ man EJ. Lakatos L. Voinnet O. RNA. Cell. 2008a  Apr 4.  Epub 2006 Aug 3. Kalantidis K. Long C. Chen Y. Ding SW.  Moazed D. Kerényi Z. Siomi H.  2009 Jul. Ni F.  Meister G. Wu L. 2006 Jun. Teng G. Characterization of the miRNA‐RISC  loading complex and miRNA‐RISC formed in the Drosophila miRNA pathway. Qi Y.  and is compromised by viral‐encoded suppressor proteins. requires the redundant action of the antiviral Dicer‐like 4 and Dicer‐like 2. 2005 Dec  1. Himber C.15(2):185‐97. Mi‐ croRNA promoter element discovery in Arabidopsis. Genes Dev.79(11):7217‐26. Hansen JE. Allen E. References  Megraw M. Matzke AJ. Magna M. Human  Argonaute2 mediates RNA cleavage targeted by miRNAs and siRNAs. Bisztray G. Small RNAs in transcriptional gene silencing and genome defense.  158   . Vaucheret H. Pruss G.  Mi S. Mette MF.  Hannon GJ.  Mérai Z. Hu Y.  2004 Jul 23. Voinnet O. Siomi MC.  Miyoshi K.14  Suppl:S289‐301. 2009 Jan 22.  Miyoshi K. Okada TN. Transitivity in Arabidopsis can be  primed. Matzke M. Alexander AL. Cuperus JT. Tsukumo H. Silhavy D. Cell. 2005 Jun. Na‐ ture.  Mérai Z. 2008 Apr 4. Tuschl T. Howell MD.12(9):1612‐9.457(7228):413‐20. Patkaniowska A. Siomi MC.

  Ørom UA. Lund AH.14(4):349‐50. Function. 2008b Dec  23. 2007  Apr.5. Introduction of a Chimeric Chalcone Synthase  Gene into Petunia Results in Reversible Co‐Suppression of Homologous Genes in  trans. Feuerbach F. Gilbert SD. Schwach F.  Epub 2007 Jan 23.29(19):3301‐17.  Nishimura K. Nielsen FC.  Okamura K. Epub 2008 Feb 19. Hiraguri A. Yokota A. Miyauchi K. Jorgensen R. Nat Struct Mol Biol. Alex‐ ander A. 2000 May 26. Ciomperlik JJ. Nguyen G. Sanial M. Béclin C. Vo TA. Lemieux C. Sachidanandam R.23(3):371‐90.  Mosher RA. Cell. 2008 May 23. 2007 Jul 13. Ahn JH. Epub  2007 Jun 28. Sullivan CM. Nikic S. Epub 2007 Jan 14. Howell MD.  Mourrain P.2(4):279‐289. Epub 2010 Sep 3. Plant Cell. The mirtron pathway generates  microRNA‐class regulatory RNAs in Drosophila.63(5):766‐77. References  Montgomery TA. Elmayan T.30(4):460‐71. Epub 2008 Dec 9. Cell. Ashida H. Plant J. Arabi‐ dopsis SGS2 and SGS3 genes are required for posttranscriptional gene silencing and  natural virus resistance. Studholme D. Tyler DM. Picault N. Duan H. MicroRNA‐10a binds the 5ʹUTR of ribosomal pro‐ tein mRNAs and enhances their translation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. The 3ʹ termini of  mouse Piwi‐interacting RNAs are 2ʹ‐O‐methylated. Fukuhara T.  Nicholson AW. 2010 Oct 6. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Godon C. The dsRNA‐binding protein  DRB4 interacts with the Dicer‐like protein DCL4 in vivo and functions in the trans‐ acting siRNA pathway. Ogawa T. RNAi‐associated ssRNA‐specific ribonu‐ cleases in Tombusvirus P19 mutant‐infected plants and evidence for a discrete siRNA‐ containing effector complex. Hagen JW. 2010  Sep.105(8):3145‐50. Suzuki T. Sakaguchi Y. Scholthof HB.  Omarov RT. Yoo SJ. Plant Mol Biol.105(51):20055‐62.  159   . 2007 Jan 30.130(1):89‐100. Fahlgren N. Vaucheret H. Proc Natl  Acad Sci U S A. EMBO J. 2008 Feb 26. Ueda H. 1999 Jun. Suzuki T. Lai EC. Morel JB.63(6):777‐85. Moriyama H. Mechtler K. Allen E.101(5):533‐42. Mol Cell. AGO1‐miR173 complex initi‐ ates phased siRNA formation in plants. Carrington JC. 1990 Apr.  FEMS Microbiol Rev. mechanism and regulation of bacterial ribonucleases.104(5):1714‐9. 2007 Apr. Jouette D. Brennecke J.  Nakazawa Y.  Napoli C. Sykora MM. A DEAD box protein is required for  formation of a hidden break in Arabidopsis chloroplast 23S rRNA. Epub 2007 Mar 25. La‐ combe AM. An in vivo  RNAi assay identifies major genetic and cellular requirements for primary piRNA  biogenesis in Drosophila. PolIVb influences RNA‐ directed DNA methylation independently of its role in siRNA biogenesis.  Ohara T. Rémoué K.  Olivieri D. Baulcombe DC.

 SINE RNA induces severe developmental defects in Arabidopsis  thaliana and interacts with HYL1 (DRB1).13(7):390‐7. 2008 Jul. Molecular bases of viral RNA targeting by viral  small interfering RNA‐programmed RISC. Schüpbach T. Hadler MJ. Wierzbicki AT. Burgyán J. Dev Cell.  Pantaleo V. 2007 May 25. Poethig RS. Wu G. Genschik P. Pélissier T. Epub 2006 Jan 30. Brault V. 2002 Mar. Casadio R.  2002 Jul.12(6):851‐62. Fariselli P. Kretsch T. 2006 Feb 7. Messing J. van der Winden J. References  Pane A. Proc Natl Acad  Sci U S A. 2004 Oct 1.  Pouch‐Pélissier MN. Schauer SE. Mette MF.22(14):e408‐16. Curr  Biol.  Pierleoni A. Heim F.  Pikaard CS. Trends Plant Sci. act in microRNA metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Marrocco K. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Richards KE.81(8):3797‐806.12(17):1484‐95. Morris TJ. J Virol. 2008 Jun 13. F‐box‐like domain in the  polerovirus protein P0 is required for silencing suppressor function. Albrecht HL. Song R. Li J.18(19):2368‐79. Ziegler‐Graff V. Lechner E.  Peragine A. Yoshikawa M. Haag JR. Wu G.  Qu F. Genes Dev.  Park W. SGS3 and  SGS2/SDE1/RDR6 are required for juvenile development and the production of trans‐ acting siRNAs in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol. Elmayan T. 2007  Jun. Efficient infection of Nicotiana benthamiana by Tomato bushy stunt  virus is facilitated by the coat protein and maintained by p19 through suppression of  gene silencing. P0 of beet  Western yellows virus is a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing. Gonzalez‐Sulser A. a Dicer homolog. Berry B.  Pazhouhandeh M. Ray A. a key member of the DCL1 complex. Vaucheret H. 2003 Jul.103(6):1994‐9. zucchini and squash encode two putative nucleases  required for rasiRNA production in the Drosophila germline. J Virol. 2002 Sep 3. Wehr K. Mol Cell. Mol Plant Microbe Interact. DeBeauchamp JL. 2007 Apr.  Papp I. Evidence for nuclear processing of plant micro RNA and  short interfering RNA precursors.  Partridge JF. PLoS  Genet. Ulrich DL.4(6):e1000096.  Park MY. Nuclear processing  and export of microRNAs in Arabidopsis. 2006 Jul 15. Szittya G. Hemmer  O. Richards KE. Matzke AJ. a novel protein. Chen X. Vaucheret H. Poethig RS. Kosinski AM. Jantsch MF. Aufsatz W.  Matzke M. CARPEL FACTORY. Ream T.132(3):1382‐90.  160   . Epub  2007 Jan 31.76(13):6815‐24. Epub 2005 Feb 28. Dunoyer P. Boko D.102(10):3691‐6. Ziegler‐Graff V. Roles of RNA polymerase IV in gene  silencing. and  HEN1. Functional separation of the requirements for establishment and maintenance of  centromeric heterochromatin. Bioinformatics. Noffsinger  VJ. Dieterle M.5. BaCelLo: a balanced subcellular lo‐ calization predictor.  Pfeffer S. Martelli PL.26(4):593‐602. Jonard G.15(3):193‐202. Daxinger L. 2005 Mar  8.  Deragon JM.

 2002 Aug 23. Bendich AJ.  Ream TS.  2005 Dec.84(23):8439‐43. Bartel DP. Cell. Plant Mol Biol. Epub 2008 Dec 24.6(9):1253‐64. Plant Cell. Basson M. J Virol. Vaucheret H. De Stradis A. 2006 Dec 15. Hor‐ vitz HR. Cell. RDR6 has a broad‐spectrum  but temperature‐dependent antiviral defense role in Nicotiana benthamiana. Webster RE. Slack FJ. Bartley GE. Strand M. Dimaio J. Player C. Clemente TE. 1968 Jan 10. Nusbaum C. Plant Cell. 5: 69‐76  Rothstein SJ. J Biol Chem.403(6772):901‐6. her‐ barium and mummified plan tissues. Control of leaf and  chloroplast development by the Arabidopsis gene pale cress.  Rhoades MW. Gómez MD. Izaurralde E.  Ruby JG. Di Serio F. Extraction of DNA from milligram amounts of fresh. Mol Cell. Bartel DP. Bettinger JC. Purification and properties of ribonuclease  III from Escherichia coli. elegans. A crucial role for GW182  and the DCP1:DCP2 decapping complex in miRNA‐mediated gene silencing.20(24):3407‐25. Epub 2005 Sep 21. Degradation of microRNAs by a family of exoribonucle‐ ases in Arabidopsis.  Reiter RS.  161   . Pasa‐Tolić L. Large‐ scale sequencing reveals 21U‐RNAs and additional microRNAs and endogenous  siRNAs in C. Chen X. Nature. Ye X. Sato S. Scolnik PA.79(24):15209‐17. A diverse and evolutionarily fluid  set of microRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Weinstein EG. Jan C. Rice D.33(2):192‐203. Subunit compositions of the RNA‐silencing  enzymes Pol IV and Pol V reveal their origins as specialized forms of RNA poly‐ merase II. Behm‐Ansmant I. Science. 1985. Coomber SA. Lee W. 1994  Sep.19(11):3610‐26. Prediction of  plant microRNA targets. Hagen G. 2008 Sep 12. Nicora CD. Hou G. Rougvie AE. Reinhart BJ. 2002 Jul 1. Bartel DP. Flores R. Gatfield D. The 21‐nucleotide let‐7 RNA regulates developmental timing in  Caenorhabditis elegans.127(6):1193‐207.16(13):1616‐26. Rhoades MW.  Rajagopalan R. Epub 2007 Nov 30.  Guilfoyle TJ. Bartel DP. MicroRNAs in  plants.  Rodio ME. Trejo J.243(1):82‐91. Ge H. 2000 Feb 24. Genes Dev. 1987 Dec. Zinder ND. Morris TJ. Norbeck AD. References  Qu F.  2007 Nov. Burge CB. Genes Dev. Lim LP.110(4):513‐20.  Rehwinkel J.  Reinhart BJ. Stable and heritable inhibition of the ex‐ pression of nopaline synthase in tobacco expressing antisense RNA. Proc Natl Acad  Sci U S A. Bourett TM. Bartel B. A viroid  RNA with a specific structural motif inhibits chloroplast development. Pikaard CS. 2009 Jan 30.5.  Reinhart BJ.  Ramachandran V. RNA.11(11):1640‐7.  Robertson HD. Axtell MJ.  Rogers SO. Bartel B. Pasquinelli AE. Delgado S.  2005 Nov.321(5895):1490‐2. Zhu JK. 2006 Dec 15. Wierzbicki AT. Haag JR. Ruvkun G.

  Sambrook J. Miyoshi K. Mutations blocking oogenesis or altering egg morphology. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins and their  emerging roles in plants. Small I.5. Female sterile mutations on the second chromosome of  Drosophila melanogaster. Nature. Russel DW. Srinivasan R. Genes Dev.  Saito K. Plant Mol Biol. Nishida KM.45(8):521‐34.  Ruiz MT. AtRLI2 is an endoge‐ nous suppressor of RNA silencing. Voinnet O.  Schein AI. 2001.448(7149):83‐6. Molecular Cloning – A Laboratory Manual. Siomi  MC. Plant Physiol Biochem. Meins F Jr.129(4):1119‐36. Leaf‐variegated mutations and their responsible genes in Arabidopsis  thaliana. Kazantseva J. Intronic microRNA precursors that bypass Drosha  processing.20(16):2214‐22. Epub 2007 Jun 24. New York:  Cold Spring Harbo Laboratory Press. Genes Genet Syst. Ungar LH. Buschmann M. Kawamura Y. 1998 Jun. Nucleic Acids Res. 2001 Aug 15.  Satyanarayana T. Epub  2005 May 24. 2008 Dec. Nigul L.10(6):937‐46. Baulcombe DC.  Genetics. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins: a socket set for  organelle gene expression. Albiach‐Martí MR.3(7):e235.  Schöb H. 2005 Jul. References  Ruby JG. Siomi H. 2009. Epub 2008 Nov  12. Chloroplast transit peptide prediction: a peek  inside the black box. PLoS Biol.76(2):473‐83.  162   . Mori T. Prasad AM. Kissinger JC.  Saito K.  Schumacher HT.13(12):663‐70. Wieschaus E. Dawson  WO.256(5):581‐5. Ishizuka A. Jan CH. Mol Gen Genet. 2002 Jan.  Sarmiento C. J Virol.  Sakamoto W. Epub 2007  Mar 24. Processing of pre‐microRNAs by the  Dicer‐1‐Loquacious complex in Drosophila cells. Initiation and maintenance of virus‐induced  gene silencing. Ayllón MA. Kassel University.78(1):1‐9. Bartel DP.  Schmitz‐Linneweber C. Truve E. 1991 Dec. Siomi MC. Silencing of transgenes introduced into leaves by  agroinfiltration: a simple. rapid method for investigating sequence requirements for  gene silencing. Involvements of the Plant 3’‐5’ Exonuclease ERL1 in Chloroplast  Ribosomal RNA Biogenesis and RNA Silencing Pathways.61(1‐2):153‐63. Trends Plant Sci. 2006 Aug  15. Gowda S. 2007 Aug. Kunz C. II. Specific association of Piwi with rasiRNAs derived from retrotransposon and  heterochromatic regions in the Drosophila genome.29(16):E82.  Saha D. Plant Cell. Siomi H.  Schüpbach T. The p23 protein of citrus tristeza virus controls asymmetrical RNA accumula‐ tion. 2007 Jul 5. Epub 2006 Aug 1. 1997 Nov. 2003 Feb. 2006 May. Nagami T. Rabindran S.

