Shelf.

DOTTED STATES OF AMERICA.

THE
JIUN^EI^ P^NDB06K
CONTAINING A DESCRIPTION OF

ALL ARTICLES REQUIRED IN CAMP
WITH

Hints on Provisions and Stores

AND

RECEIPTS FOR CAMP COOKING
^
BY

-AN OLD HUNTER"

;^^J
\

BOSTON

**
,

'

H*

^ "if

LEE AND SHEPARD, PUBLISHERS NEW YORK
CHARLES
T.

DILLLINGHAM

1885

Copyright, 1885,

By LEE

AND SHEPARD.

All rights reserved.

huxtek's handbook.

CONTENTS.
Section.

P a ge«
Introduction
5

I.

Quantity of Provisions required on a Trip.
List

II.

and Comparative List of Provisions. of Provisions from which to select

9
15 19

III.

IV. V. VI.

The Hunter's Paraphernalia The Camp Fire General Remarks on Camp Routine
Cooking Utensils General Remarks on Camp Cookery

...
. .

.

23

.....
...
. .

29

39
45
57 6i

VII.

Index to Receipts VIII. Recipes for Camp Cookery IX. The Last Resource Index to Section X. On the Treatment of Drowning, Wounds, X.

....

in
116

Stings,

etc.,
.

117

XL
XII.

Index to Section XL Miscellaneous Receipts
Signs of the

Weather

.... ....

.

130
131

135

INTRODUCTION.
The want
of
to

a

cheap,

portable

and

reliable

Hand

Book devoted
Camp,
and

the interior
especially
felt.

economy
to

of the Hunter's

more

the

Art

of

Camp

Cookery, has long been

We

have some excellent

works on Hunting, some of which devote a few pages
to

these

subjects,

but these books, in their elaborate

bindings,

with their numerous illustrations, and costing

a considerable

sum

of

money, are better
or
to

fitted to

grace
the

a

Drawing

Room
to

table,

occupy places

in

Library, than
a

be carried through the vicissitudes of
usefulness
for

campaign.

Their

would

scarcely

comfeel

pensate the

Hunter

the
in

care

which he would

bound

to

bestow on them

order to keep their beauty

unsullied
dirt,

by

the

unavoidable
little

exposure
accidents

to

dampness,

and the thousand
to

of

Camp

life.

More acceptable

the

Hunter, be he professional or

amateur, would be a rough and ready handbook which
he

could use

without

fear

and

and

trembling,

and

6

JNTR OB UC TJON.
to

which could be consigned, without compunction,
corner
the
of the
larder,

any

not
the

always,
Blest.
is

in

truth,

dispensing
I

odors of Araby
fill
:

Such a want

have

endeavored to
the
public.

such a

here handbook offered to

Many
life,

years

of

experience in

the

economy

of

Camp
me

supplemented by diligent research among the best
on the subject, have,
I

authorities
to

trust,

qualified

undertake the compilation of these pages.

The various
mented on

sections

of

the

work need not be comexception
of

here,

with

the

Section

IX,

which contains the Receipts for

Camp
the

Cookery.

The

Receipts here given cover a large area, comprising not
only
the
the
directions
for

preparing

frugal

fare
for

of

hardened

Hunter, but also the

formulas

con-

cocting the
the amateur

somewhat more dainty dishes
Nimrod.

affected

by

As
of

to

whether a professional hunter should
the

confine

himself to

commonest
I

diet

and
no

abjure
opinion.
I

the

fare
is

civilization,

need

express

That

merely a matter of personal election.

may, however,
nourished

mention
the body

the
is,

obvious
the

fact,

that

the
it

better

more hardship
,

can endure.

Good
also

food keeps us in good health

exercise, or work,

conduces to the
health the

same

desirable

end.

The

better

our

greater

pleasure
benefit

do

we take

in

working,

and the greater the

derived

therefrom.

Thus

INTRODUCTION.
we have
these

7

two

powers,

food

and

exercise,

while

separately benefiting us,

most intimately
to

depending on
that
benefit,

each other

for

their

ability

bestow
of

and

hence

while
neglect

undergoing
to

plenty

exercise
of

we
its

must not

appropriate a

sufficiency

con-comitant
facts
it

adjunct,

nourishing
that

food.

From
held

these

will

be

seen

the

idea

by

some

young amateur hunters, that they should deprive themselves
of
their

customary

diet

in

supposed

manly

emulation of
is

their

more

hardy

professional
the
in

brethren,
old
coals,

as

hurtful

as
his

foolish.

While

wiry
the

scout
sup-

thrives

on

bear meat

broiled
tea,

plemented by some meal and

and scorns

to prepare

any compound dishes, the amateur
for

who
is

leaves
liable

home
to be
ill,

a

week's holiday

in

the wilderness
if

seriously

inconvenienced,
in

not
diet.

actually

made

by
re-

too great a change

his

Again,
self
in
is

we must
the

member
food,
liberty

that

to

please
in

one's

choice of
of that

as well

as

other

matters,

a part
to

which the hunter fondly expects

enjoy,

and
civil-

should obtain, when, casting off the shackles of
ization,

he

seeks

pleasure,
or

sport,

and

health in the
lagoons.

wilds

of the
I

forest,

on the waters of the
it

Thus
present
classes

have
receipts

considered

to

be

my

duty
of

to
all

which

shall

meet the

desires

of

hunters and excursionists.

S

INTRODUCTION.
With
hunters,
to

be able to
of

cook

their

food proppiteous

erly,

is

a prime
exists

necessity

life.

No more
who,

object

than

the

young

hunter

though

surrounded by plenty, has yet to content himself with
the plainest food,

and that not cooked but spoiled by
fire.

the injudicious application of

And

yet

there are

hundreds of such amateur hunters who, when
their
initiatory

out on

shooting excursion find themselves sudthey never

denly confronted by a deficiency of which
thought,
If

a lamentable

ignorance

of

the art of cooking.

such young hunters follow the advice

presented in
in

this

handbook, they may expect

their

efforts

cook-

ing to

meet with success.
the
I

To make
on
t*he

work

as

a

guide to

Camp
general

Cooking
remarks
Boiling,

more complete,
different
etc.,

have added

some

modes
I

of

cooking,
will

such as

Roasting,

which
of

hope

prove instructive.
into

The experience

many

Trips

the

wilderness

has been drawn upon to present correct views to the
reader,
will

and that the pages here offered
all

to

the

public

enable

hunters to escape the amateur's
is

painful episodes
into

which usually attend the
mysteries
of

initiation

the

Camp

life

the

earnest wish of

"An Old Hunter."

c

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
SECTION
I.

THE QUANTITY OF PROVISIONS REQUIRED ON A

HUNTING

TRIP,

AND COMPARATIVE

LIST

OF

PROVISIONS. In

making up

our

list

of

groceries

for a

hunting excursion several circumstances are to
be considered, the duration of the trip being,
of

course,

the

first

consideration.
is

The
we

sec-

ond

consideration

as

to

whether we can
If

purchase provisions en

route.

can, then

much food with us as we should have to take if we were going to The pass through an uninhabited country.
we need not carry
as
last

consideration

under

which

we

can

at-

io

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
to limit

tempt

the
is

amount

of

provisions
of

which we transport,
the

the chance
in

securing

game

of

which
hunter

we go
can
best

search.

The
these

experienced
questions

deal

with
are
to

himself, but

while there

circumlimit

stances
a

which may authorize
extent
carries,
I

him
of

to

certain

the

amount

provisions
ad-

which he
vise
all

would most
to

earnestly

amateurs
provide

take

with

them enough
every

food
their

to

full

meals for

day of
inva-

intended stay.
carry
too

The inexperienced
food,

riably

little

and even when

they think they are most munificently provided,
they
are

sure

to

be

on

short

commons

ere

they return

to their

homes.
at

We may
an

consider

a few methods of arriving
idea
of the

approximate

quantity of provisions required by

a party
If

contemplating a hunting excursion.
us
at

four of
require,

start

on a two- week's
meals
meals.

trip

we

will

three

per day,

enough

food to

provide

168

This

number

contains only
fasts

56

dinners,

and as pur break-

and

suppers are

generally

composed

of


PROVISIONS REQUIRED.
lighter

u
at

food than

that

which we consume

the

mid-day meal,
list

we
as

may
to

so

far

moderate
the

our

of

groceries
articles

provide

most
I

substantial

for

the

dinners only.

speak of
possible

confining our expenses to the lowest
rale,

as

I

am aware
a

that

money

is

very

often

quite

consideration
for pleasure,
trip.

even with
to

those
a

who

can

afford,

spend

few weeks on a hunting

Another
quantity

way

in

which

to

arrive

at
is,

the
to

of food

which we should carry,
thereof
in

consider
if

the

value

money.

Thus, board

we

pay

$3,

$4 or $5

per

week

for

we are provided with

different classes of tables
If

according to the rates which we pay.
willing
to
live

we
$3

are

on

the

board which

per

week provides
the

—very
of

good board
four

for a hunter

grocery

list

men

for

two

weeks

need
trouble

not
in

cost

more

than

$24.
list

The only
is

making up such a
our

to

know
advan-

how
tage,

to
or,

place

money

to

the best
different

what

quantities

of of

articles

to

buy.

As

a criterion

what

is

required,

12

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
give

I

below a

list

of

groceries

which were
an actual

taken
trip,

by

three

young

hunters on

and

which

gave perfect satisfaction and
to
this
in

left
is

no great surplus
be noted that

be carried home.

It

to

was a duck shooting
:

excursion, by water,

birch bark canoes

COMPARATIVE LIST OF PROVISIONS.
Three

Men

for

Two Weeks

:

Smoked ham

PROVISIONS REQUIRED.
Cooking Raisins
Syrup
Pickles
. . .

13
2 lbs
1

gal

4 bottles

Marmalade
Harvey's Sauce

...
. .

2 jars

Baking Powder

....
.

2

bottles
1

tin
tin

Mixed Herbs
Onions
Potatoes,
carrots
Salt,

.

1

10 lbs

and

in

....
route:

same bag, a few
1-2

bush

Pepper, Mustard, Vinegar.
Butter,

Bread,

Eggs, Milk and Potatoes were pur-

chased occasionally en

The above
ducks,
snipe

is

a very simple
is

list

of plain food,

but when to this

added the game secured,

and

fish,

we have

the

materials

wherewith

to

concoct very

elaborate

meals.
fully

While

this

party were

careful to

go out

provisioned for the two weeks of their intended
stay,

the
to

game
had

which

they

bagged

enabled

them
thus

prolong their
the

trip to
full

three weeks,

and

they

pleasure of

hunting

without any fear of being stinted
tions.

in their ra-

14

THE HUXTEKS HANDBOOK,
When
going
in

pursuit

of

different

game,
the

through different descriptions

of

country,

kind

of

provisions

which

the hunter
it

should
im-

carry varies
possible
to

somewhat,
give
;

and

is

therefore

any
but
I

definite list

by which he
reference
to

may
the
of

be guided
list

think

that
a

presented

above,

and

consideration
ascertaining
at

the

methods

advanced
with
a

for

the
list

quantity
in

required,
II,

glance
to

the

Section
close

will

enable him

arrive
re-

at

a

estimate
to

of

what

he actually

quires,
at his

and

see

what

articles

of luxury are
I

disposal.

To
of

the amateur

can merely
trust

reiterate
fickle

my

admonition that he
the
chase,

not to
the

chances

nor yet to

procurability of provisions en

route.

SECTION
LIST

II.

OF PROVISIONS

FROM

WHICH TO SELECT.
at

That the hunter may see
articles

a

glance what

are

available,

and that he may overI

look none
of

of

the

necessaries,

submit a
for

list

such

provisions

as

are
into

suitable

his

larder.

When we
of
at

take

consideration

the

varieties

canned goods which modern trade
disposal
of

places

the

the housekeeper,

we

have a very
our provisions
to

long
for

list

from

which
out.

to
I

select

camping

But

wish

warn the young hunter
canned goods.
to

against

purchasing
find

largely of
in

He
on
the

will

them

most cases,
is

be very expensive food, and
appetite.

such as
will

apt to pall

He
Fried

occasionally long

for

an

honest dish of
Beans,

Ham

and

Eggs,

Pork

and

:

16

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
or

Potatoes
as
will

Flap-jacks.

Such

canned
are
as

goods
follows

be found most useful
Beef,

Cooked Corn

Ham,

Lobsters, Salmon,
Liebig's

Baked Beans, Pea
Beef,

flour,

Extract of

Lambs' Tongues,

Sardines,

Marmalade,
the

Condensed Milk.
terials

We
of
is

have

in

these

ma-

for

cold
list

lunches.

The long
by

canned
also

luxuries
to

offered

most grocers

open

inspection,

and comprises

Canned
Oxtail,

Soups,

in

Tomato, Pea,
Bouilli,
etc.,

Chicken,

Maccaroni,
Mackerel,

Soup

Canned
Deviled

Oysters,

Deviled

Ham,
Mutton,

Meats,
Beef,

Roast

Lamb
Succotash,
Pears,

and

Smoked
Feet,

Tenderloin,
Peas,

Bonne Bonche,
Tomatoes,

Pigs'

Corn,
ries,
etc.,

Strawber-

Quinces,

Peaches,

Pine

Apples,

and

in

sauces we

have Harvey,
Chutney,
etc.,

Nabob,
Tobasco,

Browning,

Worcestershire,

French and German Mustard,
of

and a host

other articles.
It

may be observed

that

by taking

a

few

cans of the luxuries the

amateur

may make

PROVISIONS TO SELECT.
his

17

meals
at

in

the

wilderness

more

like

those

home, and so escape the unpleasant
to

craving for food
I

which he has been used.
in

well

remember

that

our

first

trips

into

the

wilds,

when we
craving
failed
to

carried no canned articles,

our chief

was
to

for

fresh

meat,

and
and

when

we

secure

any

game,

were forced
after

live

on ham or

salt

pork day

day,

this

craving
in

became
small

very

marked
from the

and detracted
pleasure of the
of canned
this

no

degree

trip.

With our modern supply
need
experience

meats,

no hunter

want. other
groceries

The
are,

from
for

which
frying,

to

select

Ham, Pork, Smoked Herrings,
Potatoes,

Lard,
Flour,

Codfish,

Oatmeal,

Cornmeal,

Onions,

Carrots,

Compressed VegeRice,
Raisins,

tables,

White

Beans,

Cheese,

Brown
Cocoa,

Sugar, White Sugar, Syrup, Tea, Coffee,

Chocolate,

Broma,

Kaoka,

Pickles,

Curry Powder, Baking Powder,

Mixed Herbs,
in

Corn
whole

Starch,

Pilot

Bread,

and
as

fact

the

range

of

groceries,

necessity

or

iS

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
Do
not forget those necessary

fancy dictates.
articles,

Salt,

Pepper,

Mustard,
also

and Vinegar.
eggs,

Butter
in

may be taken and
if

packed
en
if

salt,

these
is

articles

cannot be bought
to carry,

route.

Bread

too
of

bulky
flour

and

we take
own.

plenty

we

may

bake

our

:

SECTION

III.

THE HUNTER'S PARAPHERNALIA.

When
pecially
if

contemplating a

trip,

the hunter,

es-

he be an amateur, should make out
article

a

list

of every
in

which he
in
is

will

require,

both

groceries

and

personal

belongings,

and

as

each

article

packed
it

away
off

in

its
list.

proper place he should mark
In this

the

way he

will

be sure

to

procure

everywill es-

thing which

may be needed, and he
experience
of

cape

the

disagreeable

finding,
little

when

well

on

his

journey,that

some
salt,

but

much needed
left

article,

such as

has been

behind.
following
list

The
erally

comprises the articles gena

required

when on

hunting

trip

via

water

2o

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
If

bark canoes

are used,

we should take
sail,

a

spare paddle, a pole, leg-of-mutton

canvas
rosin

and

tacks

for

repairs,

a

sponge, some

and a rosin pot and
heated,
is

iron.

This iron, being

used to melt the old rosin on the
at

canoe,

and so cover leaks when they occur
which
next

seams

have

been

previously
the
tent,

rosined.

We may

enumerate

with

its

bag, poles, ropes and pegs complete.

A

good

long rope should be
in

carried to secure the tent

gales,

and

will

be found

otherwise

useful.

Cooking
per

utensils, per Section
I

VII.

Provisions,

Sections

and

II.

Groceries
ton
bags,
in

may be
holding

best carried in strong cot-

each
the

about

10

pounds,

marked

pencil with

name

of contents,

and packed
should be
for
if

in water-proof

boxes.

These boxes
biscuit

the

size

of

common

boxes,

they are

too

big and

very heavy, when

packed, they are awkward to handle.

Canned goods,

potatoes,

etc.,

which

will

not

be injured by water, may be carried
such as salt sacks.

in

bags,

A

sharp axe and a supply

THE HUNTER'S PARAPHERNALIA.
of

z\

matches are
in

required.

Matches may
bottle,

be

carried

a

large-mouthed
tin

securely

corked,

in a

waterproof

box.
articles

We may
lows:

enumerate

other

as

fol-

Gun, powder, shot, (different
caps,

sizes)

wads

and

or

cartridges

for
oil.

breech-loaders,
Belt and hunt-

cleaning utensils, rags and
ing knife.

A
pants

sewing bag containing needles,

thread, etc., fishing outfit,
of
shirt,

wax

candles, change
night.

and

socks for

Mocas-

sins for night, a tin of

boot-grease, (see Section

XI)
ding

blankets,

water-proof

bags to hold bed-

and

clothes,
knife,

overcoat,

Rubber
spoon.

coat,

Cups,
for

plates,

fork

and

Cloth

washing

dishes.

Each

member should
towels,

have a
brush,

haversack
soap,

containing
brush,

comb,
etc.

tooth
as

handkerchief,
also

Such
in

articles

tobacco

may

be carried

the

haversack.
if

Reading matter

may be
excel-

carried
lent

desired.

Rubber sheets
and

are

articles

for spreading
for

on the ground

un-

der the
rainy

bedding,

covering goods in

weather.

Lastly,

any

medicines

which

22

THE HUXTER'S HAXDBOOK.
requisite

may be thought
(See section
X.)

should be

carried.

The experienced hunter
any remarks on

will

know without
of

my

part,

what

the

above

mentioned
but to the
as
is

articles

will
I

be most useful to him,

amateur

would say
with
at

that,

so

far

commensurate
he
is

his

capabilities of
to consult
his his

transportation,

liberty

comfort,
trip,
all

and

should take

with

him

on

articles

which
of
all

may

actually

conduct
should

to

his

enjoyment
that

his

holiday.
of
in

He

be

careful

articles

his

parapherappropriate

nalia

are

properly
so

packed

receptacles,

that in

unloading his boat or
of

canoe he
articles
It
is

will

not

have a multitude

loose

to handle.

impossible to place before the amateur
list

any absolute
the

of his requirements, but

from
select

above

table

he

will

be

able

to

whatever he

may need

for

any description of

Hunting excursion.