81(23):13135‐48. Legeai F.  163   . a plant viral suppressor of  gene silencing.42(3):264‐73. Baulcombe DC.107(4):465‐76.  Smith LM. Lucioli A.  elegans hypersensitive to RNAi. 21‐ to 25‐ nucleotide double‐stranded RNAs. Pontes O. Thijssen KL.  Sharwood RE. Loss of the putative RNA‐directed RNA polymerase RRF‐3 makes C. Bollenbach TJ. Plasterk RH. The conserved FRNK box in HC‐Pro. Ruiz‐Ferrer V. RNA. 2002 Aug 6. EMBO J.4(6):e5980. 2002 Jun 17. 2005  Aug. Xu Z.  Epub 2010 Dec 9.12(15):1317‐9. Searle I. An SNF2 protein associated with nuclear RNA silencing and the spread  of a silencing signal between cells in Arabidopsis. Hashimoto T. PLoS One. Trends Biochem Sci. Leibman D. Koushika SP. Gal‐On A. Hutvágner G.21(12):3070‐80. Stern DB. Vaistij FE. Du T. Wassenegger M. Plant Cell. Cell. Timmons L. Arazi T. 2007 May. Molnár A. 2009 Jun 19.25(2):46‐7. The PPR motif ‐ a TPR‐related motif prevalent in plant organel‐ lar proteins. Plant Cell Physiol.  Small I. On the role of RNA amplification in dsRNA‐triggered gene silencing.  Shikanai T. Baul‐ combe DC. Parrish S.  Schwach F. Simmer F. Plant Physiol.17(2):230‐43. Herr AJ.19(5):1507‐21. 2001  Nov 16. is  indispensable for chloroplast development in tobacco. References  Schwab R.  Sijen T. 2004 Jun.5. Szittya G.138(4):1842‐52.  Schwarz DS.  Simmer F.  Gaba V. An RNA‐dependent RNA poly‐ merase prevents meristem invasion by potato virus X and is required for the activity  but not the production of a systemic silencing signal. Proteomics. Ueda K. Predotar: A tool for rapidly screening pro‐ teomes for N‐terminal targeting sequences. The  chloroplast clpP gene. Yelina N.4(6):1581‐90. Nonet ML. Bayer M. Jones L.  Epub 2007 May 25. Pikaard CS. Burgyán J. A  viral protein suppresses RNA silencing and binds silencing‐generated. Fire  A. Fleenor J. Maizel A. 2000 Feb.  Silhavy D. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non‐cell autonomous effects on gene  regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Yousafzai FK.  Shiboleth YM. Overaccumulation of the  chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA  in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro.  Plasterk RH. Nishimura Y. Curr Biol. Mar‐ tienssen RA. 2003 Oct 17. Garcia D. Asymmetry in the  assembly of the RNAi enzyme complex. Ahringer J. Peeters N. Shimizu K. Tavazza M. 2011 Feb. Zamore PD. 2007 Dec.115(2):199‐208. Cell. Fire A. Voinnet O. Epub 2005 Jul 22. Peeters N. Tijsterman M. Aronin N.  Small ID. Hornyik C. Crespi M. encoding a proteolytic subunit of ATP‐dependent protease. J Virol. is required for small RNA binding and mediates symptom develop‐ ment. Whitham SA. Kuroiwa T. 2001  Mar. Hotto AM. Haronsky E. Lurin C. Epub 2007 Sep 26. Parrish S.

 Bucher G. Lakatos L. Oakeley EJ. Crystal structure of Argonaute and its  implications for RISC slicer activity. Endogenous inhibitors of RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans. Nat Chem Biol. Thierry‐Mieg J. Cline K.119(2):575‐84. Miller SC. 1999 Feb. Joshua‐Tor L. Suppression of RNA silencing by a geminivirus nuclear  protein. 2005  Feb. AceView: a comprehensive cDNA‐supported gene  and transcripts annotation. EMBO J. Genome Biol. Chloroplast RNA metabolism.5. Mol Cell. Pooggin MM. Hohn T. AC2. Akbergenov R. Veluthambi  K. A conserved motif in Argonaute‐interacting proteins  mediates functional interactions through the Argonaute PIWI domain.  Tomoyasu Y.  Szittya G. Lejeune E.9(1):R10. 2004 Jul. J Virol. Bánfalvi Z. Bur‐ gyán J. Joshua‐Tor L. 2007 Oct.  Annu Rev Plant Biol.26(7):715‐8.7 Suppl 1:S12. AtXRN4 degrades mRNA in Arabidopsis and  its substrates include selected miRNA targets.15(2):173‐83. Schoppmeier M. Goldschmidt‐Clermont M.  Stern DB. Rajeswaran R. Ladurner AG.  Tabler M. Watanabe T. Nat Struct  Mol Biol. 2010 Jun 2.  Timmons L. Genome Biol. Slicer and the argonautes. Grossmann D.  Till S. Bortfeld M.79(4):2517‐27.305(5689):1434‐7. Thermann R.1‐14. 2004 Sep 3. correlates with transactivation of host genes.14(10):897‐903. Hannon GJ. Molnár A.61:125‐55. Plant  Physiol. EMBO J. Tomita S. Epub 2004  Jul 29. Epub 2006 Aug 7. Lovas A.  Souret FF. 2008 Jan 17.  164   . Watanabe Y.  Takeda A. Green PJ. Hanson MR. Sänger HL. Havelda Z.3(13):3055‐62. Iwasaki S. Kastenmayer JP. Hothorn M. Ex‐ ploring systemic RNA interference in insects: a genome‐wide survey for RNAi genes  in Tribolium. References  Song JJ.  Hentze MW. Red bell pepper chromoplasts exhibit in vitro import compe‐ tency and membrane targeting of passenger proteins from the thylakoidal sec and  DeltapH pathways but not the chloroplast signal recognition particle pathway. Plant Cell Physiol. The mechanism select‐ ing the guide strand from small RNA duplexes is different among argonaute pro‐ teins. Epub 2008 Mar 14. Cloned single‐ and double‐stranded DNA copies of potato  spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) RNA and co‐inoculated subgenomic DNA fragments are  infectious.  Summer EJ. 2006. Science. Silhavy D. 2007 Jan. Low temperature inhibits RNA silencing‐mediated defense by the control of  siRNA generation. Smith SK.  Thierry‐Mieg D. 2004 Jul 23.  Bioessays. Shivaprasad PV.  Trinks D. 2008 Apr. Epub 2007 Sep 23.  Tolia NH. 1984 Dec 20. Heinrich C.3(1):36‐ 43.22(3):633‐40. Utsumi M. Enderle D.49(4):493‐500. 2003 Feb 3.

 2007 Dec 21. Epub 2008  May 26. In vitro study of AtERI‐LIKE1: purification and trying to discover its  natural substrate. Izaurralde E. Epub 2008 Oct 8.  165   . Mur LA. Li C. Hall TM.  Vaucheret H. 2006 Jul  21. Gasciolli V. 1999 Oct  15.  Tritschler F.  Vlatakis IX. Kalantidis K. 2006  Apr 7.36(20):6429‐ 38. Plant J. Phloem flow strongly influences the systemic  spread of silencing in GFP Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Zamore PD.  Vazquez F. Meins F Jr. Vaucheret H.  Vagin VV. Lepers C. Cell. University  of Crete.13(7):350‐8. Epub 2007  Nov 29.5. Tabler M. Ailhas J. Szittya G. 2004 May 15. 2003 Dec 26. J Biol Chem.  Vasudevan S. Beld M.22(1):129‐36. AGO1 homeostasis entails coexpression of  MIR168 and AGO1 and preferential stabilization of miR168 by AGO1.  Vamvaka.2(4):291‐9. Bartel DP. Mallory AC.318(5858):1931‐4.  Vazquez F. Epub 2004 May 6.  Vaucheret H. E. Exonuclease X of Escherichia coli.274(42):30094‐100. Switching from repression to activation: microR‐ NAs can up‐regulate translation. Endogenous trans‐acting siRNAs regulate the accumula‐ tion of Arabidopsis mRNAs. Role of GW182 proteins and PABPC1 in the  miRNA pathway: a sense of déjà vu. Tong Y. 2008 Nov. Blevins T. Genes Dev.  Viswanathan M. Hil‐ bert JL. In vivo functional analysis of the plant 3ʹ exonuclease ERL1.  van der Krol AR. Plant Cell. 1990 Apr. Flavonoid genes in petunia:  addition of a limited number of gene copies may lead to a suppression of gene ex‐ pression. Crété P. Science. 2010. Size selective recognition of siRNA by  an RNA silencing suppressor.18(10):1187‐97. Epub 2006 Jun 12. Boller T. Steitz JA. A distinct small RNA  pathway silences selfish genetic elements in the germline. Epub 2006 Jun 29. Bartel DP. Stuitje AR. The action of ARGONAUTE1 in the  miRNA pathway and its regulation by the miRNA pathway are crucial for plant de‐ velopment.11(5):379‐84. Vazquez F. 2006 Aug. Mol Cell.47(3):383‐ 94. Seitz H. 2004 Oct 8. 2010. Burgyán J. 2010 May. Trends Plant Sci.  Epub 2010 Apr 9. Nucleic Acids Res. Mol JN.  Vaucheret H. A novel 3ʹ‐5ʹ DNase  and Dnaq superfamily member involved in DNA repair. Science.313(5785):320‐4. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. Crété P. Evolution of Arabidopsis MIR  genes generates novel microRNA classes. Gvozdev V. Sigova A. Lovett ST. Mol Cell. References  Tournier B. Huntzinger E. Rajagopalan R. Plant ARGONAUTES. Bartel DP. 2008 Jul.  Vargason JM. Mallory AC. University of Crete.115(7):799‐811.16(1):69‐79.

 Purnelle B. Biogenesis and origin of thylakoid membranes. S. 2008 Nov 14. 37.96(24):14147‐52. Pinto YM. Origin.  Williams MA. and ARF4 genes. A viral movement protein prevents spread of  the gene silencing signal in Nicotiana benthamiana. 2005 Jul 5. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Nucleic Acids Res. References  Vogler H. 2007  Oct. Vain P.136(4):669‐87. Krczal G. Fletcher JC. Duby G. 127−153 (1928). Pikaard CS.  Wierzbicki AT. Baulcombe DC.  Wang Y. Bio‐ chim Biophys Acta.11(3):142‐51. Westhoff P. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Oct  9.  Voinnet O. Baulcombe DC. 2000 Nov. Lederer C.  Res. C. a virus disease of plants. Haag JR. Plant Cell. Nomenclature and functions of RNA‐directed RNA po‐ lymerases.5.  Voinnet O.18(12):861‐7. elegans Piwi. Epub 2006 Feb 13.103(1):157‐67. Zhany‐ bekova S. Akbergenov R. 2000 Sep 29. Modification of small RNAs associated with sup‐ pression of RNA silencing by tobamovirus replicase protein. Agric.95(2):177‐87. Shivaprasad PV. biogenesis. Baulcombe DC. Trends Plant Sci.  Wassenegger M. and activity of plant microRNAs. Heinlein M. 2009 Feb  20.  Voinnet O. Hohn T. Boutry M. A. Mulligan RM. J Virol. Johzuka Y. Carles CC. Cell. Reinke VA.389(6651):553. Cell. Epub 2007 Jul 18. ARF3. 2000 Nov 15. Fasler M.  Wingard. Kwon MO. Cell.  166   . regulates 21U‐RNAs during spermato‐ genesis. Noncoding transcription by RNA polymerase  Pol IVb/Pol V mediates transcriptional silencing of overlapping and adjacent genes. 2008 Jun 24.135(4):635‐48.  Wang G. Hosts and symptoms of ring spot.  Cell.28(22):4444‐51. J. Baulcombe DC. Dang V. Systemic spread of sequence‐specific  transgene RNA degradation in plants is initiated by localized introduction of ectopic  promoterless DNA.  1999 Nov 23. Tobacco VDL gene encodes a plastid DEAD  box RNA helicase and is involved in chloroplast differentiation and plant morpho‐ genesis. A database analysis method identi‐ fies an endogenous trans‐acting short‐interfering RNA that targets the Arabidopsis  ARF2.  Williams L.  Vothknecht UC. Epub 2008 May 22.81(19):10379‐88.  Voinnet O. Angell S. Osmont KS. 2001 Dec 12. Curr Biol. 12(11): 2129‐42.1541(1‐2):91‐101.  Voinnet O. 2006 Mar.102(27):9703‐8. Suppression of gene silencing: a general  strategy used by diverse DNA and RNA viruses of plants. Systemic signalling in gene silencing.  Epub 2005 Jun 24. 1998 Oct 16. Nature. PRG‐1. Addition of non‐genomically encoded nu‐ cleotides to the 3ʹ‐terminus of maize mitochondrial mRNAs: truncated rps12 mRNAs  frequently terminate with CCA.

17(24):3011‐6. Qin Y. Cullen BR. Vinegar B. elegans Argonaute family reveals that dis‐ tinct Argonautes act sequentially during RNAi. 2006 Jan 30. Wilken A.88(Pt 1):316‐24. Chen CC. Allen E. Characterization of 3ʹhExo. Patel DJ.  Xie Z.  Yang XC. Kasschau KD. J Biol Chem. Wang H.127(4):747‐57.  Yaegashi H. Baliji S.  Xie Z. Epub 2007 Aug 22. 2003 Dec 18. Johansen LK. Lindbo JA. Genetic and functional diversification of small RNA  pathways in plants. Expression of  Arabidopsis MIRNA genes. Kasschau KD. DICER‐LIKE 4 functions in trans‐acting  small interfering RNA biogenesis and vegetative phase change in Arabidopsis thaliana.  Yigit E. 2006  Oct 13. Epub 2005 Aug 29. Epub 2003 Dec 3. Func‐ tional modulation of the geminivirus AL2 transcription factor and silencing suppres‐ sor by self‐interaction. Gustafson AM. Nahal H. J Virol.102(36):12984‐9. Wilson GV. Mitani S. J Gen Virol. Genes Dev.  Yang Z. Print 2006. Batista PJ. Isogai M. A systemic small RNA signaling system in plants. Apple chlorotic  leaf spot virus 50 kDa movement protein acts as a suppressor of systemic silencing  without interfering with local silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana. 2007 Nov. Exportin‐5 mediates the nuclear export of pre‐ microRNAs and short hairpin RNAs. Buchmann RC. Ammar R. Ebright YW. 2005a Aug. Negative feedback regulation of Dicer‐Like1 in  Arabidopsis by microRNA‐guided mRNA degradation. Archer‐Evans S.138(4):2145‐54. An ʺElectronic  Fluorescent Pictographʺ browser for exploring and analyzing large‐scale biological  data sets.  Yi R. Epub 2005 Jul 22. Joshua‐Tor L.  Ye K. Epub 2004 Feb 24. Plant Physiol. Chen X. Tolia NH.2(5):E104. 2004  Aug. Epub 2004 Jul 16. 2007 Aug 8.2(1):e718. Carrington JC.  Yoo BC. Calamar A. Carrington JC. Lellis AD. 2006 Nov 17. HEN1 recognizes 21‐24 nt small RNA duplexes  and deposits a methyl group onto the 2ʹ OH of the 3ʹ terminal nucleotide.16(8):1979‐2000. a 3ʹ ex‐ onuclease specifically interacting with the 3ʹ end of histone mRNA. Sunter G. Epub 2006 Aug 15. 2004 May. PLoS Biol. Kobori T. Curr Biol. References  Winter D. Macara IG. Purdy M.  Simard MJ.34(2):667‐75. Lucas WJ. Kragler F. Zilberman D. Nucleic  Acids Res.  Yang X.  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Malinina L. 2007  Jan. Ohki S. Yoshikawa N. Mello CC. Lough  TJ. 2003 Apr  29. Pang KM. Epub  2003 Dec 17. Nature. PLoS One. Dominski Z. Givan SA. Cell. 2003 Dec 15. Takahashi T. Yu B. Allen E. 2005b Sep 6. Analysis of the C.13(9):784‐9.  Jacobsen SE.  Xie Z. Recognition of small interfering RNA by a viral suppres‐ sor of RNA silencing. Bei Y. Carrington JC. Haywood V.281(41):30447‐54.426(6968):874‐8. Bisaro DM. Provart NJ. Fahlgren N.81(21):11972‐81.  167   . Lee YM. Marzluff WF.5. Carrington JC. Varkonyi‐Gasic E.  Xie Z. Plant Cell.

 RNAi: double‐stranded RNA directs the  ATP‐dependent cleavage of mRNA at 21 to 23 nucleotide intervals.  Epub 2008 May 14. Chen X. Role of Arabidopsis AGO6 in siRNA accumula‐ tion. Zheng B. Yates JR 3rd. Heimstädt S. 2000 Mar  31. miRNAs. Kapoor A. Epub 2009 Sep 21. Epub 2008 Jul 15. Chapman EJ. Chen X. EMBO J. Li W. Ramachandran V.  Zandueta‐Criado A.28(4):598‐613. Trudeau VL.  Yu B. 2006 Apr.  Zheng B. Cobb GP. Wang Z. 2004 Jan 26. Genes Dev.19(18):2164‐75.  FEBS Lett. 2006 May 29. Huntzinger E. Plant J. Transgenically expressed viral  RNA silencing suppressors interfere with microRNA methylation in Arabidopsis. Zhang F. 2009 Dec 15. Somatic piRNA biogenesis. Yu B.  168   . The silencing domain of GW182  interacts with PABPC1 to promote translational repression and degradation of mi‐ croRNA targets and is required for target release.23(24):2850‐60. Park MY. Liu X. Nature. Sharp PA. Chen X. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Walker JC.  Han M.  Zheng X. Print 2004. Epub 2008 Sep 24. The FHA domain proteins DAWDLE in Arabidopsis  and SNIP1 in humans act in small RNA biogenesis. Chen J. Epub 2005  Aug 30.46(2):243‐59. Yang Z. Carrington JC.  Zekri L. 2010 Oct 6. Pan X. Tuschl T.  Zhang B.580(13):3117‐20. Nucleic Acids Res.29(23):6220‐ 31. DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing.455(7217):1259‐62.  Zhang D. Ji L. Peragine A. Anderson TA. Kapoor A. and  mRNA targets by their interactions with GW182 proteins AIN‐1 and AIN‐2. Ding L. Genes Dev. Cannon CH.  Zheng X.7(14):2268‐70. Bi L. Surprising features of plastid ndhD transcripts: addition  of non‐encoded nucleotides and polysome association of mRNAs with an unedited  start codon. Bartel DP. References  Yoshikawa M. La‐ grange T.101(1):25‐33. Poethig RS. Li S.29(19):3219‐21. Agarwal M. Miki D. Izaurralde E. Pontes O. ROS3 is an RNA‐binding protein required for DNA demethylation in Arabi‐ dopsis. Systematic identification of C. Zhu J. Pikaard CS. Conservation and diver‐ gence of plant microRNA genes. Zhu J.  2007 Nov 30. elegans miRISC proteins.  Zamore PD. Chevalier D.  Zhu JK. EMBO J. Iida K. 2005 Sep 15. Cheung TH. Mol Cell Biol.105(29):10073‐8. Epub 2006 May 2. Cell.32(2):542‐50. The XS domain of a plant specific SGS3 protein adopts a  unique RNA recognition motif (RRM) fold.26(6):1691‐701.  Zhang L. Bock R. Zhu JK. 2009 Dec. 2008 Jul 15.  Zamore PD. 2008 Oct 30. Intergenic transcription by RNA po‐ lymerase II coordinates Pol IV and Pol V in siRNA‐directed transcriptional gene si‐ lencing in Arabidopsis. A pathway for the biogenesis of  trans‐acting siRNAs in Arabidopsis. Li WX. Cell Cycle. Epub 2007 Mar 1. 2008  Jul 22. Liu JY. Sewell AK.5. 2007 Mar  21. Dong MQ. Mol Cell.  Yu B.

 2002  Mar. ARGONAUTE4 control of locus‐specific siRNA  accumulation and DNA and histone methylation. Importance of the C‐ terminal domain of the human GW182 protein TNRC6C for translational repression.5. Differential regulation of genes transcribed by nucleus‐encoded  plastid RNA polymerase.  RNA.  Zubko MK.          169   . Science. Epub 2009 Mar 20. Cao X. and DNA amplification.  Zipprich JT. Epub 2002 Feb 8. Mathys H. Day A. Bhattacharyya S. Filipowicz W.267(1):27‐37. within ribosome‐deficient plastids  in stable phenocopies of cereal albino mutants. Jacobsen SE. Epub 2003 Jan 9. 2003 Jan 31.299(5607):716‐ 9. 2009 May. Mol Genet Genomics. References  Zilberman D.15(5):781‐93.

  170   .

  6. 10 U RNase inhibitor in 1 x T7 RNA poly‐ merase reaction buffer were incubated at 37 °C for 1 h. 8 mM NTP mix. Subsequently 250 U T7 RNA  polymerase were added and the mixture was incubated at 37 °C for 2 h. Protein expression was induced by addition of 0. The leaves were rinsed with water and  grown under standard greenhouse conditions. 10 mM DTT. 1 μg  dsRNA.2 In vitro transcription  For the production of small rRNA species T7 promoter‐containing oligonucleotides  were used to create dsDNA which served as template for in vitro transcription. coli strain JM109.  100 mg tomato leaf material infected with Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) strain  PH106 were ground in 1 mL of 1 % K2HPO4.1 Virus/viroid infections in Nicotiana sp. were pretreated with carborundum and mechanically  inoculated with 100 μL of the before created infectious sap per leaf.  pH 8. Alternatively 100 mg tobacco leaf mate‐ rial infected with Plum pox virus (PPV) was ground in 1 mL 50 mM phosphate buffer.  Kalantidis et al. Supplements    6. plants  Young Nicotiana sp. The cells were grown at 37 °C in selective LB to an  OD600 of approximately 0.6.3 Purification of recombinant ERL1 protein  ERL1 cDNA containing an N‐terminal His‐tag was cloned into pET‐15b and ex‐ pressed in E.5 mM  IPTG and incubation at 37 °C for 3 h.  6. 1984. 2007).1. plants were infected as described before (Tabler & Sänger. Full systemic infection could be ob‐ served after 3‐7 weeks post‐infection.0.1.. Alternatively 50  ng of in vitro transcribed viroid could be used. Leaves of Nicotiana sp.1. The cells were harvested by centrifugation at  171  .7.1 Supplementary methods  6. After a final  DNase I treatment for 15 min the in vitro transcribed RNA was purified by phe‐ nol/chloroform extraction and precipitated with isopropanol.

2 Supplementary results  The project of characterizing ERL1 in N. Stephanie – Functional Analysis of ERI‐1 (Kassel University. Ευγενία –  In vivo λειτουργική ανάλυση της Φυτικής  3’ εξωνουκλεάσης ERI1 (University of Crete. After  two washes with washing buffer (protein purification buffer containing 20 and 30  mM imidazole) the protein was eluted with elution buffer (protein purification buffer  containing 400 mM imidazole).6. The reactions were run on PAA  gels and exposed to X‐ray films.   6.    6.5 % glycerol (Iida et al. Heiko – Involvements of the Plant 3’‐5’ Exonuclease ERL1 in Chloro‐ plast Ribosomal RNA Biogenesis and RNA Silencing Pathways (Kassel University. The supernatant was loaded on a pre‐equilibrated Ni‐NTA column.0. Therefore relevant  additional results for this thesis are presented below and partly cited literally. thaliana was conducted  by several lab members as part of their Master and PhD theses.  2009)  Vamvaka. Ioannis – In vitro study of AtERI‐LIKE1: purification and trying to discover  its natural substrate [original title: Βλατάκης. benthamiana and A. 27 mM KCl. Supplements  2500x g at 4 °C for 20 min and resuspended in protein purification buffer. 50  fmol were incubated with recombinant ERL1 protein in cleavage buffer [10 mM Tris  pH 8. απομόνωση και προσπάθεια ανεύρεσης του φυσικού  υποστρώματός της (University of Crete. Evgenia – In vivo functional analysis of the plant 3ʹ exonuclease  ERL1[original title: Βαμβάκα.1. Ιωάννης – In vitro μελέτη της AtERI‐ LIKE1 : καθαρισμός. 2006)] at room tempera‐ ture for empirically determined incubation times. 2007)  Schumacher.5 mM MgCl2. For  additional information please refer to the following theses:  Eckhardt. 2010)]  Vlatakis. 0. 2010)]  172   . 0.4 In vitro assays for recombinant ERL1 protein  Synthetic siRNAs or in vitro‐transcribed rRNAs were radio‐labeled and purified.. The cells  were lyzed with 1 mg/ml lysozyme on ice for 1 h and pelleted at 15000x g at 4 °C for  10 min.

 8 days postinfiltration PSTVd siRNA levels are reduced approximately 4‐ fold in samples that were treated with ERL1 overexpression (Figure 6. The results of this experiment are summarised in  Figure 6. left panel). northern‐blotted. ruling out an un‐ specific effect due to aging of the plant or differential progression of the PSTVd infec‐ tion over the course of the experiment.  This experiment shows that the steady‐state levels of siRNAs produced from PSTVd  upon infection of N.1.6. samples were collected every 4th day. however. In non‐treated samples of the same plant PSTVd  siRNA levels remain constant over time (Figure 6.1 PSTVd‐derived siRNAs are suppressed upon ERL1 overexpression  Upon infection with Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). Nicotiana plants produce large  amounts of 21‐24 nt siRNA‐like RNAs derived from the viroid sequence.1. These PSTVd siRNAs are easily detectable in northern hy‐ bridisations and hence present a suitable reporter system to study possible effects of  ERL1 misexpression on siRNA steady‐state levels. right panel). Infiltrations  with an empty binary vector served as controls. Agro‐infiltration with a control plasmid simi‐ larly had no measurable effect on PSTVd siRNA levels (Figure 6. but are oth‐ erwise symptom‐free.1. 22 and 24 nt)  equally (Figure 6. 2009)]  6. tabacum are being negatively affected by ectopic agro‐ infiltration‐mediated Arabidopsis ERL1 overexpression. and analysed by  hybridisations with PSTVd‐specific probes. middle panel).  Comparative agro‐infiltration time course experiments were conducted by overex‐ pressing Arabidopsis ERL1 in systemically PSTVd‐infected N. Γεώργιος – Λειτουργική Ανάλυση της Φυτικής ERI1: ERL1 (ERI1‐ LIKE 1) (University of Crete. and small RNA fractions were  subsequently electrophoresed on 20 % PAA gels. Non‐infiltrated samples of the same plant  were used as time points zero.2.1.1. Georgios – Functional analysis of plant ERI1: ERL1 (ERI1‐LIKE1) [original  title: Λαγιώτης. if this reduction in siRNA levels is caused by an siRNA‐degrading  173   . To study PSTVd siRNA steady‐state  levels over time.  The reduction seems to affect the different siRNA size classes (21. It cannot be undoubtedly de‐ duced. Supplements  Lagiotis. left panel). tabacum.

  Bona fide suppressors of silencing are able to inhibit or delay the initiation of RNA  silencing when expressed along with the silencing inducer. 1998). Traditionally.  In the left panel ERL1 overexpression reduced the number of PSTVd siRNAs significantly 8 dpi  whereas after infiltration of a control plasmid (middle panel) and in untreated plants (right panel)  remain constant (result and picture by Schumacher.6. To determine.  respectively. or if this is the result of a secondary effect (literally cited from  Schumacher. 1992) and trans‐ formed into A. 2009). 1998). In this assay. benthamiana line 16c that is characterised by strong and stable GFP ex‐ pression (Ruiz et al. 2009)    6. 2004).  Agrobacterium co‐infiltration assays were performed... Equal volumes of an A. tumefaciens strain  174   . essentially as described before  (Lu et al. viral genes are tested for silenc‐ ing suppressor activity by assaying their effects on sense‐induced GFP silencing in N. the genomic sequence of the Arabidopsis ERL1  gene and a hairpin construct derived from a tobacco ERL1 EST (EST ID EB681897). pathogenicity determinents have been shown to act as RNA silenc‐ ing suppressors (Brigneti et al. tumefaciens strain C58C1.2. were cloned in the binary vector pART27 (Gleave. Ectopic GFP expression triggers the co‐suppression  pathway and leads to RNAi‐mediated silencing of the transgenically produced GFP. To create ERL1 overexpression (35S‐AtERL1gen) and sup‐ pression (35S‐NtERL1hp) constructs.  benthamiana plants..    Figure 6. if ERL1 shows RNA silencing suppressor activity. The assays were per‐ formed in N. Supplements  activity of ERL1.2 ERL1 fails to affect RNA silencing in Agrobacterium co‐infiltration  assays  In plant viruses.1: Comparative agro‐infiltration time course in systemically PSTVd‐infected tobacco. GFP silencing is induced by overexpression of GFP in  an already GFP‐expressing plant.

 respectively.4 a). 2004)] served as negative and positive  controls. 1:1 mixtures with an empty binary plasmid or with a con‐ struct expressing the silencing suppressor P19 of Cymbidium ringspot virus [35S P19‐ CymRSV (Havelda et al. 2003. benthamiana line 16C to test ERL1 for RNA  silencing suppressor activity  (A) In contrast to the verified silencing suppressor protein P19 (upper left spot) ERL1 overexpression  (upper right spot) does not result in suppression of GFP silencing similar to the control constructs  (lower panel). Supplements  carrying a 35S‐GFP construct [pBIN 35S‐mGFP4 (Haseloff et al. the red ring of local GFP silenc‐ ing spread (Himber et al. exemplified by strong GFP  signal in the infiltrated patch and the absence of the red ring of local GFP silencing  spread over the course of the experiment (Figure 6. 2009)..2 a).6. Under the condi‐ tions tested.2: Agrobacterium co‐infiltration assays in N...  175   . 2003. 2008) appeared at the same time as in  the empty plasmid negative control (Figure 6.2 a). Lakatos et al.2 a). and GFP expression and silencing initiation were moni‐ tored over time using a handheld Blak‐Ray® long‐wave UV lamp.2). Kalantidis et al.25 at OD600. ERL1 was not able to suppress the onset of GFP silencing (Figure 6.  (B) Induction of GFP silencing by the infiltration of a GFP hairpin construct is not affected by overex‐ pression of ERL1 identical to the control constructs (results and picture by Schumacher. The  red ring is not only indicative of RNA silencing initiation but also shows that SLSS  was not affected by ERL1 overexpression or suppression. The final concentrations of all strains were ad‐ justed to 0.  Upon co‐expression of ERL1 and GFP (Figure 3. which is visible by the formation of a red ring around the green spot of GFP infiltration..     Figure 6. Co‐expression of P19 on the  other hand was able to suppress RNA silencing initiation. The Agrobacterium mixtures were used to agro‐infiltrate dis‐ tinct patches on 16c leaves. ERL1 suppression with a hairpin  construct similarly had no effect on the RNA silencing time course (Figure 6.. 1997)] serving as the  silencing inducer were then mixed with Agrobacteria carrying the plasmids for ERL1  overexpression or ERL1 suppression.

  It was observed that in about 50 % of the cases. be too  weak to be detected in Agrobacterium co‐infiltration assays that require rather robust  silencing suppressors like P19 to counter agro‐infiltration‐induced RNA silencing  (literally cited from Schumacher.  which suggests that systemic RNA silencing may to some extent be suppressed in  ERL1 overexpressor plants. 2009). The remaining 50 % of plants continued to systemically  silence the ERL1‐dependent bleaching phenotype and regained wildtype appearance  until senescence (literally cited from Schumacher.e. these assays show no ability of ERL1 to negatively affect RNA silenc‐ ing.3 Exogenously induced silencing spread may be suppressed after ERL1  overexpression  To confirm that white sector formation is a direct result of ERL1 overexpression.  6.2 b). strongly resembling the  phenotype of systemic GFP silencing spread (Figure 3. red arrowhead indi‐ cating a newly emerging leaf void of RNA silencing‐type spreading of green tissue). Several days postinfiltration wildtype‐like green  tissue started spreading from the veins of systemic leaves. 2009).7 f. point of infiltra‐ tion indicated by black arrowhead).2. Supplements  In an equivalent experiment.7 f).  Taken together. ERL1 overexpression and suppression also failed to af‐ fect GFP silencing when a GFP hairpin construct was used to induce silencing (Figure  6. pale green  leaves) were agroinfiltrated with an Arabidopsis ERL1 hairpin construct (35S‐ AtERL1hp) to induce RNA silencing of the transgene (Figure 3.6.  young ERL1‐ overexpressing plants with a mild bleach phenotype (i. systemic spread of induced ERL1 si‐ lencing did not propagate more than a few leaves (Figure 3. however. Given its low expression levels and predominantly chloroplastic localisation a  possible role of ERL1 in negative RNA silencing regulation may.7 f.  176   .

 benthamiana and a  surviving ERL1 overexpressor plant and tested for the respective viral loads in north‐ ern hybridisations (Figure 6.4 ERL1‐overexpressing plants are hypersensitive towards viral infection   Since antiviral defense constitutes one of the major functions of RNA silencing in  plants.  The surviving ERL1 overexpressor plants remained dwarves with crippled leaves  until senescence and produced only few underdeveloped flowers that failed to pro‐ duce any seeds. such a high lethality  rate implies a hypersensitivity of ERL1 overexpressor plants towards PPV infection.4  b).6. To this end wildtype N. benthamiana.3: Silencing of the ERL1 phenotype induced by  agroinfiltration  Systemic ERL1 silencing in a bleach‐type plant. The increase  177   . Given  that PPV infections are typically non‐lethal in Nicotiana plants. it was investigated how plants with different ERL1 backgrounds behave upon  viral infection. ERL1  overexpressor plants accumulate approximately 3‐5x higher virus titres. wildtype N.  Under the conditions tested. has never been observed in the specific  bleach‐type ERL1 overexpressor line used in the infection experiments.4  c). however.2. Supplements    Figure 6.  12 weeks postinfection total RNA was extracted from wildtype N.  Only approximately 33 % of the PPV‐infected ERL1‐overexpressing plants survived  the infection. The slow growth and reduced fertility may to some extent be ex‐ plained by ERL1 overexpression itself. while the remaining 67 % had died until six weeks postinfection. A growth/fertility defect as pronounced as in  the PPV‐infected individuals. benthamiana and ERL1 overexpressor plants  were infected with Plum pox virus (PPV). benthamiana plants showed a typical pro‐ gression of PPV infection.4 a). The red arrowhead (in the middle of the picure) shows a  newly emerging leaf void of systemic silencing‐type spread of  wildtype‐like tissue (result and picture by Schumacher. 2009).      6. induced by  agroinfiltration with an ERL1 hairpin construct (the black arrowhead  in the lower part of the picture indicates the point of agro‐ infiltration). In comparison to wildtype N. with mild mosaic symptoms developing after 1‐2 weeks  that persisted until senescence (Figure 6. ERL1 overexpressor plants in contrast  developed much stronger symptoms with severely crippled leaves (Figure 6.