SECTION
THE CAMP

IV.
FIRE.

The

quality

of

our

fire

depends, of course,
find
at

upon the wood which we
sornewhat,
great

hand,
in

and
any

though

not

necessarily
state
is

degree,

upon the

of

the

weather.

In

some

localities

wood

very

scarce

and

we have

to

exercise great

economy
be

in its use.
built
in

In such cases
hole
or

the so

fire

should

a

trench

as

to prevent

drafts of air

from

hastening

combustion.
place,

In
is

selecting

a

permanent camping

wood

one of the

most important considerations.
quantities
of
drift

In some places

wood
the

abound,

and when
hard

near by

we
in

have

standing

wood*

we

are

the cook's

paradise.
that

Care should

be

taken
the tent,

the

fire

is
it

not

built too close to

and also that

be

24

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
to

placed

leeward
In

thereof

to

prevent
fire

danger
pro-

ffrom sparks.
cure
it,

making our
green
if

we

first

a

large log,

possible,

and place

length wise to the wind, on the spot chosen

as

our fire-place.

This
it

is

called

the

"Back
fire,

log,"

and

against
is

we

build

our

on

whichever side

most

convenient.

Over the

Back

log,

from behind, project our cranes, or

"spumgullions"

— poles
the
all

driven

into
to

the

ground

and notched on the upper side
handles of our kettles,
blaze.

receive, the

as they swing
sticks for

over the
fire

In

laying

the

we

should place them

one way, parallel
at

to the

back
end.

log,

and

start

the flame

the

windward

By
a

laying the

wood

in
fire

this

manner, we

secure

more
the

compact

than
sticks

when
fall

we

cross-pile
to

sticks,

and the
as

clown

their

own burning
if

those below

are con-

sumed; but
apart

we

cross-pile the

sticks they fall

when burnt through
a

the middle,
to

and ne-

cessitate

continual

raking

keep

them

together.
parallel to

The
the

object of placing the back log

wind

is

to

prevent

its

being

CAMP
burned
to

FIRE.
to

25

through the

middle, and

allow us

work with greater ease on

either side of the

fire.

In

undertaking

the

different

methods
of

of

cooking,

we

require

different

kinds
fire

fires.

Thus, for boiling an ordinary
but for frying we
require
a

will

suffice,

good bed
is

of coals
fully
re-

and no blaze.
ferred to
in

This subject

more

"General

Remarks on Cooking,"
meal we should brush
from
the the
fire

Section Vll.

Before
the

cooking each
ashes

loose
If

away

with
for
at

a a

bough.

we camp on
the
will

same
of

spot

few days,
fire

accumulation

ashes
;

our

place be

be very inconvenient

and they

should

covered with a thin layer of earth
fire

and the
select

continued
for

thereon,
the
fire,

or

we may

a

new spot
as

covering the
their

old

ashes

before

to

prevent
to

being

blown about.
elaborate

Should we wish

cook a very
two
escape
fires,

dinner,

we

should

start

about
great

five

yards

apart,

and

so
fire

the

heat

which

one large

would throw

26

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
At one
roasting
of

out.

these fires
frying
;

we ma}' perform
the
other,

the

or

at

the

boiling.

In rainy weather,
cooking, the
of
of
fire

when not being used

for

should be covered with slabs
rain,

wood
poles

to

shed the
be
a
fire

or a

frame work
it

should
sheet,
If

erected
roof
is

over

and

a

rubber
thereon.
all

or

of

bushes,

placed

the

not

kept

burning
placed

night

some
of

dry
the

sticks

should
will

be
save

under cover
trouble
in

tent

and
fire

much

starting
will

the

in

the

morning

when everything

be wet with dew.
to the neces-

Should the hunter be reduced
sity

of using

grass or hay with which to cook,
the

he should

twist

hay

into

tight

ropes

or

blocks about two

feet

long

and of three or

four inches diameter.
are

The

tighter these blocks
will burn,
is

compressed the longer they
hotter will be

and

the

the

fire.

It

a

fact that
is

on the Western
extremely scarce,

Prairies,

where wood

often
des-

some farmers use

this

CAMP
cription
of
fuel

FIRE.
both
the

27

for

purposes

of

cooking and heating their habitations.
In using his axe to cut up
fire

wood,

the

amateur

cannot employ

too

much

care both

to prevent

accidents to himself or companions,

and to avoid breaking the
the
fire

handle or dulling
the

axe
a

on

stones.

For

production

of
car-

good supply of matches should be
and
the utmost care bestowed

ried

upon

their

safe keeping.

The hunter

will

do well

to pro-

vide himself with a sun, or burning glass, and
if

by any accident
on being held

his at

matches are
the

lost,

this
dis-

glass

proper focal

tance, in the sunshine, will readily ignite paper,
leaves,

or

small splints.

But as

this
it

glass
well
at

is

available only

during

sunshine,
of

is

to

have other methods

procuring
cloth

fire

our

command.
in

If

some paper or
charge of

be placed
it

a

gun on a

powder,
fired,

will

be

ignited

when
into

the

gun

is

and may be

coaxed
scatter

flame.

Another

method

is

to

some powder on a

stone,

and having
in

placed some dry leaves on the powder

such

28

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
manner
as
to

a

prevent

these
the

being

blown
by
a

away,

explode

a

cap

on

powder

blow of the axe or a stone.

The sparks
will

proalso

duced by striking two stones together
explode powder.
of the
into a
off

In using these methods some

powder should be dampened and formed
ball.

This

will

burn

slowly

and throw
produce

a

vast
heat.

quantity

of

sparks,

and

great

Some
a

of
fire

the

uncivilized tribes of
inserting
a
in

Polynesia procure
stick
into of

by

pointed

corresponding

hole

another
rapidly

and twirling the between the palms of the hands.
piece

wood,

stick

This method
the
of

may be looked upon
last will

as

being

hunter's

resource, and

I

hope none

my

readers

ever have to

test its

efficacy.

SECTION

V.

GENERAL REMARKS ON CAMP ROUTINE.
For the guidance of the amateur who
conversant with the General
life,

is

not

Economy
of

of

Camp

I

may

present a

series

short remarks

on the system of management which he should
follow

when on an

excursion.

As
trips

the
are

circum-

stances under which

hunting

under-

taken vary so widely, some being by land and
in

pursuit

of

different

kinds

of

game,
it

and

some by water
be well
if

in various

conveyances,
to

may

I

confine

myself

speaking of

some

definite kind of trip,

and from the observ-

ations

advanced

the

amateur

may determine
to

what

method

of
of

management
excursion.
that

pursue when
the

on any kind

For

present,

we may consider

the

following

remarks

3o

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
in

apply,

chief,

to

the

conducting
in

of

a

Duck

shooting excursion,

by water,
in

bark canoes.
as

The

daily

work

Camp, such
should either
in turn,

cooking,

collecting

wood,

etc.,

be under-

taken by each
ber
the
If

member

or each

memfor

should

be

assigned

a

special

duty

whole

trip.

possible,
all

go into

Camp

before

dark,

and

have
fall.

arrangements completed before night-

In
tions water, a
dry,

selecting
to

a

Camping ground,
are,

the

condi-

be desired
a

plenty of

wood, good
place,
tent.

with
level,

convenient
sheltered

landing
for

and

spot

the

A

bed

of

spruce
off

boughs may be made as
all

follows:

Cut
in tiers,

large
at

butts;

lay

the

boughs
bed,

commencing
a

the top of the

placing the

butts toward the bottom,

and

over this spread

rubber sheet or a blanket.
at

The blankets used
spread

night

should

not be

down

in

the daytime.

In case
the
tent

of rain,
to

dig

a

small

trench

round
in.

prevent

water from running

;

CAMP ROUTINE.
At night loosen
causes
the

31

the
to

tent-ropes,

as

the

dew

canvass

contract.

Guns may be strapped round
ammunition boxes placed
beds
the
;

the tent-poles;

at

the

head
placed
of

of

the

grocery boxes,

at

night,

inside

tent,

ranged

at

the

foot

the

beds
or

haversacks suspended from the
kept at the head of the beds,

tent-poles,
or,

in

daytime,

hung outside the
Stretch a
poles,

tent.

rope,

high
to

up

between
clothing

the
at

tent,

on

which
the

hang

nightoutwill

In
side

daytime,
for

rope

may be suspended
purpose,
or
a

the

same

pole

answer the same end.

On
taken

rising

in

the

morning spread
if

all
;

the

bedding
in,

on the
fold
it

grass,

dry,

to

air

when
each

up neatly,
the

and
his

place
bed.

man's bundle
If,

at

head of
of

during a continuance

rainy
seize

weather,

the

bedding
of

becomes
drying
it

damp,
before
for

every op-

portunity

the

fire.

When

on

an

excursion

any length of
socks,

time, such articles of

clothing as shirts,

'

32

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
may be washed on
sun to dry.
night,

etc.,

a fine

day,

and hung

in

the

At

the

canoes

should be

lifted

out

of the water,

and may be placed on
curtains of the
tent

their sides

close to
tional

the

as

an addi-

shelter

from

the

wind.
or
starting

On
day's

breaking

up

Camp,

on a
canoes

journey, examine

and repair

the

before loading up.

The
pends

consistency of which to

make
year
too

rosin de-

on

the
of

season
the

of

the
If

and the
the
if

temperature
fosin
splits
it

water.
in

hard,

or cracks

cold

water,

and

too soft

runs in

warm weather.
applying
to

Use more

or less grease according to circumstances.
the
finger

Wet
or

before

it

press

smooth the rosin on the canoe.

When
shade.
grass
if

not in

use,

keep on

the
its

canoe

in
in

the
the

Let

it

remain
is

bottom

no shade
at

available.
for

When
ing,

the ponds

the hid

evening shootin

the
it

canoe should

be

the

bushes,

or

may be masked by

placing boughs

and

CAMP ROUTIXE.
grass
in
it

33

so as to hide the
is

entire structure.

When
may
within

the canoe
sit

thus

disguised
or

the

hunter
to

in

it

to

shoot,

he

may paddle
water.

gun-shot of ducks
utensils,
in use,

in the

Cooking

after

being cleaned,

and

when not
or

should be ranged on a slab,

other piece
small
to

of

wood,
also

near

the

fire-place.

A

rack

may

be

erected

here on

which

hang dish-towels,
saplings,

etc.

Small

stripped
left

of

their

branches,
driven

but having the forks
into

on,

may be

the ground
will

on either side of the tent door,
to

and

form excellent racks on which
belts,
etc.,

hang
and

shot-bags,

during

the

day,

against
etc.

which

to

lean

paddles,

fishing-poles,

The grocery

boxes

should

be
all

over-hauled
parcels ex-

and cleaned occasionally,

and

amined and kept neatly
Place

tied up.

such groceries

as

are most

used

in

a

box by themselves.

Each member
quainted

of

the

party

should

be

ac-

with the whereabouts of every article.

34

THE HUNTER'S HA XD HOOK,
will

This
of

prevent

much

mauling

and
a
in

tossing
for

goods.

The

maxim,

"Have

place
its

everything,

and keep everything

place,''
its

should never be

more

strictly

obeyed, and

observance

is

never followed by better

results,

than when in Camp.

Keep
All

all

dishes,

knives,

etc.,

in

a

box by

themselves.
articles

which

will

admit of

it

should

be carried in bags as these
to

adapt themselves

any shape

in

the

canoe,

and

contract

as

their

contents diminish.

Ham
strong

and Pork should be wrapped
cloth,

in a clean,

and may be carried
on a
fine

in a

bag.

Occasionallv,
of
all

dav,

the
in

contents
the sun,
as
will

bags
is,

should

be spread

out

(that

vegetables,

and such

articles

be benefited thereby) and the bags allowed to
get
aired

and dried.
forget
that
to
is

Do
used,

not

the

guns,

being

much

require
oil

be

cleaned
to

occasionally.

Neat's-foot
etc.

excellent

use

on locks,

CAMP ROUTINE.

35

A
"Do
when
a

rule

which

all

amateurs should follow
breakfast."
for pleasure

is,

not argue

before

Those who do not bathe
the

daily,
it

opportunity

presents, should

make

duty to

do
at

so.

Never
will

fire

small birds with Duck-shot
of ammunition.
for

;

it

be a waste
of

Use
game.
be dry

the pro-

per sizes
If

shot
let

different

possible,
it

the

Tent

before

folding

up

to

remove.

When
examine

leaving a
are

camping ground, and
take
a
last

after

the canoes

loaded,

look and

the
left

ground
behind.
the

carefully,

that

nothing

may be

When
should

in

Canoe,
the
rest

the

guns,

if

loaded,
:

occupy

following
his,

positions

The
but

bow-man should
on
the

hammers downward,
him,
with
the

bar

in

front

of

running back by his knees; the stern-man also
rests
in the

his

against the

bar in front of him, and
as described for the

same position

bow,

keeping the muzzle pointed outwards clear of
the

man

in

the

bow.

When

in

pursuit

of

36

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
through places where

game, or when passing

ducks may lurk, the bow-man should keep his

gun

in

hand ready
loaded,

for

action.

Keep
required

the gun,
for
it

when

except

when

imin

mediate use, at half-cock, and in raising
the

Canoe
let

elevate

the

muzzle

first,

and do
etc.

not

the

hammer

catch

on the bars,
or

At

all

times,

when
its

carrying

holding a

loaded gun, keep
pressed, persons.

muzzle elevated, or deout
of

and

pointing

range

of

all

Let the weight of each
in

man be known, and
the

loading the

Canoe

distribute
will

cargo so

that
keel.

when manned she

float

on an

even

When
empty

one

person
will

alone
find

is
it

paddling
to

an

Canoe, he
to

be
in

a

great

assistance
as
ballast,

place

a

few stones
if

the

bow

especially
in

the

wind be blowing.
leg~of-mntto?i
is

For
is

sailing

a

Canoe a

sail

generally used.

The mast
edge

strapped into
the

a

notch

in

the

back

of

fore-mid

;

CAMP ROUTIXE.
bar,
to

37

and

its

heel

fits

into a small step

screwed

the ribs

beneath.
be lashed
as sails.
feet

Two Canoes may
blankets
are placed
at

together

and

or sheets used

The Canoes
apart
are
at

about

four

the

center

bars,

and the
to

tent-poles,

securely
aft-mid

lashed
bars
of

across

the

fore-mid

and

each

Canoe.
fastened

The
at

lashings

should
at
in

be
each

securely
bar.

each
be

gunnel
placed
one.

The
or

sail

may
may

either Canoe,
sailing
in this

each

carry

When

manner before the wind, great
attained

speed

may be

with

perfect safety.

When
dling,

passing over good bottoms, the pole
as

may be used
but
in

a

pleasant change from pad-

none
the

but
art

those

who

are

well

practiced

should venture to pole a

loaded

Canoe.

In going
in
.

down

stream,

keep

the

current

going up, hug the
If

shore.
to

the

hunter has

pass through
lash
all

dangervaluable

ous rapids, he

should

his

38

THE
to

Hi\\ TEA'S canoe

HANDBOOK.
divest

articles

the
all

and

himself

of

shoes

and

superflous

clothing.

From
will
life

the

foregoing
all is

remarks,
required
to

the
to

amateur

gather that
in

render his

Camp
is

pleasant, and
at

crown with sucin

cess

his

efforts

house-keeping

the

wil-

derness,
activity,

some small stock
in

of neatness
in

and

and

fact

that

he follow,

some

degree, the well-recognized customs of civilized

households.

SECTION
COOKINO
Regular Trappers

VI.

UTENSILS.

can

and
with
In

often

do

per-

form
small
for

their

cooking
of

a

surprisingly

number
is

utensils.

fact,

a

kettle

tea
is

the

stock in trade of many.

Their
or
of

game
the

spitted
in

before
of

the

glowing
in

coals

roasted
fire,

a

bed

ashes
or

the

midst
are

and

potatoes
fire.

bread

baked
in

before
limited

the

open

Thus they
their
cuisine,

rival

the

resources

of

the

paucity

of those

Kings

of the

Chase, the red denizens

of

the

primeval prairies.

And

yet

those

old

trappers are perfectly happy,
of

and

for

the best

reasons,

that

they

have
I

never known
not

any

other
that

mode

of living.

do
the

mean

to sav
civ-

they are ignorant

of

customs of

4o

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
I

ilization,

merely state
to their

that they
of

are so

ac-

customed
not desire,

mode

living that they

do

and would

not

be content, under

any
pect
to

other
the

circumstances.

But

I

do

not exhimself
utensils.
in

amateur
a

hunter to
list

confine

such

limited

of

cooking

The man who
year

devotes but a

few

clays

a

to the exciting

chase

may be
hunter,

allowed, in

following out the

same

line of

conduct as that
to retain,
life.

pursued by the

professional

as far as he wishes, the habits of his daily

He
of

should not feel called upon to stint himself

any

comforts

when

selecting

his

cooking

utensils for a trip.

For excursions
ferent

to

different

localities,

by

dif-

modes
of

of

conveyance,
the

and for different

periods
of

time,

number
required
full

and description
varies
list

cooking

utensils
I

greatly.
ar-

Nevertheless,
ticles,

present a

of these

and the hunter can easily decide
both as necessities or as

what
attri-

he

will require,

butes

to his greater comfort.
first

The

and most important

article

of our


COOKING UTENSILS.
list

41

of

cooking

utensils,

is

the

tea

kettle

most important,

for

only

in

one way can we
This

prepare this cheering beverage.
of
to
tin,

may be
suitable
party.

and should be

of

a

capacity

the

number composing
if

the

hunting
will

One
well

kettle,

kept properly clean,

very

answer for the making up both tea and

coffee.

Next
an
old

we

have

the
for

Frying-pan.
hunters,
of
in

This
a

is

stand-by
article.

and
fish,

most
and

useful

All kinds

flesh

fowls
utensil.

may
at

be
is

cooked
a

this

ever-ready
for

There
the

pan made expressly
fire,

cooking
handle,

camp

having a long iron
I

but this

instrument
is

cannot recom-

mend.

The handle
long
of

heavy
in

and

unwieldy.

For our greater comfort
attach
a

cooking
to

we may
the

wooden
pan,

handle
tying
it

short

iron one

the

thereto

with

twine or wire.
if

This handle
for greater

may be
of

detached,
transporta-

so desired,
If

ease

tion.

necessary,

two frying pans
is

may be
in

carried,

and while one

employed

frying

42

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
or

fish

ham,
potatoes,
articles.

the

other

may
beans,

be

used
or
will

for
for

frying

warming

etc.,

stewing

The
of

second

pan

well

repay the

trouble

transportation.
utensils
rice
will

We
cook

next

want
potatoes,
tin

the

in

which

to

our

beans,
kettle

or

oatmeal.