 (C)  ERL1 overexpressor plants accumulate a higher viral load 12 weeks post‐infection.    6. Whether this hyper‐ sensitivity is accountable to an siRNA‐degrading activity of ERL1 could.5S rRNA and several of  their natural processing intermediates. however. 2009). Northern analyses of variegated ERL1 overex‐ pressor tissues showed a significant decrease in the steady‐state mRNA levels of two  of the four DICER‐LIKE proteins. in vitro transcribed 5.2. 4. The fact that at least DCL1 and DCL4 are downregulated in  ERL1‐overexpressing tissue.4 d). benthamiana wildtype plants is a mild mosaic phenotype. however. the described hypersensitivity towards PPV infection may be caused  by a reduction in DCL1‐4 production and hence not constitute a primary effect of  ERL1 overexpression. as well as extracted natural rRNAs. The sam‐ 178   .8S.  (B) The symptom of PPV infection on N. 2009). (D) DCL1 and  DCL4 transcript levels are downregulated in white tissue whereas they remain normal in green tissue  overexpressing ERL1 (result and picture by Schumacher. namely DCL1 and DCL4 (Figure 6. 5S.6.  not be determined in this experiment.4: ERL1 overexpressor plants are hypersensitive towards infection by PPV  (A) Symptoms of PPV infection on bleach plants which show crippled leaves and a stunted growth.    Figure 6. Since the  DICER‐LIKE proteins are crucial core components of RNAi‐mediated antiviral de‐ fense in plants. Supplements  in viral load may explain the observed aggravated symptoms. Increasing  amounts of recombinant ERL1 were incubated with the following radio‐labeled sub‐ strates: synthetic 21‐nt siRNA. gives leeway to a possible connection between  ERL1 function and RNA silencing pathways (literally cited from Schumacher.5 In‐vitro experiments with ERL1   Several attempts have been conducted to characterize plant ERL1 in vitro.

 NEP and PSBA were not influenced by the misexpression of ERL1. Finally RBCL was strongly downregulated in ERL1  overexpressing tissue and a bit less downregulated in ERL1 suppressing tissue com‐ pared to wildtype (Figure 6. In contrast to the  results described before. This suggests no ERL1 processing activity at the chosen re‐ action conditions (Eckhardt. In contrast.   6. 2010). 2007. Neither any shortened processing products  nor a shift of the substrates. when the NbERL1 overex‐ pression construct was infiltrated. In addition wildtype plants served as a control. 2010)].5 b).5 a). Lagiotis. could be  detected in these assays. The expression of  CLPC.6 Preparation of a NbERL1 suppression construct and analysis of its ef‐ fects after transient and transgenic expression  For the analysis of ERL1 suppression in Nicotiana benthamiana a hairpin construct was  prepared from the NbERL1 sequence with approximate length of 3000 bp. its degradation by the plant started after the sec‐ ond day (Figure 6. In the case  of PFTF a slight reduction could be detected in the suppressing tissue in contrast to  overexpressor tissue where the expression was comparable to wildtype. The results  were compared with plants constitutively overexpressing ERL1 and showing a mo‐ saic phenotype.    179   . 2009.2. After co‐ infiltration with an NbERL1 overexpression construct of approximately 1000 bp an  immediate suppression could be observed. Supplements  ples were then analyzed on PAA gels.6.5 c) (Vamvaka. which would be a result of binding to ERL1. the downregulation of PFTF and PEP could not be repeated  in the transgenic plants and their expression levels were comparable to transgenic  plants overexpressing ERL1 [(Figure 6. Vlatakis.  The analysis of transgenic plants suppressing ERL1 started with three chloroplast‐ related genes and was compared with the transient suppression. PEP and  CLPP were downregulated in suppressing tissue while an upregulation could be ob‐ served in overexpressing tissue.  The effect of NbERL1 suppression on chloroplast‐related transcripts has been inves‐ tigated by transient expression of the construct and consecutive analysis.

  180   . (C) Control of the earlier identified influenced transcripts in  transgenic ERL1 suppressor plants fails to detect specific expression alterations after  knock‐down of  ERL1 (results and pictures by Vamvaka.5: Analysis of the suppression of ERL1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. The co‐infiltration of the overexpression and hairpin con‐ structs prevents the detection of the overexpression from the beginning. The overexpressing construct is easily detectable on the first  day and vanishes over the time course.  (A) Constructs for overexpression and suppression of ERL1 were infiltrated into N.6. 2010). benthamiana. mosaic plants overexpressing ERL1 and after transient  suppression of ERL1 by agroinfiltration. benthamiana and  their expression followed over four days. (B) Analysis of chloroplast‐ related transcripts in wildtype N. Supplements  (A)  (B) 3000 bp 1000 bp (C) Figure 6.

 Supplements  6.6.3 Oligonucelotides  The following primers were used during the course of the work for the respective  cloning purposes. mutant analysis and for probe preparation:    Primers used for analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana KD plants  GABI_KAT  LB3_SAIL  Lbb1_SALK  N544378 F  N544378 R  N579265_For  N579265_Rev  N834430_For  N834430_Rev    clpP Probe  NEP For  NEP Rev  Nt‐CLP‐Bam‐F  Nt‐CLP‐Not‐R  psbA For  psbA Rev  rbcL For  rbcL Rev  rpoB For  rpoB Rev  Tob‐Pftf Forward  Tob‐Pftf Reverse    At‐Eri‐Bam‐F  At‐Eri‐Not‐R  Ath‐Eri qPCR F  Ath‐Eri qPCR R  Eri FLAG Rev  Eri no Stop+TC Rev  Leader+TC Rev  mature+Bam+start  Nbe eri FOR  Nbe eri REV    ATATTGACCATCATACTCATTGC  TAGCATCTGAATTTCATAACCAATCTCGATACAC  GCGTGGACCGCTTGCTGCAACT  ACACCTTGTAAGCCATCAACG  TTTCAAACATCAATCTTCCGC  CCAATCTCGTTCAGACATTCC  TTTCTTGGACCGGGTTTTAAG  TTTACGTTCATTTCCTGAGGC  TTCCATGGTTTTGGCATCTAC    CCTTGTGAGGGTTTCACGCAGTTTCAGCAGTTCTTCCGCTTCCAG  TTTGATGCGCACTCATGGATCTA    GCAAATTCAAGGATTCCTCGACA  GGATCCGAAAGGAGGCCGTCGTATAGGTT  GCGGCCGCATCTGAGGGAGTTCCGCTAGTGC  TAACCATGAGCGGCTACGATGTT  GTAGCTTGTTACATGGGTCGTG  TGCGAATCCCTCCTGCTTATGTT    CCAAGCTAGTATTTGCGGTGAAT  CTTCCAGCTACTTTATCGCCTAC  CTTATATGCCGTGGGAGGGTTAC  GGATCCCCCGAGAGGTTTACCGCAGTG  GCGGCCGCGGTGTCCTCATGGCTATAACTT    GGATCCATGGCGTCCGCATTCTCTGC  GCGGCCGCTTACTTGATCCTGTTCTTGAAG  CAAAATGAGCGAGCAAGCAATTA  ATCCCAGTTTCCACAGGTTACAA   GCGGCCGCCGATGAATAGTAGTAGTAGGAACATTAGGTATTGAT CCTGTTCTTGAAG  GCGGCCGCCTCTTGATCCTGTTCTTGAAGAGA  GCGGCCGCCTACTTGTTTCCATTAACGAAAAAG  GGATCCATGGAAAATGCAAGGTGGAGACCCATG  AGCAGTCACAAGACTCGC  GGTGATAACAAAATGGTTCAG    181   Primers used for detecting chloroplast‐related transcripts  Primers used for the cloning and detection of ERL1  .

5S Probe  4.5S‐circular R  5.8s probe FOR  5.8s rRNA start For  5.8S‐circular R  5S Probe  5S+link For  5S‐circular F  5S‐circular R  linker mod  linker REV    Miscellaneous  35S pART7&27 F  35S pART7&27 R  Ath‐UBQ_For  Ath‐UBQ_Rev  Intron For  Intron Rev  Nico‐UBQ_For  Nico‐UBQ_Rev  Racer dT    AAGTTTGGCTGGGTGAACGTC  AAGGCCCTCCTCTTGTAGAAG  TGCTCGCTGGAGTTTATGCAA  ACTTGAGAATTTGCGGAAGC  GTGTGGGCTGAATTAGGGA  TTGGGCCTGAAGTGAGTACGA  GGCCTCACAAACCTATG    TCATGGAGAGTTCGATCCTGGCT  ATCCTCACCTTCCTCCGGCTTATCA  CAAAAACCCGTCCTCAGTTC  TCAACCATAAACGATGCCGACCA  GCGTGCGGCCCAGAACATCTAA  ACAGGTCTCCGCAAAGTCGTA  GCCCTTCCAGAGTGGTATCTCA  CCACCTGGGGCTGTAGTATG  ATCCTGGCGTCGAGCTATTTTTCCGCAGGACCTCCCCTAC   CGAGACGAGCCGTTTATCAT  AGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAG  TCCACTTGACACCTATCGTAATG  GCAACGGATATCTCGGCTCT  TAATGGCTTCGGGCGCAACT  CGGCTCTCGCATCGATGAAGAACGTAGCGAAATGCGATAC  CGGATATCTCGGCTCT  CGCCCGAAGCCATTAGG  CGATGGTTCACGGGATTC  GGATGCCTCAGCTGCATACATCACTGCACTTCCACTTGAC  ACCAATCCATCCCGAACTT  TAAACTCTACTGCGGTGAC  CAAGTTCGGGATGGATTGG  ATCGTCACAACAAATGGCATddC  GATGCCATTTGTTGTGACGAT      TATAGAGGAAGGGTCTTGCGAAGG  CAACAAAGGATAATTTCGGGAAAC  TAACCCTTGAGGTTGAATCATCC  AACTCCTTCTTTCTGGTAAACGT  CTTGGAGCAGAACATGAGATTCG  ATTGAGCCAGGGCATTTACCTC  GAGGTTGAATCTTCCGACACAAT  AACATAGGTGAGCCCACACTTAC  GCTGTCAACGATACGCTACGTAACGGCATGACAGTGTTTTTTTTTT TTTTTTTT  182 Primers used for the detection and cloning of ribosomal RNAs    .8s rRNA  5.8S‐circular F  5. Supplements    Nbe‐eri new‐qRT F  Nbe‐eri new‐qRT R  Nt‐eri_RACE A1  Nt‐eri_RACE A2  Nt‐eri_RACE S1  Nt‐eri_RACE S2  Nt‐eri_RT‐primer    16S For  16S Rev  16S+link For  18S For  18S Rev  23s_For_new  23s_Rev_new  23S+link For  4.8s probe Rev  5.6.5S+link For  4.5S‐circular F  4.

4.1 At‐ERL1‐GFP (11243 bp.2 At‐leader‐GFP (10451 bp. Spec) ..6. based on pB7FWG2 (Karimi et al.4.4 Vector maps  6. Spec).  2002)  GFP 0  att B2       ERL1 leader     att B1     35S           183   .. 2002)  GFP 0  att B2       ERL1 cDNA       att B1     35S           6. based on pB7FWG2 (Karimi et al. Supplements  6.

 3021 (PstI). 1761 (EcoRI). 2823 & 2956  (BamHI). Schumacher.  5563 (BamHI). 3684 (HindIII). Kan/Spec). 1026 (PstI). 2410. 3895 (HindIII). 3023 & 3672 (EcoRI).3 At‐ERL1‐over (15987 bp. 2009    0        At‐ERL 1 genomic              35S                Restriction sites: 963 (NotI). 2009  0      Nt‐ERL1 sense    spacer    Nt‐ERL1 antisense      35S             Restriction sites: 960 (PstI). Kan/Spec).6. 5283 (NotI). 3713 (EcoRI). Supplements  6.4. 963 (NotI).4 Nt‐ERL1‐hp (15776 bp. 5728 & 8266 (PstI)  184   .4. 1747 (BamHI). Schumacher. 5774 (BamHI)  6. 5072 (NotI).

benthamiana_ERL1_cDNA (incomplete)  GCCCTTAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAACTCACTCC TCAAGGGAGCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTACGGGATTTTGTAGGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGGT TCCTTGTATCTCCGCCGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCAGCCCAGCCGTAAAATCAGT ATCTCCGCCTCTCGTTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTTCTTCCCTAATTCAGCCCACACCTTC CCGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACTAAGATGGATG ATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGCTGCG GGACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGTTGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAA AGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCAACT TTTTCCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAA GGGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTGGCATGATACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGA AGTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGGGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACCGGGCG GCTGTCTAAATAAAGCTGCCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGACTAAAGTTCCT CAGCAATGCAAAGTAGCAGGGACGAAATTGCCACCGTATTTCATGGAATGGATTAATTTGAA GGATGTGTTTTTGAACTTCTACAAGAGGAGGGCCAAAGGAATGCTTTCAATGATGAGGGAAC TCCAGATGCCTTTGTTAGGGAGTCATCACCTTGGAATAGATGATGCAAAAAACATAGCAAGA GTACTGCAACACATGCTTAGTGATGGTGCCCTTGTGCAAATCACAGCTAGAAGAAACCCTCA TTCTCCTGAAAAAGTTGAATATCTTTTTGAGGATCGCATTGTATAACTAGTTTCTTCTGAAC CATTTTGTTATCACCTAAACATTTTTAGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA  >N. Supplements  6.thaliana_ERL1_leader_protein  MASAFSAFRVSLSRISPFRDTRFSYPATLALAHTKRIMCNSSHSVSPSPSPSDFSSSSSSSS SSPSTFSLMETS >A.5.benthamiana_ERL1_protein (incomplete)  SSHKTRHRILHFFFRKLTPQGSRLIPMATGFCRVPLLRRFLVSPPVLPFSYSLQPSRKISIS ASRSTTEESTSSLIQPTPSRTRWKPTCLYFTQGKCTKMDDPMHIDKFNHNCSLELMQNAAGL KNLRQQELEYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVLLFDAKTMDVVNFFHRFVRPTKMHEDRINEYIEGK YGKLGVDRVWHDTAIPFGEVIEQFEVWLGERQLWRNEPGGCLNKAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPQQ CKVAGTKLPPYFMEWINLKDVFLNFYKRRAKGMLSMMRELQMPLLGSHHLGIDDAKNIARVL QHMLSDGALVQITARRNPHSPEKVEYLFEDRIV >A.6.thaliana_ERL1_mature_cDNA  GAAAATGCAAGGTGGAGACCCATGTGCTTGTATTACACCCACGGAAAGTGTACAAAGATGGA TGATCCTGCCCATTTGGAGATTTTTAACCACGATTGTTCAAAGGAACTTCGAGTGGCTGCTG CTGATCTTGAGAGAAAGAAGTCACAAGAATTCAATTTTTTCTTGGTTATTGACTTGGAAGGA AAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCTATTTTGATCGTAGATGCCAAAACCATGGAAGTCGTAGA CTTATTCCACAGGTTTGTAAGACCCACCAAAATGAGCGAGCAAGCAATTAACAAATACATCG AAGGCAAGTATGGGGAACTCGGGGTTGATCGTGTGTGGCATGACACAGCTATTCCATTTAAG CAAGTTGTTGAGGAGTTTGAAGTTTGGTTAGCTGAGCATGACTTGTGGGATAAAGATACAGA TTGGGGTCTGAACGATGCAGCTTTTGTAACCTGTGGAAACTGGGATATAAAGACAAAGATTC CTGAGCAATGCGTAGTTTCAAACATCAATCTTCCGCCATATTTTATGGAGTGGATCAATCTC AAAGACGTCTACTTGAATTTCTATGGCCGTGAGGCAAGAGGAATGGTGTCAATGATGAGGCA 185   .thaliana_ERL1_leader_cDNA   ATGGCGTCCGCATTCTCTGCATTTAGGGTTTCGTTGTCCAGAATCAGTCCTTTCCGTGATAC CCGGTTCTCTTATCCCGCCACGTTGGCTTTAGCTCATACCAAACGAATCATGTGCAACTCTT CGCATTCTGTATCTCCATCTCCTTCTCCCTCTGACTTTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCT TCTTCTCCTTCTACTTTTTCGTTAATGGAAACAAGT  >A.1 Newly identified sequences  >N.5 Sequences  6.

 Seq.2)  MEDERGRERGGDAAQQKTPRPECEESRPLSVEKKQRCRLDGKETDGSKFISSNGSDFSDPVY KEIAMTNGCINRMSKEELRAKLSEFKLETRGVKDVLKKRLKNYYKKQKLMLKESSAGDSYYD YICIIDFEATCEEGNPAEFLHEIIEFPVVLLNTHTLEIEDTFQQYVRPEVNAQLSEFCIGLT GITQDQVDRADAFPQVLKKVIEWMKSKELGTKYKYCILTDGSWDMSKFLSIQCRLSRLKHPA FAKKWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRSQTKLTIMLEKLGMDYDGRPHSGLDDSKNIARIAVRMLQDGC ELRINEKILGGQLMSVSSSLPVEGAPAPQMPHSRK  >D. Seq. NP_741293.rerio_Eri1_protein (NCBI Ref.musculus_Eri1_protein (NCBI Ref. NP_001089554. Q7TMF2.2 Published sequences used for in silico analysis and primer design   >C. Seq. Seq. Supplements  GTGTGGAATAAAACTCATGGGAAGCCACCATCTGGGCATTGATGACACAAAGAACATCACGA GGGTGGTGCAACGGATGCTCTCAGAAGGTGCAGTTCTCAAGCTCACAGCTCGAAGGAGCAAA TCCAATATGAGAAACGTCGAGTTTCTCTTCAAGAACAGGATCAAGTAA  >A.1)  MSADEPSPEDEKYLESLRDLLKISQEFDASNAKQNDEPEKTAVEVESAETRTDESEKSIDIP REQQLLPSERVEPLKSMVEPEYVKKVIRQMDTMTAEQLKQALMKIKVSTGGNKKTLRKRVAQ YYRKENALLNRKMEPNADKTARFFDYLIAIDFECTCVEIIYDYPHEIIELPAVLIDVREMKI ISEFRTYVRPVRNPKLSEFCMQFTKIAQETVDAAPYFREALQRLYTWMRKFNLGQKNSRFAF VTDGPHDMWKFMQFQCLLSNIRMPHMFRSFINIKKTFKEKFNGLIKGNGKSGIENMLERLDL SFVGNKHSGLDDATNIAAIAIQMMKLKIELRINQKCSYKENQRSAARKDEERELEDAANVDL TSVDISRRDFQLWMRRLPLKLSSVTRREFINEEYLDCDSCDDLTDDKVKHLHSCDIYEIFDE KTSASFTDSKCLIC  >H. NP_001018450.5.sapiens_3’hExo_protein (NCBI Ref. NP_699163.6.2)  MEDPQSKEPAGEAVALALLESPRPEGGEEPPRPSPEETQQCKFDGQETKGSKFITSSASDFS DPVYKEIAITNGCINRMSKEELRAKLSEFKLETRGVKDVLKKRLKNYYKKQKLMLKESNFAD SYYDYICIIDFEATCEEGNPPEFVHEIIEFPVVLLNTHTLEIEDTFQQYVRPEINTQLSDFC ISLTGITQDQVDRADTFPQVLKKVIDWMKLKELGTKYKYSLLTDGSWDMSKFLNIQCQLSRL KYPPFAK  >M. Seq.1)  METKEKSRKPPNKTPQSEGDQEDQPCPDTSCEKNEDQEPSSPKQGEFSDPVYKEIALANGAI NRMNREELRAKCTELKLDTRGVNDVLRKRLKSYYKKQKLMHSPAAEGNSDMYFDYICVVDFE ATCEENNPPDYLHEIIEFPMVLIDTHTLEIVDSFQEYVKPVLHPQLSEFCVKLTGITQEMVD EAKTFHQVLKRAISWLQEKELGTKYKYMFLTDGSWDMGKFLHTQCKLSRIRYPQFARKWINI RKSYGNFYKVPRTQTKLICMLENLGMEYDGRPHCGLDDSRNIARIAIHMLKDGCQLRVNECL HSGEPRSVPISAPIEGAPAPQPPKKRD  >X.elegans_ERI‐1_protein (NCBI Ref.laevis_Eri1_protein (NCBI Ref.1)  MEEQKENRPLDTEDSVVEEDLCKKLSRNLDLVGVKQRCRFDGQEDNGTSTVSSNTSDFSDPV YKEIAIANGCVNRMTKDELKAKLVEHKLDTRGVKDVLRKRLKNYYKKQKLTHALHKDSNTDC YYDYICVIDFEATCEAGNSLDYPHEIIEFPIVLLNTHTLEIEDVFQCYVRPEINPQLSEFCV NLTGITQDTVDKSDTFPNVLRSVVEWMREKELGSKYKYAILTDGSWDMSKFLNMQCRISRLK YPRFAKKWINIRKSYGNFYKVPRTQTKLTTMLEKLGMTYNGRLHSGLDDSKNIARIAAHMLQ DGCELRVNERMHAGQLMTVSSSLPFEGAPVPQNPHLKN  186   .thaliana_ERL1_mature_protein  SENARWRPMCLYYTHGKCTKMDDPAHLEIFNHDCSKELRVAAADLERKKSQEFNFFLVIDLE GKVEILEFPILIVDAKTMEVVDLFHRFVRPTKMSEQAINKYIEGKYGELGVDRVWHDTAIPF KQVVEEFEVWLAEHDLWDKDTDWGLNDAAFVTCGNWDIKTKIPEQCVVSNINLPPYFMEWIN LKDVYLNFYGREARGMVSMMRQCGIKLMGSHHLGIDDTKNITRVVQRMLSEGAVLKLTARRS KSNMRNVEFLFKNRIK 6.

 Seq. NP_611632. XP_001713129. XP_002436970.1)  MALARVSPPAFSSPFLIHSLLRPFSSPSSVLRPRVTRVPHHRGFAIAAALSQASPLPSADGD GAVMEAPPRPSSRRPWKPTCLYYTQGKCTMLNDTLHLEKFNHNLPTDLPVNYSAADKVKSQK LDYFLVLDLEGKVEILEFPVVMIDAQSMEFVDSFHRFVHPTAMSEQRIREYIEGKYGKFGVD RVWHDTAIPFMEVLQEFEDWIEHHKFWKKEQGGALNSAAFITWFRILVEQELWKILEVRVD  >S. Seq.vinifera_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref. Seq. Supplements  >D.pombe_Eri1_protein (NCBI Ref. Seq. NM_001187847.1)  MESPVQILVWPFPCDEMNQKTPSTVEEIRIALQELGLSTNGNKRYLLIVDVEATCEEGCGFS FENEIIELPCLLFDLIEKSIIDEFHSYVRPSMNPTLSDYCKSLTGIQQCTVDKAPIFSDVLE ELFIFLRKHSNILVPSVDEIEIIEPLKSVPRTQPKNWAWACDGPWDMASFLAKQFKYDKMPI PDWIKGPFVDIRSFYKDVYRVPRTNINGMLEHWGLQFEGSEHRGIDDARNLSRIVKKMCSEN VEFECNRWWMEYEKNGWIPNRSYPPYFAS  >N.melanogaster_Snp_protein (NCBI Ref.3)  MALIKLARQLGLIDTIYVDGARPDPNNDPEESFNEDEVTEANSVPAKSKKSRKSKRLAMQPY SYVIAVDFEATCWEKQAPPEWREAEIIEFPAVLVNLKTGKIEAEFHQYILPFESPRLSAYCT ELTGIQQKTVDSGMPLRTAIVMFNEWLRNEMRARNLTLPKMNKSNILGNCAFVTWTDWDFGI CLAKECSRKGIRKPAYFNQWIDVRAIYRSWYKYRPCNFTDALSHVGLAFEGKAHSGIDDAKN LGALMCKMVRDGALFSITKDLTPYQQLNPRFVL  >S.1)  MAFYRVSPFRYGSLSSLIPYVSSPSSLSPPVRTFTLSASISTPHPSPPSLLTASPKASDRWR PMCLYYTQGKCTKMDDPTHLETFNHNCSRELQVNAANFQHLQSQHLDFFLVLDLEGKIEILE FPVLMINAKTMDVVDLFHRFVRPSEMSEQRINEYIEGKYGKLGVDRVWHDTSIPFKEVIQQF EAWLTQHHLWTKEMGGRLDQAAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPQQCKVSKMKLPPYFMEWINLKDVYLN FYKRRATGMMTMMKELQIPLLGSHHLGIDDTKNIARVLQRMLADGALLQITARRNADSPENV EFLFKNRIR  >O.1)  MALARVSPSSLANLIPPLLQSFFRPFSSDFPIRNSRRRSSPVAAAFSLTSQSAHAAREGLVM EAPRPSSRYPWKPTCLYYTQGKCTMMNDAMHLEKFSHNLKMDLPVNASATDKSKPQKLEYLL ILDLEGRVEILEFPVMMIDAQNREFVDSFHRFVRPTAMSEQRTTEYIEGKYGKFGVDRVWHD TATPFKQVLQEFEDWLGNHNLWKKEQGGSLNRGAFVTCGNWDLKTKVPEQCKVSKINLPTYF MEWINLKDIYLNFYNRRATGMMTMMRELQLPIVGNHHLGIDDSKNIARVVQRMLADGAVIQI TAKRQSATGDVRFLFKDRIR 187   .sativa_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref.bicolor_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref. Seq. Seq.crassa_Qip_protein (GenBank: ABQ45366. XP_002282697.6. NP_001131746.1)  MEDEQFMQQLRNLTCQTVDWSGFDPSKWRDEDINDWDISDDAQGDEDDNYASDASILSARHL DPFNVKPATRPHHTGPTSLRIEDVTDEQEEYRDASDLENISWPEVSVEQGEIDPITELFTPW RMVLEYPNLFVGKRNGARARPLFTLESLHENRIWDLFYLYRPSNEGNNNPLIFVPTYQMQHL LDVINRKLDVEFTFPRGHQDMFAMPFGQSNTAKPRFLGRSRSAEEWKQLTNNVPARKPGDTS ENAPFLAKQELTRRLNSIFSIQDKSKKTKNNQYKRSNLHRAWGKNIKRVQRYLGLRRRVLSD PEVSSYTPLDLTQPTGIQPEKSVVFVAIDLEAYELDQSIITEVGLAILDTAEITNVAPGEGS KNWFDFIKARHIRVKEFSWAQNSRHVQGRAEYFDFGESEFIEVAKIASVLKETIEGESSIGG EGAKRPVVLVFHDQSQDLKYIRMLGYDVASADNILEVVDTREMYQYLSRSNNASKLSNVCGY LDIPWKNMHNAGNDAVYTLQAMMGLAIDMRQKSLERAAAKASKANTSNDGYVTYSEFTATKE DVDEGWISTGELSDGGEPSLVMAASTVPNSVVETTVCENWEL >V.1)  SAASSATVRASGSVGCHMNDAMHLEKFGHNLKMDLPVNASATDKFKPQKLEYFLILDLEGRV EILEFPVVMIDAQSTEFIDSFHRFVRPTAMSEQRTTEYIEGKYGKFGVDRVWHDTAVPFKEV LQEFEDWLGNHNLWKKEQGGSLNRGAFVTCGNWDLKTKATGMMTMMRELQLPIIGNHHLGID DSKNIARVVQRMIADGAVIEITAKRQSTTGNVKFLFKDRIR  >Z.mays_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref.

1)  MCLYHTHGKCTKIDDPVHVERFNHDCSRDFQVSAADFERKRPQDFDFFLVFDLEGKVEILEF PVLIIDAKTMGVVDLFHRFVRPTAMSEERVNEYIYNKYGKFGVDRVWHDTALPFNEVLQQFE SWLTQHNLWEKTRGGRLNRAAFVTCGNWDVKTQVPHQCSVSKLKLPPYFMEWINLKDVYQNF YNPRNEARGMRTMMSQLKIPMVGSHHLGLDDTKNIARVLLRMLADGAVLPITARRKPESPGS VNFLYKNRI >P.1)  MASAFSAFRVSLSRISPFRDTRFSYPATLALAHTKRIMCNSSHSVSPSPSPSDFSSSSSSSS SSPSTFSLMETSENARWRPMCLYYTHGKCTKMDDPAHLEIFNHDCSKELRVAAADLERKKSQ EFNFFLVIDLEGKVEILEFPILIVDAKTMEVVDLFHRFVRPTKMSEQAINKYIEGKYGELGV DRVWHDTAIPFKQVVEEFEVWLAEHDLWDKDTDWGLNDAAFVTCGNWDIKTKIPEQCVVSNI NLPPYFMEWINLKDVYLNFYGREARGMVSMMRQCGIKLMGSHHLGIDDTKNITRVVQRMLSE GAVLKLTARRSKSNMRNVEFLFKNRIK  >N.thaliana_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref.trichocarpa_ERL1_protein (NCBI Ref.1)  188   .6. NM_112377.  AC217034. Supplements  >P.tabacum _5.thaliana_ERL1_cDNA (NCBI Ref. NC_001879: 109242‐109344)  GAAGGTCACGGCGAGACGAGCCGTTTATCATTACGATAGGTGTCAAGTGGAAGTGCAGTGAT GTATGCAGCTGAGGCATCCTAACAGACCGGTAGACTTGAAC  >N. Seq. NC_001879: 109601‐109721)  TATTCTGGTGTCCTAGGCGTAGAGGAACCACACCAATCCATCCCGAACTTGGTGGTTAAACT CTACTGCGGTGACGATACTGTAGGGGAGGTCCTGCGGAAAAATAGCTCGACGCCAGGAT  >N.5S_rRNA (NCBI Ref. Seq. Seq.tabacum _4. Seq. NP_566502.1: 32084‐32329)  MSFPRIPLSRVPSYLHNSNNCFHLLHPPFIPVSKTPSLPTYQTARTYTDFNSQTQTQPPLSL PSLIPSPPVNNPNATHRWKP  >A.1)  AGTTCCCAGTCCCTGTACTCGAAAGGAAGATCTTCATCTTCAATCTTCATGCTAATCGACGA AAATGGCGTCCGCATTCTCTGCATTTAGGGTTTCGTTGTCCAGAATCAGTCCTTTCCGTGAT ACCCGGTTCTCTTATCCCGCCACGTTGGCTTTAGCTCATACCAAACGAATCATGTGCAACTC TTCGCATTCTGTATCTCCATCTCCTTCTCCCTCTGACTTTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTTCTT CTTCTTCTCCTTCTACTTTTTCGTTAATGGAAACAAGTGAAAATGCAAGGTGGAGACCCATG TGCTTGTATTACACCCACGGAAAGTGTACAAAGATGGATGATCCTGCCCATTTGGAGATTTT TAACCACGATTGTTCAAAGGAACTTCGAGTGGCTGCTGCTGATCTTGAGAGAAAGAAGTCAC AAGAATTCAATTTTTTCTTGGTTATTGACTTGGAAGGAAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCT ATTTTGATCGTAGATGCCAAAACCATGGAAGTCGTAGACTTATTCCACAGGTTTGTAAGACC CACCAAAATGAGCGAGCAAGCAATTAACAAATACATCGAAGGCAAGTATGGGGAACTCGGGG TTGATCGTGTGTGGCATGACACAGCTATTCCATTTAAGCAAGTTGTTGAGGAGTTTGAAGTT TGGTTAGCTGAGCATGACTTGTGGGATAAAGATACAGATTGGGGTCTGAACGATGCAGCTTT TGTAACCTGTGGAAACTGGGATATAAAGACAAAGATTCCTGAGCAATGCGTAGTTTCAAACA TCAATCTTCCGCCATATTTTATGGAGTGGATCAATCTCAAAGACGTCTACTTGAATTTCTAT GGCCGTGAGGCAAGAGGAATGGTGTCAATGATGAGGCAGTGTGGAATAAAACTCATGGGAAG CCACCATCTGGGCATTGATGACACAAAGAACATCACGAGGGTGGTGCAACGGATGCTCTCAG AAGGTGCAGTTCTCAAGCTCACAGCTCGAAGGAGCAAATCCAATATGAGAAACGTCGAGTTT CTCTTCAAGAACAGGATCAAGTAAAGCTCTCAAGGAAAAATGACAAACCCAACAAGCTCCAT GATCCATAAATTAGTTACTTAGTCAAGTCTTTTGAGTATTAAGATGATAACTCTTAGAAGAC AATGTGGTTACGCCTAAATGTGATGTGGTGAGAAGGTTTTGTAGATTCACATGTTTCAGAGC TATGATATTTAGATTACG  >A. Seq.8S_rRNA (GenBank: AJ492448. Seq.tabacum _5S_rRNA (NCBI Ref. AC217034.trichocarpa_putative ERL1_chloroplast_leader. translated (NCBI Ref.