For potatoes, a
possible,

suffice,

but

if

an

iron

pot

should
as

be
they

carried

for

cooking the other articles
earily
tin

burn very
a a

when cooked
will

in

tin.

Nevertheless,
requiring
the
a

kettle

do very

well,

but

little

more
stirred
It

attention

to

keep
in

contents

well

and
is

the

fire

moderate
kettles

condition.
of different

a good

plan to have
will
fit

sizes,
this

such as

inside

one

another.
abilities

In
to

way we
without

greatly

increase our

cook

sacrificing

space

in

transportation.

A
a

Dutch

Oven

is

an

excellent

article

on

hunting
space
Its

excursion,
in
is

and
boat
to

should
or canoe
in

be
will

taken
per.

when
mit.

the

use

referred

Section VII.

COOKING UTENSILS.
There
are

43

a

variety

of

cooking appliances
of

manufactured
such
"
as

for "

the

use

the

hunter,

the

Tripod

and
Stove "

Utensils "
with
its

and
comthe

The Camp
camp
all

Cooking

pactly

arranged pots, but for
fire

cooking

at

open

the

utensils

mentioned

above are
rate,

that

are necessary.
that

To enumetrip

we

may
on
a

say

the

cooking utensils

required

an

ordinary

hunting

for

example,
water,
in

Duck
a

shooting
party
:

excursion,
of
four,

via

canoes,
as

for

ten

days

— are
1 1 1

follows
Kettle,

Tea

tin.

Potato
Rice,
or
2

Kettle,
etc.,

tin.

Kettle,

iron

preferred.

I

Fry Pans.
if

Dutch Oven,

possible.

When we remember
game
ashes,
utensils,

that

we can
burried

roast
in

our
the

before
it

the

fire,

or
that,

will

be seen

with

the

above
as

our
as

methods
if

of

cooking

are

uncurtailed

we had a domestic cooking
to

range

on

which

manipulate

our

meals

44

THE HUNTER'S
care

IIA

XD BOOK.
of

Great

should
to

be

taken

the

cooking be

utensils,

and

much
them

attention
clean.

cannot
Section

paid

to

keeping

VI
the

contains
hunters'

some remarks
Cooking
this

further

relating

to

Utensils,

and

should

be

read in

connection.

SECTION

VII.

GENERAL REMARKS ON CAMP COOKING.

When
cover

en

route,

and the

chief

object
little

is

to
to

distance,

the

hunter has

time

bestow on cooking.
his

He
the

then

falls

back on
his

canned goods, and probably
at

confines

efforts

cooking to

production of

the
in

ever-acceptable
stationary

can of
and,

Tea.

But when

a

camp,
time

indeed,
en
route,

whenever
the

he

can

spare

when

hunter

should put forth his best efforts and produce
at

least

one

solid,

substantial

and comfortperson who
of
is

able
at

meal per day.
all

To
with

the

conversant
of

the

art
is

cooking,

the preparing
pleasure.
gratified
if

such a

meal

an absolute he
trip feel

More
his

especially

does

companions

on the

are

46

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
in

deficient
truth,

knowledge
experienced

of

cooking,

for,

in

the

cook

then
in

becomes
the
party,

the

most
he
his

important
also
efforts

personage
the

and
that
will

has
are

pleasure

of

knowing
the
of

appreciated, for
well as
is

good
the

of

hunters,

as

that

proverbial morose husband,
their

reached through
a

stomachs.
quite
his

Though such
to

person
the
trip,

may
yet

be
for

willing
party,

undertake
the
of
to

cooking
a

during
state

entire
affairs

more
all

desirable

exists

when

the

party

are
in

able

undertake that im-

portant
course,

duty
to

rotation.

(We

refer,

of

parties

who have no
party

hired

cook

with
to

them.)

No
on
in

should

ever

venture
without

go

out

a
their

hunting
ranks
It

excursion
at

numbering
son
to

least
to

one per-

who can cook.
write

appears

be foolish
remark,
but
I

such an evident, simple
hunters
act

when
not

amateur
suit

foolishly,
to

must

my
I

conversation

their
to

conpreact
just
of

hension?

have known
I

parties

thus foolishly.

once met

with

a

party

!

CAMP COOKIXG.
young
home.
with
to

47

men

on

an
a

excursion,

and

far

from

They had
them,
but,

good supply of provisions
sheer ignorance
they
of
to

from
food,

how
buy
way.

cook

their

were glad

meals at the houses of farmers on
But
of

the

we

will

revert

to
will

a

more pleasant part
as
is

our subject
the
chief

— we

endeavor,
of
this

one
to to

of

objects

pamphlet,

teach
enjoy,

such
to
its

young
fullest,
it

amateur
their
in

hunters

how

food.

In
or
at

cooking, be
the

the

kitchen
of

of

kings,

humble

camp

fire

the

hungry
be
paid
All
close

hunter,
to

too

much

attention
quality

cannot

that

God-like

—cleanliness.
undergo

our

cooking

utensils

should
used,

inspection

before

being

and
put
to

after

use
in

they
their

should

be

cleaned
All

and

away

proper place.

articles

be cooked
the

should
himself
tention

be thoroughly cleaned, and

cook
at-

would
to

do

well

to

pay

a

little

personal
to

cleanliness
his
art.

before

he

undertakes
of

exercise

Look you
can we con-

what more

disgusting

object

48

THE HUXTER'S HAXDBOOK.
than the person
in

ceive

who,

rousing from his
to

blankets

camp,
with

proceeds
utensils

prepare

the

morning

meal
last

which,
are

though
yet clean

musty from

night's

supper,

when compared with

his unsanctifled condition?

The
food

sight of

a slovenly, dirty person cooking our
in

detracts
If

no small
of

degree
party

from
are

our
able

appetite.
to

several

the

assist

in

preparing

a
to

meal,
the

one
fire
;

should another

collect

wood and attend
such
that
articles

may
etc.,

clean
so

as

game,

potatoes,

he

who

undertakes to
give
his

super-

intend

the
to
If

cooking
the
the

may

undivided
the

attention
groceries.

handling

of

small

cook has no assistance, he
his

should

so

regulate

work

that

all

the

rougher tasks are completed

first,

so

that

he

may wash
more
gredients

his

hands
office

before

undertaking the
the
in-

delicate
of

of

manipulating
dishes.

his

various

The
cook
first

cook

must not forget that
the

different

articles

vary in

length

of

time

required

to
fire

them,
those

and he

should place

on the

CAMP COOKING.
requiring the longest time
all
;

49

he

will

thus
once,

have

his

articles

ready for table
allowed
to

at

and
.

nothing need be

get cold.

ON BOILING.
This
food,
fish,

is

the

simplest
it

method

of

preparing
of

and
meat,

by

almost

every description
vegetables

fowls
in

and

may

be

cooked.
the

When
of

camp we need not
boiling
;

confine

operation

of

to

any

particular

description
articles
in

kettle

we
pan,

may
the

even

boil

our
the are

frying

essential

conthat
It

dition

of

operation

being
in

merely
water.
etc.,

the
is

articles
to

cooked
that

boiling

be noted

soups,

stews,
their
to

are
to

made
their
in

by

boiling,

and
rather

owe
than

names
the

ingredients

utensils

which
often
at

they

are

prepared.
to

The
use
the

hunter
utenfar

may
sils

be called upon
his

command
those
for
civilization,

for

purposes
which,
in

different

from
of

the

economy

they

were intended.

;

5o

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
boiling
to

In

articles

the

hunter
points
:

must

pay
pot
to

attention

the

following
boiling,

— the
to

must
cease
boil

be

kept

and

not

allowed
is

boiling

until

the

article

cooked
cook

slowly
article

;

know
(given
it
;

the time required
in

the

the

different

recipes)

and abide by
is

skim the pot when
on the surface.

a

scum
the
of

seen
is

to to

form

When

object

extract

substance from scraps
as
in

meat,
the

or

from

bones,

making soups,
boil
faster,

pot

may be allowed
taken from

to

but

should be kept closely covered.
ing
ity

The
interest,

follow-

remark,

an excellent authorof

on

Cooking,

may be
to

as

it

will

apply as

well

any
to

articles

which the
of.

hunter

may

cook, as

the

meat spoken
with

"Two
water,

mutton chops

were covered
fiercely,

cold

and one boiled
gently,
flavor

and the other
of

simmered
hour
;

for
of

three-quarters
the

an

the

chop
superior
\

which
to

was
of

simmered
the

was

decidedly

that

one which was boiled
fast

the

liquor

which

boiled

was

in

like

proportion

more

CAMP COOKIXG.
savoury^
fat

51

and,
its

when
j

cold,
this

had

much

more

on

surface

explains
etc.,

why quick
its

boiling
juices

renders
are the

meat

hard,
in

— because

extracted

a

greater

degree."

When
water
the

water evaporates quickly, more hot

should
boiling

be
of

added.

Some remarks on
will

Vegetables
in

be

found

under that head

the

recipes.

ON ROASTING AND BAKING.

A
much
remain
be he
its

method
in

of

roasting

fish

and
is

game,
cover

vogue with old hunter's,
in

to

them up

a bed

of

hot

coals,

where they
is

until

cooked.
to

This method
amateurs.
recipes,

not to

recommended
will

Nevertheless,
directions
for

find,

in

the

use,

and he

may

experiment
he does
is

with

some

fish

or

game on which
successful
of

not

depend
to

for a

meal.
its

Great experience

required

ensure
simpler
his

accomplishment.
is

A
It
is

method
before

roasting

by
fire.

spitting

game

a

good

clear

52

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
continually

thus
the
is

under

his

surveillance,

and
as
it

operation
simple.
article

should

be

as

successful

A

pan

should
roasted

be
to

placed
catch

under
fat

the

being

the

which
placed
article

exudes.
in

A
pan,

little

water

should

be

the

with

some
be

salt,

and the
basted be too
of

cooking
liquor.
as,
it

should

frequently

with this

The
by

fire

should

not

hot at
the

first,

hardening the
the
half

outside

meat,

prevents

heat

from penethe the

trating.

When
placed

about

cooked,
fire,

meat
fire

may

be

nearer the

or

increased.
articles
is
is

The time required
given
a
in

to

roast various

the

recipes.
in

The
the
to

Spit

merely
to

stick

inserted

meat or
hold the
laid over

game
article

be roasted, and
fire.

serves
It

before the
stick,

may be
in

a

forked

or

supported

any

manner

found convenient.
should
before

The

article

being roasted

be

frequently

turned,

and

basted

as

stated.
in

Baking,
of

our

domestic
article

kitchens,

consists
in

placing

the

to

be

cooked

the

;

CAMP COOKING.
oven,

53

and

observing

various
of

regulations.

Such

an operation we,
a

course

never
but

per-

form when on
can
fire

hunting
potatoes,

excursion,
etc.,

we
the

bake
in

bread,

before
roast

the
is

same manner
no
difference

as
in

we
the

meat.

There
the

operations

articles

operated
of

upon

bestow the

name
our

on

the
is

method
baked,

operation.

Thus

bread

our
all

game
Dutch

roasted.

Bread,
best

and
in

compound
a

dishes

may be
and
the

baked

Oven,

amateur

who

considers

his

comfort
these

should,
articles

when

possible,
his

have

one

of

among
placed

cooking
a

utensils.

The
of coals,

oven

his

before
the

hot

bed

and by
readily

collecting

heat,

and by

reflection,
its

cooks any

articles

consigned to

care.

ON
Frying

FRYING.

may be termed
method
all

the

hunter's
food.

rough

and
this

ready

of

preparing
flesh,

By

method

fishes,

and

fowls

may

54

THE HUNTER'S HAXDBOOK.
cooked.
:

be

The following
a clear
fire

points
of
it

should be
;

observed
the

— Have
hot

coals
well
;

make
before
oil
is

pan

and
in
it

grease
to

placing

articles

cook
;

olive
if

better than
fat,

lard or other grease

using pork
place
the

cut
in

it

up
the

and

try

out,
oil

and
;

meat
should

remaining

all

articles

be
to

frequently

turned

to

allow

the

steam

evaporate

;

shake
articles
fat

the
to

pan
stick
;

often,

and do not allow the
care
fire,

take
take

that

the
if

sputtering
does,

does

not
at

and

it

remove the pan

once

from the coals and blow out the blaze.
observing of
tions

The
direc-

these points,
in

and of

the

found
the

the

different
attain

recipes,

should
success
trout

enable
in

hunter to

complete

frying
birds.

his

pan-cakes,

ham and

eggs,

or

ON

STEWING.
applied
in

The
duction

term
of

Stewing

is

to

the

pro-

compound

dishes,

which

the

CAMP COOKIXG.
various
this

55

ingredients

are

boiled

together.

By
an
cook

method
fragrant

we

can

produce
Stewing

many savoury
is

and

dishes.
for

also

economical process,
together
scraps
of

we

may
small

thus
birds

meat,

and
to

other

articles

which alone would prove
It

be
that

but sorry morsels.
all

has
aid

been
to

stated

cookery
I

is

but
that
to

an

digestion,

and
be
I

while

hold

some
the

cookery
digestive

may
organs,
of

very
will

detrimental

acknowledge that the process
of

stewing

resembles the action
therefore,
if

the

stomach,
reason,

and
to

is

from

no
to

other
the

be
use.

highly

recommended
points
are
stir

hunter's

The
slowly

to

be

observed
:

when
the

stewing
pot
boil

articles
;

as

follows


to

let

frequently

prevent

burning,
until

and
the

keep

the
is

pot

continually

boiling

mass

cooked.

Further
in
all

remarks
recipes

on
for

stewing

will

be

found

preparing dishes by that useful

method.
requisite

The hunter who
sils

carries

the

utenjust

has

all

of

the

methods of

cooking

56

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
at

mentioned
indeed

his

command, and he must be
being

shiftless

who,

provided

with

a
it

sufficiency
in
it,

of

good food, can not prepare

such a manner that he
but
also
this

may
its

not
fullest

only eat
extent.

enjoy

it

to
I

In closing

Section,

may quote
:

lowing from an excellent authority
extent
the

— "To
of

the

fol-

some
cook-

claims

of

either
taste

process
of

ing depend upon

the

the
the

individual.
flavor

Some
fried

persons
meats,
It

may

esteem

of

while
is

others will

prefer

broils or
to

stews.

important,

however,

under-

stand the
so
that

theory of each

method

of

cooking,
it

whichever may
well.
is

be

adopted,

may
by
a

be done

Bad
far

cooking,
inferior
to

though

good method
by a bad

good cooking

method."

INDEX TO RECEIPTS.
RECEIPTS FOR CAMP COOKERY,
No.

(SEC. VIII.)
Page.

SOUPS.

General Remarks
i

......
FISH.

61

Plain

2

Pea Soup Bean Soup

63

64
64
65

3

Liebig's Extract of Beef.

4
5

Canned Soups
Vegetable Soups

65

6
7

Smoked Herrings
Fish, to

66
67
of

bake

in the coals

8

Fish, ordinary

method

cooking

.

.

68 68

9
10

Brook Trout Salmon
Codfish.

68
10S
.
.

(See No. 89.)

Fish-cakes.

(See Nos. 90-91.)

109-110

CANNED
11

FISH.

Oysters, stewed

69
70

12

Oysters, fried
Oysters,

13
14 15

raw
as

16
17
1

3

19

canned Lobsters, stewed Lobster Salad Lobster Croquettes Salmon, as canned Salmon, stewed
Lobsters,
.

.....

70
70 70
71 71 71

72

58

INDEX TO RECEIPTS.
GAME.

20
21

Venison, moose, bear-meat,

etc.,
etc.,

to roast

Ducks, partridges,
ashes

........
quails,
etc.,

72

roasting in the

73

22 23

Ducks, partridges, squirrels,
fore

roasting

be-

the

fire

24
25

Ducks, to stew Ducks, to fry
Snipes,
to to fry

26
27

Snipes,
Snipes,

stew

on toast

28

29 30
31

Turkey, to boil Goose, to roast
Rabbit,
Rabbit,
curried

Rabbit, to roast

.... .... .... .... ....
.

.

.

32

with onions

MISCELLANEOUS MEATS.
33
Salt

Beef and Pork, stewed

.

34
35

36
37

33

Corned Beef, canned, cold Corned Beef, canned, stewed Ham, Bacon or Pork, to fry Ham, Bacon or Pork, to roast or bake Ham and Eggs

3) 40
41

Ham

or

Pork, with onions
.

Ham, barbecued
Pork fritters Pork and Beans. Pork and Beans. Eggs, to poach
Eggs, to boil

42

43

No. No.

I

2

44
AS

46
47

Eggs,

Savory

Eggs, curried

IXDEX TO RECEIPTS.
VEGETABLES.
48
Potatoes, to
Potatoes, to

59

bake
boil

49
50
51

Potatoes, (raw)
Potatoes,

fried

.

.

.

(boiled)

52

Potato

fritters

53 54 55

Onions, to boil

Onions, to fry
Vegetables,

.... ....
fried

miscellaneous

56

Vegetables, canned

MISCELLANEOUS DISHES
57

Rice, plain

boiled
raisins

5S

Rice,

with

59

Rice, savory

60
61

Rice croquettes

Rice pudding

62 63

64
65 65
6/

Oatmeal pancakes Flour pancakes Indian Meal pancakes Oatmeal porridge Corn Meal porridge Corn Meal porridge, fried

63

69
70
71

Hoe Cake Corn Bread Oat Cake
Bread

....
.

.

.

.

.

PUDDINGS.
72 73
Batter

pudding, baked or boiled

74

Rice pudding Cossacks' Plum pudding

....

60

INDEX TO RECEIPTS.
SALAD-DRESSINGS AND SAUCES.

75 j6
yy

Dressing for Canned Lobster, etc. Tomato Salad Dutch sauce, for Meat or Fish

.......
. . .
.

.

ioo
ioi

78 79

Sauce for Ducks, Geese,

etc.

....
.

ioi
101

Drawn

Butter,

for

Fish,

Onions,

etc.

.

.

102 102

80
81

82

Pudding sauce Sauce Hollandaise, or Drawn Butter Plum pudding Sauce
BEVERAGES.
Tea,

.

.

103
103

General Remarks.

83

Tea, to steep or draw
Coffee, Coffee,
to to

.....
...
in
.

84
85 86
87

draw improve

105 106
107

flavor

of

Coffee,
Coffee,

substitute for

cream

107
.

Essence or Extract of

88

Beverages, miscellaneous

....
.

.107
10S

APPENDIX.
89 90
91

Codfish,

salt, to

boil

Fish Cakes, with raw fish Fish Cakes, with cooked fish

....
. . .