tabacum _23S_rRNA (NCBI Ref. Seq. Supplements  GCAACGGATATCTCGGCTCTCGCATCGATGAAGAACGTAGCGAAATGCGATACTTGGTGTGA ATTGCAGAATCCCGTGAACCATCGAGTCTTTGAACGCAAGTTGCGCCCGAAGCCATTAGGCC GAGGGCACGTCTGCCTGGGCGTCACGCATCGCGTCGCCCCCCGCAC  >N. NC_001879: 102762‐104252)  TCTCATGGAGAGTTCGATCCTGGCTCAGGATGAACGCTGGCGGCATGCTTAACACATGCAAG TCGGACGGGAAGTGGTGTTTCCAGTGGCGGACGGGTGAGTAACGCGTAAGAACCTGCCCTTG GGAGGGGAACAACAGCTGGAAACGGCTGCTAATACCCCGTAGGCTGAGGAGCAAAAGGAGGA ATCCGCCCGAGGAGGGGCTCGCGTCTGATTAGCTAGTTGGTGAGGCAATAGCTTACCAAGGC GATGATCAGTAGCTGGTCCGAGAGGATGATCAGCCACACTGGGACTGAGACACGGCCCAGAC TCCTACGGGAGGCAGCAGTGGGGAATTTTCCGCAATGGGCGAAAGCCTGACGGAGCAATGCC GCGTGGAGGTAGAAGGCCCACGGGTCGTGAACTTCTTTTCCCGGAGAAGAAGCAATGACGGT ATCTGGGGAATAAGCATCGGCTAACTCTGTGCCAGCAGCCGCGGTAATACAGAGGATGCAAG CGTTATCCGGAATGATTGGGCGTAAAGCGTCTGTAGGTGGCTTTTTAAGTCCGCCGTCAAAT CCCAGGGCTCAACCCTGGACAGGCGGTGGAAACTACCAAGCTGGAGTACGGTAGGGGCAGAG GGAATTTCCGGTGGAGCGGTGAAATGCGTAGAGATCGGAAAGAACACCAACGGCGAAAGCAC TCTGCTGGGCCGACACTGACACTGAGAGACGAAAGCTAGGGGAGCGAATGGGATTAGATACC CCAGTAGTCCTAGCCGTAAACGATGGATACTAGGCGCTGTGCGTATCGACCCGTGCAGTGCT GTAGCTAACGCGTTAAGTATCCCGCCTGGGGAGTACGTTCGCAAGAATGAAACTCAAAGGAA TTGACGGGGGCCCGCACAAGCGGTGGAGCATGTGGTTTAATTCGATGCAAAGCGAAGAACCT TACCAGGGCTTGACATGCCGCGAATCCTCTTGAAAGAGAGGGGTGCCTTCGGGAACGCGGAC ACAGGTGGTGCATGGCTGTCGTCAGCTCGTGCCGTAAGGTGTTGGGTTAAGTCCCGCAACGA GCGCAACCCTCGTGTTTAGTTGCCATCGTTGAGTTTGGAACCCTGAACAGACTGCCGGTGAT AAGCCGGAGGAAGGTGAGGATGACGTCAAGTCATCATGCCCCTTATGCCCTGGGCGACACAC GTGCTACAATGGCCGGGACAAAGGGTCGCGATCCCGCGAGGGTGAGCTAACCCCAAAAACCC GTCCTCAGTTCGGATTGCAGGCTGCAACTCGCCTGCATGAAGCCGGAATCGCTAGTAATCGC CGGTCAGCCATACGGCGGTGAATTCGTTCCCGGGCCTTGTACACACCGCCCGTCACACTATG GGAGCTGGCCATGCCCGAAGTCGTTACCTTAACCGCAAGGAGGGGGATGCCGAAGGCAGGGC TAGTGACTGGAGTGAAGTCGTAACAAGGTAGCCGTACTGGAAGGTGCGGCTGGATCACCTCC TTT  >N. Seq. NC_001879: 106331‐109140)  TTCAAACGAGGAAAGGCTTACGGTGGATACCTAGGCACCCAGAGACGAGGAAGGGCGTAGTA ATCGACGAAATGCTTCGGGGAGTTGAAAATAAGCATAGATCCGGAGATTCCCGAATAGGGCA ACCTTTCGAACTGCTGCTGAATCCATGGGCAGGCAAGAGACAACCTGGCGAACTGAAACATC TTAGTAGCCAGAGGAAAAGAAAGCAAAAGCGATTCCCGTAGTAGCGGCGAGCGAAATGGGAG CAGCCTAAACCGTGAAAACGGGGTTGTGGGAGAGCAATACAAGCGTCGTGCTGCTAGGCGAA GCAGCCCGAATGCTGCACCCTAGATGGCGAAAGTCCAGTAGCCGAAAGCATCACTAGCTTAT GCTCTGACCCGAGTAGCATGGGGCACGTGGAATCCCGTGTGAATCAGCAAGGACCACCTTGC AAGGCTAAATACTCCTGGGTGACCGATAGCGAAGTAGTACCGTGAGGGAAGGGTGAAAAGAA CCCCCATCGGGGAGTGAAATAGAACATGAAACCGTAAGCTCCCAAGCAGTGGGAGGAGCCAG GGCTCTGACCGCGTGCCTGTTGAAGAATGAGCCGGCGACTCATAGGCAGTGGCTTGGTTAAG GGAACCCACCGGAGCCGTAGCGAAAGCGAGTCTTCATAGGGCAATTGTCACTGCTTATGGAC CCGAACCTGGGTGATCTATCCATGACCAGGATGAAGCTTGGGTGAAACTAAGTGGAGGTCCG AACCGACTGATGTTGAAGAATCAGCGGATGAGTTGTGGTTAGGGGTGAAATGCCACTCGAAC CCAGAGCTAGCTGGTTCTCCCCGAAATGCGTTGAGGCGCAGCAGTTGACTGGACATCTAGGG GTAAAGCACTGTTTCGGTGCGGGCCGCGAGAGCGGTACCAAATCGAGGCAAACTCTGAATAC TAGATATGACCTCAAAATAACAGGGGTCAAGGTCGGCTAGTGAGACGATGGGGGATAAGCTT CATCGTCGAGAGGGAAACAGCCCGGATCACCAGCTAAGGCCCCTAAATGATCGCTCAGTGAT AAAGGAGGTAGGGGTGCAGAGACAGCCAGGAGGTTTGCCTAGAAGCAGCCACCCTTGAAAGA GTGCGTAATAGCTCACTGATCGAGCGCTCTTGCGCCGAAGATGAACGGGGCTAAGCGATCTG CCGAAGCTGTGGGATGTAAAAATACATCGGTAGGGGAGCGTTCCGCCTTAGAGAGAAGCCTC CGCGCGAGCGGTGGTGGACGAAGCGGAAGCGAGAATGTCGGCTTGAGTAACGCAAACATTGG 189   .tabacum _16S_rRNA (NCBI Ref.6.

105O08F.tabacum _similar to UniRef100_A7P1T2 Cluster: Chromosome chr19 scaffold_4  (BP529372. Supplements  TGAGAATCCAATGCCCCGAAAACCTAAGGGTTCCTCCGCAAGGTTCGTCCACGGAGGGTGAG TCAGGGCCTAAGATCAGGCCGAAAGGCGTAGTCGATGGACAACAGGTGAATATTCCTGTACT GCCCCTTGTTGGTCCCGAGGGACGGAGGAGGCTAGGTTAGCCGAAAGATGGTTATCGGTTCA AGAACGTAAGGTGTCCCTGCTTTGTCAGGGTAAGAAGGGGTAGAGAAAATGCCTCGAGCCAA TGTTCGAATACCAGGCGCTACGGCGCTGAAGTAACCCATGCCATACTCCCAGGAAAAGCTCG AACGACTTTGAGCAAGAGGGTACCTGTACCCGAAACCGACACAGGTGGGTAGGTAGAGAATA CCTAGGGGCGCGAGACAACTCTCTCTAAGGAACTCGGCAAAATAGCCCCGTAACTTCGGGAG AAGGGGTGCCTCCTCACAAAGGGGGTCGCAGTGACCAGGCCCGGGCGACTGTTTACCAAAAA CACAGGTCTCCGCAAAGTCGTAAGACCATGTATGGGGGCTGACGCCTGCCCAGTGCCGGAAG GTCAAGGAAGTTGGTGACCTGATGACAGGGGAGCCGGCGACCGAAGCCCCGGTGAACGGCGG CCGTAACTATAACGGTCCTAAGGTAGCGAAATTCCTTGTCGGGTAAGTTCCGACCCGCACGA AAGGCGTAACGATCTGGGCACTGTCTCGGAGAGAGGCTCGGTGAAATAGACATGTCTGTGAA GATGCGGACTACCTGCACCTGGACAGAAAGACCCTATGAAGCTTCACTGTTCCCTGGGATTG GCTTTGGGCCTTTCCTGCGCAGCTTAGGTGGAAGGCGAAGAAGGCCTCCTTCCGGGGGGGCC CGAGCCATCAGTGAGATACCACTCTGGAAGGGCTAGAATTCTAACCTTGTGTCAGGACCTAC GGGCCAAGGGACAGTCTCAGGTAGACAGTTTCTATGGGGCGTAGGCCTCCCAAAAGGTAACG GAGGCGTGCAAAGGTTTCCTCGGGCCGGACGGAGATTGGCCCTCGAGTGCAAAGGCAGAAGG GAGCTTGACTGCAAGACCCACCCGTCGAGCAGGGACGAAAGTCGGCCTTAGTGATCCGACGG TGCCGAGTGGAAGGGCCGTCGCTCAACGGATAAAAGTTACTCTAGGGATAACAGGCTGATCT TCCCCAAGAGCTCACATCGACGGGAAGGTTTGGCACCTCGATGTCGGCTCTTCGCCACCTGG GGCTGTAGTATGTTCCAAGGGTTGGGCTGTTCGCCCATTAAAGCGGTACGTGAGCTGGGTTC AGAACGTCGTGAGACAGTTCGGTCCATATCCGGTGTGGGCGTTAGAGCATTGAGAGGACCTT TCCCTAGTACGAGAGGACCGGGAAGGACGCACCTCTGGTGTACCAGTTATCGTGCCCACGGT AAACGCTGGGTAGCCAAGTGCGGAGCGGATAACTGCTGAAAGCATCTAAGTAGTAAGCCCAC CCCAAGATGAGTGCTCTCCT >N.tabacum _similar to UniRef100_A7P1T2 Cluster: Chromosome chr19 scaffold_4.6.  tobacco (EB681897. BY14266)  CTTCTTCAGGAAAACTCATACCTCAGAGAGCCGTTCAATTCCAATGGCTATGGGATTTTCTA GGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGTTTCCTTGGTATCTCCTCCGGTACTACCTTCTTCGTACTCACT TCAGGCCCAACCGTAAAATGAATATCTCAGCCTCTCTTTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTTCT TCCCTAATTCAGCCCACACCTTCCCGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACGTGTCTCTACTTTACTCA AGGTAAGTGCACCAAGATGGATGATCCTATGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAATTGCTCGC TGGAGTTTATGCAAAATGCTGCGGGACTTGAGAATTTGCGGAAGCAGGAGTTGGAATACTTT TTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAAGTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTCTTTGATGC TAAAACCATGGATGTGGTTGACTTGTTCCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCAACAAAAATGCACGAAG AAAGAATAAACGAATATATAGAAGGGAAATATGGAAAACTAGGAGTTGATCGGTATGGTATC 190   .060116T7)  GACTCAGCAGTCACAAGACTCGCCACCGTATCCTTCATTTCTTCTTCAGGAAACTCACTCCT CAAAGGAGCCGTTTAATTCCAATGGCTACGGGATTTTGTAGGGTCCCCTTGCTGCGGCGGTT CCTTGTATCTCCGCCGGTACTACCTTTTTCGTACTCACTTCAGCCCAGCCGTAAAATCAGTA TCTCCGCCTCTCTTTCTACCACCGAAGAATCTACTCCTTCCCTAATTCAGCCCACAACTTCC CGTACCCGTTGGAAGCCAACATGTCTCTATTTTACTCAAGGTAAGTGCACTAAGATGGATGA TCCTACGCATATTGACAAGTTTAATCATAGTTGCTCCCTTGAGCTTATGCAAAATGTTGCGG GACTTAAGAATTTGCGGCAGCAGGAGTTGGAATACTTTTTGGTGCTTGATTTGGAGGGTAAA GTTGAGATTCTTGAGTTTCCAGTTCTCCTATTTGATGCCAAAACCATGGACGTCGTCGAGTT TTTCCATAGGTTTGTGAGGCCGACAAAAATGCATGAAGACAGAATAAATGAATATATAGAAG GGAAATATGGAAAGCTAGGAGTTGATCGCGTCTAACATGATACAGCTATCCCATTTGGAGAA GTTATCGAGCAGTTTGAAGTTTGGCTGGGTGAACGTCAATTGTGGAGAAATGAACTGGGCGG CTGTCTAAATAAAGCTGCCTTTGTTACTTGTGGGAACTGGGATCTGAAGA >N. KP1B.

 nuclear gene encoding  chloroplast protein.tabacum _FtsH‐like protein Pftf precursor (Pftf) mRNA.6.1)  ATGGCTACTTCATCAGTATGCATAGCAGGAAATAGTTTGTCTACTCATAGAAGGCAGAAAGT TTTCAGGAAGGACATTTATGGCAGGAAAATTTTATTTTCCTCAAATCTTCCATCGTCTAGTA AAACATCGAGAATAGCTGTAAAAGCATCCCTTCAGCAAAGGCCAGATGAAGGAAGAAGAGGT TTTCTCAAATTATTGCTTGGAAATGTTGGGCTTGGAGTACCGGCTTTGTTAGGTGATGGAAA AGCCTACGCTGATGAGCAAGGTGTGTCTAACTCAAGGATGTCGTATTCTAGATTTTTGGAGT ATTTGGATAAGGATAGGGTGCAAAAAGTAGATTTGTTTGAAAACGGAACCATAGCTATTGTT GAGGCTATATCTCCAGAATTAGGAAACCGGGTTCAGAGGGTTCGGGTACAACTACCTGGGCT CAGCCAGGAACTCCTTCAGAAGTTGCGAGAAAAGAACATTGACTTTGCTGCTCACAATGCCC AAGAGGACTCGGGTTCTTTCCTATTCAACTTGATTGGGAATCTGGCATTCCCGCTTATTTTG ATTGGTGGTCTTTTCCTGCTATCAAGGCGGTCTCCCGGAGGAATGGGAGGTCCTGGTGGGCC TGGTAACCCATTAGCATTTGGTCAATCAAAGGCTAAATTCCAAATGGAGCCAAACACTGGTG TAACATTTGATGATGTTGCTGGTGTAGATGAAGCAAAACAAGATTTTATGGAGGTCGTAGAA TTTTTGAAGAAGCCCGAGAGGTTTACCGCAGTGGGGGCTCGTATTCCAAAAGGTGTTCTTCT TGTTGGTCCTCCTGGTACTGGGAAGACCCTGCTAGCAAAGGCAATTGCTGGTGAAGCGGGTG TTCCATTTTTCTCAATTTCAGGTTCAGAATTTGTTGAGATGTTTGTTGGTGTAGGAGCCTCT CGAGTCCGTGATCTTTTCAAGAAGGCCAAGGAAAATGCTCCCTGCATTGTATTTGTTGATGA AATTGATGCTGTTGGGCGGCAAAGAGGGACTGGAATTGGAGGAGGGAATGATGAAAGGGAAC AGACCCTGAACCAACTATTGACAGAAATGGACGGTTTCGAAGGAAATACTGGTATAATAGTT GTTGCGGCAACCAATCGTGCAGATATTCTTGACTCTGCTTTGCTGAGACCAGGGCGATTTGA TAGACAAGTAAGTGTGGATGTTCCAGATATCAAGGGAAGAACAGAGATCTTAAAGGTTCACG CGGGCAACAAGAAGTTCGATTCTGATGTTTCTCTTGAAGTTATAGCCATGAGGACACCCGGT TTTAGTGGTGCAGATCTTGCTAACCTCTTAAATGAAGCAGCCATTCTTGCTGGTCGGCGTGG TAAGACAGCAATCGCATCCAAAGAGATTGATGATTCAATTGATAGGATAGTGGCTGGAATGG AAGGAACAGTCATGACTGATGGCAAGAGCAAGAGTCTGGTGGCATACCACGAAGTTGGACAT GCCATCTGTGGAACTCTCACTCCAGGGCATGATGCTGTTCAAAAGGTCACATTAATCCCACG TGGTCAGGCAAAAGGTTTGACCTGGTTCATTCCTGCAGATGATCCAACCTTAATATCCAAGC AGCAACTCTTTGCTAGAATTGTCGGAGGACTTGGGGGAAGAGCTGCAGAGGAAGTTATCTTT GGTGAACCTGAGGTGACCACTGGTGCTGCAGGCGATTTGCAGCAGATCACCGGTTTGGCAAA ACAGATGGTTGTCACTTTTGGGATGTCTGAACTTGGCCCATGGTCACTCATGGATTCTTCTG CCCAAAGTGGTGATGTAATCATGAGAATGATGGCTAGGAATTCTATGTCAGAAAAGCTAGCT GAAGACATTGATGGTGCTGTGAAGAGGCTTTCAGACAGCGCATATGAGATTGCATTGACCCA TATCCGCAACAACCGTGAAGCAATTGATAAGATTGTGGAAGTCCTCCTTGAAAAGGAGACGA TGACCGGAGATGAATTCCGCGCTATTCTCTCAGAATTTGTTGAAATTCCTGCTGAAAACCGA GTTGCTCCTGTTGTACCTACCCCAGCAACTGTATAA >ATP‐dependent Clp protease Nicotiana tabacum homologue (NtGI: TC85451)  CATTGAGAAAGATCCTGCGTTGGAGAGGAGGTTCCAACCAGTTAAAGTCCCTGAACCTACTG TGGATGAAACCATACAGATCTTGAAAGGGCTTCGGGAGAGATATGAGATTCATCACAAGCTC CGTTACACCGATGAGGCATTAGAAGCTGCTGCCCAGCTTTCTTATCAGTACATCAGTGACCG TTTTCTGCCTGATAAAGCAATTGATTTGATTGATGAAGCTGGTTCCCGTGTTAGACTACGCC ATGCACAGCTCCCTGAGGAAGCAAGAGAGCTCGAGAAAGAACTTCGTCAGATTACAAAGGAG AAAAATGAAGCTGTGCGAGGTCAAGATTTTGAAAAGGCGGGGGAACTGCGTGATAGAGAAAT GGATCTTAAGGCACAGATCTCAGCCCTGATAGACAAAAACAAAGAGATGAGCAAGGCTGAAT CCGAGGCTGGAGATACAGGTCCACTCGTTACAGAGGCAGATATTCAGCACATTGTGTCTTCA TGGACTGGCATCCCTGTCGAGAAGGTTTCAACAGATGAATCTGATCGCCTCTTAAAAATGGA AGAAACACTTCACACCAGAATCATTGGCCAGGATGAAGCTGTGAAAGCCATTAGTCGCGCTA TCCGACGTGCTCGTGTTGGGCTCAAGAATCCCAACCGACCTATTGCCAGTTTCATCTTTTCT GGTCCAACTGGTGTTGGGAAATCAGAACTGGCCAAGGCTTTAGCAGCGTACTACTTTGGTTC 191   . complete cds (GenBank: AF117339. Supplements  TAATTCAGTAGTTCGAAATACAATTCAGCAGTTGGAACTTAGCGCCTTTTGGTTCTATATGA AGAATTGCATG >N.

tabacum_ mRNA for chloroplast RNA polymerase.6.2)  CTGGCTTCCACAGCTTCTTACTCTCCAAGTCCAACATCTCAATGGAGAACTCAAAAACTCCC AAAAAGATTCAATTTTTATGTCATTCACAATCAAGAATTTGGAAAATTATCCCAAAGTTCAT CACTTTCCACTTCTTCATTTCCCAAAACTCTTAAATTACCTGTAATTCATATGCCAATTAAT AATATTCAGTCCCAAACAACAGTGTGTGTATCCACTGATGAGAATCTTGAAGAATTGGTGAA TTTGCAGAAAATCCCAAATGGGTTTTTGAATAAAGAATCAAATAAGAGAGTTTTTATTCAAG ACCCACCTTGGGTTTCTTCACTTTTTATGAATAGTTTGTTTGTTAGAGCTAAACAGGTTCAA GGGGTGAGAAGGGAATTTAGGGAAATTGAGAGAAGGAGAAGGTATGCTATGTTGAGGAGGAG ACAAATAAAGGCGGAAACTGAGGCTTGGGAGCAAATGGTGGAGGAATATAGGGAGTTGGAGA GGGAAATGTGTGAGAAGAAACTAGCACCCAATTTGCCTTATGTTAAAAAGCTGTTATTGGGT TGGTTTGAGCCATTGAGACAAGCTATAGAGAAGGAGCAGAACGCTGAGACGACCGTGAAACA TAGGGCGGCGTTTGCGCCACATATTGATTCTTTACCTGCTGATAAAATGGCTGTGATTGTGA TGCATAAGTTGATGGGATTGTTGATGATGGGTGGTAAAGAAGAGAGATGTGTTCAGGTCGTC CAAGCTGCGGTGCAGATTGGCATGGCAGTCGAGAATGAAGTTAGGATTCATAATTTCTTGGA GAAAACAAAGAAACTCCAGAAACATATGACTGGAGCTCAAAGTCAAGAAGATATGAGTAAGG AGACAATGATTCTAAGGAAACGGGTCAAAAGCTTGATTAAAAGGAATCGAGTAGTTGAGGTG AGAAAGCTGATGAAAAGTGAAGAACCCGAGTCTTGGGGTCGGGATACACAGGCTAAGTTAGG ATGCCGGCTTTTAGAATTATTAACAGAAACAGCTTATGTGCAACGTCCAGTGGATCAGTCTG CTGATACTCCTCCTGATATTAGGCCTGCGTTCAGGCACGTATTCAAAATTGCTACAAGAGAT CCGGGGAAGAACATTGTCAAGAAGTATGGTGTCATTGAATGTGATCCATTGGTTGTTGCGGG AGTTGACAGAACAGTGAAACAGATGATGATTCCTTATGTGCCTATGTTGGTGCCACCCAAAA AATGGAGAGGGTATGACAAAGGCGGATACTTATTCTTGCCCTCCTATTTGATGCGCACTCAT GGATCTAGGAGGCAACAAGATGCTGTAAGAGGTGTTCCCACGAAACAAATGCAGCAAGTTTA TGAGGCCTTGGATACCTTAGGAAGCACTAAATGGAGAGTGAATAAAAGGATACTAAATGTGG TTGAGAGTATTTGGGCTGGAGGAGGAAATATTGCTGGCCTAGTGGATCGCAAAGATGTTCCC ATACCGGAGTTGAGCAACTCCGATGATATAATGGAAGTGAAAAAGTGGAAATGGAAAGTGAG AAAATCCAAGAAAATCAACCAAGAGTTGCATTCCCAAAGATGTGACACAGAGCTCAAGCTTT CAGTTGCTCGGAAATTGAAAGATGAGGAAGGATTTTATTATCCTCACAATCTTGATTTTCGA GGACGTGCATACCCTATGCATCCTCATTTGAATCACTTGAGCTCTGATCTCTGTCGAGGAAT CCTTGAATTTGCGGAAGGACGACCACTAGGAAAGTCAGGATTGCGTTGGCTGAAAATACATT TAGCAAGTCTTTATGCAGGGGGGGTAGAGAAGCTCTGCTACGATGCACGCCTTGCATTTGTA GAAAACCACATTCATGACATATTAGATTCAGCAAACAATCCTCTAAATGGAAATCGATGGTG GTTAAATGCTGAGGATCCTTTTCAGTGCTTAGCAGCTTGCATCAACCTATCAGAAGCTTTAA 192   . Supplements  TGAAGAAGCAATGATCCGGCTTGATATGAGTGAGTTTATGGAGAGACACACTGTCTCTAAAC TCATTGGTTCACCCCCTGGTTATGTTGGTTACACTGAAGGTGGTCAACTGACTGAAGCTGTG AGGCGTCGACCTTACACTGTTGTGCTCTTTGATGAGATTGAGAAGGCTCATCCTGATGTCTT CAACATGATGCTTCAAATTCTTGAAGATGGAAGATTGACAGACAGCAAGGGCAGAACTGTCG ACTTCAAGAATACACTTCTCATCATGACATCGAATGTCGGAAGCAGTGTGATAGAGAAAGGA GGCCGTCGTATAGGTTTTGATCTAGATTATGACGAGAAGGATAGCAGTTACAACCGTATCAA GAGCTTGGTGACTGAGGAGTTGAAACAGTACTTTAGGCCAGAGTTCTTGAACAGATTGGATG AGATGATTGTATTCCGTCAGCTCACTAAGTTAGAGGTGAAGGAGATAGCTGATATCATGCTT AAGGAGGTCTTTGAGAGGTTGAAAAATAAGGAGATAGAACTTCAAGTGACGGAGAGGTTTAG AGACAGGGTGGTTGACGAAGGGTACAACCCAAGCTACGGAGCAAGACCGTTGAGGAGAGCTA TTATGAGACTGCTGGAAGACAGCATGGCCGAGAAGATGCTTGCAGGTGAGATCAAAGAAGGT GATTCAGTAATTGTGGACGTGGACTCTGATGGTAATGTGACCGTCCTCAATGGCACTAGCGG AACTCCCTCAGATCCAGCTCCTGAGCCTATCCCTGTGTAGATCCGCTCTGCTGCTTGCTTTA GCTCTGCAAATTTGTTGTTTGTAATGTTGCTTTCATTTGTCTTGGCCACTAAGCTCTCCTGG GGTTATGAAGCAACTTGTGAGTAATTTATGGGGTCATTGGGTGATGAAATTCTGCCAAGTTG AGAAGGGTAGCACCTCCATTATATCAGACCTTTCAGGATTACACACTATATACTGAATTTCT TTAAGATTGTAGTGACCTCGCAAGATAGTGTAAAATTGCGACGAAGACTATGTAGAACC  >N. rpoT3‐tom gene (GenBank:  AJ416570.

1)  ATGCCTATTGGTGTTCCAAAAGTCCCTTTCCGAAGTCCTGGAGAGGAAGATGCATCTTGGGT TGACGTATACAACCGACTTTATCGAGAAAGATTACTTTTTTTAGGCCAAGAGGTTGATAGCG AGATTTCGAATCAACTTATTGGTCTTATGGTATATCTCAGTATCGAGGATGAGACCAAAGAT CTGTATTTGTTTATAAACTCTCCTGGGGGCTGGGTAATACCTGGGGTGGCTATTTATGATAC TATGCAATTTGTGCGACCAGATGTCCATACAATATGCATGGGATTAGCCGCTTCAATGGGAT CTTTTATCCTGGTCGGAGGAGAAATTACCAAACGTCTAGCATTCCCTCACGCTAGGGTAATG ATCCATCAACCTGCTAGTTCTTTTTATGAGGCACAAACAGGCGAATTTGTCCTGGAAGCGGA AGAACTGCTGAAACTGCGTGAAACCCTCACAAGGGTTTATGTACAAAGAACGGGGAAACCCT TATGGGTTGTATCCGAAGATATGGAAAGAGATGTTTTTATGTCAGCAACAGAAGCCCAAGCT TATGGAATTGTTGATCTTGTAGCGGTTGAATGA >N.tabacum_ ClpP protease (ClpP) mRNA. Supplements  AAAGCTCGTCACCACATACTGTCATCTCCCATCTGCCTATTCATCAGGATGGTTCATGCAAT GGCCTACAGCACTATGCTGCTCTGGGGAGAGATAGCATGGAGGCCGCAGCCGTCAACTTAGT TGCTGGAGAGAAACCAGCTGATGTTTATACTGAAATTGCTCTGAGGGTTGATCATATTATCA GAGGAGATAGTATCAAGGACCCTGCAATTGATCCTAATGCTTTACTAGCCAAACTCCTAATT GACCAGGTTGACAGGAAATTGGTGAAGCAGACAGTAATGACCTCAGTGTATGGTGTTACCTA TGTCGGAGCACGTGAGCAAATCAAAAGAAGATTGGAGGAGAAGGGTCTTATCGATGATGATA GGCTGCTATTTACTGCATCTTGCTATGCTGCTAAAGTGACATTAGCTGCTTTGGGGGAGTTA TTTCAAGCGGCACGTGGCACAATGACTTGGCTTGGTGACTGTGCTAAGGTGATTGCTTTAGA AAATCAGCCAGTGCGATGGACGACACCACTGGGGCTCCCTGTTGTGCAGCCTTACTTTAAAA CTCAGCGGCATGTTATAAGAACTTCTCTTCAAATTTTGGCTTTGCAGCGCGAGGGTGATGCA GTTGAGGTCAGGAAACAGAGAACTGCTTTTCCTCCAAATTTCGTGCACTCACTTGATGGTTC GCATATGATGATGACTGCTGTTGCTTGTAGGGATGCTGGACTACAATTTGCAGGGGTACATG ATTCCTTCTGGACTCATGCATGTGATGTCGACCAGATGAACAGGATACTCCGCGAAAAGTTT GTGGAGCTGTACAGTTTGCCTATTCTTGAAGATTTGCTCGAAAACTTCCAGAAGTCATATCC AGCATTAACATTTCCTCCTCTACCAAAAAGAGGTGATTTCAATTTAAGGGAAGTTCTCGAGT CGCCCTACTTCTTTAACTGA >N. complete cds (GenBank: U32397. chloroplast gene encoding chloroplast  protein.1)  ATGCTCGGGGATGGAAATGAGGGAATATCTACAATACCTGGATTTAATCAGATACAATTTGA AGGATTTTGTAGGTTCATTGATCAAGGTTTGACGGAAGAACTTTATAAGTTTCCAAAAATTG AAGATACAGATCAAGAAATTGAATTTCAATTATTTGTGGAAACATATCAATTGGTCGAACCC TTGATAAAGGAAAGAGATGCTGTGTATGAATCACTCACATATTCTTCTGAATTATATGTATC CGCGGGATTAATTTGGAAAAACAGTAGGGATATGCAAGAACAAACAATTTTTATCGGAAACA TTCCTCTAATGAATTCCCTGGGAACTTCTATAGTCAATGGAATATATAGAATTGTGATCAAT CAAATATTGCAAAGTCCCGGTATTTATTACCGATCAGAATTGGACCATAACGGAATTTCGGT CTATACCGGCACCATAATATCAGATTGGGGAGGAAGATCAGAATTAGAAATTGATAGAAAAG CAAGGATATGGGCTCGTGTAAGTAGGAAACAAAAAATATCTATTCTAGTTCTATCATCAGCT ATGGGTTTGAATCTAAGAGAAATTCTAGAGAATGTTTGCTATCCTGAAATTTTTTTGTCTTT TCTGAGTGATAAGGAGAGAAAAAAAATTGGGTCAAAAGAAAATGCCATTTTGGAGTTTTATC AACAATTTGCTTGTGTAGGTGGCGATCCGGTATTTTCTGAATCCTTATGTAAGGAATTACAA AAGAAATTCTTTCAACAAAGATGTGAATTAGGAAGGATTGGTCGACGAAATATGAACCGAAG ACTGAACCTTGATATACCCCAGAACAATACATTTTTGTTACCACGAGATATATTGGCAGCCG CCGATCATTTGATTGGGCTGAAATTTGGAATGGGTGCACTTGACGATATGAATCATTTGAAA AATAAACGTATTCGTTCTGTAGCAGATCTTTTACAAGATCAATTCGGATTGGCTCTGGTTCG TTTAGAAAATGTGGTTCGGGGGACTATATGTGGAGCAATTCGGCATAAATTGATACCGACAC CTCAGAATTTGGTAACCTCAACTCCATTAACAACTACTTATGAATCCTTTTTCGGTTTACAC CCATTATCTCAAGTTTTGGATCGAACTAATCCATTGACACAAATAGTTCATGGGAGAAAATT AAGTTATTTGGGCCCTGGAGGACTGACAGGGCGCACTGCTAGTTTTCGGATACGAGATATCC 193   .6.tabacum_ chloroplast DNA for putative RNA polymerase beta‐subunit (ORF  1070) (GenBank: X12745.