108

109

.110
PRO-

THE LAST RESOURCE, OR WHAT TO USE WHEN VISIONS RUN SHORT. (Sec. IX.)
General Remarks.
92

Potato soup

112

93

Dandelions, as greens

114

94
95

Corn Meal
Frogs, to
roast,

n^
fry

or

stew
of diet

.

.

.

.115
.

96

Miscellaneous

articles

.

.115

SECTION
RECEIPTS
Note.
of

VIII.

FOR CAMP COOKERY.
should wish to prepare any

If

the

hunter
dishes
to

the

compound

mentioned
include
the

in

these
different

Receipts,
ingred-

he
ients

must
in

remember
his list

of groceries. varied,

In

all

the

receipts

the

quantities

may be

but the

proportions should

be observed.

SOUP.
GENERAL REMARKS.
Soups
are

seldom made

at

the

Camp

fire,

but as times

and carcasses
into

may occur when game might of
dish, I
feel

scraps of

meat

be

concocted
these

a

fragrant

that

Re-

ceipts

would

not

be

complete
to

without

some
gen-

reference
eral

being made soups

Soups.

As
out

a
of

rule

may

be

made

any

62

THE HUNTER'S HA XD BOOK.
or

flesh

game which
to

will

impart

its

substance
are

and

flavor

the
of

water.
diet,

Canned soups

excellent a
jar
of

articles

and when we have
of
in

Liebig's

Extract

Beef we can

produce a soup unrivalled
of

the whole range

cookery for

its

wholesome

and sustaining
to
full

qualities.

Soups should be allowed
time in
the

boil

for

a long
of

order

that

the

sub-

stance

article

operated upon

may be
and
in ar-

extracted.

The soup should
In

boil slowly

be frequently skimmed.

making soups

camp we wish
ticle,

to

produce a good strong
the
clear,

rather

than

delicate

dish

of

society

dinners.

To
a small
in

this

end

it

is

a good

plan to place

quantity

of

vegetables,
first

properly cut up,
ing
it

the

pot

when

plac-

on the

fire.

In the time

required to

extract the

substance
will

from

the

meat
and

these

vegetables

have

dissolved,

will

be

thoroughly incorporated with the liquor.
vegetables
will

Other
as

may be added
Thus,
carrots

at

such

times

allow of their being

cooked without

their
in

dissolving.

may

be

put

CAMP COOKERY.
three-quarters
to

63

of

an hour
\

before

the

soup

is

be taken

off the fire

potatoes and onions,
All

twenty minutes

before.

vegetables

for

soups should be thoroughly cleaned, cut into
small
to

pieces,
to

and placed

in

cold

water ready
In thick-

add

the

soup when required.
flour,

ening soups with

the

flour
all

should be

mixed with cold water and
up,

lumps broken
boiling

and

then

stirred

into
to

the

soup.

Should the hunter have
short
rations,

place
the

himself
pot

on
to

he

will

find

soup

be his best friend.
1.

PLAIN PEA SOUP.

Put 3 pounds pork,
into
1-2
little

well

soaked,

and

cut

4 or

5

pieces, into 3

quarts water.

Add
2

pound

split

peas,

1-2

teaspoonful sugar, a
vegetables or
hours,
biscuit

pepper,

3

ounces

fresh
2

ounces compressed.
peas
are tender.
Salt

Boil

or

until

Broken

may
instead

be
of

added.
pork,

beef

may be used
be
well

but should

soaked.

Do

not

64

THE HUNTER'S HA XD BOOK.
until

add vegetables
boiled

the

meat and peas have

an

hour and a
2.

half.

BEAN SOUP.

To
beans,

i

gallon
2

water add
pork,

i

1-2

pints

white
4

pounds
fine,

or

a

ham

bone,

onions cut
are
in
2

and pepper.
If

Boil until beans

dissolved.

the beans

have been soaked

water for some
hours
will

time, say over night, about
to

suffice

cook

them.

3-

liebig's

extract of beef.
full

That the hunter may see the
this
article,
I

value

of

quote

the

following
pots
:

from

the

wrapper accompanying the
of

"A
of

quarter

a

teaspoonful
will,

of

Extract dissolved in boiladdition

ing water
ficient

with the
of
salt,

a

suf-

quantity
of

produce a breakfast
tea."

cupful
is

strong

and clear Beef
beverage
to

This
of
in

an

excellent

partake

the

early

morning before undertaking

to

pre-

CAMP COOKERY.
pare
soup,
is

65

the

regular
to

breakfast.

"An

excellent

equal

that prepared from fresh meat,

obtained by boiling

soup vegetables, with
till

some bones and marrow,

done,

and

then

adding the necessary quantity
plenty of
tils,

of Extract, with
len-

salt.

Soups made with peas,
bread,
barley,

beans,

potatoes,

carrots,

turnips,

and other vegetables, gain by the adof

dition

Extract

as

much

as

if

fresh
in

meat

had been boiled with them, equal
to

quantity

what would be required

for

producing the

Extract."
4-

The canned soups
be

sold

by grocers, are

to

recommended.

Directions for use

accom-

pany each can or

package.
5-

VEGETABLE SOUP.
(A good dish
to

use

when

rations run
1

short.)

3 onions,
potatoes,
all

3

small
cut up.

turnips,

carrot,

and 4

Put into the pot with

66

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
pound
butter,

1-4

same
of

of

lean ham,

or

any

bones or

scraps

meat,

and
for

a
10

pinch of
minutes,

mixed herbs.

Place over
of

fire

then add a spoonful
2

flour

well

mixed

in

quarts
of

of

water,
(if

and

a dessertspoonful
salt

Ex-

tract

Beef,

on hand,)
are

and pepper.

Boil

until

vegetables

well

cooked, skim,

and serve with toasted bread.

FISH.
(Under
this

head

we

have the canned
our
larder,
fly,

fish

which
those
line).

we may

purchase

for

as or

well

as

which we may catch with the
6.

hook and

SMOKED HERRINGS.

The
toast

simplest

way
the
first

to

cook these
of

fish

is

to

them,

at

end

a pointed

stick

over the
the
skin.

coals,

cleaning

and
is

removing
scald
up,
in

Another

method
the

to

boiling

water until
tail

skin

curls

then

remove head,
into fry

and
a

skin.
little

Clean well.
butter
or
in

Put
lard.

pan

with

Fry gently

a few

minutes,

dropping

a

lit-

CAMP COOKERY.
tie

fy

vinegar.
trip,

These are excellent
if

articles

on

a

and may,

occasion

arises,

be eaten
re-

without any more

cooking than what they

ceived in being smoked.
7-

BAKING FISH IN THE COALS.
Clean the
to
fish,

and

if

it

is

large

enough
do

be
slit

emptied through a hole
the
belly.

in

the neck,

not

Season the inside with
if

salt

and
meal.
coals,

pepper,

and

liked,

stuff

with
of

Indian

Have ready
and
first

a

good

bed

glowing
it

lay the fish in this

and cover

up,

using

some ashes

or

dead embers, that

the fish

may

not be burnt. Half an hour, more
is

or less, according to size,
operation.
the

required for the

Experience alone

can

determine

time required.
fire

On removing
off

the fish from
flesh

the
will

and peeling

the

skin, the

be found to be

clean

and
in

well
this
it

soaked.

The amateur should experiment
before he

method
for

undertakes

to

trust

to

the

production of a meal.

63

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.

ORDINARY METHOD OF COOKING
All
frying,
fish,

FISH.

eels

included,

may be cooked by
being
cut

the

larger

ones

up
fish,

into

several

pieces.
in

After cleaning the
a
of

wipe
hot
in-

and dry well

cloth.
fat.

Place

in

the

pan with plenty
dian
meal.
often.

Sprinkle

with

Turn frequently
Season with
salt,

and shake the
pepper,

pan

and a

few drops of any sauce
9-

desired.

BROOK TROUT.
If

small,
boil
79.)

fry

as

directed
serve

in

No.

8.

If

large,

and

with

drawn

butter.

(No.

10.

SALMON.

Salmon
drawn
and

may be
(No.

boiled

and
or

served
into

with
pieces

butter

79
of

)

cut

fried.

Time

boiling

varies according

:

CAMP COOKERY.
to
is

69

size.

Add

salt

to

the

water in which

it

boiled.

CANNED
Directions
cans.
for

FISH.
generally

use

are

printed

on

the

The

following will be found useful
II.

OYSTERS,

STEWED.
oysters into the fry

Pour the liquor pan
to

off the

stew with twice the quantity of milk.
little

Add
some

a

butter,

the

size

of
little

a

marble,

salt

and pepper,

and a
little

crumbled

biscuit, or

thicken with a

flour.

As soon
and

as
let

the liquor boils

throw

in

the

oysters

them remain

for

30 seconds.

Then pour
milk canthe

into

dish for immediate use.

When

not

be
of

had, use water, same quantity as
the oysters, and to the above

liquor

named

ingredients

add a pinch of mixed herbs.

A

few drops of

lemon

juice

is

an improvement,

when herbs

are

not used.

70

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
12.

OYSTERS, FRIED.

Dry the
beaten
ez'X

oysters

in

a
in

clean

cloth.

Dip

in

and then

biscuit

crumbs.
salt

Or
and
lard,

sprinkled

with

Indian meal.
five

Add

pepper.

Fry for four or
better for this

minutes in

which

is

purpose

than butter.

Turn them when necessarv.

OYSTERS,

RAW.

When
salt,

oysters are

used raw, as canned, add
to
suit

pepper and vinegar
14.

the

taste.

LOBSTER,

AS CANNED.

When
in

lobsters

are

eaten

cold,
in

as

prepared
75, will

the

cans,

the

salad given

No.

be an excellent addition.
!$•

LOBSTER STEW.

Chop
water,
2

the lobster fine,

add a

little

milk

or

raw beaten eggs, and a small lump

CAMP COOKERY.
of butter.
utes.

71

Stew

in

frying
to

pan

for

five

min-

Salt

and pepper
16.

taste.

LOBSTER SALAD.

Mix
a hard

olive

oil,

mustard,

vinegar,

salt

and
add

boiled

egg.

Beat up

together,

lobster, lettuce

and seasoning

to suit the taste.

Sliced cucumber or
for
lettuce.

tomato may be substituted

LOBSTER

CROQUETTES.
fine
;

Chop
salt.

the

lobster

add
as

pepper

and

Mix

with
there

one fourth
is

much bread
into
balls
in

crumbs as
with
2

meat.
of
in

Form

tablespoons
roll

melted butter.
biscuit

Dip

beaten egg and
in
lard.

crumbs.

Fry

18.

SALMON, AS CANNED.

Add

salt,

pepper and vinegar to

suit

taste.

;

72

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK,
19.

SALMON, STEWED.

Some people
they find that
it

cannot

eat

canned

salmon
unthe
the

poisons

them.

These
if

pleasant effects will not be experienced
fish
oil
is

prepared as follows
place
fry

:

— Pour
in

off
little

all

and
the

the

salmon

a

water

in

pan.
off

Let simmer for a minute,
water.

and pour
water,
biscuit

the

Add
flour,

a

little

fresh

and

thicken
Salt,

with

or bread

or

crumbs.
to

pepper and a pinch of
the
taste.

mixed herbs
for five

suit

Stew gently

minutes.

GAME.
(All

game should be kept
if

for

a

day or two before

being used,

the

weather

will

permit.

20.

Venison,
spitted
fire,

moose,
joints

or

bear

meat

may

be

in

of

several

pounds before the

turning occasionally

and sprinkling with
as

salt

and pepper.
Remarks,

Baste

required.

(See

"General
ing.)

Camp

Cookery,"

— Roast-

Use any sauce

preferred.

CAMP COOKERY.
21.

73

Ducks, partridges,
in
fish

quail, etc.,

may be

roasted
for

the
in

coals

in

the

manner

described

No.

7.

Draw and
not pluck

clean in the usual
off

manner, but
Stuff

do
bread

the

feathers.

with

crumbs
salt

or

broken biscuit

well
the

seasoned
bird
in

with

and pepper.
the
feathers,

Dip
and
re;

water to

wet

bury in the ashes and
quired
the
size

coals.

The time
are
half

can
of

only

be

judged by experience
strength
will

bird and

of

fire

to

be considered.

A

teal

require

an

hour

or

more,

other

birds
fire

proportionately.
skin,

When
and
flesh
if

taken from the
the

remove the

operation has been

successful the

will

be found

to

be
see

clean

and tender.
78.)

(For sauces for game

No.

22.

Ducks,

partridges,
snipes,

pigeons,
squirrels,

turkeys,
etc.,

geese,

black-birds,
spitted

may

be
well,

before

the

fire.

Clean the birds
for

and observe the directions given

"Game"

74

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK'.
No.
20.

in

The

birds

may be

split

open down
stick,

the

back and extended on the spitting
they

or

may be

roasted whole,

with

appro78,

priate
etc.)

dressings.

(For dressings see
to

No.

Time
or or

required

roast

Woodcock

or

Snipe, 15
tridge,

20

minutes.

Pheasant or Par-

20
3

30 minutes.
for

Duck, 45
large

minutes,
:

Turkey,
for

hours
size.

a

one

2

hours

middling

23-

DUCKS, ALL. KINDS,

TO STEW.
into
in

Clean
pieces.

well

and
in

divide
the

convenient
cold

Place
to

pot
or

enough

water
will

cover
to

them,

as

much
boil
of

as

you

require
stew.
salt,

produce the desired quantity

of

Place

on the

fire

and
pinch

slowly.

Add
herbs,

pepper,

and
or

a

mixed
to suit
etc.,

Worcestershire

other

sauce

taste, also

some onions,

carrots, potatoes,

cut fine.

A

few
the
will

of

these

vegetables
first

may
the
re-

be placed in
fire.

pot

when

put to
time

They

dissolve

in

the

;

CAMP COOKERY.
quired to

75

stew the
the

game,

and add a pleasrequired,

ant body to

dish.
half.

Time

about
of vegcarrots,

one hour and a
etables

The remainder
as

may

be

added

follows:
will

about 45
potatoes,
utes.
If

minutes before stew
onions,

be cooked

or

turnips,

about 30 min-

vegetables

are not

used
to

to

thicken
a
for

the
little

stew,

by

being
corn

allowed
starch

dissolve,

flour or

may be
slowly for

used
a

that

purpose.
is

To
secret

stew
of

long

time

the

success

in

making

these stews, and yet the pot must be removed

from the
iently
ally

fire

as

soon
Inspect
will
let

as

the

meat meat

is

suffic-

cooked.

the

occasionit

and

you

know
the

just

when
of

is

done.
pot

Do
at

not
the

contents

the

burn

bottom.

Skim

the pot fre-

quently.
24.

DUCKS, TO FRY.

Having cleaned and plucked the
vide
into

bird,

di-

pieces,

such

as

legs,

wings, and

j6

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK,
four pieces of the body.
cloth,

make
\

Dry the meat
hot frying pan
Sea-

in

a

and place
fat

in

the

with

some pork
salt,

previously tried out.

son with

pepper, and
done.
set

any sauce desired.

Fry

slowly

until

Remove
in

the

meat
fire

from the pan and
to

a dish
the
fat

by the
in

keep warm.
little

Then

to

the

pan
de-

add a
sired
to

water (sufficient to make the
of

quantity

sauce)

thicken with

flour,

which has been added an

onion chopped
Stir

line

and

some

mixed
and

herbs.

briskly
five

until

incorporated,

stew
the

for

about
duck,

minutes.
serve.

Pour

over

fried

and

25-

SNIPES,

TO FRY.
24)

Same
cut

as

for

Ducks, (No.
after

but do not

the

birds

up

cleaning.

Omit onion

from the sauce.
26.

SNIPES,

TO
for

STEW.

Same
Place
6,

method
10,

as
12

Ducks,
in

(No.
pot,

23.)

or

birds

the

whole,

CAMP COOKERY.
at

77

once.

If

the

birds are

very

fat,

remove
fre-

the fat before
quently.

stewing them.

Skim pot

27.

SNIPE ON TOAST.
After dressing the birds fasten
piece
of of
fat

a very thin

ham

or
in

bacon round the breast
boiling hot
lard
for two
salt,

each and fry

minutes.
serve

Sprinkle

with pepper
toast.

and

and

each on a piece of
28.

TURKEY, TO BOIL.
Pluck
it
;

the
it

bird
inside
cloth.

carefully,

draw

and

singe

wash
with

with

warm
off

water. the

Wipe

dry

a
to

Cut

head and

neck close
of

the

backbone,

leaving enough
the
stuffing.
off

the

crop skin to turn
the

over
legs,

Draw
the

sinews from the
just

and cut

feet

below the
into
Fill

first

joint

of the leg.

Press

the

legs

the
the

sides

and skewer
with sausage

them

firmly.

breast

or forcemeat,

or

bread

crumbs,

herbs

and

78

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
Put
it
;

onions.

into

sufficient

hot

water

to

cover
half
rises.

boil

gently

for

from
the
78,

one and a

to

two hours.

Remove
Nos.

scum
79,

as

it

(For sauces see
29.

81.)

GOOSE, TO ROAST.

Having picked, cleaned and singed the bird

make
(if

a

stuffing

as
of

follows

:

2

ounces onion
is

the

flavor

raw

onions

not

liked,
;

slice

and

partly

boil

them) chopped
;

fine

1

ounce sage or mixed herbs
crumbs, stale
walnut,
the
;

4 ounces bread
butter,
size
salt.

a lump
little

of

of

a

and a

pepper

and

Mix
of

whole

well

together

with
fill

the the
to

yolks
goose,

two eggs.
the
stuffing

Do
will

not

quite

as

swell.

Tie

it

the

spit at
half,

both ends, and roast for an hour and a
or an

hour and

three

quarters.

3°-

RABBIT,

TO ROAST.

Skin and clean thoroughly, and spit before
a

good

fire.

(Observe the directions given in

"General

Remarks on Cooking,"

— Roasting.)

CAMP COOKERY.
3*-

79

RABBIT,

CURRIED.

Skin
joints.

and wash the rabbit and cut it into Put on to stew with 2 ounces but-

and 3 onions sliced. When the onions are brown pour in one pint of stock, made
ter

with
stock
stew.

Extract

of

Beef.

(See

No.

3.)

The
to the

should be

boiling

when
of

added

Mix
1

1

tablespoonful
flour

curry powder

and
little

tablespoonful

smoothly

with

a

water and add to the stew.

Stew slowly
little

for

half
is

an hour or

more.

A
Serve

lemon

juice
rice.

an improvement.

with boiled

32.

RABBIT WITH ONIONS.

Clean
in

the

Rabbit
water
it

and
to
out,

put

it

on
it.

to

boil

enough

cold

cover
joint
it,

When
and
fry

boiled
in

tender
to

take

lard

a light brown.

Remove from
keep warm.

the

pan and
six

set

by the

fire

to

Have
lard.

onions sliced,

and

fry

them

in

the

80

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
done add
of
flour.

When
minute,

a

little

water and a table-

spoonful

Let this

simmer

for

a

and pour over the

rabbit.

MISCELLANEOUS MEATS.
33-

SALT BEEF AND PORK STEWED.

Cut
dice
If

the

beef
in

and
the

pork,

or

either,

into

and place
the

pot

or pan

to

stew.

meat
off

is

very

salt

the
for

water
2

may be
for

poured
fresh

after

stewing

minutes, and

water added.

After stewing gently

half an hour,
etc.,

add vegetables,
pepper
rice.

carrots, potatoes,

and

some

and

mixed

herbs.

Thicken with
are cooked,

flour or

When

vegetables

remove the stew and add toasted
biscuit.

bread,

or

broken

34-

CANNED CORNED
After removing the
into
slices,

BEEF, COLD.
cut

beef from the can,
with
or

and

use

pepper,
other

mustard,

and

Worcestershire,

any

sauce

to

CAMP COOKERY.
suit
taste.

81

Canned
and

beef

should
in

be

kept in

a

cool

place,

placed

cold

water for

some time before

being opened.
35-

CANNED CORNED
Stew together some
tatoes, or

BEEF, STEWED.

carrots, onions

and powith

some

compressed

vegetables,
taste,

herbs,

pepper

and

salt

to

and when
as
in

nearly cooked
desired.

add as much
until

canned beef
the

Let simmer
has

gelatine

the

beef

become incorporated
5

with the

stew

— between

and

10
36.

minutes.

HAM, BACON, OR PORK, TO FRY.

The simple operation
is

of

frying these

meats

properly understood by few.
:

The following
slices cut

points should be attended to

—The
be
hour,

should not
inch thick.

be
If

more
very

than
salt,

one-eighth

of

an

and

these

meats
in

generally are,

the slices should
for
at

soaked

warm water

least

an

and

the

82

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
times.
If

water changed two or three

this

does not extract the

salt

sufficiently, the slices

may be
ing.

boiled

for

a

short

time
all

before fryrind,
etc.,

After soaking,
nicely.

pare

off

and trim
before hot

Wipe
the

and dry the

slices

placing in
well

pan.

Have
fry

the

pan

and

greased,

and

the

slices

quickly until
sary.

brown, turning them when necessauce
to
taste.

Add pepper and
37-

HAM, BACON OR PORK, TO ROAST OR BAKE.

The
before

slices

of

ham,

etc.,

as

cut

and preroasted

pared as dictated in No.
the
fire

36,

may be
rolled

on

a

spit,

or

up and
in

secured with
the

a

wooden skewer, and baked

Dutch

oven.
38.

HAM AND
Prepare
the

EGGS.

ham
the

as

directed

in

No.
cut
fried

36.

(For this purpose
little

slices

may

be

a
re-

thicker

if

so

wished.)

When

CAMP COOKERY.
move from pan
that
it

83

and
not

set

by

the

fire.

See

the

pan

is

very hot, and break into
of

the

desired
the
it

number
egg

eggs.

In

doing

this

hold
let

very

near the

pan, and

do not

spread much.
steady until
the

The pan must
eggs are
set.

be held very

Dip a

little

of

the hot
salt

grease over the
if

eggs.

Add pepper and
the

necessary.

When
slice of

eggs are cooked place
serve.
this

each on a

ham and
in

A
No.

nicer
is

method

of

prepar-

ing *eggs for
water.

dish

by poaching them

(See

44.)

39-

HAM, OR PORK, AND ONIONS.
Prepare
36,

the

ham,

etc.,

as
fire

directed in
to

No.

and

place

by the

keep
2

warm.
man,
nearly
liked,

Have
cooked,

ready

some onions,
and

say

per

previously

sliced

stewed

until
if

with
if

pepper,
necessary.

some

herbs

and
from
drain

salt

On
and

taking the

ham
5

the
the

pan,
water,

place the
in
it

onions,
fry

from which
for

about

84

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
Add a the ham
tablespoonful
or

minutes.

moist
serve.

flour.

Turn over
No.
54.)

pork, and

(See

40.

BARBECUED HAM.
Prepare
in

as in

No.

36,

then

lay

the slices

the pan, pepper each,

and spread on each
Pour

one-fourth teaspoon of
in
ful

made mustard.
half

vinegar in
to

proportion of
;

a teaspoon^
often.
to

a

slice

fry

quickly,

turning

Remove and

place on
of

a dish.

Then add
if

gravy half a glass

wine,

on hand, and

one teaspoonful sugar, boil up once and pour
over the
slices

of

ham.
41.

PORK FRITTERS.
Prepare
36.
slices

of

pork as

directed

in

No.

Place in
at

pan and

fry until nearly done.

Have
cold

hand a thick batter
to

made
pork

of

one

part corn meal
water.

two parts
slices

flour,

mixed with
in

Dip the

of

the

CAMP COOKERY.
batter,

85

and

replace

in

fry

pan

until

cooked

a

nice brown.
42.

PORK AND BEANS.
Soak
boil
1

NO.

I.

quart
1

beans over night.
onion.

Next day
nearly done

with
out
to

large

When
fire,

take

the onion,

and

place the beans in
or
in
1-2

a dish

bake

before the
of

Dutch

oven.
salt

In

centre

beans
buried.

put

pound
some

pork,

not

fully

Pour

in

of the

water in which

the beans

were boiled,

and bake one hour.
43-

PORK AND BEANS.
Boil

NO.
3 of

2.

the
half

beans,

(time about

hours)
pork,
If

and

when
pepper

done

add pieces
onion
cut

some
water
that

and an

fine.

evaporates,

add more, but

regulate

so

when

the

beans are boiled there
off.

will

be

no

water to pour
of
in

Do

not

bake.
for

A

supply

these

beans

may be
in

kept
a

some days
pan,
etc.,

a jar,

and warmed

frying

as

required.

86

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK,
44.

'

EGGS, TO POACH.

Have some
in

water,

well
into

salted,
this

simmering
break
as

the frying

pan,
a

and

the

eggs,

one
the

at

time,

carefully,

so

not to
slowly

break

yolk.

Let

the

egg

run
as

from the
water
as

shell,

holding the hand

near the

possible.

Dip the hot water over
before they are hard.
half

the eggs.

Remove them
a
a

Time about two and
each
This
eat

minutes.

Place
toast.

upon
is

piece of

thin

buttered

an excellent way of preparing eggs to

with fried

ham

or

pork.

(See

No. 38.)

45-

EGGS, TO BOIL.

Time

required,

to

boil

soft,

three

minutes.

After that time
ter

they become hard.

The
as
spoil pot,

wait

should

not

be boiling
the

violently,

is

then liable to burst
egg.

shell

and
in

the
as

Place the

egg gently

the

a

very slight blow will

crack the

shell.

;

CAMP COOKERY.
46.

87

SAVORY EGGS.

Break
of
salt,

5

eggs

into

a

dish,

add

a

pinch

pepper and thyme, or mixed herbs
;

beat them well together

have the frying pan
2

ready and place
butter
;

in
;

it

about

ounces fresh
in

let

it

boil

then

pour

the

eggs
min-

and
utes,

stir

quickly until

cooked,

about

4

and serve immediately.
47-

EGGS,
Slice
2

CURRIED.

onions
1

and

fry

in

butter

until
;

brown,

add
pint

tablespoonful

curry
of
until

powder

add

1

of

broth
3)

made

Extract

of

Beef, (See

No.

and stew

onions
or

are

tender.
starch.

Thicken with a

little

flour

corn

Have
into

8

eggs boiled hard and slice
stew.

them
but do

the
boil.

Let them get warm

not

88

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
VEGETABLES.
48.

POTATOES,
Potatoes
fire.

BAKED.
before
of

may
a

be baked

the

open

Have
potatoes

good bed

coals

and place

the

on a stone before them.

Turn
will

them when necessary.
crack

When

done they
gently
in

open

when

squeezed

the

hand.
49.

POTATOES,

BOILED.
of boiling
:

The simple
the
ter,

operation

potatoes

is

best performed as follows

—Wash,
to

and leave
boiling

skin on, and throw them into
salted.

waa

When
thrust

soft

enough

allow

fork to

be

through them
the
pot,

easily,
let

dash
po-

a

little

cold water into

the

tatoes
off
fire

remain
water.

two

minutes,

and

then
a

pour
slow
Peel

the

Replace

them
an open

over

until

the

steam

is

evaporated.
dish.

them and place them
about half an
hour.

in

Time,

CAMP COOKERY.

89

POTATOES (RAW),
Peel
large

FRIED.
cut
in
in
slices

potatoes

and

a

quarter of an inch

thick.

Dry
a

a
lire,

cloth

and

fry

in

lard.

Have

quick

and

move
as
to

the

slices of potato continually,

turning

required.
drain,

When

crisp,

place
salt

on a plate and pepper.

and sprinkle with
5 1-

POTATOES,

BOILED,
potatoes,
in

TO FRY.
cut

Take
slices,

any

cold

them

into

and place them
plenty
of
fat.

the

hot frying

pan

with

Add

salt

and pepper,
with
a
knife.

and

stir

and

turn

frequently

Time,

about

20

minutes.
52-

POTATO FRITTERS.
Beat
together
1-2
1

cupful
pint
of

mashed
milk,
1

potatoes,

2

eggs (beaten,)
ful

tablespoonthe

of

flour,

(mixed with some

of

milk)

go

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
little

and a

melted
in

butter,
lard.

about one table-

spoonful.
quired.

Fry

some

Turn when

rel

53-

ONIONS,

BOILED.
onions,

Peel
salted

and

wash

the
soft.

and
the

boil

in

water until

Change
are half

water
if

once,

when

the onions
soft

cooked,

so

wished.

When

remove

from

pot,

and

pour some
79.)

drawn butter over them (See No.

Time, about half an hour.
54-

ONIONS FRIED.

The

following method gives a dish of rather
is

strong onions, but

liked by many.
the

It

be used also
or pork (See

to

prepare
:

onions for
slice the

may ham

39)

Peel

and

desired
the hot
fat.

number
frying

of

onions,

and place them
lard

in

pan with

plenty of

or pork

Add
Stir

salt,

pepper, and sauce, to suit the

taste.

frequently,

and

cut

as

fine

as

desired
a

while frying.

When

nearly

done sprinkle

CAMP COOKERY.
little

91

flour
to

over them,

and

stir

them well up
and break
all

so

as

cook the

flour

well,

lumps.
55-

VEGETABLES,

MISCELLANEOUS.
such as
clean
carrots,
well,
pla-

To cook
turnips,
slice

other vegetables,
to use

etc.,

alone,

them
until

them, and lay in cold

water

cing them in the pot.
briskly,

Have

the water boiling

and

salted.

Skim the water

before

putting in
bles
sink,

the

vegetables.
are

When
them
off

the vegeta.

they

generally

done.
as

Test

with
done.

a

fork,

and

take

soon as

56.

CANNED VEGETABLES.
Directions for use generally
can.

accompany each
especially
to

Canned Tomatoes
to

are

be

recommended
lent

the hunter,

and

are

excel-

when

stewed
salt

with

bread

crumbs,

or

broken

biscuit,

and pepper.

92

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.

MISCELLANEOUS DISHES.
57-

RICE,

PLAIN
rice

BOILED.
it

Pick over the
water.

and wash
rice

in

cold
of

To

i

pint
1-2

put

3

quarts
salt.
it

boiling
for to
17
boil.

water and

teaspoonful
the
off
all

Boil

minutes

from
pour

time
the
fire,

begins

Then
pot

water,

and

replace
off,

over

a moderate

with cover

to

steam

fifteen

minutes.

Be accurate as

to

time.
58-

RICE,

BOILED,
rice

WITH

RAISINS.

Prepare

the

as

directed in
for

No.

57.

When
throw
boil

it

has
a

been

boiled

10

minutes,
let

in

handful of cooking raisins and
as
in

and steam
put
to
in
at

No.
they

57.

If

the

raisins

are

first

are

liable

to

be

boiled

pieces.
59-

SAVORY RICE.

Wash
gently
in

and
a

pick

1-2

pound
(made

rice

;

stew

it

little

broth,

of

Ext.

Beef,

CAMP COOKERY.
See
herbs,
is

93

No.

3)

with

an
of

onion,
salt.

some

mixed
the
rice

and a pinch
dip
it

When

swelled,

out

of

pan and place bea dish

fore

the

fire

to dry.

Then place on
it

and pour
it.

the

broth

was boiled

in

round

60.

RICE CROQUETTES.

To
balls.

some

cold

boiled

rice

add

enough
rice

beaten egg to allow of making the

into

Add
flavoring

also
to

sugar
suit

and lemon

peel,

or

any
the

the taste.

Then form
or
in

mass

into

small

oval

balls

cakes,

sprinkle with
egg.

bread crumbs, and dip
butter.

beaten

Fry
sugar.

in

When done
61.

sprinkle

with

RICE PUDDING.

See No.

73.

62.

OATMEAL PANCAKES.

Mix

together,

dry,

1-2

pint

flour,

1-2

pint

oatmeal,

and

2

teaspoonfuls

Baking Powder.

94

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
cold

Add enough
batter,

water to form into a thick
of
salt.
it

and a pinch
hot,

Have
with
the
a

the

fry-

ing

pan
fat.

and grease

piece

of

pork
ing

Pour on some
cakes which

of
will
is

batter,

form-

three

not

touch

one

another.

When

one side

cooked, turn with
teach
to

a

knife.

A
light

little

experience will

the
to

exact amount of

Baking

Powder

use

produce
ency
coals
of
is

cakes,
batter.
to

and the

proper consist-

the

A
fry

good

bed

of

hot

required,

properly,

and the

pan must be well greased before cooking each
batch of
cakes.
63.

FLOUR PANCAKES.

To
and

i

pint

of

flour

add

enough
Beat

milk
3

to

form into a thick
add.

batter.

up

eggs,

Beat

the

whole

until

perfectly
in

smooth.

Add

a

pinch of

salt.

Fry

the
in

frying pan, observing the

directions

given

No. 62.

CAMP COOKERY.
64.

95

INDIAN MEAL CAKES.
(The
following
is

quoted

from
be

"The
tried
it if

Complete
wished.

American

Trapper,"

and
this

may

We

have never tested

Recipe, but

should be a

success.)

''Indian

meal

cakes

are

easily

made

by

dropping a quantity of the hot mush (Indian

meal porridge,
frying

boiled

for

an

hour,)
stirred

in

the

pan,

having
of
as

previously
soda,
(or

in

a

small

quantity
it

baking

powder)
is

and turning browned."
62.

soon as the lower side
directions
for

See

frying in

No.

65.

OATMEAL PORRIDGE.
Moisten
water,
pints
1

pint

of

oatmeal with some cold
salt,

add
of

a

little

and

pour

into

2

boiling
If

water.

Boil

half an

hour or
Boil

more.
slowly

too thick
stir

add more water.

and

frequently.

96

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
66.

CORN MEAL PORRIDGE.
Corn, or Indian meal porridge
the
is

made

in

No. 65) and the same proportions of meal and water
Oatmeal,
(See
are used.
Boil
for
at

same manner as

least

one hour.

67.

CORN MEAL PORRIDGE, FRIED.

The
it,

porridge, or sapaun, as the Indians term

produced by following recipe No. 66, may

be sliced when cold,
pork
fat.

and

fried

with

lard

or

68.

HOE CAKE.
Pour
corn

enough

boiling
to

water,

or
it.

milk,

on
it

meal,

(salted)

moisten
longer.

Let

stand for an hour,

or

Put three
pan,

ta-

blespoonfuls on the hot frying
into

and form
thick.

a round

cake about half
it

an inch

When

brown, turn

over.

Grease the pan

with lard or pork

fat.

CAMP COOKERY.
69.

97

CORN BREAD.
Into
ter
i

pint
to
in

of corn

meal

pour boiling waone-half
tea-

enough

wet
hot

it.

Dissolve

spoon soda
tity

water, (or

mix same quanthe

of

baking powder with
it

meal
beaten
size

while
eggs,
of

dry) and add
1

with

two

well

teaspoon
Stir

salt,

and butter

the

an

egg.
(tin

well
will

and bake
do) for half

in

buttered

pans
in

plates

an

hour
fire.

the

Dutch oven, or before the open
a strong
fire,

Have

in

either
70.

case.

OAT CAKT.

To
cold

i

pint

of

oatmeal add

i

teaspoon

of

baking powder,
water
to

mix

well,

and
a

add
pint

enough
of
salt.

moisten, and

Spread about half an inch thick
ing
to

on the
the
;

fryfire

pan
bake.
in

well

greased.

Hold over
is

Turn
the

when bottom
oven.

done

or

roast

Dutch

The cake should

not scorch,

but gradually dry through.

gS

THE HUNTERS HANDBOOK.
7
1
-

BREAD.

When camping
of

out,

we can make excellent
:

bread by the following method
flour

To

i

quart

add

3

teaspoonfuls
while dry.
cold

of

baking pow-

der,
of

and mix well
salt.

Add
or

a

pinch

Mix

with

water,

sweet

milk, into

a thick dough that can be handled

without
this

sticking.
its

Knea.d

it

thoroughly

;

on

depends
the

excellence.
to

Rub
the

dry flour

on

hands

prevent

dough

from

sticking.

Form
a

into

round biscuits or loaves.
fire,

Bake
oven.
a

before

good
biscuits

or

in

the

Dutch
in
to

These
pan,

may
it

also

be
the

baked
fire,

frying

holding

over

cook slowly, and turning the biscuits as often
as

necessary.

They

are

best

when

cold.

PUDDINGS.
72.

BATTER PUDDING, BAKED OR BOILED.

Take
beaten
;

6

ozs.

flour,
all

a

little

salt,

and 3 eggs
milk,,

beat

together

with

added

CAMP COOKERY.
by degrees,
put into
a
until

99

of

the

thickness

of
in

cream,

buttered pan, and
If

bake
to

Dutch
boilled,

oven for about an hour.

be

Put the mixture into a buttered
mold,
tie

and floured

(tin

cups

will

answer the purpose) and
Place the mould in a
Boil

over with a cloth.
of

kettle

boiling water.

one hour and
will

a

half,

or

more.

The longer time

pro-

duce a lighter
sugar.

article.

Eat with butter and

73-

RICE PUDDING.
Boil

some
but
a

rice

and
not

raisins,

as

directed
rice.

in

No.
there

58,

do

steam
in
it.

the

Let
done,
stirred

be

little

water

When
well

add two
in,

or

three

beaten

eggs,

and a

little

sugar.
set

Let
aside
to

simmer four or
cool.

five

minutes, and

74-

COSSACKS'

PLUM PUDDING.
1

Mix
raisins,

well
3-4

together
lb.

lb.

of

flour,

3-4
fine,

lb.

pork

fat

chopped

2

ioo

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
syrup
tightly

tablespoonfuls
water.

or
in

sugar,

and

1-2

pint

Tie

a

cloth,

and

boil

4

hours.

For sauce see No. 82.

SALAD-DRESSINGS AND SAUCES.
75-

DRESSING FOR CANNED LOBSTER, ETC.

Rub
oil,

the

yolks

of
1

2

hard-boiled eggs

to

a

smooth paste with
or

dessert spoonful of salad

melted

butter,

add
1

to

it

2

teaspoon-

fuls of

made mustard, and
sugar,

teaspoonful fine

white
of

and put

to

it

gradually

a

cup

vinegar.

Another:
2


tablespoonful
3

potatoes
1

mashed;
teaspoonful

1

made

mustard;
salad
oil,

salt;
;

tablespoonfuls

or

melted butter
2

4 tablespoonfuls

vinegar
fine
;

;

yolks of

hard-boiled eggs pounded

1

onion cut

fine,

and one tablespoonful
Mix.
all

Anchory or other
and pour over

sauce.
etc.

together

lobster,

CAMP COOKERY.
76.

101

TOMATO SALAD.
Cut
tomatoes,
fine

not
as

over

ripe,

into

slices.

Cut up, as
ions,

possible,

some

small

on-

one to each
tomato.

tomato,

and sprinkle over

slices of

Add

pepper, salt and vinsoaked,
or
partially

egar.

Onions
if

may be

cooked,

considered too strong.
77-

DUTCH SAUCE FOR MEAT OR
Put 6 spoonfuls
gar,

FISH.

of

water,

and 4
thicken

of

vine-

into

a

warm
of
boil.
2

pan, and
eggs.

with the
hot,

beaten yolks
but do
juice.

Make
in
etc.

quite

not

Squeeze

some

lemon

Pour over meat,
78.

SAUCE FOR DUCKS, GEESE, ETC.

Chop very
sage
frying

fine

1

oz.

onion

and

1-2

oz.

or

mixed
to

herbs.

Put them
4

into

the

pan

stew

with

tablespoonfuls of

to-

THE IJLWTER'S HANDBOOK.
Simmer gently
teaspoonful
of

water.

for

10

minutes,
salt,

then
i

add
oz.
fine.

i

pepper and

and

fine

bread crumbs, or biscuit broken very

Mix
of
Stir

well

together.
(see

Then pour

to

it

a

gill

broth
well

No. 3) or melted but-

ter,

together,

and simmer a few

minutes longer.
79-

DRAWN BUTTER, OR WHITE
ONIONS,

SAUCE, FOR FISH,

ETC.
of

To
enough

the

desired

quantity
flour
to

milk,

add
a

moistened
butter and
or
fifteen
will

thicken;
salt.

add

lump
for

of

a

little

Boil slowly

ten

minutes.
dc.

If

milk cannot

be had, water

(See

81.)

80.

PUDDING SAUCE.
1

teaspoonful
beaten,
stir
it

of

milk, and
;

2

yolks of eggs
place
the
stir

well

and some sugar
it

on
;

fire,

and
let

till

just

comes

to

boil
it

then
into

cool.

When

luke-warm,

a

CAMP COOKERY.
glass
of

103

sherry,

or

the

same

quantity

of

water with a small dash of any liquor.
81.

SAUCE HOLLANDAISE, OR DRAWN BUTTER FOR
FISH.
2

spoonfuls of

flour

mixed with
and

1

pint

of

water.

Place

in

fry-pan,

when cooked
and the yolks
fire

add pepper,
of
1-2
2

salt,

lemon

juice,
off

eggs,

beaten.
Stir

Take
all

and add

lb.

butter.

the

time.

82.

PLUM PUDDING SAUCE.

Mix
melted
small

some
butter
glass
;

fine

white
a

sugar
of

with

some
a

add

glass
a

sherry,

of

brandy, and

little

nutmeg

and lemon-peel grated.

BEVERAGES.
TEA.

General Remarks.

To

ensure having a good cup

of

tea,

you

must buy a

good

article

from a responsible

104

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
No
article

grocer.
largely
ing,

of

commerce
with

is

more
disgust-

adulterated,

or

more
tea.

baneful
in

substances
the
the
prices

than
of
this

The
therein

vast

difference
at

article

shows
has

once

that

modern

trade
If

become
is

greatly
for

prostituted.

the

tea which
is

sold

fifteen

cents
that
?

per

pound
is

good,
for

how

shall

we

name

which
If

sold

ninety cents
is

per pound
price,

the

ninety

cents
figure,
in-

an

honest

and

no

fancy

then the tea sold at the lower price

must

deed
careful

be

trash.

That

the
this

hunter
his

may be
bev.

when purchasing
I

favorite

erage,

quote

the

following

remarks

from

one of our daily papers:
"


some samples
showed
the
of
al-

A

recent analysis of
tea
in

leged

New

York,

that

the

specimens
articles
filbert
:

examined
Nutgalls,

contained

following
filings,

currant leaves,
of

iron

husks,

sulphate

copper,

oak

bark,
col-

hornets'
ored,
grass,

and wasps'
acid,

nests
aloes,

shredded

and

acetic

manila paper, vernal
dis-

and other things too numerous and

CAMP COOKERY.
gusting
to

105

mention."

As

teas

vary

some-

what

in

strength,
tastes

and as

different people have
it

different
to

to

be suited,
exact
rule

is

impossible

lay

down any
to

for

the

amount
water.

of

tea

add

to

a given
the

quantity of
following

As

a

general
:

guide

formula

may be used


83 .

TEA, TO STEEP

OR DRAW.
teaspoonful for each
tea-pot."

An
cup,
rather

old

rule

runs,
for

"

1

and

one

the
It

This
either

is

ambiguous.

may mean
"1
to

"1

teaspoonful for each
i.

cup placed on the

table,

e.,

for

each person," or

teaspoonful

for

each cup of tea expected
each cup
of

be

used, or for

water placed in the tea-kettle."
following
is
1

However, the
the

generally used
oz.
tea,

at

camp

fire:

— Put
Shake
do not

or
of

2 1-2

tablespoonfuls,
water.

heaped,

to

4 pints

boiling
fire.

Remove immediately from
slowly.
fire,

the

Cover

the
let

kettle,
it

and

place

by the

but

boil.

Should

io6

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
proportion

this

make
the

the

tea

too

strong,

or

too

weak, regulate

next
soft

drawing

accord-

ingly.

Use

the
is

purest

water attainable.
stand for a long

Tea which
time
with
the

allowed
in
is

to
it,

leaves
if it

becomes very unkeep some
should be

wholesome, and
cold,
to

desired to
day,
it

drink

during the
leaves

poured from
soon
as

the

into

another

can as

sufficiently

drawn,

or

the leaves

may
to

be dipped out with a spoon.
excess
will

Tea drank
and
health

produce

nervousness,
far

strong
as
to

green

tea

may

so

injure

produce lameness and neuralgia.
84.

COFFEE, TO DRAW.
(Buy fresh ground, rather than the imported packages.)

Add
tion of

coffee
1

to
oz.,

boiling

water

in

the

propor-

or

3

table.spoonfuls,

to

1

quart.

Boil

for

30

minutes

or

longer.

If

the coffee does
of

not settle, dash in half

a cup

cold

water,

and

let

stand

a

few

minutes.

Should the coffee
next making.

be

weak,

use

more when

CAMP COOKERY.
85-

107

COFFEE, TO IMPROVE FLAVOR OF

The
proved,

flavor

of
its

coffee

may be
aroma

greatly

im-

and

delicate

increased,

by

adding a
it

little

soda

to

the water with
will
suffice.

which

is

made.

A

very

little

86.

COFFEE, SUBSTITUTE FOR CREAM

IN.

Beat an
of

egg
the

to

a froth,
of

put

to

it

a

piece
in

butter

size

a

walnut,
to

place
it

a

can and

pour the coffee on
pot, or
stir
if

gradually
the coffee,

from the

the egg

into

when
at

off

the

fire,

you have no other can

hand.
87.

COFFEE,

ESSENCE,
sold

OR EXTRACT
is

OF.
to

This

article,

by grocers,

be recwater,

ommended, and produces, with
an
instantaneous

boiling

cup
bottle.

of

coffee.

Directions

accompany each

io8

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
88.

MISCELLANEOUS BEVERAGES.
The
following
articles,

which are

all

to

be

recommended, have directions printed on the
wrappers or boxes
essence
of
:

— Cocoa, chocolate, Cadbury's
broma, kacka,
etc.

cocoa,

Cocoa
of

forms a very
in

nourishing drink

to

partake
of

the

morning before the
is

labor

cooking
will

a
of

regular breakfast

undertaken, and
are

be

use

to

those

amateurs who
rising,

unaccus-

tomed
fore

to very early

or to

working bewith

breakfast.
if

It

may

be
is

prepared
to

water alone,

no milk

be procured.
be an excel-

A

few bottles of lime juice
addition
to

will

lent

the

hunter's outfit.

APPENDIX.
The
following useful

Receipts were omitted under the heading of "Fish " :

89

.

COD-FISH, SALT, TO BOIL.

Wash

the

fish

well,

and

cut

into

pieces,

according to size of

pot.

Place in the pot

CAMP COOKERY.
with
ly.

109

cold water and

set

on

fire

to

boil

slowwill

Change
the

the

water

once.
it

This
cleaner.

freshen

fish,
is

and
to

render

A
in

good method

soak the

fish,

cut

up,

water over night, and cook next day.
done,

When
sauce

remove

skin

and

bones.

For

see Nos.

79-81.
90.

FISH
1

CAKES (WITH RAW
cod-fish,

FISH).

pint

salt

raw,

picked

very

fine,

and as
will

many
equal

raw,
to

whole,
2

peeled

potatoes

as
in

be

pints.
until

Put together
are
fire

cold

water and boil

potatoes

thor-

oughly
drain
butter

cooked
off

;

remove

from

the

and

the
of

water.

Mash
Mix
a

together.

Add

size

an egg,
pepper.
at

two well-beaten eggs,
well
into

and
Drop,

a
1

little

together.

spoonful

time,
lard.

the

frying

pan
turn.

well,

greased
not

with

Brown*
cakes with

and
the

Do
;

mould

these

hand

drop the mixture from a spoon.
mustard,
etc.

Use

sauce,

no

THE HUX TEN'S HAXDBOOK.
91.

FISH

CAKES (WITH COOKED
boiled
all

FISH).

Take
potatoes.

cold,

cod-fish

and

cold,

boiled

Pick

the

bones from
together.
if

fish,

and
a

mash
little

fish

and

potatoes
salt

Add
the

pepper,

and

necessary.
until

Form
out-

into

cakes, and fry with

lard

sides are
tard,
etc.

brown and

crisp.

Use

sauce, mus-

SECTION

IX.

THE LAST RESOURCE, OR WHAT TO USE WHEN
PROVISIONS

RUN SHORT.
sometimes
his
in

The
far

hunter

may
money

find

himself
a
very-

from home, with
ebb,
to

provisions at
his
It is

low

no
be

pocket,

and

no
has

game
to
call

secured.
all

then that he

up

his
his

powers of endurance, and

to

exercise
his
if

all

knowledge
go
as

of
far

cooking
as

to

make
True,
try

provisions
is

possible.

he

passing through
if

a

settled
his

counlies

he can not starve, but
a land
things
of

route

through
eat the

famine
are

he
not

may have
included

to
in

many
list

which

of his ordinary food.

We

do not genor

erally

eat

frogs,

meadow-hens,
all

beavers,
ot

and yet these are

good

articles

food,

and the

hunter

who

can obtain

them,

when

ii2

THE HUXTEFTS
provisions
to to

Hs* XDBOOK.

his

are
in

expended,
luck.

should

consider

himself

be
the

He
of
I

might
still

be

re-

duced

necessity
articles.

eating

more

objectionable

have

known
flesh.

men
What
of

who
we
the
diet.

were
eat
is

glad

to

eat

skunk
of

more a matter
fitness

custom
articles

than
of

superior

of

the

our

This fact appears more fully when we
that

remember
eat
their

the

natives

of

the

South Seas
;

snakes,
their

beetles

and
;

worms
and
oily

the
in-

Chinese
habitants
flesh,

birds'

nests

the

civilized

of

Europe

their

frogs

horse

and

the

Esquimaux
Mostly

the

blubber
in

of

the

whale.

every
the

school-boy
of

America can
North

relate

how

Indians

the

and
of

West

eat

their

dogs

;

how

the
spe-

cannibals
cies.

Polynesia devour their
will

own

But we

not

enter

into

any deep

discussion on
to

this

subject.

We

merely wish
should he

show

the

amateur

hunter

that

be placed

on

short rations,

by any unavoid-

able circumstances, or be perfectly destitute of
his

ordinary food,

he

has

still

at

his

com-

CAMP COOKERY.
mand many articles which will sustain The hunter should watch his decreasing
of

113

life.

stock
so

provisions

with

a

jealous

eye,

and

regulate his

return

journey that he

will

reach
larder

a

place

where
stock

he
is

may
the

replenish

his

before
stated
utensil

his

entirely

consumed.
is

As
best

elsewhere,
to

soup-pot
rations

the
short.

use

when

run

A

proper manipulation
of

will

make

a small

amount

food do great service.

The
hunter
at
\

following receipts

may be
indeed,

of

use to the

some

of

them,

may be used

any time, but they are so appropriate for
times of scarcity of provisions that we
this

use in

have placed them under
92.

head.

POTATO SOUP.
Peel
to

and chop 4 onions and put them
with
2

in-

a

kettle

oz.

fat

or

butter,

add 3
hour.

quarts

of

water,

and

boil

half

an

Then add
pepper and

4

lbs,

peeled and sliced potatoes,
to

salt

taste

;

stir

well

on

the

U4
fire

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
for

half

an hour.
a
little

Any
of

scraps

of

meat*
or

biscuits,

or

rice,

barley or

flour,

some
this

mixed
dish.

herbs

will

course

improve

93-

DANDELIONS, AS GREENS.

Gather some tops of dandelions, wash

well,

and put into
to cover

just

enough salted boiling water
tender squeeze out
in
all

them.
place

When
them

the
fry

water,
for

the

frying-pan,
little

and
pep-

a

few minutes, with a
butter,
slices

salt,

per

and

or
of

pork

fat.

When
eggs

done,
if

add some
tainable.

hard-boiled

ob-

94.

CORN MEAL.
If
is

a

good supply
a

of
it

this

wholesome

article

carried in

bag,

will

form a valuable

stand-by when

what

is is

generally considered to
scarce.

be more dainty food
using are given
in

Methods

for

Nos.

64-66-67-68-69.

CAMP COOKERY.
95-

115

FROGS,

TO ROAST,
legs

FRY OR STEW.
of

The
No.
or

hind

only

frogs

are
fire,

used. (see

These may be
20,)

roasted
in

before

the

fried

the

pan, (see
23-26,)

Nos.

24-25,)

stewed,

(see

Nos.

using

such

in-

gredients

as

are

obtainable.
96.

MISCELLANEOUS

ARTICLES TO USE.

The
casion
food.

following articles
arises
:

may be used
are

if

oc-

— Squirrels
fact
is

very good

as

This

not

generally
as
;

known
(see

among amateur
Nos.
22
22,)

hunters.
25.

Cook

directed in
roast,

or
fry,

Meadow-hen

No.
23.)
If

(see

No. 24) or stew, (see No.

Black-birds

— same
to

as

meadow-hens.
very
strong,

the

hunter

has

eat

any

objectionable flesh or fowls, the articles should

be

thoroughly

washed

and
pepper

par-boiled,

and
used

such things as onions,
freely,
if

and

salt

on hand.

INDEX TO SECTION

XI.

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.
Page.

To To To

preserve
salt

Meat and Fish

131

Meat and Fish

132 133

preserve
to

Dead Game
a

Boot Grease

How

Load

Gun

......

133 134

SECTION

X.

THE TREATMENT OF DROWNING, WOUNDS, ACCIDENTS, BITES AND STINGS, ETC.
As
the

hunter
in

is

much
outfit

exposed

to

accidents,

he

should have

his

such simple remedies as
useful.
strip

experience teaches

him may be most
articles
:

We
of

may
of

enumerate the following
ing
Plaster,

—A
of

Stick-

Bottle

of

Tincture
Bottle
a

of of

Arnica,

Bottle

some

strong Liniment,

Diarrhoea Mixture,
Cathartic
Bites,
Pills.

Bottle of

Dark Brandy, and
of

box

The
Cuts,

following methods
etc.,

treating

Wounds,

will

prove to be effectual, in

the absence

of a Physician.
I.

BURNS AND SCALDS.

To burns
or
grease

apply some
the

cotton dipped in

oil,

spot
treated

with
in

any
the

fat

at

hand.
j

Scalds

may be

same way

or

n8

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
scraped

covered with
the
flour.

raw

potato
dust

;

or well

cover
with

scald

with

treacle,

and

2.

ORDINARY CUTS.

Use
the

thin

strips

of sticking

plaster.

Bring
together.

edges

of

the

wound
3-

carefully

LARGE CUTS.
Cut two broad pieces
as
to of sticking plaster so
;

look

like

a

comb
on

clean the wound,

pouring
piece
of

on
the

some

lukewarm

water

;

place

a

plaster

either

side

of the

wound.
cut,

These pieces
must
be
so

should have been
arranged,
that

so

and

they
pro-

shall

interlace

each
or

other.

Cross

the

jecting strips,

teeth,

and

by pulling them
the

through
press

each

other

close
plaster
it

wound,
clown,
itself.

then

the

sticking

well

both

on the

flesh

and where

crosses

TREATMENT OF

£>/?OtVAr/A'G ETC.
t

119

CONTUSIONS, OR

BRUISES.

Bathe
with
a

with
piece
the

Tincture
of

of

Arnica,

and bind

cotton, on

which pour a few
bathe
in

drops of
ter

Tincture,

or

cold waIf

and
is

bind

with

damp

cotton.

the

skin
parts

broken dilute the Arnica with twelve

water,
5-

HEMORRHAGE.

When
bright
the

an

artery

is

divided
the
If

or

torn
is

the of a

blood jumps
scarlet
is

out

of

wound, and
a

color.

vein

is

injured

blood
the

darker

and flows evenly.
and
other

To
under
cloth

stop
it

latter

apply a bandage,
of

place
so

a
as

piece
to

cotton

or

folded,

press
to

on the vein.
arterial

In

ap-

plying

bandages
to

arrest

bleeding

be careful

place
If

them between the wound
the

and the heart.
tie

wound
or

is

in

the
will

arm,
not

a

piece

of

tape,

cord

that

120

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
loosely

cut,

round

the

arm

above the

cut.

Pass a small stick under the tape and twist
it

round

until

the
to
in

tape

compresses

the

arm

tightly
tie

enough
stick

arrest the
position.
If

bleeding.
it

Then
bleeds
in

the
a

still

place
cloth,

cork,

or piece

cf

wood
on
the

rolled

underneath the tape,
of the

inside

of

the fleshy part

arm
If the

where the

artery
in

may be
leg

felt

beating.

wound

is

the
the

and

the twisted
fails

tape,

placed
bleeding,
a
line
little

above

wound,

to

arrest

the
of

place the

cork in the direction
the
side

drawn from
to the outis

inner part
of

of the knee a
groin.

the

The

object

to

com-

press

the artery.

6.

BLEEDING AT THE NOSE.
Plug the nostrils with
forehead
the
lint,

and

bathe

the

and nose with cold
raised.

water,

keeping

head

Raise the arms,
the

and place
the

both

hands

behind

head,

allowing

1

TREA TMENT OF DRO WNING, E TC.
head
to

1

2

rest

on them.

To chew

a

piece
to

of
ar-

paper, or
rest

other substances, also tends
bleeding.

the

VIOLENT SHOCKS.

When
untie
all

a

person

is

rendered
etc.,

unconscious,
loosen
with
if

strings,

collar,

and

any
the

clothing

that

is

tight

and

interferes

breathing.
is

Raise the head,

and note

there

any bleeding from any part;
salts

apply smellto

ing

or

a burning feather
to

the

nose,

and hot bottles

the

feet.

CHOKING.
If

a bone,
throat,

or other

substance
forefinger
to

is

caught in

the

insert

the

and
induce
the

press

upon the roof
iting.
If

of the

tongue
not

vom-

this

does
a
large

have
of

desired
or

effect,

swallow
If

piece
fail

potato

soft

bread.

these

to

remove the ob-

:

122

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
take
a

struction,

mustard emetic.

(A

large

teaspoonful of mustard,
of

mixed with a tumbler

warm

water.)
9-

DROWNING.
Send
and
i.

for

medical

assistance

immediately,
as
;

in

the

mean

time

proceed
it

follows

Strip

the

body and rub

dry

then rub

with
in

hot

blankets,

and place on a warm bed,
if

a

warm
the

room

possible.

2.

Cleanse

away
3.

froth

from

the

nose

and mouth.

Apply warm bricks or
the
arm-pits,

stones, bottles, etc.,

to

between
4.

the

thighs,

and

to

the soles of the feet.
the

hands

enclosed
the

in

Rub warm
in

the

body with
5.
If

socks.
a

possible,
6.

place
restore

body

warm
(or

bath.
of

To
the

breathing,
into

put the pipe
nostril,

a

common
into

bellows

one

blow
other

nostril)' carefully

closing

the

and

the

mouth

;

at

the

same

time

draw
the
free

downwards, and
upper part of

push
the

gently

backwards
to

windpipe,

allow a

TREATMENT OF DROWNING,
admission of
to
inflate
little
;

ETC.

1:3

air;

blow
till

the the

bellows
breast
is

gently,

the

lungs,

raised
free,

a

then set the mouth and nostrils

and press gently on the chest.
operation
of
life

Repeat
until

this

of

inflating

the
the

lungs

signs

appear.

When
to

patient
nose,
if

revives

apply smelling salts
able,

the

obtain-

and give

some

warm
the
roll

wine or brandy

and water.
feet.

Never hold the body up by the
not

Do
and

rub
not

body
on

with

salt

or

spirits

do

casks.
for

These
twelve

remedies
hours.

should

be

continued

10.

SUNSTROKE, APOPLEXY, AND
Raise the head
pressure on
all

FITS.

and
sides

support
of

it

by
;

gentle

the

the

head

unloose
apply
for

tight

clothes,

strings,

etc.,

and

cold water to

the

head
if

and

face.

Send

medical assistance

procurable.

124

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
ii.

NARCOTIC POISONS.
(Bane
berries;
;

fools

parsley;
;

deadly
etc.)

nightshade;

water hemlock

thorn apple

opium,

Give emetics, large draughts of
the
throat,

fluids,

tickle

apply

smelling salts

to

the

nose,
chest,
to

dash
apply
rouse

cold

water

over

the

face

and

mustard
the

poultices,

and

endeavor

person
if

by

walking

between

two

persons,

and,

possible,
12.

by

electricity.

VEGETABLE IRRITATING POISONS.
(Mezereon
etc.)
;

monks-hood

;

bitter

apple

;

gamboge,

Give emetics of mustard or chamomile, large
draughts of

warm
if

milk, or other

bland
give

fluids,

leech the belly
infusion

necessary,

and

strong

of coffee.

POISONOUS FISH.
(Old-wife
fish,
;

sea-lobster

;

mussel

;

tunney

;

blower

;

rock-

etc.)

Give an emetic, excite vomiting by tickling

TREATMENT OF DROWNING,
the
throat,

ETC.

125

and draughts by

of

warm
and

water.

Fol-

low emetics

purgatives,

give

sugar

and water

to

drink freely.
14.

BITES
(Viper
If
;

OF REPTILES.
;

black-viper

rattle-snake,

etc.)

possible, immediately tie

a

tape or string

between the wound and the heart, and draw
tight.

Scarify

the

parts

with

a

penknife,
bleeding,

or

other sharp instrument to excite

and
fre-

apply
quently

a

cupping

glass
it,

over

the

bite,

removing
alkali,

and bathing the wounds

in volatile

(or

some

liniment.)

If

a

cupping glass cannot be

procured,
possible,

make

the

wound bleed
it,

as

much

as
a

and suck
Give

or burn

it

well with

hot poker.
if

the patient plenty of

whiskey,

possible,

and

cover up warmly.

BITES OF

MAD ANIMALS.

Tie a string tightly above the part, cut out
the bite,

and cauterize the wound with a red

126

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
poker,
or

hot
tive,

lunar caustic.
of
.

Give a purga-

and plenty

warm
16.

drink.

SIMPLE

BITES.

For small bites (where the

animal

is

not
of

mad) bathe the part

well

with

Tincture

Arnica diluted with twelve times the quantity
of

water.
17-

NETTLE STING.

Rub
bathe

the

part

with green

sage

leaves,

or

with

water in which some herbs have

been steeped.
18.

STINGS OF BEES
Pull the
to

AND WASPS.
pressing a watch key
;

sting

out,
it

over
if

it

expose

well

suck

the

wound,

possible,

and bathe with cold water.
19.

TREATMENT OF DIARRHOEA.
This
complaint
is

very

liable

to

attack

amateur hunters, being induced by change of

TREATMENT OF DROWNING,
water,
diet,

ETC.
bottle
of
in

127

and mode

of

living.

A
place

of

Diarrhoea mixture
druggist,

may
In

be

procured
a

any
the

and
outfit.

should

have

hunter's
icine
try

absence of
:

such
a

medof

the

following

— Half
from

cupful

milk or water, and one

teaspoonful of pepper,
soft

mix

and

drink.

Abstain
is

food.

Brandy and pepper
Dr.
says
the

a more effectual remedy.

Franklin,
:

in

his

"Advice
that

to

Swimmers,"
is

" It

is

certain

much swimming
to

means
do

of

stopping diarrhoea, and even of

producing constipation.

With respect
to at

those
are

who

not

know how
diarrhoea
to

swim, or
a

who

affected

with

season
that

which
a

does not permit them

use

exercise,

warm
skin,

bath,
is

by

cleansing

and

purifying

the

found very salutary, and often
cure."
20.

affects

a

radical

BLACK-FLIES,

MOSQUITOES,

ETC.,

OINTMENTS FOR

PROTECTION FROM.

These pests

generally

infest

every locality

frequented by the hunter, and to guard against

:

128

THE HUNTER'S HA XD BOOK.
bites

their tions
i.

some

of

the

following

prepara-

should be

carried
in

The simple herb, pennyroyal, found
localities,

most sandy

rubbed

on

the

hands
insects.
oil

and
2.

face,

will

check the attacks of
of
i

Make an ointment
3

ounce

of

pennyroyal,

ounces
or

lard.

Put into a
bottle,

little

wooden

box,

wide-mouthed

and

apply when
3.

required.
tar

Mix common
Bottle
for

and sweet

oil

in

equal

parts.
4.

use.
is

Tobacco smoke
and
be
if

obnoxious

to

mos-

quitoes,
will

the

pipe

be lighted, those pests

not

so

troublesome.
21.

BLACK-FLIES, MOSQUITOES,

ETC.,

TO RID THE

TENT

OF.
infest

When
way
or

these

insects

the

tent,

a

smudge should be

lighted in the

windward doorcurtain.

placed under
is

the

windward
of
birch,

The smudge
bark,
set

composed
fire

or

other

on

and

covered

with

green

TREATMENT OF DROWNING,
grass,
leaves,

ETC.
which

129

or

other

materials
of

will

create
the

a

large
is

amount

smoke.
tent,

While
drive
cloth,

smoke
all

passing through the
insects
tent,
is

out

the

with

a

towel

or

then close the

and the smudge may be
plan
in to

removed.

It

a good
the
will

continue
a

the

smudge
that

outside

tent,
drift

such

position

the

breeze

the
off

smoke

on

the

canvas.

This
the

will

drive

the insects with-

out

filling

tent

with

the

smoke.

INDEX TO SECTION

X.

THE TREATMENT OF DROWNING, WOUNDS,
ETC.
No

SECTION

XI.

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.
TO PRESERVE MEAT AND FISH.

The hunter may
than he
then employ some
to

at times secure

more game

can immediately use,
of

and he should

the

following

methods
:

preserve
i.

the

surplus for future
fish

needs
meat,
the

To
flesh

dry
intp

meat and
small,
off

:— For
all

cut

the

thin

strips,

meat

being
place
the
salt.

cleaned
the

the

bones.

If

venison,
of

pieces
of

of

meat

on

the

inside

hide

the

animal,
pieces

and
up

mix
in

well

with

Roll
it

these

the

hide
a

and

let

stand for three
the
into
fire-place

hours.

Build
four

frame
forked
of

over
poles

by

driving
in

the

ground
six

the
apart.

form

a

square,

and about

feet

The

forks

132

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
about four feet above the ground.
lay
of

should be

On
the

these
strips

a

frame-work

of

poles,

spread
start

meat
fire

on
of

the

frame,

and

a good

steady
the
fire

hard
for

wood beneath.
keep

Keep
The
meat
hide
strips

lighted

twenty-four hours.
will

meat

thus

prepared
of

for

al-

most any length
is is

time.

Moose and bear
If

dried

in

the

same manner.
to

the

not

available

wrap
in

the

salted

in,

place
is

them
to
let

in

layers

any vessel.
salt,

The

object

them absorb the
dries
in.

which the
Fish
Scale
the
2

fire

afterward
dried
in

may
them,

be

the

same manner.
cutting

spread
them,

open

by

down
not

back, clean

and remove backbone.
fish
:

To
of

salt

meat and
the

— When
or
fish

it

is

desired

to

keep
time,

meat

for

any

length

we

may

cut

the

meat into
in

convenient pieces,
earthen vessel,

and place

in

layers
salt

an

using pepper
the

and

freely,

and

keeping

vessel

covered
as
usual,

in

a

cool

place.

For
cut

fish,

clean

from the
into

belly

down

the

back, and so divide

MISCELLAXEOUS RECEIPTS.
two pieces, place
in

133

layers

in

an earthen or
piece
freely
in

wooden
with
cool

vessel,

sprinkling
little

each

salt

and a

pepper.

Keep

a

place.

TO PRESERVE DEAD GAME.
If

only for
in

a

short

time,

clean,

pluck and

place

a

covered
If

jar,

using salt and pep-

per freely.
follows
the
the
:

for

a long time,
the
intestines,

proceed as
pluck,
fill

—Take
with
in

out

inside

unground

wheat,
of
to

and place
the

fowl
in

a

heap or cask
a
It

same
its

grain,

such

manner
will

as

insure

being covered.

keep

for

months.

BOOT GREASE.

A
is

simple
as

preparation
follows
2
:

for

boots and
1

shoes
part
parts

made

Melt together
beeswax,
or

black
tallow

rosin,

parts
will

and
fat.

3

(candle

do)

other

This

keeps the leather
into
to

soft

and waterproof.
at fire

Pour

a

tin

box,

and melt

when wanted

apply.


134

THE HUXTER'S HAXDBOOK.
HOW TO LOAD A GUN.

The

following

old-fashioned

rhyme

contains
:

some

good hints on loading a muzzle loader

"Our
Gun,
Whilst

sport almost

at

hand,

we charge

the

ev'ry

well-bred

Dog
If

lies

quietly

down.

Charge
piece

not

before.

over

night

the

Stands
will

loaded,
;

In

the

Morn

the

Prime

hiss

Nor
blame

Prime

too

full,

else

You
lose

will

surely

The

hanging

Fire,

and

the

pointed

Aim
Yet
tridge

cleanse

the

Touch-hole

first

;

a

Par-

Wing,
to

Most
bring.

the

field

for

this

wise

Purpose

In
fail

charging

next,

good

Workmen
but
not

never

To
Ball.

ram

the

Powder

well,

the

SECTION

XII.

SIGNS OF THE WEATHER.
very
tell,

It

is

convenient for the

hunter to be
state

able
of

to

by observing the present

the

weather,
day,

what
for

state

will

exist

during

the

next

or
tell

perhaps a longer period.
will

He may
to

thus
tent,

whether he

be

able

strike

or start

on any
or

arranged ex-

cursion on the
better

morrow,
in

whether he had

remain
signs
of

camp
the

and avoid a wetting.
as

The
sky

weather,

seen in than

the

and clouds, are nothing
of

more

the

existing state
is

the weather,

but as one state

invariably

followed

by

another of a de-

scription

which

never

varies,

we

may,

by

observing the
rience,
sarily
foretell

present state,
the
state

after

some expe-

which shall necesa

succeed.

In

presenting

few remarks

;

:;

136

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
hunter in fore-casting the weather,

to guide the
f

we

shall

not touch upon

any of the complex

considerations by which "the weather prophet"
arrives
at

his

learned
to

conclusions,

We
of

shall

confine
rules

ourselves

some

of

the

simplest
nature

laid

down by those observers
have

who have given
rules

us the benefit of their studies

which

been

proved

to

be

trust-

worthy.
1.

SIGNS IN

THE SKY AND HEAVENLY
little

BODIES.
as

An

easily-remembered

rhyme runs

follows

Will

Evening red and morning grey set the traveler on his way But evening grey and morning red Will bring down rain upon his head.
is

This

truth

and
of

poetry

combined.
says
:

An

old couplet, worthy
If It
it

credence,

rains

before

seven,
eleven,

will

clear before

In
not

other

language,
for

early

morning rains do

continue

any length of time.

61GJVS

OF THE WEATHER.
at sunset,

137

A
the

clear

sky and dead calm

with

sun going down a well-defined form, but

on

which

the

eye
in

can gaze

without

being

dazzled,

indicate,
;

summer, a warm, bright
such
a

morrow

in

winter,

sunset

is

suc-

ceeded by sharp

frost.

A
low.
If

yellow

sunset

indicates wet, soon

to

fol-

it

rains

before

sunrise,

there will

be

a

fine

afternoon.

A
if

red

evening

foretells

fine

weather,

but

the

color

spreads very far

upwards from
if

the

horizon in the

evening

;

or

the
it

color

spreads in like manner at sunrise,

foretells

wind or
If

rain,

or
at

both.
rising

the

sun

appears enlarged there
if

will

shortly

be sudden and sharp showers,
in

in

summer; but

winter settled and moder-

ate weather.

Halos,

cornas,

etc.,

indicate

coining rain

or

snow.

A

haziness
the

in

the

atmosphere,

which

ob-

scures

sunlight,

and makes the sun look

138

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
or
ill-defined,

white
the
low.
If

foretells rain.

If at

night
fol-

moon and
the
rays,

stars

grow dim,

rain

will

sun
or
the

is

white

at

setting,

or

shorn of
of

his

goes

down

behind a bank
is

clouds on
expected.
If

horizon,

bad weather

to

be

the
,

moon
red,

looks
;

pale
if

and

dim,

expect
color,

rain

if

wind

of

her natural
will

with a
If
iris,

clear sky,

fair

weather
is

obtain.

the

sun at rising
circle

surrounded by an
fair

or

of

white clouds,
short
time.
in

weather

will
If

follow,

for a

there
it

are
will
it

red

clouds
;

the

west

at
tint

sunset,
of

be
will

fine

if

they
fine
;

have a
or
if

purple,

be

very
in

red,

bordered with black
If there

the

southeast.

be

a

ring or
fine

halo

round the
is

sun

in

bad weather,
If

weather

at

hand.

there

be lightning without thunder after
fair

a

clear

day,

weather
the

will

continue.

Before

much

rain

clouds grow bigger,

and increase very

fast.

When

the clouds are


SIGNS OF THE WEATHER.
formed
like

139

fleeces,

but

dense

in

the

middle
bright

and bright towards the edges, with a
sky,

they are signs
rain.
If

of

frost,

with

hail,

snow,
air,

or

clouds from high
like

in the

in

thin white trains
tell

locks

of

wool they

fore-

wind

and

probably
covers

rain.

When
sky,

a

gensmall

eral

cloudiness

the
fly

and

black
are a

fragments of clouds
sure sign
of
rain,

underneath, they
it

and probably
of

will

be

lasting.
rain,

Two

currents

clouds

always

portend
If

and, in

summer, thunder.
clouds are seen in
fine

at

sunrise

many

the
will

west

and soon

disappear,

weather

obtain.
If

the

clouds
of

at

sunrise

move

to

the west,
exist.

fine
If

weather,

short duration,

will

there be a rainbow during continued wet
rain
will

weather, the
If

soon be over.
it

a

rainbow disappear suddenly,

will

be

fine.

The
weather
If

following
:

signs

all

foretell

foul,

wet

the

sun

rise

pale,

or

purple

red,

or

140

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
dark blue,
day.
the clouds
the are

even
the
If

there

will

be

rain

during

red

at

sunrise,

there will

be rain
If

next

day.

at

sunrise

many dark
it

clouds are seen in
will

the

west,

and remain,

rain

on

that

day.
If

the sun
cloud,

at
it

rising
will

is

covered by a dark
the

spotted
If

rain

same day.
,

the

sun burn

more than usual

or

there
fine

be a halo round the sun or moon during
weather, foul
If
it

weather
during

is

at

hand.*

rain

sunshine,

showers

will

continue.
If

the full

moon

rise

pale

;

wet.

If

it

rise

red

;

wind.
the
stars

If

appear

larger,
is

and

closer,

and

flicker,

rain

or

wind

at

hand.

An Aurora

Borealis

foretells

wet

weather.
is

A
*

continued rain from

the

south

scarcely

In "The Wreck of the Hesperus" the Old Sailor says: "I pray thee put into yonder port, For I fear a hurricane." "Last night the moon had a golden ring, and to night no
see."

moon we

SIGNS OF THE WEATHER.
ever

141

succeeded by settled weather
changes,
of

before the
or

wind
point
If

either

to

the

west

some

the

north.

rain

falls

during

an east wind,

it

may

be expected
If

to

continue for twenty-four hours.

the

sun be
in

seen
clouds,

double,

or

more times

reflected

the

expect a heavy storm.
at

A

very red

eastern sky

sunset, indicates

bad weather.
2.

SIGNS

IN FOGS
class
in

AND
of

MISTS.
of

A
less

less

complicated

Signs
sky,

the

Weather
the

than those

observed
in
its

the

but

one none

accurate

readings,

is

that presented by the

movements
cumstances
the
sults

of

fogs

and mists, and the

various

cir-

under which these are formed.
conditions under
lead,
this

Some
and the

of
re-

simplest
to

Class,

which they
rise

are

as

follows

:—

If
ish,

mists

in

low ground and soon van-

expect fine
mists
rise

weather.
to

If

the

hill-tops,

expect

rain

in

a

day or two.
black mist
indicates

A

coming wet.

1

42

THE HUNTER'S HAXDBOOK.
the

When
rises

fog
fair

leaves

the
is

mountains and
at

higher,

weather

hand.

If
after
not,
If

the
a

dew

lies
it

plentifully
is

on
of

the

grass
If

fine

clay,
is

a

sign

another.
will

and there
near the
before
days.
the
fields

no wind, rain

follow.

full

moon
it

there
will

be

a

general
for sev-

mist
eral
If

sunrise,

be

fine

are

covered with
is

a

mist be-

fore

sunrise,

fine

weather
or

indicated.
in

If a

white mist,

dew, form

the

eve-

ing
ing:

near a river,
land,

and spread over the adjoinbe
fair

there

will

weather.
or mist, with wind,

If

there
will

be

a

damp
the
fog,

fog

rain
If

follow.
fields
in

the
a

morning
it

be

covered
rain

with

heavy wet

will

generally

within
If

two or three days.

a

morning fog form into clouds,
heights,
layers,

at

dif-

ferent

which

increase

in

size

and

drive in
foretold.

thunder

and

heavy rain are

S/GXS OF UNE WEATHER.

143

SIGNS

GIVEN

BY

ANIMALS,

INSECTS,

AND

INANI-

MATE OBJECTS.
Any change
imals,
these,
birds,
in

the

weather has

its

effect

upon

an-

insects,

and some inanimate
impart
is

objects,

and

by

their state

actions,

to

us their

knowledge
True, by
of
in

of

what

of

weather

approaching.

observing
Parts
1

the signs

which have
this

been

treated

and
state

2

of

Section,

we may

foretell

the

coming

as

soon as can animals or birds, but by
of

knowing the meaning
tures
of

the

signs

which those
of a

crea-

exhibit,

we may

avail ourselves

large store
is

knowledge which,

though
easy

second-hand,
of

ready-

made, and as useful as
facts

acquirement.
Naturalists,
etc.,

The
unre-

which have been noted by
head,
are

der this
fer
ter.

very volumnious, but we shall

only to those

which

may be

of

use

to

the hun-

When
chntter,

rain

is

coming, ravens caw, swallows
birds

small

plume

themselves

and
great

make
noise

a
in

show
the

of washing, crows

make

a

evening, and

geese

cackle more

than

usual.

Sheep huddle

together

at

the

approach of

144

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
their tails in
its

bad weather, and turn
tion.
If

direc-

Dogs
spiders,

feel in

lazy at

the approach

of rain.

spinning their webs,
long,

make

the

terminating filaments
tion
will

we may,

in propor-

to

their length, conclude that the

weather

be fine

and continue so

for ten
their

or twelve

days.
in

Spiders generally
;

alter

webs once

24 hours
in
;

if

they do this between six and
evening,
there
will
in

seven
night

the

be a fine
morning,
expect

if

they alter their web
if

the

a fine
fine

day;

they

work during

rain,

weather,
spider
spiders
is,

and the more active
the
finer
will

and busy
weather.

the
If

be
in

the
the

web (gossamer)

fly

autumn
and

with
fine

a south wind,

expect an
spiders

east

wind

weather.
their

When

break

and de-

stroy

nests,

and creep away, wet weather

may be
If

expected.
fly

gnats

in

compact bodies

in the

beams
there

of

the setting
If

sun,

there will be fine weather.
fly

bats

flutter

and beetles

about,

will

be a

fine

morrow.

SIGNS OF THE WEATHER.
If

145

owls
to

scream during foul
fair.

weather,

it

will

change
If
fair

storks

and cranes

fly

high and

steadily,

weather.
all
:

In

of

the

following

cases,

rain

is

to

be

expected
If

ditches

and

drains smell

stronger

than

usual.
If

tobacco

smoke seems denser and

more

powerful.
If

the

convolonlus and

chickweed close.

If foxes

and dogs howl and bark more than

usual.
If
If

moles cast up

hills.

horses stretch out their necks,
air,

and

sniff

the
field,

and

assemble

in

the

corner of

a

with their heads

to
if

leeward.
quails

If turkeys gobble,

and

make more

noise
If

than usual.
sea-birds
fly

towards land, and land-birds

to

sea.
If

swallows

fly

lower

than

usual.

146

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK.
the
fly

If

crow

makes

a great

deal

of

noise,

and
If

round and round.
screams more than usual, and

water-fowl

plunge into the water.
If

cranes

place

their

bills

under

their

wings.
If

fish

bite

more
the

readily,

and gambol near
ponds.

the surface
If
If

of

streams and

frogs

and toads croak more

than usual.

the

owl screech.
sea-gulls
is

When
a

and

other

birds

fly

inland

stoim
If

to

be expected.
be hushed with

the

wind

sudden heat,

thunder and rain are foretold.

General

Remarks.
last

Sudden

rains

do

not

long,

but

when

the air grows

thick

by degrees, and the sun,

moon, and
it

stars

shine

dimmer
six

and

dimmer,

is

then

likely to

rain

hours.

After very

warm and calm
some
rain,

weather, a squall
follow
;

or storm, with
at

may

likewise

any

time

when the

atmosphere

is

heated

SIGNS OF THE WEATHER.
much above
season, and
the

147

usual
there

temperature
is,

of

the

when
electric

or

recently

has

been,
in

much

or

magnetic disturbances

the

atmosphere.
are

Storms

most

frequent
In

in

December
there
ver-

January and February.
are nal

September

generally one or
equinoctial gales

two
are

storms.

The
than

stronger

the

autumnal.
NOTE.
All

mention of the
presaging the
as

readings

of

scientific

in-

struments as
posely omitted,

weather,

has

been

pur-

the

general hunter does not

carry
is

such instruments on his excursions.
possible
to

While
whence

it

im-

enumerate
weather
express

the

sources

the reI

marks

on the
to

have

been gathered,
indebtedness
to

wish,

nevertheless,
useful

my

a very
to a

volume

entitled

"Enquire

Within,"

and

copy of "Vernier's Almanac."

FINIS.

"In less than one hundred pages
philosophy."

is

much and deep

THE STARS AND THE EARTH;
OR

Thoughts upon Space, Time and Eternity.
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY

THOMAS

HILL, D.D., L.L.D.

Late President of Harvard University.
Cloth,

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i

The author takes up the phenomenon

SHORTHAND WITHOUT A MASTER.

Universal Phonography; OR
SHORTHAND BY THE " ALLEN METHOD." A. Self -Instructor, whereby more Speed than Long-Hand Writing is gained at the First Lesson, and additional Speed at each subsequent Lesson.

By

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G.
50

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There is scarcely any acquirement so helpful to the student, scientist, or professional man, as shorthand writing. Heretofore, all the methods have required so long a time before one could become so proficient as to ui.ike it of any advantage, t'.iat men in middle life or busy men have not een able to uive the time ^o learn if but l>y the "Allen Method" one can most in " ihj idle mo nents of ;i lvi-y hfe," certainly, in an hour a d;iy two or three mouths, become so expert as to report a lecture verbatim. m Rev. Dr. THOMAS HILL, Late President of Harvard College.
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Portland, June 2, 1883. Mr. Allen's method of thoroughly practical, and must, of necessity, lead to better practical results than the analytic methods usually pursued. I hope Mr. Allen's methods will bring into more general use the phonographic style of shorthand. From R. M. Pflsifer, of R. M. Fulsifer <fc Co., Proprietors of the "Boston Herald." The "Herald," Boston, Aug. 17,1881.
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nost cordiallv indorse the

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37 Matthews, Harvard College.

I had taken but two lessons of you, and at my third lesson I wrote three times as fast as an ordinary long-hand writer. S. B. PEARMAIN.

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After taking a two months' cou r se I wrote from matter with which was entirely unfamiliar, one hundred and forty words per minute. B. C. STICKNEY.
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MINNIE

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How the Ant

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BEGINNINGS WITH THE MICROSCOPE.
A WORKING HANDBOOK,
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or, the

Mistakes, Trials, and Tabulations of a

Frenchman while wrestling with the English Tongue." After sco listening to his story of how he went to the theatre expecting to how Laura Keene appear in two pieces, supported by her husband
;

ho told some of his mishaps over and over again, because his hearers how he said, kept saying "Do tell," "I want to know," &c.
;

"kicked the bucket," and used other expressions of a like nature,
supposing them to be the most polite forms of speech; what a Btruggle he had with certain little words to find out how to say broke
i

off,

broken up, broken

and how he made other
listener has expressed the

&c, many a mistakes almost without number,
out,

broken down, broken

in,

hope the Professor would have thj
it

lecture

put in some permanent form, that

might not be forgotten.

Finally taking the advice of his friends, Professor Dubois has con-

cluded to add the materials collected in later years, and have the

whole published as one of Lee and Shepard's popular handbooks. It is published in English and French, on opposite pages, and will
thus be a very valuable aid to those learning French.

"FULL OF SERVICEABLE INFORMATION."

Handbook of Conversation
Its

:

Faults

and

Its

Graces.

COMPRISING
i.

2.— Mr. Trench's Lecture. 3.— Mr. Parry Gwinn's " A "Word to the Wise or, Hints on the Current Improprieties of Expression in "Writing and Speaking." 4.— Mistakes and Improprieties in Speaking and Writing CorDr. Peabody's Lecture.
;

rected.

COMPILED BY

ANDREW P.

PEABODY,
50 Cents.

D.D.,

L.L

D.,

Late of Harvard University.
Cloth,

" A book which will he of incalculable value to the young man or woman who will carefully m>te and follow out its numerous and valuable suggestions It is worth owning, and ought to be studied by many who heedlessly misuse their mother tongue."— Boston Deacon.
" This little manual contains a great varietv of valuable matter for the instruction of those who would improve their style in conversation. It is in fact one of the veiy best and clearest handbooks of its kind that we have seen "— T lie Day, Baltimore.

"It is a useful handb o'c on the proprieties and English speech.' The Churchman

common

errors of

*' Th°: book is full of serviceable information and can be advantageously read and kept for reference bv everv one who desires to converse and to write properly and gracefully '''—Paper World.
'

II

tp

for re
oi.l it

v.\\

U

a neat nocket-volume. which every person phonld have reference Kor the young it is of especial value and to the of great interest."— Vox Popuh.
is

KNOW WHAT YOU ARE

DRINKING.

WATER ANALYSIS:
A
Handbook
BY
for

Water

Drinkers.
D.

G. L.

AUSTIN, M.
50
Cents.

Price

" This little book furnishes to non-professional men a ready and pleasing method of determining water to the extent necessary to afford a perfect idea as regards its wliolesomeness for drinking purposes. We cannot but congratulate the author on the happy conception and execution of this work, which cannot fail to make many friends in its behalf."— Chicago Chemical Review.

" The tests are, for the most part, simple, and are described in language devoid of technicalities. The work will be of service to all who wish to know what they a.e drinking."— Medical bulttiin, lJhnu.

cago Interior.

"This will prove a very acceptable hook to those who drink water, and who hive any special desire to know what kind of water they drink. It has been prepared by an entirely competent person."— Chi-

"It condenses into fifty pages what one would have to' wander through a small chemical librar- to find, we commend the book as deserving of a wide circulation "— N. Y. Independent.

"Another of Lee and Shepard's model litt'e Handbooks,' wlrch have proven a popular card it contains the gist of the science."— Des Mines State Leader.
'

'•

A most valuable little
" i

book."- Boston

Globe.

D r &us t' n 'M1 well-known authority, and his conclusions will command attention."— Brooklyn Eagle. N ° *.?"? ran P ernsp this book, even for a few moments, without coIr ,«

seeimr tnat it is verv systematic and concise; plainly written, and well worth the price asked "- Medical and Surg.cal Journal, Si. Louis.

USEFUL IN AN EMERGENCY.

WHAT
A
Handbook

IS

TO BE DONE?
and Adults.

for the

Nursery, with useful Hints for Children

By ROBEBT
PHYSICIAN TO
Price, cloth,

B.

DIXOJST,
;

M.D.

Surgeon of the Fifth mass. Infantry

THE BOSTON DISPENSARY.
SO cents; paper, 30
cents.

This is not only a useful, but at the same time a clever little handbook, and one which is well adapted for all who have any regard
for their

own

health or that of their children.

The book
and

contains
diseases,

hints

and remedies

fjr the treatment of accidents
".

and they are so clearly arranged that any on can easily understand what do do in an emergency when a physician cannot be reached, or
before his services can be obtained.
is

Besides the general hints, there a prefix containing a set of rules on the personal care of the health, arranged in such a clear and concise manner that they will be not

only instructive, but, at the same time, exceedingly interesting readIf people of ad classes cannot or will not eat, drink, and avoid all that is recommended in this book, at least they can learn the reason why such and such conditions of atmosphere, diet, and exercise should be sought for, and such an 1 such determiidng causes of ill health be shunned. If every boy and girl in the l.ind could be taught the rules to be found in this little book, we have no hesitation
ing.

in saying they would be saved much suffering and disease, and would add incalculably to the strength of our Continent by producing and preserving a sounder and more vigorous race of human beings. This handbook will be found especially useful for cottagers during the summer season, who live at some distance from their physician. It is, witbort doubt, the best book of the kind yet prepared for the

non-professioual world.

rHE MOST COMPLET E BOOK OF THE KIND EVER WRITTEN.

Practical Boat-Sailing.
on the Management of Small Boaife Conditions; with Explanatory Chapteis on or. dinary Sea Manoeuvres, and the Use of Sails, Helm, and Anchor, and Advice as to what is proper to be done in Different Emergencies; Supplemented by a short

A concise and simple Treatise
all

and Yachts under

VOCABULARY OF NAUTICAL TERMS.
By DOUGLAS FRAZAR,
Formerly Fourtn Officer of the Steamship ••Atlantic," Master ef ti e Bark " Maryland, " and Conv minder of the Yacht " Fennimore Cooper " in the Northern Seas of Chn.a and Japw*.

Numerous

Illustrations.

Cloth, $1.00.

calities

" Capt. Frazar has done his work in a sailorly way, using no technibut which he explains fully before hr goes an inch further. His ideas are clear and concise, his method simple and practical, and his teachings so plain that his little book will be hailed with real pleasure by all who are embryo yachtsmen. The illustrations, of which there are over two dozen, are right to the point,' ami from them the beginner can at once* see' what some men would take pages to explain. * * his little work is of great practical value, and shoula be in the hands of every yachtsman."— Nautical Gazette.
'

I

" Capt Frazar is the son of a shipmaster, and was fami ar with boats, Yachts, and shipping generally, from his youth until he rose to the top of his profession as a seaman. * * It is, unquestionably, the most complete book of the kind ever written, and will, no doubt, be read with interest by all who have anything to do with boats or yachts."—
1

Traveller, Boston.

" Its directions are so plain, that with the aid of the accompanying pictorial illustrations and diagrams given in the book, it does seem as if •anybody,' aft r reading it, could safely handle a sailboat in a squall."— Times, Hartford. " The work is admirably done, and by a thorough study of these directions, boat sailing, which lias been considered the most dangerous, is really made one of the most safe of sports." Providence Journal.

Of course Capt. Frazer does not pretend that one may become an Expert sailor bv reading his book, but he gives a great amount of valuable information, and so smooths the way to the practical knowledge which can only be gained by actual experience."— New Bedford Mer"
cury.

" Here is a book that every boy ought to have There are certain things boys will do. They fish, shoot, swim, and sail it may be added * * that they al«o drown and are shot. Boys should be taught how ^o do these things which, when igno'antly attempted, vield danger. Here we have a good guide to the art of boat sailinsr; sensible instruction, full explanation! and a clear evidence of the fact that to be careless is to be in danger. We can heartily commend the volume."— Hartford Courant.

"JUST

HOW

IT IS DONE."

Whirlwinds,
Cyclones, and Tornadoes.
By
"A
Prof. ^W. N.
JDJk.VIS. (Harvard College.;

Cloth, 50 cents.
popular treatise upon the causes of these phenomena, lately become of such frequency in the West and South, has become much needed. The public have become somewhat familiar with these through reading of their terrible effects, but there is a too general lack of knowledge as to their causes. The study of the natural phenomena of the earth, sea, and air have yielded great additions to the general stock of knowledge on these subjects, and the reasons giving rise to any one of these great disturbances, as well as the more common experiences of rain and wind, can be accurately explained, if not always predicted, by those who watch the weather reports. Every one should master the explanations Lowell Tunis. given in this little book." " Any of the thousands in this country who have been blown into the middle of next week by tornadoes during the past few years can discover precisely how it was done by reading this little book, which belongs to Lee & Shepard's Science Series.' It is in fact an essay on the theory of storms, accompanied by a number of cuts and diagrams intended t<> throw additional light upon the subject. To say the very least of the book, it is exceedingly interesting and instructive, whether the theory advanced is correct or not." C/ii'-af/o Herald. " Mr. Davis, who is an instructor in Harvard College, in the essay before us, has given his theory of storms, in an interesting and convincing manner. At a time like the present, when the West seems singled out for the most extraordinary natural disturbances, and the East is not free from dangerous storms and floods, such a work is of real value, not only as showing the causes, but also the means of prevention, of those apparently ungovernable phenomena. The action of whirlwinds and cyclones, the causes of motion, the danger of tornadoes, etc., are clearly described, and are useful to the scientist as well as to the layman." — Boston Commercial B\d

which have

'

letin.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

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