 partial cds.6. tabacum_ coupling factor beta‐subunit gene.1)  ATGTCACCACAAACAGAGACTAAAGCAAGTGTTGGATTCAAAGCTGGTGTTAAAGAGTACAA ATTGACTTATTATACTCCTGAGTACCAAACCAAGGATACTGATATATTGGCAGCATTCCGAG TAACTCCTCAACCTGGAGTTCCACCTGAAGAAGCAGGGGCCGCGGTAGCTGCCGAATCTTCT ACTGGTACATGGACAACTGTATGGACCGATGGACTTACCAGCCTTGATCGTTACAAAGGGCG ATGCTACCGCATCGAGCGTGTTGTTGGAGAAAAAGATCAATATATTGCTTATGTAGCTTACC CTTTAGACCTTTTTGAAGAAGGTTCTGTTACCAACATGTTTACTTCCATTGTAGGTAACGTA TTTGGGTTCAAAGCCCTGCGCGCTCTACGTCTGGAAGATCTGCGAATCCCTCCTGCTTATGT TAAAACTTTCCAAGGTCCGCCTCATGGGATCCAAGTTGAAAGAGATAAATTGAACAAGTATG GTCGTCCCCTGTTGGGATGTACTATTAAACCTAAATTGGGGTTATCTGCTAAAAACTACGGT AGAGCCGTTTATGAATGTCTTCGCGGTGGACTTGATTTTACTAAAGATGATGAGAACGTGAA CTCACAACCATTTATGCGTTGGAGAGATCGTTTCTTATTTTGTGCCGAAGCACTTTATAAAG CACAGGCTGAAACAGGTGAAATCAAAGGGCATTACTTGAATGCTACTGCAGGTACATGCGAA GAAATGATCAAAAGAGCTGTATTTGCTAGAGAATTGGGCGTTCCGATCGTAATGCATGACTA CTTAACGGGGGGATTCACCGCAAATACTAGCTTGGCTCATTATTGCCGAGATAATGGTCTAC TTCTTCACATCCACCGTGCAATGCATGCGGTTATTGATAGACAGAAGAATCATGGTATCCAC TTCCGGGTATTAGCAAAAGCGTTACGTATGTCTGGTGGAGATCATATTCACTCTGGTACCGT 194   .5‐ biphosphate carboxylase/ oxygenase large subunit gene. complete cds. chloroplast  genes for chloroplast products (GenBank: J01450. Supplements  ATCCTAGTCACTATGGACGTATTTGCCCAATTGACACATCTGAAGGAATCAATGTTGGACTT ATTGGATCCTTAGCAATTCATGCGAGGATTGGTCATTGGGGATCTCTAGAAAGCCCTTTTTA TGAAATTTCTGAGAGGTCAACCGGGGTACGGATGCTTTATTTATCACCAGGTAGAGATGAAT ACTATATGGTAGCGGCAGGAAATTCTTTAGCCTTAAATCAGGATATTCAGGAAGAACAGGTT GTTCCAGCTCGATACCGTCAAGAATTCTTGACTATTGCATGGGAACAGGTTCATCTTCGAAG TATTTTTCCTTTTCAATATTTTTCTATTGGAGCTTCCCTCATTCCTTTTATCGAACATAATG ATGCGAATCGAGCTTTAATGAGTTCTAATATGCAACGTCAAGCAGTTCCTCTTTCTCGCTCC GAGAAATGCATTGTTGGAACTGGGTTGGAACGACAAGCAGCTCTAGATTCGGGGGCTCTTGC TATAGCCGAACGCGAGGGAAGGGTCGTTTATACCAATACTGACAAGATTCTTTTAGCAGGTA ATGGAGATATTCTAAGCATTCCATTAGTTATATATCAACGTTCCAATAAAAATACTTGTATG CATCAAAAACTCCAGGTTCCTCGGGGTAAATGCATTAAAAAGGGACAAATTTTAGCGGATGG TGCTGCTACGGTTGGTGGCGAACTTGCTTTGGGGAAAAACGTATTAGTAGCTTATATGCCGT GGGAGGGTTACAATTCTGAAGATGCAGTACTTATTAGCGAGCGTTTGGTATATGAAGATATT TATACTTCTTTTCACATACGGAAATATGAAATTCAGACTCATGTGACAAGCCAAGGCCCTGA AAAAGTAACTAATGAAATACCGCATTTAGAAGCCCATTTACTCCGCAATTTAGATAAAAATG GAATTGTGATGCTGGGATCTTGGGTAGAGACAGGTGATATTTTAGTAGGTAAATTAACACCC CAGGTCGTGAAAGAATCGTCGTATGCCCCGGAAGATAGATTGTTACGAGCTATACTTGGTAT TCAGGTATCTACTTCAAAAGAAACTTGTCTAAAACTACCTATAGGTGGCAGGGGTCGGGTTA TTGATGTGAGGTGGATCCAGAAGAGGGGTGGTTCTAGTTATAATCCCGAAACGATTCGTGTA TATATTTTACAGAAACGTGAAATCAAAGTAGGCGATAAAGTAGCTGGAAGACACGGAAATAA AGGTATCATTTCCAAAATTTTGCCTAGACAAGATATGCCTTATTTACAAGATGGAAGATCCG TTGATATGGTCTTTAACCCATTAGGAGTACCTTCACGAATGAATGTAGGACAGATATTTGAA TGTTCACTAGGGTTAGCAGGGAGTCTGCTAGACAGACATTATCGAATAGCACCTTTTGATGA GAGATATGAACAAGAAGCTTCGAGAAAACTTGTGTTTTCTGAATTATATGAAGCCAGTAAGC AAACAGCGAATCCATGGGTATTTGAACCCGAATATCCAGGAAAAAGCAGAATATTTGATGGA AGGACGGGGAATCCTTTTGAACAACCCGTTATAATAGGAAAGCCTTATATCTTGAAATTAAT TCATCAAGTTGATGATAAAATCCATGGGCGCTCCAGTGGACATTATGCGCTTGTTACACAAC AACCCCTTAGAGGAAGAGCCAAACAGGGGGGACAGCGGGTAGGAGAAATGGAGGTTTGGGCT CTAGAAGGGTTTGGGGTTGCTCATATTTTACAAGAGATGCTTACTTATAAATCGGATCATAT TAGAGCTCGCCAGGAAGTACTTGGTACTACGATCATTGGGGGAACAATACCTAATCCCGAAG ATGCTCCAGAATCTTTTCGATTGCTCGTTCGAGAACTACGATCTTTAGCTCTGGAACTGAAT CATTTCCTTGTATCTGAGAAGAACTTCCAGATTAATAGGAAGGAAGCT >N. and ribulose‐1.

6. Supplements  AGTAGGTAAACTTGAAGGTGAAAGAGACATAACTTTGGGCTTTGTTGATTTACTGCGTGATG ATTTTGTTGAACAAGATCGAAGTCGCGGTATTTATTTCACTCAAGATTGGGTCTCTTTACCA GGTGTTCTACCCGAGGCTTCAGGAGGTATTCACGTTTGGCATATGCCTGCTCTGACCGAGAT CTTTGGGGATGATTCCGTACTACAGTTCGGTGGAGGAACTTTAGGACATCCTTGGGGTAATG CGCCAGGTGCCGTAGCTAATCGAGTAGCTCTAGAAGCATGTGTAAAAGCTCGTAATGAAGGA CGTGATCTTGCTCAGGAAGGTAATGAAATTATTCGCGAGGCTTGCAAATGGAGCCCGGAACT AGCTGCTGCTTGTGAAGTATGGAAAGAGATCGTATTTAATTTTGCAGCAGTGGACGTTTTGG ATAAGTAA >N.tabacum_ chloroplast gene P32 for thylakoid membrane protein (GenBank:  X00616.1)  ATGACTGCAATTTTAGAGAGACGCGAAAGCGAAAGCCTATGGGGTCGCTTCTGTAACTGGAT AACTAGCACTGAAAACCGTCTTTACATTGGATGGTTTGGTGTTTTGATGATCCCTACCTTAT TGACGGCAACTTCTGTATTTATTATTGCCTTCATTGCTGCTCCTCCAGTAGACATTGATGGT ATTCGTGAACCTGTTTCAGGGTCTCTACTTTACGGAAACAATATTATTTCCGGTGCCATTAT TCCTACTTCTGCAGCTATAGGTTTACATTTTTACCCAATCTGGGAAGCGGCATCCGTTGATG AATGGTTATACAACGGTGGTCCTTATGAACTAATTGTTCTAGACTTCTTACTTGGCGTAGCT TGTTACATGGGTCGTGAGTGGGAGCTTAGTTTCCGTCTGGGTATGCGACCTTGGATTGCTGT TGCATATTCAGCTCCTGTTGCAGCTGCTACCGCAGTTTTCTTGATCTACCCAATTGGTCAAG GAAGTTTTTCTGATGGTATGCCTCTAGGAATCTCTGGTACTTTCAATTTCATGATTGTATTC CAGGCTGAGCACAACATCCTTATGCACCCATTTCACATGTTAGGCGTAGCTGGTGTATTCGG CGGCTCCCTATTCAGTGCTATGCATGGTTCCTTGGTAACTTCTAGTTTGATCAGGGAAACCA CAGAAAATGAATCTGCTAATGAAGGTTACAGATTCGGTCAAGAGGAAGAAACTTATAACATC GTAGCCGCTCATGGTTATTTTGGCCGATTGATCTTCCAATATGCTAGTTTCAACAACTCTCG TTCGTTACACTTCTTCCTAGCTGCTTGGCCTGTAGTAGGTATCTGGTTTACCGCTTTAGGTA TCAGCACTATGGCTTTCAACCTAAATGGTTTCAATTTCAACCAATCTGTAGTTGACAGTCAA GGCCGTGTAATTAATACTTGGGCTGATATCATTAACCGTGCTAACCTTGGTATGGAAGTTAT GCATGAACGTAATGCTCACAACTTCCCTCTAGACCTAGCTGCTATCGAAGCTCCATCTACAA ATGGATAA >T‐DNA vector pDs‐Lox. basta resistance: 3195 to 3746  (AY836546. complete sequence.1)  ATGAGCCCAGAACGACGCCCGGCCGACATCCGCCGTGCCACCGAGGCGGACATGCCGGCGGT CTGCACCATCGTCAACCACTACATCGAGACAAGCACGGTCAACTTCCGTACCGAGCCGCAGG AACCGCAGGAGTGGACGGACGACCTCGTCCGTCTGCGGGAGCGCTATCCCTGGCTCGTCGCC GAGGTGGACGGCGAGGTCGCCGGCATCGCCTACGCGGGCCCCTGGAAGGCACGCAACGCCTA CGACTGGACGGCCGAGTCAACCGTGTACGTCTCCCCCCGCCACCAGCGGACGGGACTGGGCT CCACGCTCTACACCCACCTGCTGAAGTCCCTGGAGGCACAGGGCTTCAAGAGCGTGGTCGCT GTCATCGGGCTGCCCAACGACCCGAGCGTGCGCATGCACGAGGCGCTCGGATATGCCCCCCG CGGCATGCTGCGGGCGGCCGGCTTCAAGCACGGGAACTGGCATGACGTGGGTTTCTGGCAGC TGGACTTCAGCCTGCCGGTACCGCCCCGTCCGGTCCTGCCCGTCACCGAGATTTGA   195   .

 Austria  Brücklweg 20. Univ. DI Dr. Prof. no children      Education  Doctorate Studies in Agricultural Sciences at the University  of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences in Vienna.  Austria    09/2006 – current  14th of October. Dr. 2011)     Personal Information  DI Jutta Maria Helm  Born the 11th of July. 1999    196  . Austria  GCSE A‐level with good success at the BG/BRG Gmunden. funded by a Marie Curie Fellowship at the Institute  of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology. Mag. Kriton Kalantidis  Graduation to “Diplomingenieurin” in Food Science and  Biotechnology (comparable to MSc) with excellent success  Master thesis: Characterization of the myeloperoxidase  mutant Met243Thr produced in CHO cells. Marie‐Theres  Hauser  expected end: 2011  PhD thesis: The putative RNA silencing protein ERL‐1 is  involved in chloroplast ribosomal RNA processing in  plants. supervised by Ass. supervised by  Ao. 4663 Laakirchen. unmarried.Helm@gmx. 2005    10/2003 – 02/2004    10/1999 – 10/2005    22th of June.6 Curriculum vitae (March. 1981 in Gmunden.at  Austrian citizenship. Dr. Christian Obinger  Grade: excellent  Exchange semester at the Aristoteleio Panepistimio Thessa‐ lonikis in Thessaloniki. Foundation of Re‐ search and Technology Hellas (FoRTH‐IMBB) in Heraklion. Greece  Study of Food Science and Biotechnology with emphasis on  biochemistry and cell biology at the University of Natural  Resources and Applied Life Sciences in Vienna. Prof. Prof. Austria  Mobile: +43 699 10402842  E‐Mail: Jutta. supervised by Ao. Univ.6.  Austria.  Greece.

 Austria  Teaching assignment: Exercises in Molecular Biology (Eng‐ lish)  University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences  in Vienna. regional ex‐ pert CIS/SEE. Austria  Assistant within the GENAU‐Project: Heritable stress ef‐ fects in plants  SCA Graphic Sundsvall AB (Ortviken Paper Mill – Devel‐ opment Department) in Sundsvall.    03/2005 – 05/2005  University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences  in Vienna. Austria  Regulatory Affairs Manager: product expert. photometric and potentiometric determina‐ tion of wine quality parameters and optimization of the  probe preparation for the Reflectoquant® determination of  yeast‐usable nitrogen.    04/2010 – current    01/2010    04/2006 – 08/2006    06/2005 – 07/2005    07/2004 – 09/2004    08/2003    07/2002 – 08/2002    197   . Supplements    Work experience  Ebewe Pharma GesmbH Nfg KG (Sandoz Business Unit  Oncology Injectables) in Unterach. regulatory maintenance  University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences  in Vienna. Germany  Reflectometric. Austria  Chemical analysis of food raw material.  Austria Frost Nahrungsmittel GmbH (Quality Assurance) in  Groß‐Enzersdorf. Austria  Laboratory support in analytic chemistry for undergradu‐ ate students. Austria  Sewage and physical paper analysis.  Merck Life Science & Analytics (Research & Development  Department) in Darmstadt.6.  SCA Laakirchen (Quality Assurance) in Laakirchen. validation of cali‐ bration functions and assistance in the microbiological labo‐ ratory. Sweden  Evaluation and validation of a protocol for the determina‐ tion of COD release during the thermo‐mechanical pulping  process and its application at different refiner loads.

 FPLC. Kalantidis K. (2006). ba‐ sics in SPSS  A. hiking and volleyball. Helm JM. reading.  working with radioactivity. Generation  of transgenic plants. SDS‐PAGE. Obin‐ ger C. Greek: very  good. real‐time PCR. A role for plant ERL1 in rRNA  biogenesis – in preparation  Helm JM. play‐ ing guitar    Software    Driving licenses    Interests      Publications  Helm JM.  Arch Biochem Biophys. COI. Zederbauer M. Stopped‐Flow Spectroscopy. RNA silencing move‐ ment in plants. DNA‐/RNA‐/Protein‐Extraction. sports especially  bicycling. Schumacher HT. ELISA. 3’‐ RACE. competent with internet applications. (2011) Local RNA silencing mediated by agroin‐ filtration. Agroinfiltration. Confocal‐/Electron‐/ Lightmicro‐ scopy  MS Office 2003 & 2007. Kalantidis K.  Flow Cytometry. Schumacher HT. Supplements        Additional skills  Languages  Methods  German: mother tongue. Isola‐ tion/Transformation of protoplasts. to experience foreign  cultures and habits. French. Biol Cell. English: excellent. Dadami E. B (own car available)  Studying languages and travelling. Methods in Molecular Biology 744  – in press  Kalantidis K. Jantschko W.  eCTD‐Manager.6. Cloning. SAP. 445(2):199‐213    198   . Southern/Northern/Western Blotting. Jakopitsch C. my dog Mavrodafni. Active site structure and catalytic mechanisms of human peroxidases. Helm J. Adobe Photoshop CS3. 100(1):13‐26  Furtmüller PG. RNAi & Plant Gene Function Analysis. swimming. Bogner M. Vamvaka E. Spanish: good  PCR. (2008). animal cell culture (CHO cells). Alexiadis T.  liquid chromatography.

199  .

                          Da steh ich nun. Goethe    200  . ich armer Tor!  Und bin so klug als wie zuvor…  Faust.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful