www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • May 17, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 235
RUSSIAN RIOTS
WORLD PAGE 31
CAP CRUISES
IN PLAYOFFS
SPORTS PAGE 11
MARY R. KENNEDY
FOUND DEAD IN N.Y.
NATION PAGE 7
POLICE MOVE AGAINST NEW PROTEST IN
MOSCOW
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The long-vacant former Shen Auto
Dealership on the border of Burlingame and
San Mateo will be home to 155 luxury apart-
ments as the AFL-CIO Building Investment
Trust has pledged to invest nearly $70 million
in constructing the project.
BIT has contracted with Sares Regis Group
of Northern California to develop the com-
plex at 800 and 888 N. San Mateo Drive that
was given final approval by the city’s
Planning Commission in October.
Several proposals to build on the site have
failed over the past decade as previous devel-
opers failed to complete the project, mostly
due to financing. San Mateo officials grappled
for years whether to keep the site an auto
dealership but started accepting housing
Auto siteto become housing
Officials swat at
mosquito district
Local Agency Formation Commission
not convinced by list of improvements
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The special district oversight group whose recommendation
could spell the end for the county’s embezzlement-scarred
mosquito district or reaffirm its current governance put off a
final decision until comments made at yesterday’s public hear-
ing can be incorporated into a final report.
However, even with a final ruling far from delivered, com-
ments by members of the Local Agency Formation
Commission indicated they weren’t convinced by the list of
internal improvements implemented by the San Mateo County
Mosquito and Vector Control District to prevent future finan-
cial mishaps.
Attorney Joan Cassman, representing the district, and board
President Sam Lerner each offered changes such as having the
managing director approve every program and transaction, hir-
ing a new auditor and using an identity theft program.
Lerner said he acknowledged the “district’s embarrassment
Workshop provides
help for hoarders
Peninsula Community Services aims to
educate first responders about condition
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Several years ago, Peter Ebner faced eviction from his home
in San Mateo, but not for neglecting to pay his bills. He was
facing eviction because his residence was so filled with pos-
sessions that it posed a safety hazard.
Code enforcement officers gave him 60 days to make his
home safe for firefighters to enter or he would have to move
out. This posed a great challenge for Ebner, who was strug-
Rendering of luxury apartments to be built at the former Shen Auto Dealership on the border
of Burlingame and San Mateo.
Trust announces financial commitment
for long-vacant car dealership location
See HOMES, Page 22
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Customers line up to buy cannoli at Romolo’s Cannoli & Spumoni Factory on 37th Avenue in San Mateo Wednesday.The store
is run by Mike and Joe Cappello, who have taken over the family business.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Brothers Mike and Joe Cappello love
their jobs.
They get to eat Italian deserts all day,
whenever they want, as they are now
master spumoni and cannoli makers.
They learned their craft from their
grandparents, Romolo and Angela, and
have since taken over the family busi-
ness on 37th Avenue in San Mateo.
Romolo’s Cannoli & Spumoni Factory
is celebrating its 44th year and the broth-
ers have painstakingly calculated that
the desert shop has just sold its 1 mil-
lionth cannoli.
This Saturday, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.,
the brothers will roll back prices on can-
noli to $1 apiece, the same price their
A million cannoli
Romolo’s Cannoli & Spumoni Factory celebrates milestone
Mike and Joe Cappello See CANNOLI Page 23
See HELP Page 23
See LAFCO Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor-comedian
Bob Saget is 56.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1937
Teddy Hill and His Orchestra recorded
“King Porter Stomp” for RCA Victor’s
Bluebird label in New York; making his
recording debut was trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie.
“If an article is attractive,or useful,or
inexpensive,they’ll stop making it tomorrow; if
it’s all three,they stopped making it yesterday.”
— Mignon McLaughlin, American journalist (1913-1983)
Actor Bill Paxton is
57.
Talk show
host-actor Craig
Ferguson is 50.
In other news ...
Birthdays
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Silver dollars magically
travel through space in
the hands of illusionist
Patrick Martin, who
performed his Science of
Magic presentation at
the Bayside STEM
Academy in San Mateo
May 7. Martin, who can
be seen on Fox
Network’s ‘Masters of
Illusion,’ will host an
illustrated talk on how
illusions affect the mind
while he performs
sleight of hand tricks at
the California Academy
of Sciences’s NightLife
this evening.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. West
winds 10 to 15 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest winds 15
to 20 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
The letter “Future Saltworks project” in the May 16 edition
of the Daily Journal by Gail Raabe listed her wrong city of res-
idence. She lives in Redwood City.
Correction
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in first place; No. 09 Winning Spirit in second
place; and No. 08 Gorgeous George in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:44.19.
(Answers tomorrow)
EXUDE ETHIC ZODIAC BUCKET
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He went to Prague because he wanted to do
this — “CZECH” IT OUT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NLAEK
OVIRS
TAREOT
DRENGE
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
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o
n

F
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k

h
t
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p
:
/
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w
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w
.
f
a
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k
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ju
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Answer:
3 8 4
10 11 12 14 24 6
Mega number
May 15 Mega Millions
13 23 29 30 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 2 6 5
Daily Four
6 1 7
Daily three evening
In 1510, Early Renaissance painter Sandro Botticelli died in
Florence, Italy; he was probably in his mid 60s.
In 1792, the New York Stock Exchange had its origins as a
group of brokers met under a tree on Wall Street.
In 1849, fire erupted in St. Louis, Mo., resulting in the loss of
three lives, more than 400 buildings and some two dozen
steamships.
In 1912, the Socialist Party of America nominated Eugene V.
Debs for president at its convention in Indianapolis.
In 1939, Britain’s King George VI and Queen Elizabeth
arrived in Quebec on the first visit to Canada by reigning
British sovereigns.
In 1946, President Harry S. Truman seized control of the
nation’s railroads, delaying — but not preventing — a threat-
ened strike by engineers and trainmen.
In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Brown v. Board of
Education of Topeka, unanimously struck down racially segre-
gated public schools.
In 1961, Cuban leader Fidel Castro offered to release prisoners
captured in the Bay of Pigs invasion in exchange for 500 bull-
dozers. (The prisoners were eventually freed in exchange for
medical supplies.)
In 1971, “Godspell,” a contemporary musical inspired by the
Gospel According to St. Matthew, opened off-Broadway at the
Cherry Lane Theatre.
In 1980, rioting that claimed 18 lives erupted in Miami’s
Liberty City after an all-white jury in Tampa acquitted four for-
mer Miami police officers of fatally beating black insurance
executive Arthur McDuffie.
In 1987, 37 American sailors were killed when an Iraqi war-
plane attacked the U.S. Navy frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf.
Actor Peter Gerety is 72. Singer Taj Mahal is 70. Singer-song-
writer Jesse Winchester is 68. Rock musician Bill Bruford is 63.
Singer-musician George Johnson (The Brothers Johnson) is 59. TV
personality Kathleen Sullivan is 59. Boxing Hall-of-Famer Sugar
Ray Leonard is 56. Sports announcer Jim Nantz is 53. Singer Enya
is 51. Rock singer-musician Page McConnell is 49. Actor David
Eigenberg is 48. Singer-musician Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nails) is
47. Actress Paige Turco is 47. Rhythm-and-blues musician O’Dell
(Mint Condition) is 47. Actor Hill Harper is 46. TV personality/inte-
rior designer Thom Filicia is 43. Singer Jordan Knight is 42.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Darnell Van Rensalier (Shai) is 42.
Workers go trash-picking
for woman’s rings
ATTLEBORO, Mass. — An Attleboro,
Mass., woman is praising the city’s trash
collection company after its workers
helped her dig through mountains of
stinking garbage to find five valuable
rings she inadvertently threw away,
including her engagement and wedding
bands.
Deb Kirby says she took the rings off
one day last week to dry them after wash-
ing her hands. She said she wrapped them
in a paper towel, got distracted and tossed
them.
Distraught, she called Waste
Management.
The company had the truck that picked
up her garbage unload at a transfer station.
She knew the rings were in a black bag
with a blue drawstring. She and Waste
Management workers found it in just 30
minutes.
She says she’s “extremely grateful and
so very impressed” by Waste
Management.
Cops: Man shoots
friend in leg at his request
STOCKHOLM, N.Y. — Authorities
say a northern New York man had his
friend shoot him in the leg with a rifle
because he wanted to know what it feels
like to be shot.
State police in St. Lawrence County say
the shooting occurred around 5 p.m.
Sunday in the rural town of Stockholm
when 25-year-old Shawn Mossow of
neighboring Norfolk relented to his
friend’s repeated requests and shot him
once in the right leg with a .22-caliber
rifle.
The 24-year-old man from Norfolk is
expected to make a full recovery. Police
haven’t released his name.
Mossow was charged with reckless
endangerment. He’s being held in the
county jail on $10,000 bail.
Horse runs into sea,
rescued a mile offshore
CARPINTERIA — Maybe he should
be named Bob.
An Arabian horse named William got
spooked during a California beachside
photo shoot Tuesday and swam a mile out
to sea before rescuers got to him and
helped him back to shore.
Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Capt. Jay
Irwin said that the horse’s white head
looked like a seagull bobbing in the water.
Owner Mindy Peters says the 6-year-
old Arabian, whose official name is Heir
of Temptation, was part of a photo clinic
on the beach when it was spooked by
waves and ran off.
Rescue swimmers assisted by the Santa
Barbara Harbor Patrol and state parks
employees found the horse a mile off-
shore as darkness fell.
Man freed on bond but
must write book reports
RICHMOND — A man charged in an
undercover sting operation in Northern
California that ended in gunfire has been
ordered released on bond on the condition
that he read and write book reports.
U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez
Rogers allowed 23-year-old Otis Mobley
to be freed Monday, although she delayed
an order to allow prosecutors to appeal her
decision.
Under the bond order, Mobley would be
required to spend an hour reading and a
half hour writing each day as he awaits
trial on robbery and assault charges.
Mobley and two others are accused of
arranging to sell a grenade launcher for
$1,000 to an undercover federal agent in
Richmond. Hutcherson was shot and
wounded by agents during the alleged
meeting.
Family wakes to find
Lexus in their pool
LA PUENTE — The Diaz family
awoke to find a Lexus at the bottom of
their swimming pool.
The said that drivers navigating the
tricky intersection next to their house in
La Puente have hit their cinderblock wall
before, but early Sunday one of them
smashed right through it in his silver
sedan, then sank into the pool. A crane
later fished out the 2006 Lexus.
California Highway Patrol officer Steve
Licon says the driver — 40-year-old
Modesto Cabral — was able to escape
from the car through the passenger side
window and had only minor injuries.
Jail records show he was booked on
suspicion of drunken driving and was
being held on $10,000 bail. It is not clear
whether he’s hired an attorney.
9 15 17 24 35 18
Mega number
May 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
For more information call 650.344.5200
*While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, May 18 at 9:00am to 1:00pm
Burlingame Recreation Center
850 Burlingame Avenue, Burlingame
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Free Services include*
Refreshments
Blood Pressure Check
Kidney Screening
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Resources and Service from all of San Mateo County
—over 40 exhibitors! Goody Bags & Giveaways*
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Bayview Villa
Assisted living and dementia care
This Friday
MENLO PARK
Theft. A potted plant was taken from a front
yard on the 200 block of Marmona Drive
before 5:24 p.m.
Narcotics. A person was arrested for pos-
sessing a controlled substance at Newbridge
Street and Hollyburne Avenue before 11:17
p.m. Thursday, May 10.
Grand theft. Jewelry was taken from a
house on the 1300 block of Madera Avenue
before 6:40 p.m. Thursday, May 10.
Vandalism. Someone tampered with the lug
nuts on a vehicle on the 100 block of Bay
Road before 9:53 a.m. Thursday, May 10.
Drunk driver. A man was arrested for driv-
ing under the influence on the 700 block of
Willow Road before 12:42 a.m. Wednesday,
May 9.
Petty theft. License plates were stolen on
the 1000 block of Berkeley Avenue before
10:56 p.m. Tuesday, May 8.
BURLINGAME
Stolen vehicle. A car was stolen from a resi-
dence on the 500 block of El Camino Real
before 9:56 a.m. Tuesday, May 8.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on the
500 block of Primrose Road before 5:01 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8.
Theft. Jewelry was stolen from a residence
on the 1100 block of Palm Drive before 6:45
p.m. Monday, May 7.
Police reports
No music, no pants, no fun
A radio and some pants were stolen on
Broadway in Redwood City before 5:57
p.m. Sunday, May 13.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Don’t let Jackie Prager’s size fool you.
She may be an introvert — and small —
but Prager pushes herself. For instance, she
has two black belts in kung fu — a fact that
makes her parents feel a lot better about
Prager attending college on her own. The
skill could come in handy for another rea-
son. Prager has always wanted to become a
lawyer.
“My grandmother said they were super-
heroes who helped others. And, I loved
superheroes,” Prager said of her childhood
desire to be in a courtroom.
That desire has never waned. In fact, it has
only become more specific. The 18-year-old
will graduate from the College of San Mateo
Middle College and head to the University
of San Francisco to double major in English
and psychology with a minor in legal stud-
ies. It’s all part of Prager’s plan to be a pros-
ecutor working on cases concerning
women’s and children’s rights.
Prager didn’t start out as a butt-kicking
gal. As a little girl, she was very energetic
and participated in a variety of activities like
dancing, ice skating and gymnastics. After
watching her younger brother in his kung fu
classes, Prager enrolled while in fourth
grade. In her sophomore year, she earned her
first black bet. She earned her second in
November.
During the day, Prager attended Baywood
Elementary School for four years then trans-
ferred to Laurel Elementary School after
being accepted into a GATE program. She
attended Borel for one year, then her family
moved to Davis for a year, and she returned
to Borel Middle School. The family stayed
put after that. Prager enrolled at Aragon
High School and took choir classes — a way
to explore her admiration for singing and
push herself out of a fairly shy norm. Prager
has also spent much of her time volunteer-
ing. She truly enjoys helping people and has
given her time at the library, local senior
center and in the classrooms of her previous
teachers.
She applied to the Middle College pro-
gram thinking it would be a better fit. Prager
was right. Her parents weren’t sure of the
choice at first. Prager was sold during the
first semester when classes started a bit later.
Her parents are happier now that she’s grad-
uating with college credits. For a few class-
es, she’s starting college with a sophomore
standing.
At University of San Francisco, Prager can
use that as an opportunity to graduate early
or spend more time in the study abroad pro-
gram in London. She’s undecided which
option will be her path. Before making any
decisions, Prager plans to spend the summer
traveling with her family and getting to
know her new roommate.
The College of San Mateo Middle
College’s graduation will be held 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 29.
Great Grads is in its seventh year profiling
one graduating senior from each of our local
schools. Schools have the option to partici-
pate. Those that choose to participate are
asked to nominate one student who deserves
recognition.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Becoming a superhero for others
Age: 18
City of residence: San
Mateo
College: University of San
Francisco
Major: English and
psychology with a minor in
legal studies
Favorite subject in high
school: English
What she’ll miss about
high school: Living at
home with my family.
Biggest life lesson learned thus far:You have to
accept defeat in order to move forward.
Jackie Prager
4
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
• U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, is asking veterans with back-
logged claims at the Oakland
Veterans Affairs’ Office to join her at
a “fix-it meeting” on Monday, May
21, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Room
207 of The War Memorial Building,
401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. Veterans are waiting an
average of 320 days to receive a decision from the VA’s
Oakland office which handles claims from Kern County to
the Oregon border. Some 34,000 claims remain unsettled at
the office which has the VA’s second highest case delay
record in the nation, according to Speier’s office.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Foster City Council will consider an ordinance to
amend a development agreement with Gilead Sciences after
it acquired a 32-acre site, with a five-story building, from
Electronics for Imaging called the North Campus. The
company now owns about 72 acres in the Vintage Park area,
including the 40-acre South Campus, and is seeking to
extend the an agreement set to terminate July 10 of this year
until April 10, 2013 to negotiate new terms on the future
development of the campus. Gilead plans to construct up to
1.2 million square feet of biopharmaceutical office and labo-
ratory uses with ancillary facilities and parking. Gilead is
seeking to amend the Vintage Park General Development
Plan to integrate both campuses. The council meets 6:30
p.m., Monday, May 21, City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd.,
Foster City.
Official seeks U.S. commitment on high-speed rail
SACRAMENTO — The leader of the California Senate
called Wednesday on the Obama administration to say now
whether it will commit more federal money to the state’s high-
speed rail project if the president wins a second term.
The request came as Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg pushes skeptical state lawmakers to approve $2.7
billion in initial spending by July 1 to meet a federal construc-
tion deadline.
The federal government has pledged $3.5 billion, on top of
the $9 billion authorized by California voters.
A sticking point is whether more federal money will be
available to complete the project once it gets under way. The
rail project is expected to cost at least $68 billion.
Around the state
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An elderly San Mateo man’s former
longtime prostitute who was already on
probation for taking his money by intim-
idation is accused of threatening him
several times in the last month before
beating him with a brick and making off
with more money, his television and car.
Prosecutors say San Francisco resi-
dent Lynette Evette Derouen, 38, and the
82-year-old victim had a several-year
arrangement in which she would come
to his home to provide services. The man
ended the business relationship but
authorities say Derouen still came to his
home. After pressuring him into giving
her money and write checks to her
daughter’s boyfriend, she was convicted
in July 2011 of felony grand theft,
placed on probation and ordered to stay
away from her former client, according
to the District Attorney’s Office.
But in April, District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said Derouen began returning
to the man’s home, entering it several
times again to threaten him and demand
money.
“He gave her money out of fear or just
to make her go away,” he said, adding
that she threatened to “bash his head in
with a rock.”
On May 11, Derouen is accused of
entering the house where the man was
making lunch and pushing him to the
floor while she shouted “show me the
money.” Wagstaffe said she struck him
with a brick she had brought with her
before grabbing between $50 and $100
in cash and a brand-new television
which she put in the man’s car.
She also allegedly grabbed two tele-
phones to prevent the man from immedi-
ately calling police.
A security camera at the San Mateo
Medical Center across the street caught
Derouen leaving the house holding the
television and driving off in his vehicle.
The car was recovered later that after-
noon when Derouen was stopped on an
unrelated warrant out of East Palo Alto.
Wagstaffe said her luggage was in the
trunk.
Derouen is charged with 12 crimes,
including eight felonies. The counts
include home invasion robbery, resi-
dential burglary, embezzlement of an
elderly person, violating a probation
order, car theft and removing a wireless
device to prevent someone from seek-
ing help.
At her initial arraignment, she asked
for a court-appointed attorney and plead-
ed not guilty. She did not waive her right
to a speedy trial and returns to court May
29 for a preliminary hearing.
She remains in custody in lieu of
$500,000 bail.
New Jersey governor, mayor
channel Seinfeld in video parody
TRENTON, N.J. — New Jersey Gov.
Chris Christie and the mayor of New
Jersey’s largest city are channeling the
Seinfeld-Newman rivalry in a video par-
ody that spoofs the mayor’s heroics and
Christie’s vice presidential potential.
The Republican governor finds him-
self thwarted at do-gooding by Newark
Mayor Cory Booker. The Democrat
rescued a neighbor from a fire last
month.
Booker tells Christie “I got this” as he
fixes the governor’s flat tire, helps Bruce
Springsteen replace a missing guitar and
Tebows after catching a baby dropped
from a state Capitol balcony before
Christie’s eyes.
Each time, Christie grits his teeth and
says “Booker!”
Prostitute charged with beating elderly client
Around the nation
5
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Fair Political Practices
Commission will investigate if
Redwood City Councilwoman
Rosanne Foust violated state law last
month for commenting on the pro-
posed Cargill Saltworks development
while heading an economic business
group which has vocally endorsed the
development.
In a May 10 letter to Marsha
Cohen, the Redwood City resident
who filed the complaint, FPPC
Enforcement Division Chief Gary S.
Winuk confirmed it was moving for-
ward rather than dismissing the com-
plaint outright.
Launching an investigation doesn’t
mean the FPPC has yet to make any
decisions on Cohen’s allegations or
Foust’s possible conflict. However,
both Cohen and Foust see the step as
fruitful.
“I respect the decision that they
want to look into it. I respect the
process and it
allows me the
opportunity to
respond and have
my facts put out
there,” Foust said.
Cohen said she
is “pleased” the
FPPC felt there is
reason for further
investigation.
“They obvi-
ously felt there was something to go
on,” she said.
The FPPC did not respond to an
inquiry.
Cohen filed the complaint after a
Redwood City Council meeting at
which Foust suggested seeking an
advisory vote on whether the city
should scrap the pending Saltworks
proposal or continue waiting for a
revised plan on which it would ulti-
mately vote. Earlier this month,
developer DMB formally pulled its
application on the heels of a city
announcement the City Council
planned to deny both the vote idea
and the proposal which had sat
unmoving for three years.
Cohen and other sections of the
public cried foul on Foust’s com-
ments because she is president of the
San Mateo County Economic
Development Association, a private
organization which endorsed DMB’s
now-defunct “50-50 Balanced Plan”
for retail, housing and open space.
In 2010, the FPPC launched a sim-
ilar investigation into allegations
Foust violated the Political Reform
Act with her dual roles. The FPPC
warned Foust to abstain from
Saltworks-related matters from that
point forward. The FPPC also noted
Foust acted on the counsel of then-
city attorney Roy Abrams and issued
her a written warning that future vio-
lations would carry up to $5,000 in
fines. Cohen said the previous inci-
dent strengthened her decision to file
the recent complaint.
“We all make an assumption we are
being represented based on officials’
best guess on what’s right or what’s
fair,” Cohen said.
Investigation to begin for possible conflict
Rosanne Foust
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Los Altos woman accused of
Tasing and stabbing her estranged
husband at their Redwood City con-
struction firm office last fall while
wearing bubble wrap to protect her-
self pleaded not guilty yesterday to
premeditated attempted murder and
assault.
After entering her plea, Laura Jean
Wenke, 51, also waived her right to a
speedy prosecution and scheduled a
Sept. 24 jury trial.
Wenke and her husband are in the
midst of a divorce and have a young
child. Wenke stood to gain a $2 mil-
lion life insurance payout if her hus-
band died and was very jealous of his
new girlfriend,
according to
prosecutors.
On Sept. 15,
Wenke allegedly
arrived at the
family business,
W e n k e
Construction, on
Laurel Street and
parked a truck in
front of the
office windows to block the view of
passersby. Inside, prosecutors say she
asked her husband to look up some-
thing in his computer and, as he
worked, she stunned and then stabbed
him with a folding knife several times
in the neck and torso.
After her arrest, police reported she
was wearing a mechanic’s jumpsuit
and underneath the clothing her torso
was swaddled in bubble wrap, appar-
ently as protection against being hit
herself.
Wenke’s husband was hospitalized
with injuries to his lung, neck and
chest but later released.
During a preliminary hearing last
month, he testified as did a police
officer who said a “to do” list of activ-
ities related to the crime was found
inside Wenke’s purse.
Wenke remains in custody without
bail and faces seven years to life in
prison if convicted because of the
premeditation allegation.
Estranged wife pleads not guilty to stabbing husband
Laura Wenke
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Even if vot-
ers approve Gov. Jerry Brown’s pro-
posal for higher taxes this fall, his
ballot initiative would be only a par-
tial solution to the state’s chronic
budget deficits.
California could face shortfalls
for the foreseeable future depending
on how much Democrats are willing
to cut social programs and whether
the economy rebounds. In many
cases, the financial pain on
Californians will persist. College
students will still face higher tuition
fees, public school teachers still face
layoffs and parks are still scheduled
to close.
Officials at the University of
California, for example, are consid-
ering plans to raise tuition by 6 per-
cent this fall. If voters reject
Brown’s tax hike
in November,
the officials
warn of a mid-
year, double-
digit tuition
increase or dras-
tic cuts to cam-
pus programs
and staffing.
“Whether the
tax initiative passes or fails, the UC
still loses,” said Cheryl Deutsch, 27,
a graduate student in urban planning
at the University of California, Los
Angeles.
The California State University
system hiked tuition by 9 percent for
this fall and froze admissions for
next spring in response to state
budget cuts. There are no plans to
roll back the tuition increases of
recent years even if the tax hikes
pass.
Even with tax, California
could face chronic deficits
Jerry Brown
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A threat that’s
been hanging over the economy is
starting to look a lot less menacing.
Oil and gasoline prices are sink-
ing, giving relief to businesses and
consumers who a few weeks ago
seemed about to face the highest
fuel prices ever.
President Barack Obama’s re-
election prospects could also bene-
fit, especially if prices keep falling
as some analysts expect. A majority
of Americans disapproved of
Obama’s handling of gas prices in
an AP-GfK poll early this month.
But that was before the full effect of
the recent drop had reached drivers.
The average U.S. retail gasoline
price has dropped 21 cents a gallon
to $3.73 since hitting a 2012 peak of
$3.94 on April 6.
The economy could gain, too.
Consumers who spend less on fuel
have more to spend on other pur-
chases, from autos and furniture to
appliances and vacations, that could
help drive economic output and job
growth.
Lower oil prices ease load
on consumers and Obama
6
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Marguerite Ann Philips
Marguerite Ann Philips, born May 1940,
died December 2011. Marguerite was the only
daughter of Elsie and Charles Philips. She was
born at the outbreak of World War II in the tiny
mining village of Nantyglo, in South Wales.
She left school at 15 and joined Bath Travel
Agency as a travel agent and later gained her
qualifications as a travel guide.
In 1967-68, Marguerite emigrated from
Britain to New York and became an expert in
European travel. From New York, she moved
to Florida and then on to San Francisco. She
became an American citizen.
In the 1980s, Marguerite bought her house
in East Palo Alto and eventually settled into
the life of an American.
Marguerite was a member of the East Palo
Alto Homeowners Association and served as
the secretary of the organization for many
years. She once ran unsuccessfully as a candi-
date for the East Palo Alto City Council.
She was an avid quilter and a member of the
Peninsula Quilters. She was a member of the
Iris Society.
She worked for many years for Bungey
Travel in Palo Alto and for Phileas Fogg Travel
in the Stanford Shopping Center until the 9/11
attack forced the company to change its struc-
ture. She died of a heart attack.
There will be a memorial service this com-
ing Saturday, May 19, 2012, at 2 p.m. at the
Soka Gakkai International Silicon Valley
Community Center located at 1875 De La
Cruz in Santa Clara.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 250 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
ly’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 250 words
or without editing, please submit an inquiry to
our advertising department at ads@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Obituary
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — One of life’s simple
pleasures just got a little sweeter. After years
of waffling research on coffee and health, even
some fear that java might raise the risk
of heart disease, a big study finds
the opposite: Coffee drinkers
are a little more likely to live
longer. Regular or decaf
doesn’t matter.
The study of
400,000 people is the
largest ever
done on the
issue, and the
results should reas-
sure any coffee lovers
who think it’s a guilty
pleasure that may do
harm.
“Our study suggests that’s
really not the case,” said lead researcher
Neal Freedman of the National Cancer
Institute. “There may actually be a modest
benefit of coffee drinking.”
No one knows why. Coffee contains a thou-
sand things that can affect health, from help-
ful antioxidants to tiny amounts of substances
linked to cancer. The most widely studied
ingredient — caffeine — didn’t
play a role in the new study’s
results.
It’s not that earlier studies
were wrong. There is evi-
dence that coffee can
raise LDL, or bad
cholesterol, and
blood pressure at
least short-term, and
those in turn can raise
the risk of heart dis-
ease.
Even in the new study,
it first seemed that coffee
drinkers were more likely to die
at any given time. But they also tend-
ed to smoke, drink more alcohol, eat more red
meat and exercise less than non-coffee-
drinkers. Once researchers took those things
into account, a clear pattern emerged: Each
cup of coffee per day nudged up the chances
of living longer.
The study was done by the National
Institutes of Health and AARP. The results are
published in Thursday’s New England Journal
of Medicine.
Careful, though — this doesn’t prove that
coffee makes people live longer, only that the
two seem related. Like most studies on diet
and health, this one was based strictly on
observing people’s habits and resulting health.
So it can’t prove cause and effect.
But with so many people, more than a
decade of follow-up and enough deaths to
compare, “this is probably the best evidence
we have” and are likely to get, said Dr. Frank
Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health.
He had no role in this study but helped lead a
previous one that also found coffee benefi-
cial.
Study finds java drinkers live longer
By Marcy Gordon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A key House
Republican says the $2 billion trading loss at
JPMorgan Chase raises critical questions
about how banks control their risks. But
Republican lawmakers rejected calls from
Democrats for stricter regulation.
Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., chair-
man of the House Financial Services subcom-
mittee, noted the loss during a hearing about
how best to regulate banks big enough to
bring down the broader financial system.
Lawmakers said a firm’s character should
count when regulators determine if they are
“systemically important financial institu-
tions.” Such a designation would subject them
to a stricter level of oversight.
The panel’s hearing on a key tenet of the
2010 regulatory overhaul was scheduled well
before JPMorgan revealed its trading misfire
last week.
Republicans on the subcommittee
denounced the overhaul’s requirement for
financial firms to be tagged as “systemically
important.” They said it really means a firm is
considered “too big to fail” — the doctrine
that brought taxpayer bailouts of Wall Street
during the 2008 financial crisis.
“These firms will never fail,” said Rep.
Spencer Bachus, R-Ala., chairman of the full
Financial Services Committee.
News of the surprise loss at JPMorgan, the
only major bank to stay profitable during the
financial crisis, has renewed calls for tougher
oversight of Wall Street banks. Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner said Tuesday that
JPMorgan’s loss bolsters the case for stricter
rules.
But Bachus and other Republicans insisted
that the overhaul law, which most Republican
lawmakers had voted against, won’t prevent
another crisis and will drive financial busi-
ness overseas.
Democrats say regulations are needed “that
will essentially prevent a company from los-
ing money or taking risk,” Bachus said. “No
law can do that.”
Regarding JPMorgan, Bachus said that
“even with this loss, I believe they’re one of
the most profitable institutions in the country
... There is no risk from this loss to depositors
or taxpayers.”
Key Republican: JPMorgan $2B loss raises questions
NATION 7
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE – I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a “red-fag”. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the “Archdiocese of Los
Angeles” has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
“Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California” the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with “Stewart Enterprises”
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. “Stewart Enterprises” runs a
website called “Catholic Mortuaries.com”
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I don’t see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point I’m trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesn’t mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
By Mark S. Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Leslie Sabo’s
Vietnam War ended in the flash of
his own grenade, hurled at an enemy
bunker in Cambodia to save sur-
rounded comrades. Forty years later
— and a dozen years after the long-
lost paperwork turned up in military
archives — he was honored by
President Obama on Wednesday
with the nation’s highest award for
gallantry.
Obama presented the Medal of
Honor to Sabo’s widow, Rose Mary,
and said doing so helps right the
wrongs done to a generation that
served freedom’s cause but came
home to a brooding and resentful
nation.
“Instead of being celebrated, our
Vietnam veterans were often
shunned,” Obama said in a hushed
East Room. “They were called many
things when there was only one
thing that they deserved to be called
and that was American patriots.”
Spec. Leslie H. Sabo Jr. of
Elwood City, Pa., was serving with
U.S. forces near the village of Se
San in eastern Cambodia in May of
1970 when his unit was ambushed
and nearly overrun by North
Vietnamese forces.
Comrades testified that the rifle-
man charged up from the rear,
grabbed an enemy grenade and
tossed it away, using his body to
shield a fellow soldier. And shrug-
ging off his own injuries, Sabo
advanced on an enemy bunker that
had poured fire onto the U.S. troops
— and then, pulled the pin on his
own grenade.
GI killed in Cambodia awarded Medal of Honor
By Jim Fitzgerald
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEDFORD, N.Y. — Robert F.
Kennedy Jr.’s estranged wife, Mary
Richardson Kennedy, who had
fought drug and alcohol problems,
was found dead in her home
Wednesday.
An autopsy for the 52-year-old
was scheduled for Thursday, and no
cause of death had been released.
In a statement issued by Robert
Kennedy Jr.’s chief of staff, the fam-
ily described Mary Kennedy as “a
genius at friendship.”
“Mary inspired our family with
her kindness, her love, her gentle
soul and generous spirit,” the family
said.
The former Mary Richardson, a
longtime connection of the Kennedy
clan, married Robert Kennedy Jr., a
prominent environmental lawyer
and the son of Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy and
nephew of
President John F.
Kennedy, in
1994. The couple
had four chil-
dren, the
youngest born in
July 2001.
Robert Kennedy
Jr. also has two
children from a previous marriage.
Mary Kennedy was an architect
and designer and had overseen the
renovation of the couple’s home into
an environmentally advanced show-
piece. Her family cited her devotion
to her children in remembering her.
“We deeply regret the death of our
beloved sister Mary, whose radiant
and creative spirit will be sorely
missed by those who loved her,” the
family said in a statement issued by
Lawrence. “Our heart goes out to
her children who she loved without
reservation.”
Two U.S. Navy ships
collide in Pacific; no injuries
SAN DIEGO — An 844-foot-long
U.S. Navy assault ship collided with a
refueling tanker Wednesday in the
Pacific Ocean, causing damage to
both ships, but there were no injuries
or fuel spills, military officials said.
The midmorning accident between
the amphibious assault vessel USS
Essex and the oiler USNS Yukon
occurred about 120 miles off the
coast of Southern California as the
Essex was approaching the Yukon to
be refueled, said Cmdr. Charlie
Brown, a spokesman for the 3rd
Fleet. Brown said the steering appar-
ently stopped working on the Essex,
which was carrying 982 crew mem-
bers on its way to San Diego for
scheduled maintenance.
Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s
estranged wife, Mary,
found dead in New York
REUTERS
Barack Obama comforts Rose Mary Sabo-Brown after awarding the Medal of Honor posthumously to her
husband, Army Specialist Leslie Sabo Jr., for his actions in Cambodia in May 1970, in the East Room of the White
House.
Mary Kennedy
Around the state
LOCAL 8
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Craig Ichiuji, Agent
State Farm Agent
461 First Ave
San Mateo, CA 94401
Bus: 650-342-8857

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A
memorial service for John Lee, the
former mayor of San Mateo who
died May 7 from lung cancer, is
scheduled at 3 p.m., Sunday, June 3 at the
San Mateo Marriott, 1770 S. Amphlett
Blvd. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking
donations be sent to: John Lee Memorial
Fund, San Mateo Credit Union, 330 W.
20th Ave.
***
If you like goody bags, have some docu-
ments to shred or want information about
senior services be sure to visit the Senior
Showcase Information Fair tomorrow. It
will be held at the Burlingame Recreation
Center from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Everyone is
welcome and everything is free including
admission, health screenings and refresh-
ments. You can ask a pharmacist about med-
ications and see what 40 senior-related
exhibitors have to offer. The Daily Journal is
proud to produce this community event.
Come by and say hi to our staff.
***
San Mateo’s College Heights Church
will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of its
founding Sunday, June 3 with a special 10
a.m. service and a 6 p.m. potluck dinner
along with remembrances by former minis-
ters and charter members.
In April 1959, the idea of a new church for
the Hillsdale area of San Mateo was first pre-
sented to the Council of the Congregational
Church of San Mateo. On Feb. 12, 1962,
Verne E. Henderson was called to serve as
the organizing minister and worship services
were begun in temporary facilities at the
Abbott School Auditoriumon May 6, 1962.
The dedication of the new church was Nov.
7, 1965.
***
Election Day for the June 5 Presidential
Primary Election is three weeks away, and
May 21 is the last day for eligible voters to
file a new or updated voter registration card
to be entitled to vote in this election.
Voter registration cards are available at the
County Elections Office, as well as at any
public library, city hall or office of the U.S.
Postal Service or Department of Motor
Vehicles. Cards are also available online,
from the website of the California Secretary
of State at https://www.sos.ca.gov/nvrc/fed-
form/. Voter registration cards require the
applicant’s original signature and must be
submitted in person or through the mail. A
mailed registration card that is postmarked on
or before May 21 will satisfy the deadline.
***
Consider it a hometown hero at a home-
town parade. San Carlos High School gradu-
ate and former Michigan governor Jennifer
Granhold will serve as a celebrity judge this
weekend at the San Carlos Hometown Days
parade which starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, May
19.
***
Rotary District 5150 held its annual con-
ference in April. At which, the San Bruno
Rotary Club made a clean sweep of the
awards, garnering the following: Community
Service Award, New Generations Awards,
Rotary Foundation Award, World
Community Service Award, Vocational
Service Award, Club Service Award, culmi-
nating in the Best Club Award.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal
staff. It appears in the Thursday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Home sales down, prices up
Home prices were up on average the week
of May 19, 2007, though Bay Area homes
sold the previous were at the slowest pace in
12 years, according to DataQuick
Information Systems.
A total of 7,447 new and resale
homes and condos were sold in
the nine-county Bay
Area in April 2007, a
sales reduction of
18.4 percent when
compared with the 9,129 homes
sold in April of the prior year.
Despite the drop in sales, Marin County’s
median price for resale homes in April 2007
broke a California county record at
$1,010,000 — the first time any county in
California passed the million-dollar mark,
according to DataQuick. The median price
paid for a home in the Bay Area also
increased in April 2007 to a record high of
$659,000.
Sixteen Mile House reopens
Just under a year after the Sixteen Mile
House doors were closed in downtown
Millbrae, the historic site was reopened the
week of May 19, 2007 offering dinner and
drinks with historic ambiance.
Local restaurateur Peter Liu, who owns
Peter’s Cafe on Millbrae Avenue and El
Camino Real, bought the landmark the prior
year because of the central location and rich
history for the area. But purchasing the busi-
ness wasn’t enough to get things up and run-
ning. Liu needed to do major renovations to
have his vision of the site come to life.
The restaurant was established in 1861 but
wasn’t built at its original location on El
Camino Real until 1872 by the Sanchez fam-
ily. Jose Antonio Sanchez was a famed
Indian fighter in the Mexican Army who
came to San Francisco as young child with
his parents in 1776 as part of the De Anza
Expedition. After 44 years of service,
Sanchez was awarded the Buri Buri Rancho
— a 14,000-acre site upon which the Sixteen
Mile House was built.
In the 1970s, the original building was torn
down because the $50,000 price tag to
restore the building was too steep.
The place was resurrected on Broadway
with a plain front until a few years later
when the old-
time facade
was built to
resemble the original building.
County asks racing board
to reconsider turf decision
If the state’s horse racing board were to
reverse its position of not allowing Bay
Meadows race track to operate without syn-
thetic turf the week of May 19, 2007, county
officials could still secure the race dates
needed to continue the annual county fair,
members of the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors said that week.
The board was expected to pass a resolu-
tion urging the California Horse Racing
Board to exempt the race track from the
requirement.
Synthetic turf is thought by many to be
safer for horses and jockeys but Bay
Meadows felt it unnecessary to spend $8
million to $10 million when the facility was
slated for demolition and renovation in two
years. In March 2007, the county asked for a
two-year extension which the board denied.
The board then denied the race track any
2008 dates, leaving the last scheduled race
for Nov. 4, 2007.
From the archives highlights stories originally
printed five years ago this week. It appears in the
Thursday edition of the Daily Journal.
OPINION 9
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Let the people
see the 50/50 plan
Editor,
I, for one, hope that DMB will bring
forth a revised plan for development of
the Saltworks site. As a Redwood City
resident, the first plan tickled my
curiosity. Frankly, I think the 50/50
plan was intriguing, especially since it
was the result of extensive discussions
with Redwood City residents.
Also, significant public interest has
been expressed concerning restoring
marshlands, adding new parks, ball-
fields and levees and the foresightful
concept of living near work. So, yes, I
look forward to a revised development
plan and a thorough review through the
environmental impact review process.
Then, and only then, will I make up my
own mind whether I think it is the right
thing for Redwood City.
Foster Kinney
Redwood City
The right to free speech
Editor,
Wow, San Mateo made it onto
YouTube. (“Rabbi’s speech called hate-
ful” in the May 16 edition of the Daily
Journal). That’s great. The whole
nation and beyond can see just what a
truly great community we have. The
first town in the nation to adopt an
infantry regiment during a hated war
and the first town in the United States
to give a “Welcome Home” parade to
returning veterans. I’m proud of this
little town of ours.
Oh, but that didn’t make it onto
YouTube now did it? Now we can also
go down in history as the seat of the
hate movement in the Tea Party. This is
truly a proud moment for we San
Mateans. It is also an especially proud
moment for the Republican party who
are being held hostage by this portion
of their base. Thank you, to the two
lone voices of reason, Chuck Mc
Dougald and Leonard Stone, for speak-
ing up and defending the Republican
Party’s honor in San Mateo. And before
any of you get your big boy underwear
in a bunch, yes, I believe in the right to
free speech, that’s why I’m exercising
mine now.
JD Rhoads
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
By Nels Johnson
E
arning mostly Cs in high
school, I always summed up
my chronic underachieving by
blaming my teachers for grading me
unfairly. Nevermind the fact that I hard-
ly ever studied or finished my home-
work. The fault lay in a conspiracy of
teachers (and my unsympathetic par-
ents) with a communal grudge against
me. It certainly wasn’t my fault.
Call it poetic justice, but I am a high
school teacher now, and the tables have
ironically turned. Today’s zeitgeist in
teaching is what I’d always dreamt of
in my days as a lazy student:
Students aren’t to blame for low test
scores. Teachers are.
This blame-the-teacher phenomenon
is rooted in the increased interest in
standardized exams like the STAR test,
the annual state assessment with conse-
quences for the schools but not the stu-
dents. Intended initially as a means of
isolating standards not being addressed
sufficiently in a curriculum, a tool to
improve classroom teaching, STAR test
scores have become the singular basis
for evaluating the efficacy of California
public school teachers.
Discussing the value of standardized
testing itself is a topic for another
piece. The problem that concerns me
here is that the test results simply don’t
matter to students. By high school, the
higher achieving students are so con-
cerned with grades and SATs that
spring STAR exams are nothing but a
nuisance. Lower performing students
feel the same indifference, no doubt
reinforced by the excess of preparatory,
compulsory assessments the schools
have administered over the years in a
quixotic effort to boost their scores. For
students both at the top and the bottom,
it’s a litany of meaningless bubbling.
But for teachers these days, standard-
ized test results are viewed by outsiders
as the sole barometer of their success as
an educator. School boards are clamor-
ing for student achievement data as a
way of evaluating and compensating
teachers, with complicated “value-
added” formulas to differentiate the
performance of students above and
below the curve. Quarterly assessments
modeled after the STAR and Exit
exams have become typical in most
school districts, and whole curricula
have been redesigned to reach numeri-
cal goals that the students themselves
know nothing about.
The ironic casualties of this assess-
ment process have been not only the
diminished will in the students them-
selves, whom the process is meant to
help, but a watering down of curricu-
lum as well. Poor student performance
is now seen as an indicator of flaws in
classroom instruction — i.e., teachers
are leaving students behind. As a result,
new generations of teachers are learn-
ing their craft in an environment where
low test scores are no longer a natural
consequence for a student’s lack of
preparation or attentiveness but a need
for intensive “scaffolding” or “remedia-
tion,” which is educational jargon for
slowing and dumbing down. The sub-
ject matter has become so compartmen-
talized, the consequences so muted, that
there is little room for real learning
anymore.
It’s never good when students fail in
school, but as they mature they can at
least learn from past mistakes. I teach
seniors, and some of the best college
essays I’ve read deal with owning up to
past laziness and becoming a more
responsible, serious student.
Consequences are an essential part of
the learning process; skills and academ-
ic standards are important, but not near-
ly as vital as the industry and discipline
required to perform. Reteaching materi-
al, allowing a second try on a test, scaf-
folding content to make it as easy as
possible — the whole culture of public
education has resorted to spoon-feeding
students to chase the one-size-fits-all
illusion of 100 percent proficiency on
STAR tests.
It is a noble goal, every student being
proficient, but it’s not worth the price
we are paying. As a father of two
teenaged sons in public schools, I am a
fan of increased accountability for
teachers, but I am equally concerned
with my children taking responsibility
for their own progress. I have heard all
the complaints about ticky-tacky tests
and unfair biases, and it’s probably true
that some teachers don’t always educate
them as well as they should. But my
son’s grades are their grades.
No matter how much my 16-year-old
self disagrees.
Nels Johnson lives in Millbrae with his
wife and two boys, and has taught high
school for 21 years on the Peninsula.
Evaluating education
Overly protective?
P
rom season is in full force, which can only mean a
couple of things — teen dreams turn to fancy
dresses, party buses, last hurrahs, after parties and
making the most of an evening built up as the night to end
all high school nights.
For some, the festivities also means sex, sometimes for
the first time, sometimes
for the 101st time. That
choice, regardless of how
many times prior, can
also mean unintended
consequences like sexual-
ly transmitted diseases or
pregnancy. Neither are
probably the crowning
achievement on which a
senior wants to end his or
her high school career.
A condom company a
week or so back sent out
a press release apparently
trying to curb these
issues. NuVo Condoms
announced it would give free supplies to any high school
for distribution specifically before prom. The company
quoted a report finding one in five 17-year-olds plan to go
all the way the first time on prom night and added it was
not condoning post-prom moments but wanted to make
sure they were safe.
Sounds good.
Sure, underneath the altruism was obviously a marketing
ploy. But generosity and good deeds don’t always come
unwrapped in strings and gimmicks. If the outcome of the
offer is still prevention, isn’t that all that really matters?
The bigger question was if the offer is even a good idea.
Would even open-minded Peninsula schools and parents
balk? Would students even be confident enough to grab a
condom or two under the watchful gaze of school adminis-
trators?
First, I tried the company itself just to see if anybody
nationwide was taking them up on the offer. Crickets.
Absolutely no response which frankly does not send a
good message about their strategy and maybe even their
product. Scratch that then. But specific marketing aside,
was prom-specific distribution a good idea?
Confessing ignorance on the secret or maybe not-so-
secret lives of teens, I asked a few what they thought.
They mainly looked uncomfortable and offered up the
popular “I don’t know” response which is more a reflec-
tion on our generation gap than their lack of opinion. They
didn’t want to talk about those kinds of things with anyone
twice their age. So how in the world would they ever be
comfortable stockpiling contraception in public?
Again, I turned to someone much more educated than I.
Perryn Rowland, program director at San Mateo County-
based Teen Talk, said teens are much more knowledgeable
and open than previous generations. She called the idea
interesting but said any prom condom distribution should
be more than just a bowl in a bathroom. Instead, she
prefers it being part of a comprehensive sex ed program
and communication with parents about values and their
own experiences.
Taking out the threat of not knowing what your kids are
up to or learning can make parents more receptive. Giving
kids the tools to discuss with their parents what they think
rather than just assuming the worst can make students
more willing to seek out contraception at prom or other-
wise.
Like me, she’s not a big fan of the marketing — the
reality is any clinic, organization or school can nab 1,000
condoms for $55 or so.
“But I always think if it prevents one teen pregnancy or
one STD infection, that’s a good thing,” she said.
Truth is, for all the marketing gimmicks and programs,
some teens will still get pregnant or infected. Just offering
condoms doesn’t necessarily ensure the teens will actually
use them. Even adults might cringe a bit if they had to go
ask the school nurse for a supply.
But it’s a start. And while NuVo’s offer may not be the
best answer, it certainly could spark a conversation in local
districts and schools about possibilities for next spring’s
batch of formals or maybe all dances.
Schools already utilize breathalyzers to keep students
safe — yes, also to make sure they aren’t breaking the law
or won’t throw up mid-dance, but safety is a component.
Are condoms much different?
Prom can still be the night to end all nights. Offering a
little protection just helps make sure it’s also not the night
to end — or at least drastically change — young dreams.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,598.55 -0.26% 10-Yr Bond 1.765 -0.68%
Nasdaq2,874.04 -0.68% Oil (per barrel) 92.660004
S&P 500 1,324.80 -0.44% Gold 1,539.70
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By Pallavi Gogoi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The unending turmoil
in Greece spread fallout across the finan-
cial markets Wednesday. The Dow Jones
industrial average fell for the ninth day
out of 10, and gold, oil, and the euro all
dropped to multi-month lows.
Greece called a new round of elec-
tions for June 17 after coalition talks to
form a government fell apart. The presi-
dent said depositors were pulling hun-
dreds of millions of euros out of banks,
weakening the country’s strained finan-
cial system.
The main cause for investor worry was
that Greece would pull out of the group
of countries that use the euro, and that
that would throw the global markets into
chaos.
For U.S. stocks, it was a fairly quiet
day, but another decline in a month that
has been relentlessly downbeat. The
Dow fell 33.45 points to 12,598.55, and
the Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
5.86 points to 1,324.80.
The Dow has been on a nearly unbro-
ken slide since May 1, when it closed at
a four-year high. Since then, it has had
just one up day, and that was a gain of
only 20 points on May 10.
The average has lost 4.4 percent in
May and is headed for its first losing
month since September.
“We’re in a period where there’s little
conviction to buy,” said Richard Cripps,
chief investment officer at brokerage
Stifel Financial. “The road ahead is too
uncertain because of European concerns
and the presidential election later this
year.”
Elsewhere in the markets,
it was an eventful day:
• The dollar continued its two-week
climb against the euro. The dollar
improved to $1.27 per euro, the strongest
since January, as traders worried about a
messy exit from the euro bloc by Greece.
The stronger dollar drove the Indian
currency, the rupee, to an all-time low.
The rupee sank to 54.44 against the dol-
lar, surpassing the prior low of 54.39 on
Dec. 15.
• The price of benchmark U.S. crude
oil fell by $1.17 to finish at a seven-
month low of $92.81 per barrel. It is
down nearly 13 percent since the begin-
ning of May.
Dowfalls for ninth day
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Thursday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Marathon Oil Corp., up $2.45 at $42.98
The oil and gas producer will spin off its refining
and marketing business into a separate publicly
traded company.
Merck & Co., down $2.46 at $34.69
The drugmaker ended one clinical trial of a key
drug candidate, a blood thinner, and limited
another study of the drug to exclude stroke
victims.
Supervalu Inc., down 21 cents at $7.50
The grocery chain’s shares continued sliding
after the company cut its outlook on Tuesday
because of weak sales and shrinking profit
margins.
NASDAQ
TTM Technologies Inc., up $3.12 at $17.74
The circuit board maker raised its fourth-quarter
guidance because of greater demand for its
products.
Cree Inc., down $3.74 at $65.46
Shares of the lighting-products maker tumbled
after a weak outlook from a Taiwanese
manufacturer of LED lighting chips.
Micron Technology Inc., up 29 cents at $9.63
An analyst upgraded the memory chip maker’s
investment rating because of stabilizing prices
and a strong outlook for chips used in mobile
devices.
Whole Foods Market Inc., up $2.30 at $52.31
A research analyst believes the upscale grocer’s
shares will keep rising this year because
consumers are willing to spend more on food.
Big movers
By Peter Svensson
and Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Responding to
extraordinary demand, Facebook said
Wednesday that it would sell more stock
in the company’s initial public offering.
But ahead of the IPO, a debate emerged
between two of the nation’s largest
automakers: Does it pay to advertise on
the social network?
General Motors, the nation’s largest
automaker, said it would abandon
Facebook ads after concluding they were
ineffective. At the same time, Ford reaf-
firmed its commitment to Facebook,
saying their relationship was stronger
than ever.
The direct financial impact of GM’s
move is minimal for Facebook, but the
decision drew attention to the network’s
advertising system, which some
observers regard as immature.
In a regulatory filing Wednesday,
Facebook said it would add 84 million
shares, worth up to $3.2 billion, to the
IPO, which is shaping up to be the
decade’s hottest. The company’s stock is
expected to begin trading Friday on the
Nasdaq Stock Market under the ticker
symbol “FB”.
Almost half of the additional shares
come from investment firms DST Global
and Tiger Global.
Does advertising on Facebook pay?
FTC: Skechers deceived
consumers with shoe ads
WASHINGTON — The government
wants you to know that simply sport-
ing a pair of Skechers’ fitness shoes is
not going to get you Kim
Kardashian’s curves or Brooke
Burke’s toned tush.
Skechers USA Inc. will pay $40 mil-
lion to settle charges by the Federal
Trade Commission that the footwear
company made unfounded claims that
its Shape-ups shoes would help people
lose weight and strengthen their butt, leg
and stomach muscles. Kardashian,
Burke and other celebrities endorsed the
shoes in Skechers ads.
Business brief
<<Celtics beat 76ers for 2-1 series lead, page 15
• Sagan wins another stage of Tour of California, page 12
Thursday, May 17, 2012
ONE AND DONE: OAKLAND SCORES ONCE IN THE FIRST BUT TEXAS’ DARVISH SHUT IT DOWN THE REST OF THE WAY >>> PAGE 13
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
They say good things come to those who wait.
Burlingame baseball manager Shawn Scott
resisted the urge to bring Grant Goodman up to the
varsity squad last year as a sophomore and that
patience has paid off with one of the best two-way
threats in the Peninsula Athletic League this sea-
son.
“Grant forced my hand last year, but I didn’t
play the card,” Scott said.
Scott said he wanted Goodman in the lineup
every game — pitching or playing the field —
and last year he would have only seen time on the
mound.
This season, Goodman, now a junior, has
owned the mound and, after some minor adjust-
ments to his swing, is powering the ball around the
yard.
Last week against Hillsdale, Goodman pitched
five innings, allowing only one run on two hits. He
also singled twice and scored a run as the Panthers
locked up the PAL’s Bay Division championship.
For his efforts, Goodman is this week’s Daily
Journal Athlete of the Week.
“He’s been steady. Very steady,” Scott said. “I
know what I’m going to get every time he goes out
there. He keeps us in ball games.”
What Scott and the Panthers get is a bulldog on
the mound. No matter what is happening in an
inning, Goodman is locked in. He has an ERA of
1.34 and opponents are hitting just .131 against
him this season. And while he may not be a clas-
sic strikeout pitcher, he gets his fair share of swing
throughs. In 67.2 innings, he has struck out 83. He
struck out six Knights in the title-clinching win.
But Goodman is equally comfortable and confi-
dent in his defense to allow batters to make con-
tact.
Goodman guides Panthers to PAL title
Athlete of the Week
See AOTW, Page 16
T
he San Francisco Giants are 37
games into the 2012 season and hov-
ering right around .500. It’s feeling
like déjà vu all over again — a lot like 2010,
right? We all remember what happened two
years ago — it ended with the Giants win-
ning their first World Series since moving
West.
Then again, 2012 is starting to feel like
2011 again as well. We all remember what
happened last year, right? The Giants hovered
around .500 the first half of the season and
then fell apart late, missing the playoffs.
2011 had all the
makings of a repeat of
2010 and then it fell
apart. Which wDon’t
compare, let it ride
The San Francisco
Giants are 37 games
into the 2012 season
and hovering right
around .500. It’s feel-
ing like déjà vu all
over again — a lot
like 2010, right? We
all remember what
happened two years
ago — it ended with the Giants winning their
first World Series since moving West.
Then again, 2012 is starting to feel like
2011 again as well. We all remember what
happened last year, right? The Giants hovered
around .500 the first half of the season and
then fell apart late, missing the playoffs.
2011 had all the makings of a repeat of
2010 and then it fell apart. Which way will
the Giants go this season? Granted, injuries
have already plagued San Francisco this sea-
son, losing its closer in Brian Wilson and its
best hitter in Pablo Sandoval. Given that, the
Giants and their fans should be happy with a
.500 record.
Consider this as well: when a team is well
below .500, what does everyone say? “Let’s
get to .500 first and go from there.” The gen-
eral consensus is you don’t start thinking
playoffs until at a team is at least .500. The
2012 is a
new year
See LOUNGE, Page 16
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Menlo School baseball team kicked off the
defense of its 2010 and 2011 Central Coast
Section Division III championships with an
emphatic win over visiting St. Thomas More in
the first round of the 2012 CCS playoffs.
Pitcher Jake Batchelder pitched a five-inning
no-hitter and Freddy Avis hit two home runs and
drove in four as second-seeded Menlo beat No.
15 More 10-0 in a five-inning, 10-run mercy rule
game Wednesday afternoon in Atherton.
“It’s always good to get a 10-runner in,” said
Menlo manager Craig Schoof. “We hit the ball
pretty hard.”
Of Menlo’s 11 hits, six were for extra bases —
three homers and three doubles. In addition to
Avis’ two shots, Mikey Diekroeger added one as
well, a laser line drive over the right-field wall in
the bottom of the second inning to give Menlo a
3-0 lead.
That was just the appetizer, however. Avis hit
his first homer — a two-run shot — also over the
right-field fence. But all the Menlo hits paled in
comparison to Avis’ bomb in the fifth, also a two-
run homer. He took a 1-0 pitch and hit it not only
over the right-field fence, but over the scoreboard
and the trees behind the scoreboard.
“It’s the furthest left-handed home run I’ve ever
seen here,” said Schoof, who has coached at the
school for 25 years.
That was more than enough offense for
Batchelder. While Avis may have gotten most of
the accolades over the last year and a half,
Batchelder is no slouch. The lefty was simply too
much for an overmatched More squad.
“Pitching with a lead is always easier,”
Batchelder said. “I’ve always had that blessing
here at Menlo.”
Batchelder ran into a speed bump in the third
inning when he walked two batters and hit anoth-
er to load the bases with two outs. But Batchelder
induced a popup to second base to end the inning.
Other than that little wobble, Batchelder
cruised, striking out seven.
Menlo baseball cruises in CCS opener
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Step one in the repeat is done.
The Capuchino softball team is well aware that
the road to its second straight Central Coast
Section Division III title will be anything but a
walk in the park as the No. 7 seed.
But in the 2012 playoff opener Wednesday, the
Mustangs looked every bit the defending champi-
ons, taking care of No. 10 Stevenson 12-2 in a five-
inning mercy rule outcome.
“It’s huge,” said Capuchino coach Todd
Grammatico of the win. “I think it makes a huge
statement. A lot of people kind of wrote us off. …
I never wrote us off. After the Carlmont game I told
the kids, ‘I never know what team is going to show
up. You guys are good enough to beat anyone, but
you don’t always come with the right attitude.’And
ever since then, they’ve come with the right atti-
tude and the right team has been showing up.”
That win against Carlmont a week ago locked
up a playoff berth for the Mustangs. It was their
biggest win of a now seven-game winning streak.
And on Wednesday, they picked up the victory
behind the solid pitching of Gabby Tudury and the
power stroke of Ariana Wassmmer.
“We’ve just been getting more confidence every
week and after Carlmont, I told the kids, Carlmont
has the highest points in CCS and if you can beat
them 5-2, you can beat anybody,” Grammatico
said. “So they seemed to listen to me this time.”
Perhaps the turning point of the game came in
the first inning when Stevenson had runners at sec-
ond and third with only one out. It was then that
Tudury buckled down and struck out back-to-back
hitters to end the threat. From that point on, No. 5,
who was pitching in her first CCS game, was nails.
“I kind of needed to find my groove,” Tudury
said. “I wasn’t in the zone the first inning. Nerves
get you in your first CCS game, so I was a little
nervous. But, after the first inning I was fine. My
teammates were there for me. So I felt like I could
pitch just fine.”
“It was huge to get out of that first inning,”
Grammatico said. “I felt like they were going to
score and the two strikeouts and getting out of the
inning was huge.”
Cap crushes Stevenson
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Capuchino’s Jen Lewis rounds third and heads home during the Mustangs’ 12-2 win over
Stevenson in the first round of the CCS playoffs.
See MENLO, Page 14
See CAP, Page 14
SPORTS 12
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Menlo golfer Andrew Buchanan
saved his best Central Coast Section
performance for last.
Shooting a 64, the Menlo junior
was the CCS medalist at the golf
championship tournament at Rancho
Cañada-West golf course in Carmel
Tuesday.
Buchanan finished first out of 65
high school golfers who represented
24 high school teams — and he did
it in record fashion. Buchanan tied
the all-time CCS championship indi-
vidual scoring record of 64 set in
2010 by Patrick Grimes, a former
Knight, and in doing so led Menlo to
a fifth-place finish in the team com-
petition.
Sacred Heart Prep, the county’s
other representative, finished sev-
enth.
Buchanan scored five birdies and
an eagle in his 7-under par round.
Buchanan scored birdie, eagle, birdie
on holes 16 through 18 to complete a
bogey-free round and take home the
top spot.
Menlo shot a team total of 382
strokes, establishing a new Menlo
school record-low for the CCS cham-
pionship tournament in which five
scores count. The old record was set
in 2010 at 389.
Menlo finished just five strokes
behind third-place qualifier
Archbishop Mitty High School.
First place went to Robert Louis
Stevenson of Pebble Beach and sec-
ond place was won by Palma High
School of Salinas.
Buchanan is a repeat medalist after
winning the CCS Regional 2 tourna-
ment last week at Rancho Cañada,
shooting a 68.
Between the two CCS rounds,
Buchanan also competed at
Pasatiempo at the U.S. Open Local
Qualifying. Shooting a 1-under par
70 at Pasatiempo, Buchanan finished
tied for third in the U.S. Open Local
Qualifying round and advances to the
U.S.Open Sectional Qualifying at
Lake Merced June 4.
Menlo freshman Ethan Wong post-
ed the second place score for Menlo,
shooting a 74. Wong finished 17th in
the field of 65. Wong finished strong
going 1-under par on his final 4
holes.
Senior Will Petit shot a 76, record-
ing his personal best high school 18-
hole score in his final appearance of
his four-year varsity golf career.
Petit started off on a hot streak
shooting 1-under par on the front
nine. He went bogey free on the front
nine and birdied the tough par-5 sixth
hole.
Senior Jackson Dean shot a solid
82 and junior Max Garnick complet-
ed the scoring for Menlo by shooting
86.
Buchanan advances to the Nor Cal
tournament next Monday at Butte
Creek Country Club in Chico as an
individual representative for Menlo
School.
Jeff Carney of Burlingame had a
solid championship round, shooting a
77 to tie six others for seventh place.
Derek Ackeman of Sacred Heart
Prep shot a 73 to pace the Gators and
tie three others for 13th place.
Isiah Salinda of Serra shot a 75 to
wind up in 22nd place along with
SHP’s Bradley Knox.
Menlo-Atherton’s Max Culhane,
participating as another individual
qualifier, shot a 77 along with team-
mate Travis Anderson. Another Bear,
Matt Tinyo, shot an 81.
Andrew Vetter’s 82 and Zach
Lamb’s 86 rounded out Sacred Heart
Prep’s scoring.
CCS tennis
The county is without a representa-
tive in the Central Coast Section indi-
vidual tennis tournament.
After first round wins by Matt
Campana of Serra and Corey Pang of
Carlmont, local tennis players fell in
second round competition Wednesday.
Pang, the Peninsula Athletic League
Player of the Year, made easy work of
Carmel’s Russell Poole 6-0, 6-1 before
running into Trevor James of
Bellarmine, who beat the Scot 6-2, 6-
0.
James actually took down two of the
PAL’s best by making short work of
Burlingame’s Scott Taggart 6-2, 6-0.
The loss ends an impressive freshman
campaign for Taggart.
Campana advanced on a scratch by
Westmont’s Sriman Kolachalan but
lost a tough three-set battle to No. 3
Manpeet Twana 5-7, 6-4, 6-3.
Menlo’s Buchanan wins CCS golf title
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLOVIS — Slovakia’s Peter
Sagan of Slovakia raced to his
event-opening fourth straight stage
victory in the Tour of California on
Wednesday to increase his overall
lead to 16 seconds.
The 22-year-old Sagan, riding for
Liquigas-Cannondale, finished the
130.2-mile stage from Sonora to
Clovis — the longest leg in the race
— in 5 hours, 18 minutes, 8 seconds
in 95-degree conditions.
“Today was a harder stage,”
Sagan said. “Today, I was thinking
it was not possible for me to win,
but (teammate) Daniel (Oss) said,
‘Today we work for you.”’
Australia’s Heinrich Haussler,
racing for Garmin-Barracuda, was
second for the fourth straight day,
about a bike-length behind.
Rabobank’s Michael Matthews, also
from Australia, was third in the
stage.
Jeff Louder, the United
Healthcare rider from Salt Lake
City, was 34 seconds back in third
place with four stages left.
Sagan wins another stage in Tour of California
SPORTS 13
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas —
Expectations for Yu Darvish were
every bit as big as the contract he
signed to move from his native
Japan.
He continues to meet and perhaps
even exceed them.
Darvish pitched 7 2-3 strong
innings and Adrian Beltre had a
two-run homer to help the Texas
Rangers beat the Oakland Athletics
4-1 on Wednesday night.
“He was very efficient and made
them swing the bat,” Texas manager
Ron Washington said. “Broke his
cutter out tonight and moved his
fastball around the zone.”
Darvish (6-1) gave up one run and
four hits while striking out seven to
win his sixth game in seven deci-
sions and give a weary Rangers
bullpen a rest.
After giving up a run in the first,
Darvish settled down and retired 11
of the last 15 batters he faced. He
lowered his ERA to 2.60. The
Rangers committed more than $107
million to acquire Darvish.
Mike Adams struck out Johnny
Gomes, who represented the tying
run, for the final out in the eighth.
Joe Nathan struck out the side in the
ninth his eighth save.
“No matter what the situation, I
try to throw as many inning as I can
and go as long as possible,” Darvish
said through an interpreter when
asked if he was aware the bullpen
needed some downtime after long
man Scott Feldman’s spot start
Monday, middle man Robbie Ross
and a Alexi Ogando’s tireless work
over the last week.
“I was able to throw with less
effort,” Darvish said. “Getting taken
out in the middle of the eighth is
something that I’m not completely
satisfied with.”
Craig Gentry and Elvis Andrus
each had two hits, including run-
scoring singles in a decisive fourth
inning.
Gentry beat out an infield single
to third to score Nelson Cruz.
Oakland rookie pitcher Tommy
Milone (5-3) gave up four runs in
seven innings, holding the Rangers’
offense down until the fourth.
“I thought he threw the ball
extremely well,” Oakland manager
Bob Melvin said. “And really, if we
get the ball over to first base on the
Gentry ground ball, it’s a 2-1 game.
“I thought, considering it’s his
first time pitching here to that line-
up, I don’t know how he could have
done much better.”
The Rangers sent nine players to
the plate in a four-run fourth inning
that was started by Josh Hamilton’s
Yu Darvish shuts down A’s THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Roger
Clemens’ lawyer toyed with Brian
McNamee’s memory and attacked
him from several directions at once.
The attorney even put an easel next to
the witness with the words: “MIS-
TAKE. BAD MEMORY. LIE.”
Eventually, there came the inevitable
question: “Do you sometimes just
make stuff up?”
McNamee has frequently taken
long pauses before answering ques-
tions in three days on the witness
stand, but he didn’t hesitate this time.
He leaned into the microphone and
said softly but assuredly: “I didn’t
make it up.”
Clemens’ chief accuser was on the
stand for two hours of aggressive
cross-examination Wednesday on
one of the most important days —
perhaps the most important — in the
perjury trial of the seven-time Cy
Young Award winning pitcher.
Clemens is charged with lying when
he told Congress in 2008 that he
never used steroids or human growth
hormone.
McNamee has testified he injected
Clemens with both, and the credibili-
ty of Clemens’ former friend and
longtime strength coach will no
doubt be the No. 1 topic when the
jury starts deliberating the case.
Going for style over substance,
Clemens lawyer Rusty Hardin was as
colorful as his outfit — bright orange
tie, cream-colored suit — and contin-
ued his practice of mispronouncing
the witness’ name as mac-nah-MAY
instead of MAC-nah-mee. He
skipped from topic to topic without
warning, often confusing McNamee
while trying to sow seeds of doubt in
the jurors’ minds.
McNamee says he gave Clemens
injections of performance-enhancing
drugs in 1998, 2000 and 2001.
During questions about the 1998
injection, Hardin inadvertently intro-
duced evidence he had sought to keep
away from the jury.
McNamee:‘I didn’t make it up’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Jaime Garcia matched his career
high with nine strikeouts, David Freese hit a go-ahead solo
home run in the seventh inning, and the St. Louis Cardinals
gave manager Mike Matheny a victory against his old Giants
team with a 4-1 win Wednesday night.
Buster Posey hit a tying RBI single in the sixth against
Garcia (3-2) for San Francisco, which missed multiple scoring
chances yet again in what has been the biggest downfall for
this bunch.
Pinch-hitter Skip Schumaker added a two-run double in the
eighth for the Cardinals, who improved to 13-7 on the road.
In a matchup of the last two World Series champions, the
Giants didn’t do enough to back Madison Bumgarner (5-3).
He lost his second straight start following a five-start winning
streak on a breezy Bay Area night featuring a hovering mist
above the field.
Garcia, who pitched a three-hitter in a 9-0 win over the
Giants on Aug. 22, 2010, in St. Louis, had another memorable
performance on the mound. While he allowed nine hits in 7 1-
3 innings, he didn’t issue a walk for the first time this year and
threw an efficient 92 pitches. The lefty also struck out nine San
Francisco batters on April 9, 2011.
Jason Motte pitched the ninth for his seventh save in nine
opportunities.
Slugger Carlos Beltran missed his third straight game for St.
Louis with a sore and stiff right knee, but he could be available
in Thursday afternoon’s series finale against his former club.
Beltran spent the second half of 2011 with the Giants after a
trade from the New York Mets.
St. Louis took the lead in the first when Rafael Furcal scored
on Allen Craig’s fielder’s choice. Furcal and Freese each had
three hits. Freese connected for his eighth home run with a
shot into the tunnel area in left field with two outs in the sev-
enth, then doubled in the ninth.
Freese also singled in the fourth to snap an 0-for-17 funk,
helping the Cardinals win consecutive games after they avoid-
ed an 0-5 homestand by beating the Chicago Cubs 7-6 on
Tuesday.
Late runs sink Giants in loss
Rangers 4, A’s 11
Cardinals 4, Giants 1
SPORTS 14
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The momentum of the whiffs car-
ried over to the Capuchino offense.
The Mustangs scored two runs in the
bottom half of the first inning with
Tudury and Chia Santiago picking up
RBI singles as part of a four-hit
frame.
“It was nice to score in the first
inning,” Grammatico said. “It took
some of the pressure off. In all of our
games, we don’t start scoring until the
second time through the order and it
was good to score early.”
With the lead in hand, Tudury came
out and threw perfect innings in the
second and third.
“I tried to tell myself that it was just
another game, stay focused, just pitch
how you can, don’t try to do anything
too fancy or overwork,” Tudury said.
“I just acted as if it was another game
— a much more important game, but
I just tried to keep calm.”
Her offense was the ultimate calm-
ing factor for Tudury. Capuchino
exploded for six runs in the bottom of
the second inning, sending 11 batters
to the dish.
Lili Luevano led off with the walk
in the second and Eleni Katout sin-
gled to begin a trio of knocks by
Capuchino — the latter, a single by
Alexis Coulter was good for an RBI.
The big hit of the frame was a triple
off the bat of Wassmer that brought
home a pair.
“Actually, we faced a really good
pitcher last Tuesday against Carlmont
and she throws pretty hard,” Wassmer
said of her team’s plate approach on
Wednesday. “So, it was hard to adjust
to this pitcher, although she was good
as well, the other girl threw a little
harder so we were working a lot at
practice and I think that helped a lot to
adjust.”
Santiago picked up another RBI
with a single and she’d later score on
an error at second base to make it 8-0
in favor of Capuchino.
“I think the confidence, in every-
one, has gone up toward the end of the
season, so everyone knows they can
hit,” Tudury said of her team’s hitting.
“So when you go up to bat knowing
you can hit, you just hit better.”
The rest of the contest was elemen-
tary.
Before Stevenson could score,
Capuchino added two more runs.
Again, it was an extra-base hit off the
bat of Wassmer that was the big blow.
No. 9 would later score on a Tudury
single.
Tudury got into her only trouble of
the game when she began the fourth
with a walk and a single. Those two
runners would come in to score.
Capuchino got the two runs back in
the fourth with Luevano getting the
party started on a base knock. Katout
brought her in with a triple of her
own. She’d later waltz home when
Kelly McDaid singled up the middle
to make it 12-2.
Tudury pitched a perfect fifth to
seal the deal for Capuchino.
“It’s really important,” Wassmer
said of the win, “because now we’re
confident and we can go to the next
game confident as well. We’re just
going to keep on cheering and prac-
ticing very hard so we can try to win
again.”
Continued from page 11
CAP
“His breaking ball was better than
it has been,” Schoof said.
Menlo wasted little time in taking
the lead. After setting More down in
order in the top of the first, Menlo
put together a two-out rally in the
bottom half of the frame. Chris
Zeisler singled and stole the first of
seven Menlo stolen bases to get into
scoring position. He then came
home on Batchelder’s double over
the center fielder’s head.
Menlo was shut out in the second
inning but, in the third, it started to
get its bats going. Diekroeger led off
the inning with a line drive over the
fence in right field for a 2-0 Menlo
lead and it grew from there.
“I thought it was going to be a
ground-rule double,” Schoof said. “I
didn’t think it had enough height (to
clear the fence).”
Zeisler followed with a bunt sin-
gle and went to third when the
throw to first was high and went into
foul territory down the right-field
line. Batchelder drove Zeisler in
with a groundout to put Menlo up 3-
0 after three.
Menlo doubled its advantage with
a three-run fourth. Graham
Stratford got the rally started with a
bloop double into no-man’s land in
shallow center field and he trotted
home on Avis’ first home run.
Batchelder, who reached on a field-
er’s choice, would later come
around to score on Sam Crowder’s
single up the middle.
The game ended during Menlo’s
next at-bat in the bottom of the fifth,
as it scored four runs to reach the
10-run mark. Carson Badger
reached on an error and stole sec-
ond. He was sacrificed to third by
Stratford and came home on Avis’
moon shot. Later, with the bases
loaded, Crowder hit a comebacker
to the More pitcher. He threw home
to force out Diekroeger at the plate,
but the catcher’s throw to first was
high and sailed into foul territory in
right field. Both Zeisler and
Batchelder came around to score
and end the game.
“We did what we had to do,”
Schoof said. “We’ll have [Avis]
ready on Saturday.”
Menlo will play either No. 10
Stevenson or No. 7 San Lorenzo
Valley in a quarterfinal game
Saturday at a time and place to be
announced.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
DAVE BOUVIER
Menlo pitcher Jake Batchelder was unhittable Wednesday, pitching a
no-hitter in the Knights’ 10-0 win over St. Thomas More in the first round
of the CCS playoffs.
SPORTS 15
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Dan Gelston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA — Kevin Garnett scored
27 points, grabbed 13 rebounds, and used a
dominant second quarter to help the Boston
Celtics beat the Philadelphia 76ers 107-91 on
Wednesday night and take a 2-1 lead in the
Eastern Conference semifinals.
Whistled for a costly illegal pick late in a
Game 2 loss, Garnett crushed the Sixers early
and never let them think about a fourth-quarter
rally.
Garnett scored 13 of Boston’s 32 points in the
second quarter and the Celtics became the first
team to win by double digits. Game 1 and Game
2 were each decided by one point.
Rajon Rondo had 23 points and 14 assists.
Paul Pierce, playing with a banged-up knee, had
24 points and 12 rebounds.
Game 4 is Friday in Philadelphia.
“Our offense finally came alive,” Pierce said.
“We moved the ball. We knew that’s what we
were going to have to do to score 100 points.”
Garnett had somehow become forgotten in
Boston’s offense in Game 2 until the fourth
quarter. Coach Doc Rivers said the Celtics sim-
ply weren’t going to the 16-year veteran because
they had established an offensive presence in the
low post.
The Celtics wouldn’t let that happen again.
They needed Garnett at his best in
Philadelphia, where the Sixers had won their last
four postseason games.
So much for that minor streak. Garnett yapped
his way down the court after several big early
buckets and clearly enjoyed taking it to the
Sixers. He buried those 10 to 16 footers with
ease in the second quarter to turn a seven-point
deficit into a 13-point lead.
“I thought a lot of guys tonight came and they
didn’t think about what they were not doing
well,” Rivers said. “A lot of guys just came and
played.”
The Celtics again heard the whispers that they
were too weary, too old to have their champi-
onship experience matter against the up-tempo
Sixers.
Pierce is gutting out an MCL injury in his left
knee that has robbed him of his jumper and
slowed him down on both sides of the ball. He
scored only 21 points combined in the first two
games and failed to be the impact player the
Celtics needed if they want to play deeper in the
postseason.
He charged the lane in the first quarter for a
couple of angry-looking dunks. He even pound-
ed the backboard for emphasis after one as if to
show the Sixers he still had some lift in those
legs.
“That’s who he is,” Rivers said. “That’s how
he’s been even when he’s healthy. Paul’s just a
grinder.”
He’ll need to do it again to hold off the Sixers.
Thaddeus Young scored 22 points and Jrue
Holiday had 15 for the Sixers. Lou Williams and
Jodie Meeks each scored 13. Starters Elton
Brand, Spencer Hawes and Evan Turner com-
bined for only 11 points.
“Sometimes you’ve got to take it and go with
it and come back the next game,” Young said.
“That’s what we’ve got to do.”
Wearing their matching red 76ers logo T-
shirts, fans fled for the exits at the 6-minute
mark and the Sixers down 101-76.
The Sixers hadn’t hosted a second-round
game since 2003, when coach Larry Brown and
All-Star Allen Iverson ruled the town. Julius
Erving walked out to a roaring ovation when he
presented the game ball and Eagles quarterback
Michael Vick watched from a suite.
Celtics take 2-1 series
lead with win over 76ers
Celtics 107, 76ers 91
By Ira Podell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — David Clarkson’s deflected
goal 2:31 into the third period snapped a tie and
lifted the New Jersey Devils to a 3-2 victory
over the New York Rangers that evened the
Eastern Conference finals at one game apiece
on Wednesday night.
Clarkson built off the momentum created by
Ryan Carter’s goal late in the second period
that tied the game, 2-2. Ilya Kovalchuk had
given the Devils a 1-0 lead with a power-play
goal in the first. Defenseman Bryce Salvador
added two assists, and Martin Brodeur stopped
23 saves for the win.
“We had to keep going to the net, and I think
we were doing some good things,” Clarkson
said. “We’ve been playing some good hockey
and we’ve got to continue to do it. That is a big
win for us.”
Marc Staal and Chris Kreider scored in the
second for the Rangers, who lost their third
straight Game 2 after winning the series open-
er. Top-seeded New York, which had 24 saves
by Henrik Lundqvist, hasn’t had a two-game
lead at any point in these playoffs.
Game 3 will be Saturday in New Jersey.
New Jersey got even at 2 when Salvador
wound up for a shot at the blue line and fired a
drive that Carter — with his back to the net —
brilliantly deflected past Lundqvist with 1:51
left in the second. Marian Gaborik stood up
straight in front of Salvador, but didn’t drop
down as many of his teammates have to try to
block the shot. For that, he was pinned to the
bench by coach John Tortorella, even through
New York’s power play in the third.
Gaborik returned to the ice with 8:40 remain-
ing.
The Devils kept the pressure on the Rangers
at the start of the third and wiped out the good
work New York displayed in the second. After
spending much of the first penned in their own
end, the Rangers rebounded to erase their early
deficit and briefly take the lead thanks to their
previously inept power play.
With Alexei Ponikarovsky off for interfer-
ence, Staal fired a shot that sailed wide of the
net and struck the back boards before popping
back in front and pinballing into the net off
Salvador and Brodeur at 2:23. The goal was
originally credited to Derek Stepan, who was in
front, but the puck managed to miss him both
on the way toward the net and on the bounce
back.
Staal nearly netted another moments later
when he ripped a drive that Brodeur had to
lunge fully to his left to snare with his glove.
Kreider, the rookie from Boston College,
scored for the second straight game to give the
Rangers a 2-1 lead at 12:19. Anton Stralman let
go a shot from above the right circle that ticked
Kreider’s stick and fluttered past Brodeur for
the rookie’s fourth goal. He had to wait to get it
because it was first given to Stralman before
being changed during a commercial break.
Devils top N.Y. Rangers
Devils 3, Rangers 2
16
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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“He pitches to contact when I call for
certain pitches,” Scott said. “Grant has
good command of the outer half of the
plate. … He pops his fastball very well
and has good command of his off-speed
(pitches). He doesn’t have any fear of
throwing any pitch in any count.”
His five innings of work against
Hillsdale was the first time he didn’t
pitch a complete game since going six
innings against Half Moon Bay March
28.
When Goodman isn’t on the mound,
he is equally dangerous as a hitter. He is
second on the team in batting with a
.353 average, is tied for the team lead in
hits with 24 and is third on the team in
RBI with 15.
Scott said he tweaked Goodman’s
swing a little bit throughout the season
and it has paid off in the second half as
his power numbers have gone up. He
leads the Panthers, by far, in doubles
with 12. The next closest is Cody
Johnson with six.
“He’s very deadly at the plate,” Scott
said. “I have him hitting with a little
more rhythm. Since we made that
adjustment, he’s done some really good
things. … He was clicking (at the plate)
before that, but the power numbers
went up after (making the adjustment).”
With the playoffs beginning today
and a senior season yet to be played, the
sky appears to be the limit for
Goodman. Scott doesn’t know if he’ll
be a hitter or pitcher at the next level, he
just knows Goodman can excel at both.
“He’s probably a better hitter right
now,” Scott said. “Honestly, it’s up to
him. But if I’m a scout, as hard as he
throws (consistently in the high 80s),
they’re going to put him on the mound.”
Continued from page 11
AOTW
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Grant Goodman allowed just one run on two hits in Burlingame’s
title-clinching win over Hillsdale last week.
Giants, then, should be in prime posi-
tion to make a run later in the season.
But many experts picked the Giants
to win the National League West, and
now they appear to be just spinning
their wheels, mired in the same prob-
lems as the last two seasons: lack of
production at the bottom of the order
and abysmal hitting with runners in
scoring position.
The Giants addressed their lack of
hitting by adding Melky Cabrera and
Angel Pagan, who are both off to solid
starts. Most of the rotation has been
locked in since a couple of shaky
weeks at the beginning of the season,
and Tim Lincecum appears to be find-
ing whatever it was he was missing,
although he continues to grind through
every start. Nothing has been easy for
“Big-Time Timmy Jim” this season.
The biggest concern, especially with
Sandoval out, is the offensive produc-
tion of the infield. So far, first and sec-
ond base have been a black hole,
shortstop has been marginally better
but, considering Brandon Crawford
was put at short more for his glove
than his bat and he’s already commit-
ted eight errors, manager Bruce Bochy
needs to seriously look at other alter-
natives.
The Giants’ biggest mistake during
the offseason was not have a legiti-
mate Plan B for Freddy Sanchez at
second base. By hoping for a healthy
Sanchez, the Giants took the chance
he would be back by now and were
willing to live with the likes of
Emmanuel Burriss, Ryan Theriot —
and now Charlie Culberson — at sec-
ond as a short-term stopgap. Now,
with Sanchez’s return still in question,
we’re starting to see how huge the
hole is at second.
So what’s the answer? It’s just to
survive around the .500 mark until
reinforcements arrive. If Sandoval can
come back healthy and pick up where
he left off, that will give the Giants a
huge boost. Also, you can expect gen-
eral manager Brian Sabean to make
some kind of move for a bat around
the trade deadline.
With their pitching staff, the Giants
are built for post-season play, when
runs are hard to come by and strong
pitching can keep teams in games.
They are not built, however, for the
grind of a 162-game season. All these
one-run games mentally exhaust teams
and walking the knife edge all season
long is, as Duane Kuiper famously
said, torture. They will have to scratch
and claw their way into the playoffs
— which we found out last year is no
sure thing.
There are still 120-something games
left to play and there’s no need to live
and die with every pitch in mid-May.
Like they say, it’s not how you start
but how you finish. Will 2012 end like
2010 or 2011?
Of course diehard fans will say this
season ends with a World Series title,
while the realist will say let’s wait and
see.
I’m in the second camp.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed
on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 17
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
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4 Course Fondue Feast & Wine
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License# 41050763 www.sterlingcourt.com
THURSDAY
BASEBALL
DivisionII
No.11 Burlingame (20-6) at No.6 Saratoga (17-12),
4 p.m.
No. 16 Woodside (16-11) at No. 1 Willow Glen (21-
6), 4 p.m.
FRIDAY
TrackANDFIELD
CCS finals at Gilroy
Field events, 4 p.m.
Running events, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASEBALL
CCS quarterfinals,TBA
SOFTBALL
CCS quarterfinals,TBA
CCS PAIRINGS
CCS BASEBALL
St. Francis 10, Carlmont 0
Carlmont 100 100 0 2 5 4
St. Francis 134 020 X 10 10 0
WP — Degregorio LP — Collins (6-3, 4-2)
3B: Eggers (SF) 2B: Haake (C) Bishop, Deason (SF)
3H: Bishop (SF) 2H: Baker (SF) 3RBI: Eggers (SF)
2RBI: Bishop, Strem (SF)
Serra5, Wilcox0
Serra 121 000 0 — 5 6 2
Wilcox 000 000 0 —0 2 3
WP —Cox LP —Cruk
Multiple Hits —McDonald (2),Tinsley (2).
Records — Serra (19-12 overall).
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
BASEBALL
Major LeagueBaseball
MLB—Suspended Toronto 3B Brett Lawrie four
games and fined him for his aggressive actions to-
ward umpire Bill Miller during a May 15 game
against Tampa Bay.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Assigned RHP Dan
Wheeler outright to Columbus (IL). Released RHP
Robinson Tejeda.
KANSASCITYROYALS—Promoted OF Wil Myers
and RHP Jake Odorizzi from Northwest Arkansas
(Texas) to Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS—Activated 1B Justin
Morneau from the 15-day DL.
TAMPABAYRAYS—Acquired OF Rich Thompson
from Philadelphia Phillies for OF Kyle Hudson.
Placed OF Brandon Guyer on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to May 13. Transferred RHP Jeff Nie-
mann from the 15- to 60-day DL.
TRANSACTIONS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 23 14 .622 —
Atlanta 23 15 .605 1/2
Miami 20 17 .541 3
New York 20 17 .541 3
Philadelphia 19 19 .500 4 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 22 15 .595 —
Cincinnati 19 17 .528 2 1/2
Pittsburgh 17 20 .459 5
Houston 16 21 .432 6
Milwaukee 16 21 .432 6
Chicago 15 22 .405 7
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 24 13 .649 —
San Francisco 18 19 .486 6
Arizona 16 22 .421 8 1/2
Colorado 15 21 .417 8 1/2
San Diego 14 24 .368 10 1/2
———
Wednesday’sGames
San Diego 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Washington 7, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Miami 8, Atlanta 4
Houston 8, Milwaukee 3
Philadelphia 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Colorado 6, Arizona 1
St. Louis 4, San Francisco 1
Thursday’sGames
Cincinnati (Latos2-2) at N.Y.Mets(Dickey5-1),10:10
a.m.
Arizona (Cahill 2-4) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-1),12:10
a.m.
St.Louis (Wainwright 2-4) at San Francisco (M.Cain
2-2), 12:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2) at Washington (Zim-
mermann 2-3), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 4-1) at Atlanta (Beachy 4-1), 4:10
p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 2-1) at Houston (Happ 2-3),
5:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Vol-
stad 0-5), 5:05 p.m.
L.A.Dodgers (Harang 2-2) at San Diego (Volquez 2-
2), 7:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 24 14 .632 —
Tampa Bay 24 14 .632 —
New York 20 17 .541 3 1/2
Toronto 20 18 .526 4
Boston 17 20 .459 6 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 21 16 .568 —
Detroit 18 19 .486 3
Chicago 17 21 .447 4 1/2
Kansas City 15 21 .417 5 1/2
Minnesota 11 26 .297 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 24 14 .632 —
Oakland 19 19 .500 5
Los Angeles 17 21 .447 7
Seattle 16 23 .410 8 1/2
———
Wednesday’sGames
Minnesota 11, Detroit 7
Cleveland 9, Seattle 3
Toronto 8, N.Y.Yankees 1
Tampa Bay 2, Boston 1
Texas 4, Oakland 1
Baltimore 4, Kansas City 3, 15 innings
L.A. Angels 7, Chicago White Sox 2
Thursday’sGames
Seattle (Noesi 2-4) at Cleveland (McAllister 1-1),
9:05 p.m.
Minnesota(Walters0-1) at Detroit (Fister 0-1),10:05
a.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 3-3) at Texas (M.Harrison 4-3),
11:05 a.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 2-4) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-
3), 11:10 a.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 3-2) at L.A.Angels (C.Wil-
son 4-3), 12:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes 3-4) at Toronto (Hutchison
2-1), 4:07 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 3-1) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 1-
3), 4:10 p.m.
AL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 7 3 1 22 23 16
Kansas City 7 3 0 21 13 7
D.C. 5 4 3 18 20 16
Chicago 4 2 3 15 11 10
New England 4 6 0 12 12 13
Montreal 3 5 3 12 12 16
Houston 3 3 3 12 8 9
Columbus 3 4 2 11 8 11
Philadelphia 2 6 1 7 7 12
Toronto FC 0 8 0 0 6 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 8 3 2 26 19 12
San Jose 7 2 2 23 22 12
Seattle 7 2 1 22 13 4
Vancouver 5 3 2 17 10 11
Colorado 5 5 0 15 15 12
FC Dallas 3 6 3 12 11 18
Los Angeles 3 5 2 11 12 15
Chivas USA 3 6 1 10 6 12
Portland 2 5 3 9 9 13
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Tuesday’s Games
Houston 0, Portland 0, tie
Wednesday’s Games
Colorado at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Seattle FC at Vancouver, 2 p.m.
New York at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Chicago at Portland, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, May23
Chivas USA at New York, 4 p.m.
FC Dallas at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Columbus at Seattle FC, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
vs.Athletics
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/19
@Giants
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/20
@K.C
1:30p.m.
NBC
5/27
@Rapids
6:30p.m.
CSN+
6/20
@RSL
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
vs.Crew
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/19
vs.Athletics
7:15p.m.
NBC
5/18
@Brewers
10:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
5/23
vs.Cardinals
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/17
vs.Athletics
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/20
@Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/23
@Giants
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/19
@Rangers
11:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
5/17
@Giants
7:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/18
vs. Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/21
vs. Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/22
vs. Angels
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/23
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/21
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/22
18
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION/WORLD
By Elizabeth A. Kennedy
and Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — In his first interview since
December, Syrian President Bashar Assad
insisted Tuesday his regime is fighting back
against foreign mercenaries who want to over-
throw him, not innocent Syrians aspiring for
democracy in a yearlong uprising.
The interview with Russian TV showed
Assad is still standing his ground, despite
widespread international condemnation over
his deadly crackdown on dissent.
“There are foreign mercenaries, some of
them still alive,” Assad said in an interview
broadcast Wednesday on Russian state news
channel Rossiya-24. “They are being detained
and we are preparing to show them to the
world.”
Assad also cautioned against meddling in
Syria, warning neighboring nations that have
served as transit points for contraband
weapons being smuggled into the country that
“if you sow chaos in Syria you may be infect-
ed by it yourself.”
He did not elaborate, but rebels and anti-
regime activists say Syrian forces have mined
many of the smuggling routes where weapons
flow into Syria — mainly from neighboring
Turkey and Lebanon.
Assad, who inherited power from his father
in 2000, still has a firm grip on power in Syria
some 14 months into a revolt that has torn at
the country’s fabric and threatened to under-
mine stability in the Middle East.
The U.N. estimated in March that the vio-
lence has killed more than 9,000 people, and
hundreds more have been killed since then as
a revolt that began with mostly peaceful calls
for reform transforms into an armed insur-
gency.
A group known as the Free Syrian Army is
determined to bring down the regime by force
of arms, targeting military checkpoints and
other government sites.
A U.N. observer team with more than 200
members has done little to quell the blood-
shed, and some even have been caught up in
the violence themselves.
Six observers had to be evacuated from a
northern town controlled by the opposition
Wednesday, a day after a roadside bomb hit
their convoy and left them stranded overnight
with rebel forces.
Syrian leader: Terrorists are behind unrest
REUTERS
Men run to take cover during clashes at the Sunni Muslim Bab al-Tebbaneh neighborhood
in Tripoli, northern Lebanon.
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Army leaders have
begun to study the prospect of sending female
soldiers to the service’s prestigious Ranger
school — another step in the effort to broaden
opportunities for women in the military.
Gen. Raymond Odierno, Army chief of
staff, said Wednesday that he’s asked senior
commanders to provide him with recommen-
dations and a plan this summer. And while he
stressed that no decisions have been made, he
suggested that Ranger school may be a logical
next step for women as they move into more
jobs closer to the combat lines.
“If we determine that we’re going to allow
women to go in the infantry and be successful,
they are probably at some time going to have
to go through Ranger school,” Odierno told
reporters. “If we decide to do this, we want the
women to be successful.”
According to Odierno, about 90 percent of
senior Army infantry officers have gone to the
school and are qualified as Rangers. Allowing
women to go to Ranger school, he said, would
allow them to be competitive with their male
counterparts as they move through the ranks.
Going to Ranger school, however, does not
automatically mean women would be allowed
to serve in one of the Army’s three elite
Ranger battalions, which are Army special
operations forces. In fact, many male soldiers
who wear the coveted Ranger tab on their uni-
forms never actually serve in one of the three
battalions.
Currently, women are not allowed to serve
as special operations, infantry or armor forces,
which are considered the most dangerous
combat jobs. They are, however, allowed to
serve in a number of support jobs such as
medics, military police and intelligence offi-
cers that are sometimes attached to combat
brigade units.
Odierno said his commanders are looking at
whether the Army should open up infantry
and armor jobs to women, and how that
should be done.
Army reviews whether women can go to Ranger school
Greece gets caretaker
until new vote in June
By Elena Becatoros
and Nicholas Paphitas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATHENS, Greece — A senior judge has
been sworn in to head Greece’s caretaker gov-
ernment for a month as the debt-crippled
country lurches through a political crisis that
threatens its membership in the 17-nation
eurozone.
The political uncertainty is worrying
Greece’s international creditors as well as
Greeks themselves, who have withdrawn hun-
dreds of millions of euros from banks since
the May 6 election.
Council of State head Panagiotis
Pikrammenos, 67, was appointed Wednesday
to head a government that will lack the man-
date to make any binding commitments until a
new election, which is expected June 17.
His 16-strong Cabinet will be sworn in
Thursday.
About (euro) 700 million ($898 million) in
deposits have left Greek banks since May 7,
the day after the election, President Karolos
Papoulias told party leaders after being
briefed by central bank governor George
Provopoulos.
“The situation in the banks is very difficult,”
Papoulias said according to a transcript of the
meeting’s minutes released Tuesday night.
“Mr. Provopoulos told me that of course there
is no panic, but there is great fear which could
turn into panic.”
REUTERS
Newly appointed caretaker Prime Minister
Panagiotis Pikrammenos enters the office of
Greece’s President Karolos Papoulias in Athens.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
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Building a boat:
The rewards of
doing it yourself
By Jesica Glazer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
My father was recovering from a heart attack, flipping
through a magazine at the library, when he decided to build his
first boat.
He saw an ad for a wooden kayak kit, and something about
the grace of the construction and the fact that it was done by
hand struck him. Despite a lack of woodworking skills, he
decided to try building one himself.
“The process was slow and plodding,” he said. “But then a
light bulb goes off in your head and you realize why it was
designed that way, why it fits that way.”
That was back in 2001, and there have been other projects
since: a 14-foot sailboat, a second kayak and a guitar. Working
with wood is a constant learning experience for my dad, Russ
Glazer. On the phone, he’ll launch into a breathless discussion
of scarf joints, rolling bevels or Brazilian blood wood. He stud-
ies diagrams, calls manufacturers, browses online forums,
reads instructions, and collects purple bruises and bloodied fin-
gers.
“It’s human nature to challenge yourself,” he said.
There are plenty of do-it-yourself projects out there: growing
a garden, brewing beer, making jewelry, sewing clothes.
Building boats requires a particular kind of commitment. It’s
complex and expensive. It can take months or years.
And it can be addictive, working out in the garage, sawdust
clinging to your clothes, making mistakes and finding the solu-
tions yourself. After the wood is sanded, chiseled and planed,
the boat is not merely assembled, but carved and coaxed into
graceful curves that allow it to glide through water. In the end,
you’re left with a product that can either deliver you safely to
harbor or not, depending on the quality of your labor.
Because the lesson is so clear — work hard, get a boat that
floats - John Goodman, an interior designer from Houston, saw
an opportunity to teach his kids the value of diligence and
proper planning. He spent six months building a Goat Island
Skiff with his daughter Desiree and son David, and when it
was done, he and David, then 12, sailed it 200 miles along the
coast in the 2010 Texas 200 race, camping ashore at night.
Many people advised against the trip, including, initially, the
skiff’s designer, Michael Storer, who said it was designed for
calmer conditions. A Goat Island Skiff is similar to a rowboat
with sails. It lacks the stability of a larger fiberglass boat. Shift
your weight too abruptly or turn the tiller too fast and the boat
jerks to the side like a spooked horse. Even in sheltered waters,
wind changes can present a challenge.
See BOAT, Page 22
By Melissa Rayworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When we furnish a room, many of us
carefully measure to be sure the couch
isn’t too wide or the dining room table
too long. We draw a horizontal map,
determined to fit everything in without
crowding.
But design experts do something
more: They think vertically.
Kitchen and bath designer Matthew
Quinn, principal of Design Galleria
Kitchen and Bath Studio in Atlanta, says
that as designers learn to sketch room
layouts in design school, they discover
the impact of the vertical and horizontal
lines that furnishings and architecture
create.
For example, a homeowner might not
realize that a dark countertop contrasting
with lighter cabinets underneath will
create a horizontal line across the room,
making the ceiling feel lower and the
kitchen smaller.
“One of the main reasons that clients
hire designers is that grasping scale can
be difficult,” says interior designer Kyle
Schuneman of Live Well Designs in Los
Angeles.
Ready for your own crash-course in
thinking vertically?
Quinn, Schuneman and
decordemon.com founder Brian Patrick
Flynn offer tips on how to work effec-
tively with the heights of furniture,
draperies and decorative pieces:
MAXIMIZE SMALL SPACES
To make a small or low room feel big-
ger, draw some vertical lines, says
Schuneman.
“Hang the curtains all the way to the
ceiling, not to where windows stop. Your
eye visually feels like the space has been
lifted,” he says.
Patterned wallpaper or painted stripes
on a wall can also help do the trick.
For tile bathrooms and kitchen back-
splashes, Quinn suggests hanging rec-
tangular subway-style wall tiles vertical-
ly, so they appear as tall, thin pieces.
People normally use subway tiles hori-
zontally, presenting them as short, wide
rectangles.
BRING INTIMACY
TO LARGE SPACES
The same principles work in reverse.
You can bring a large room down to a
more comfortable scale by adding hori-
zontal lines through contrasting colors
or added surfaces.
A kitchen island with several levels
will make a high-ceilinged kitchen feel
cozier, says Quinn.
To decorate a huge loft space recently,
Schuneman used “lower seating profiles
for all the couches and side chairs, and
that really kind of created a nook within
a big space.” It became “a room within a
room,” perfect for intimate conversation.
PLAY WITH LIGHT
Lighting also can bring a large room
down to size or add the impression of lift
to lower ceilings.
“When spaces are tall, grounding
them with pendant lights or chandeliers
really makes a space seem more inti-
mate,” Flynn says.
Quinn agrees: We notice hanging
lights in relation to the heads of people
standing in a room. Lights that hang
within a few inches of the heads of your
tallest guests will make even a very tall
room feel warm and welcoming.
For low-ceilinged rooms, try recessed
ceiling lighting instead of hanging
lights. Quinn suggests choosing smaller,
pin-point recessed lights rather than the
wider, can lights. The larger ones can
make you feel as though a spotlight is
bearing down on you.
Another trick: If your ceiling lighting
can be positioned, point lights toward
the sides of the room rather than directly
downward. This widens and opens up
the space.
ADD DRAMA
You can have fun with height in bed-
rooms, Flynn says, even if the ceiling is
low. “I do this by playing with scale and
proportion in relation to tall, architectur-
al headboards or platform beds,” he says.
“Similar to a giant chandelier in a grand
entry, I love walking into a bedroom and
being greeted by a statement bed. To
keep a tall headboard from being too
tall, I counterbalance it with hefty bed-
side chests, and either hanging pendant
lamps above them, or by bringing in
super-tall table lamps.”
Or use art to play with dimensions: “A
super wide, extra tall piece of art over a
simple sofa in a living room can strike
Vertical lines add lots to a room
See VERTICAL, Page 22
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Gardening in a small space can be
challenging, but some of the nicest
gardens I have seen have been small
and incredibly well thought out.
Creating a small garden is much
more difficult than creating a large
one because each component of a
small garden is critical to its suc-
cess.
I lived in New York City for sev-
eral years and learned some creative
ways to garden in small spaces. City
gardens, for those lucky enough to
have one, tend to be narrow and
long and often have limited
amounts of sunlight. These chal-
lenging spaces require well-
informed decisions when it comes
to planting. Often the problem is
less about which plants will work
and more about editing down the
choices.
Many city gardeners with con-
fined spaces have learned that,
while they may not have much hor-
izontal space, they have plenty of
vertical space. And what is the best
way to take advantage of vertical
space? Plant vines.
Vines as a group of plants tend to
be underused in most gardens, and
that is unfortunate. They provide
multiple solutions to design prob-
lems. Requiring no more than some
support to wrap themselves around
or rest on, most vines direct their
energy into growing upwards when-
ever possible. They can be used
effectively in creating visual screens
when trained on a well-placed trellis
or can be the perfect solution for
covering up an unsightly feature
like an old fence.
Fast-growing annual vines like
hyacinth bean, moon vine and bottle
gourd can grow as much as 15-20
feet in a season and will grow over
almost anything, provided they have
plenty of sun, water, warmth and
good soil. Perennial vines like trum-
pet vine, honeysuckle and many
varieties of clematis may take a few
years to establish; once they are,
they can be almost as vigorous as
annual vines, with the added advan-
tage of returning year after year.
Many vines will also grow lateral-
ly if that is their only option. Thus,
they can be useful for creating over-
head shade on top of an arbor or
pergola. Some even perform effec-
tively as ground covers. I have seen
both climbing hydrangea and
Virginia creeper used this way to
great effect. Some vines will even
cascade back down toward the
ground if they outgrow the vertical
support holding them up, often with
dramatic effect. English Ivy is prone
to this; I recall a particular garden in
New York I with a tall chain-link
fence with ivy cascading from the
top, giving the appearance of a dark
green waterfall.
Some vines start out small but
become behemoths over time, and
thought should be given to choosing
the right vine for the right location.
Many can be downright destructive.
Aggressive growers like wisteria are
capable of growing thick, python-
like stems that can eventually over-
whelm trees if allowed to grow into
them. They rapidly grow upwards
toward the light until they reach the
canopy, where their own leaves
block their host’s access to the sun,
often with lethal results.
The fast, vigorous growth of wis-
teria could easily overwhelm a
small arbor or trellis, but could be
the perfect solution for creating
shade on a pergola over a large deck
that would be inaccessible to other
less vigorous growers.
When choosing vines for your
garden, keep the plant’s overall
habits in mind. If you want to screen
out the view into your neighbors
yard, for example, training English
ivy on a trellis or fence could be the
perfect solution, since it is ever-
How does your garden grow? Upwards
Perennial vines like trumpet vine, honeysuckle and many varieties of
clematis may take a few years to establish; once they are, they can be
almost as vigorous as annual vines,with the added advantage of returning
year after year. See VINES, Page 22
SUBURBAN LIVING 21
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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DAILY DOOR BUSTERS THROUGH OUT THE STORE
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Why do some trees weep?
Because they want to grow down.
Instead of reaching for the sky, as most
trees do, young stems of weeping trees
toy only briefly with upward growth
before arching gracefully earthward.
Some plants begin to weep in earnest
only after they get some age to them.
Many yards benefit from some weep-
ing tree, whether it’s a willow along a
streambank, a weeping cherry lending
grace and tranquility to a front lawn, or a
weeping beech providing a hideaway for
kids. The only caution with weeping
trees is not to plant too many, which
might mean more than one. Otherwise,
the scene can look sad indeed.
IN THE BEGINNING
A weeping tree may have begun life as
a random seedling whose quirky
arrangement of genes directed its stems
to weep. Some such plants, although
woody, could hardly be called trees. A
weeping kind of goat willow, for exam-
ple, makes a kind of billowing ground-
cover never rising more than a few feet
off the ground.
Or, a weeping tree may have begun
life with normal stature — until some
cells in some branch underwent a slight
mutation to a weeping habit. Perhaps the
mutation was caused by sunlight or tem-
perature; perhaps it was spontaneous. At
any rate, all new stems and branches
originating from those changed cells
weep.
MAKING NEW WEEPING TREES
Now let’s make new plants from that
weeping seedling or weeping branches.
If the plant is one that roots easily from
cuttings, you could just clip off a branch,
stick it in the ground or some potting
soil, and nurture it along. Problem is that
if the tree is a heavy weeper, it will never
get much off the ground.
To get that weeper up off the ground,
or to create a weeping tree from a plant
that doesn’t root readily from cuttings,
graft a stem or bud from the weeping
plant atop a trunk of some upright plant.
As with any graft, success is possible
only if the trunk section is closely relat-
ed to the weeping stem piece. The graft
juncture is usually obvious throughout
the life of the tree.
To create a real, taller tree out of a
ground-hugging weeper, or if the plant is
one that doesn’t root readily from cut-
tings, graft a stem or bud from the weep-
ing plant atop a trunk of some upright
plant. As with any graft, success is pos-
sible only if the trunk section is closely
related to the weeping stem piece. The
graft juncture is usually obvious
throughout the life of the tree.
Sometimes a branch of a weeping tree
will all of a sudden start reaching sky-
ward. (Talk about a wacky looking tree!)
That stem could have arisen from a bud
Why do some trees weep?
Plants remember,
adapt to survive
By Betsy Blaney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LUBBOCK, Texas — No one’s talking about giving intelli-
gence tests, but researchers say they’ve shown that plants have
smarts — the sort needed to help them survive dry times.
Years from now the findings could lead to crops that are better
able to withstand drought conditions. Already, studies on two
crops have shown they too have short-term memory for surviving
dry times, University of Nebraska-Lincoln researcher Michael
Fromm’s said.
He contends his team’s findings are the first of their kind in life
forms above yeasts.
The outcome of Fromm’s initial study, with a member of the
mustard family, confirmed what many nursery professionals and
home gardeners have observed: Stressing plants helps them adapt
and aids them in surviving transplanting.
“It’s important that it’s in all plants, but the next part of the
story will have to move the research forward,” Fromm said.
“There’s no question this is a critical long-term problem. Drought
tolerance is extremely important but it’s also extremely difficult.”
He declined to name the two crops he and his team studied sub-
sequent to work with Arabidopsis — the mustard plant — citing
confidentiality issues with the peer-reviewed journal scheduled to
publish those results later this year.
In the mustard plant research, Fromm and his team compared
reactions of plants stressed by withholding water to those that got
water. The ones that went without water — the trained or stressed
plants — bounced back more quickly the next time they got
dehydrated. Those that got water — the untrained or non-stressed
plants — wilted faster and their leaves lost water at a faster rate
than the trained ones.
There were changes at a molecular level when the trained
plants were deprived of water again. When water was then made
available, the changes reverted back to normal levels. That
changed, though, after subsequent periods of drought as the
plants “remembered” their molecular response to stress.
“There’s a connection between the environmental stress, the
drought, and the plant response with not only physiological
changes but developmental changes,” Fromm said. “That’s a
decision the plant makes that we think this process can influ-
ence.”
The mustard plant forgot the previous stress “memory” after
five days of watering, but the researchers said other plants’ mem-
ories could be different.
“It kind of backs up what a lot of people have thought,” Texas
Tech horticulture professor Thayne Montague said. “Once a plant
is exposed to stress, drought ... it can be a beneficial response
short term. Now, long term that hasn’t really been looked at.”
One Lubbock woman, president of the city’s 60-member mas-
ter gardener program, said she thinks a plant’s roots are keys to
drought survival. The shorter the root, a result of overwatering,
the less the plant will tolerate drought.
“Plants don’t think,” Barbara Robertson said. “It almost has to
have something to do with the root system. A stressed plant with
deep roots is going to do better.”
The Nebraska research team’s results could be transferred to
row crops, such as corn, cotton or wheat, but that potential is still
about 20 years away, Fromm said. Ideally, the goal would be to
have the memory last from growing season to growing season.
See WEEP, Page 22
SUBURBAN LIVING
22
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
development proposals for the site in 2005.
As with all BIT investments, all onsite construction will be
performed by members affiliated with local unions.
“This project is expected to create over 300 union construc-
tion jobs,” Bill Nack, secretary-treasurer of the San Mateo
Building and Construction Trades Council wrote in a state-
ment. “To say the least, we are excited by this prospect.”
City officials are excited too.
“This is great news. We need more housing,” said
Councilman Jack Matthews. “The project will provide jobs for
people who live here and they in return will spend their money
here.”
Deputy Mayor David Lim agreed.
“I am excited to see the new apartment units in San Mateo
will be built with local union labor,” Lim wrote in an email.
The transit-oriented development will be within walking dis-
tance of the downtown Burlingame Caltrain station.
The development sits on three acres and will feature an out-
door pool and playground along with a dog park, fitness center
on multiple levels with underground parking, according to the
developers.
A groundbreaking for the project will be June 1 and con-
struction is expected to be completed by December 2013.
“When you see union members back to work on BIT job
sites, it’s impossible not to feel an appreciation and loyalty to
this program,” Mike Stotz, president of the AFL-CIO
Investment Trust Corporation, wrote in a statement.
The architect for the project is Thomas P. Cox, Architects
Inc., of Irvine. A joint venture of Devcon Construction, Inc.
and Regis Contractors Bay Area will serve as the construction
manager and general contractor.
The AFL-CIO Building Investment Trust is a commercial
real estate fund with approximately $2.9 billion in assets. The
mission of the BIT is to provide competitive, risk-adjusted
returns for its pension plan participants through investments in
commercial real estate while promoting economic develop-
ment and creating union jobs.
Continued from page 1
HOMES
the perfect balance between the furnishings and the architec-
ture,” Flynn says.
CREATE STORAGE
Furniture that extends to the ceiling can “visually open up
the space, but also give you all that storage you’d lose other-
wise,” Schuneman says.
So build custom cabinets all the way to the ceiling or choose
pieces of furniture that reach as close to your ceiling as possi-
ble.
“People often use a cabinet that they already have, which
doesn’t reach the ceiling, and then try to add storage baskets on
top,” he says, “instead of buying the right piece — that taller
piece — from the beginning.”
DISTRACT FROM A BAD VIEW
“The best places to use tall, vertical furnishings are in rooms
where stellar views aren’t the main attraction,” says Flynn. “I
wouldn’t be quick to do high-back, Hollywood Regency chairs
along a floor-to-ceiling glass wall in a Manhattan high-rise
overlooking Central Park.”
If you’ve made the right decisions about height, Schuneman
says, then you can fill a space with furnishings without feeling
overcrowded. “It sounds counterintuitive,” he says. “But the
more furniture you put into a space, it does actually open up
the space. It shows how usable it is.”
Continued from page 19
VERTICAL
Yet the Goodmans forged ahead. The
trip was completed successfully, and so
was the parental lesson.
“We built something that our lives
depended on, a lifeboat,” said Goodman.
“They have great pride in that.”
Another boat builder, Nick Offerman,
portrays the gruff Ron Swanson, a dis-
gruntled city employee, on NBC’s
“Parks & Recreation” and, like the char-
acter, enjoys building canoes.
Offerman grew up working on a fami-
ly farm in Illinois where he learned to fix
barns and build fences. In Chicago, he
built sets to help support himself as a
young actor. Then, when he moved to
Los Angeles and married actress Megan
Mullally (“Will & Grace”), he wasn’t
ready to leave woodworking behind. He
found a warehouse near the Golden State
Freeway where, on his days off, he
builds furniture from fallen trees.
“I needed a response (to the city).
There is so much plastic and glitter to
this town,” said Offerman, sitting in the
cavernous woodworking studio. The
warehouse is filled with slabs of wood
stacked against the walls, tools hanging
from hooks, and two canoes suspended
from the ceiling.
“It was a way for me to keep attached
to my family, and feel that I was main-
taining my manhood,” he added.
Offerman has built many things but
building a canoe was different, requiring
more eyeballing, more judgments made
without precise measurements. With the
boat, as with his other woodworking
projects, he takes pride in sturdy con-
struction.
“I wanted to learn how to build things
the way people built them when they
lasted,” he said.
You can watch Offerman build his first
canoe in a video at his website
OffermanWoodshop.com. He narrates
with the same deadpan voice as the char-
acter he plays, but there are moments
when a childlike giddiness comes
through. “OK, so far it’s working,” he
says at one point and giggles with joy as
he watches the canoe take shape beneath
his hands.
That sense of accomplishment is what
led Adam Green of New York City to
found Rocking the Boat, a nonprofit that
recruits teenagers from the South Bronx
to build boats after school. In a ware-
house along a sparkling stretch of the
Bronx River, students who have never
taken a shop class learn how to use
power tools, read blueprints and prob-
lem-solve. They build sailboats and row-
boats under 20 feet, and are working on
a 30-foot whaling boat commissioned by
the Mystic Seaport museum, in Mystic,
Conn. The whaling boat will take more
than two years and 24 students to com-
plete.
Green uses boat-building to teach
independence, follow-through and confi-
dence.
“So many of our efforts go physically
unrewarded,” said Green. “It feels good
to build something and touch what you
make, especially in this digital age.”
“We are creatures who can make
things,” he said, “and that gives us a rea-
son for living.”
Continued from page 19
BOAT
green, and if kept on the fence will take
up little space. This is a common solu-
tion in city gardens. However, keep in
mind that English ivy can grow upwards
of 100 feet, and in many parts of the
country it is considered a pernicious
invasive species. To keep it where you
want it and looking good, you will need
to trim it several times during the grow-
ing season.
Most vines, once they are trained onto
a support, need an occasional pruning to
keep them in shape and, like many
shrubs, should be cut back before new
growth begins each spring. There are
exceptions to this rule, and some flower-
ing vines (including certain clematis)
have particular pruning requirements to
maximize flowering.
No matter what part of the country
you garden in, there are dozens of vines
to choose from for your garden. When
deciding, start by examining the condi-
tions the plant will be growing in. Don’t
try to grow a sun lover in full shade and
vice versa. There are many resources
available both online and at your local
library to help you choose the best vines
for your garden.
If your garden is small, don’t forget to
take advantage of vertical space. By
planting a few vines you could end up
with more to enjoy than you ever imag-
ined.
Continued from page 20
VINES
below the point where the graft was
made. Or a weeping tree that originated
as a branch mutation might have
retained some non-weeping cells. In
either case, just cut any nonweeping
stems right back to their origins.
MANY THAT WEEP
Looking beyond the ubiquitous weep-
ing cherries and crabapples, weeping
trees are not all that rare.
Japanese dogwood (Cornus kousa) is a
lovely tree whose white blossoms unfold
after the leaves are fully out; the variety
“Elizabeth Lustgarten” has somewhat
weepy upper branches. “Pendulum,” a
weeping form of Katsuratree
(Cercidiphyllum japonicum), presents a
waterfall of bluish green leaves.
For a weeping evergreen, few are
more graceful than the Sargent hemlock.
Or more odd than a weeping form of
giant sequoia, whose leading stem push-
es skyward in fits and starts, zigging and
zagging and dipping along the way but
always remaining clothed in a shaggy
mane of droopy branches.
Continued from page 21
WEEP
DATEBOOK 23
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, MAY 17
California Native Plants Plant
Workshop. 9 a.m. to noon. This
hands-on workshop will develop a
community demonstration garden
while teaching you how to design
and create your own California Native
landscape. Registration required. To
register call 349-3000 or visit
bawsca.org.
Writer’s presentation. 9:30 a.m. to
noon. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. Free.
For more information call 616-7150.
2012 Senior Informational Fair.
10:30 a.m. to noon. Pacific
Community Center, 540 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Free. For more information
call 738-7353.
San Mateo AARP Chapter 139
celebrates its 50th anniversary.
11:00 a.m. San Mateo Elk’s Club, 220,
20th Ave., San Mateo. Lunch will be
served at noon. Following lunch, the
E-Jays will perform. For more
information call 345-5001.
Water Awareness Festival. 4 p.m. to
7 p.m. Cal Water Customer Center, 341
North Delaware St., San Mateo. Free.
barbecue hot dogs, face painting and
information on water quality,
construction projects, rates,
conservation and environmental
affairs. For more information call 558-
7800.
Magical Fun-due at The Melting
Pot. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Melting Pot,
2 N. B St., San Mateo.
SeeLiveMagic.com’s own David Miller
will be performing sleight-of-hand
and close-up magic. This event is free
to restaurant patrons. For more
information visit
www.seelivemagic.com.
Arrowsmith Program info night. 7
p.m. Associated Learning and
Language Specialists, Inc., 1060 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. The
Arrowsmith Program is now offered
through the ALLS Cognitive Center.
Based on neuroscience research, The
Arrowsmith Program can help
improve reading, math, attention,
listening and more. Seats must be
reserved. For more information visit
allsinc.com or call 631-9999.
Dr. Justin L. Barrett speaks. 7 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Renown
developmental psychologist and
anthropologist at Oxford University,
Dr. Justin L. Barrett, will share his
theory that we are all predisposed to
believe in God from birth. Free. For
more information call 522-7818.
Bachata Dance Class. 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Foster City. All-level
Bachata dance class on Thursdays at
same time. Drop-in cost $16. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Marty Brounstein Book Signing
Event. 7 p.m. Kepler’s Books, 1010 El
Camino Real, Menlo Park. Brounstein,
a resident of San Mateo will be
available to sign copies of his book,
‘ Two Among the Righteous Few: A
Story of Courage in the Holocaust.’
Free. For more information call (888)
361-9473.
Salsa Dance Class. 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. All-level salsa
dance class on Thursdays at same
time. Drop-in cost $16. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
FRIDAY, MAY 18
Literacy Network Breakfast. 7:30
a.m. to 10 a.m. Poplar Creek Golf
Course, 1700 Coyote Point Drive, San
Mateo. Guest speakers will include
state Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, comedian Will Durst and
Dovetail Project Leader Kevin
Vogeltanz. $35. For more information
and to make a reservation visit
brownpapertickets.com/event/23509
2.
‘Step Out For Seniors.’ 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. Join
us for a ‘Step Out For Seniors’ walk
event. For more information call 616-
7150.
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Burlingame
Recreation Center, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. More than 40
senior-related business will be
present. There will also be goodie
bags and door prizes. Free services
include document shredding, kidney
screening, ask the pharmacist and
more. Sponsored by the Daily Journal
and Health Plan of San Mateo. Free.
For more information call 344-5200.
Lunch event. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Join us for
lunch, dancing and karaoke. For
tickets and more information call
616-7150.
Chinese San Francisco. 2 p.m. to 3
p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
Yong Chen, Ph.D., UC Irvine will offer
a view of San Francisco’s famed
Chinatown from a Chinese
perspective. A reception, book sale
and signing will immediately follow
the presentation. Fee includes same-
day admission to Filoli. Parking is free.
$25 for members. $30 for non-
members. For more information visit
filoli.org.
Annual Half Moon Bay High School
Art Show Reception. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Coastal Arts League Gallery, 300 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. Free. For more
information visit
coastalartsleague.com.
Norwegian Holiday Celebration.
6:30 p.m. Highland Community Club,
1665 Fernside St., Redwood City.
Vigeland Lodge, Sons of Norway,
invites the public to a celebration of
Syttende mai, Norway’s national
holiday. Dinner at 7 p.m. There will
also be Norwegian music. $20 for
adults. $7.50 for students. For more
information and reservations call 851-
1463.
Free Surf Party with Drifting Sand.
7 p.m. Vinyl solution Records, 151 W.
25th Ave., San Mateo. Join Drifting
Sand for a night of free surf music at
Vinyl Solution Records in San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 571-
0440.
Mateo Motion IX: San Mateo High
School’s Annual Dance Show. 7:30
p.m. San Mateo High School Gym, 506
No. Delaware St., San Mateo.There will
be performances in the style of jazz,
contemporary, hip-hop and more.
$10 for students and seniors. $12 for
adults. $2 discount for advanced
purchases. For more information and
for tickets visit smhsdance.org.
Richie Cole’s Alto Madness Plus:
Swing to Bebop. Oshman Family
JCC, Schultz Cultural Arts Hall, 3921
Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Free garage
parking. $35 for adults. $30 for PAJA
members. $15 for students. For more
information and for tickets visit
pajalliance.org.
Monthly Milonga. 8 p.m. to
midnight. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
David and Nancy Mendoza host
Monthly Milongae on the third Friday
of each month. All-level Argentine
Tango lesson from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.,
Milonga from 9 p.m. to midnight. $12
at 8 p.m., $10 at 9 p.m. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
SATURDAY, MAY 19
California Youth Symphony’s 60th
anniversary Alumni Reunion
Concert. Spangenberg Theatre, 780
Arastradero Road, Palo Alto. $50
adults. $35 students. For tickets or
more information visit cys.org.
National River Cleanup. 9 a.m. to
noon. Colma Creek, 180 Utah Ave.,
South San Francisco. Everyone
welcome. Rest rooms will be
provided. Free. For more information
call 599-1448.
African American Community
Health Advisory Committee ‘Soul
Stroll For Health’ & Resource Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Coyote Point Park,
1701 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Enjoy a one-, three- or five-mile
course and a Health and Screening
Resource Fair to promote healthy
lifestyles. Activities for all ages. For
more information call 696-4378.
Volunteer Orientation. 9 a.m. Center
for Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. For more information call
340-7022 ext. 328.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
gling with hoarding, a disorder that affects
approximately 25,000 people in San
Mateo County.
“Hoarding can take over your life,” said
Ebner, who at one point had five storage
units for all of his personal property.
In his home, he had cleared paths
through his countless items to walk from
room to room. He was unable to entertain
guests in his home.
“You live your own life, but it doesn’t
include other people,” he said.
Ebner’s landlord connected him with
the Stanford Department of Psychiatry for
treatment. Unfortunately, Ebner was still
at the risk of losing his home because he
was violating fire code.
“People can’t just stop overnight when
they have been [hoarding] for a number of
years,” he said.
The psychiatry department referred
Ebner to Alan Merrifield, CEO of
Peninsula Community Services.
Merrifield, who has had experience with
hoarders, was able to connect Ebner with
a professional organizer. By working with
the professional organizer, Ebner was able
to pass safety inspections and stay in his
home.
“I’m not completely healed, but I’m a
lot better off,” said Ebner, who is now
comfortable entertaining in his home.
“I’m living my life more than I did
before.”
Now Ebner serves on the Peninsula
Community Services board and is helping
to educate others — particularly first
responders — about hoarding. He is
speaking at PCS’s first Enhanced Harm
Reduction for Hoarders workshop in
Redwood Shores today.
The goal of the workshop is to educate
community members that might interact
with hoarders — police, firefighters, psy-
chiatrists, property managers, social
workers, code enforcement officers — on
the services that can help reduce the
health and safety issues posed by hoard-
ing.
Sometimes residents do not get 60 days
to get cleaned up, said Ebner.
“Sometimes [officers] come back the
next day with a dump truck,” he said. “It
can be really traumatic for the person that
has a hoarding problem.”
Ebner hopes the PCS program will
enable the community to connect hoarders
with the right resources.
“If we can make homes safer, healthier,
more comfortable places to live, it will
make it easier for an emergency person to
come in,” said Merrifield, who has made
helping hoarders the new mission of PCS.
The workshop will go over the many
services in the county that can help
finance cleanup and home repair, or help
install smoke detectors, for example.
Code officers will then be able to broker
these services that can help to “dehazard”
homes, said Merrifield.
“We want to be unequivocal advocates
for these people,” he said.
This will be the first program that focus-
es primarily on eliminating the health and
safety hazards caused by hoarding, said
Merrifield. He hopes to bring assistance to
the hoarders who are not actively seeking
help.
“There has never been a program in this
county for this group of people,” he said.
“We think it’s long overdue.”
Many hoarders are not seeking help
because they are worried about losing
their homes or being forced to comply
with code immediately, said Merrifield.
This is something that the enhanced harm
reduction program hopes to overcome so
residents can gradually work in a positive
direction to tackle the problem.
People are not seeking help because
they are misunderstood, said Merrifield.
“They are hiding because the whole
population is stigmatized,” he said.
“A lot of people scoff at this as an actu-
al problem,” agreed Dr. Joanne Chan, a
clinical psychologist based in San
Francisco. “They think it’s just a lifestyle
choice.”
Chan, who leads a treatment group for
PCS, will also be speaking at today’s
workshop.
There is a big difference between
hoarding and just being messy, she said. It
becomes hoarding when the behavior is
affecting life routines, she said.
“It is about the level of clutter, but it is
also about impairing function and causing
distress,” she said.
Chan compared hoarding to an array of
mental health issues — addiction, depres-
sion and anxiety.
“It’s an actual clinical disorder,” she
said.
The enhanced harm reduction program
will be a non-judgmental way to go about
making gradual improvements, said Chan.
“Instead of being punitive, we will offer
options,” she said.
The PCS group hopes to provide ongo-
ing education on Enhanced Harm
Reduction for Hoarders and expand the
program to other neighboring counties.
The Enhanced Harm Reduction for
Hoarders workshop is today from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at the Sobrato Nonprofit
Conference Center in Redwood Shores. To
register, call Alan Merrifield at (650) 343-
4380 or email him at amerrifield@hoard-
ers.org. Representatives from the PCS will
also be at the Senior Showcase
Information Fair Friday, May 18 at the
Burlingame Recreation Center. The fair
runs from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
For more information on hoarding and
local resources for hoarders visit hoard-
ers.org.
Continued from page 1
HELP
and deep disappointment this terrible inci-
dent occurred,” but said it needs to stay
focused on its job. He said previous criti-
cism by boardmember Betsey Schneider,
who helped uncover the alleged embez-
zlement and called the district out of con-
trol, does not represent the board or the
district.
Cassman also urged LAFCo to keep the
district as is, particularly as it is already on
a better path.
“Human beings are not perfect. The
human institutions we create are not per-
fect. ... But we human beings do learn
from our mistakes,” said Cassman, calling
the district now “a more perfect agency.”
But LAFCo members said Cassman’s
letter to the district — essentially echoing
her comments before the board yesterday
— did not do justice to the hefty task
before it.
“This just basically says don’t worry
about anything. We have it all under con-
trol and we are dedicated people,” said
LAFCo Boardmember Sepi Richardson,
also a Brisbane councilwoman.
Without deeper internal controls,
Richardson said, “We’re going to be back
here in no time at all.”
LAFCo Boardmember Don Horsley,
also a San Mateo County supervisor,
echoed the sentiment, saying that the only
change in operations appears to be having
someone new provide the final set of eyes.
“This looks to me like exactly the same
thing as before,” he said.
The board and public comments offered
at yesterday’s LAFCo meeting will be
incorporated into a final report on the dis-
trict and include a recommendation to
maintain the status quo or alter it in some
way. Options include dissolution and fold-
ing into another county function, dissolu-
tion and creating of a new service area or
changes to the 21-member board of
trustees.
The report is due back in July.
LAFCo pushed up the district’s regular-
ly scheduled review after two former
finance employers, including one with
two prior embezzlement convictions,
were charged with taking more than
$400,000 and questions arose over the
internal organization that may have con-
tributed to the alleged crime.
The district calls dissolution or reorgan-
ization unwarranted, particularly because
of the corrective measures already imple-
mented.
The LAFCo board lauded the district’s
work and its efforts but said the two-mem-
ber finance staff needs more controls and
possibly more staff. County Controller
Bob Adler said the district has the same
“red flags” as many others, particularly
the “mom and pop accounting” methods.
Horsley, though, said that is even more
reason to have internal controls — the dis-
trict is managing taxpayer funds.
“It’s not a mom and pop operation.
Mom and pop is mom and pop’s money,”
he said.
Adler suggested LAFCo more broadly
take a lead role in working with all special
districts on internal improvements and
possibly establishing a finance committee.
Continued from page 1
LAFCO
grandparents sold them for in the 1970s.
They are calling it a cannoli party and
will crown San Mateo resident Joanne
Curley as the Cannoli Queen as she was
the lucky person to purchase the millionth
cannoli from Romolo’s.
Curley gets a free cannoli a day for the
next year as part of her prize.
New customers to Romolo’s can get a
brief history of the shop, hear and see how
cannolis are made and sample the
spumoni.
“They are all handcrafted by me and my
brother,” Joe told a customer Wednesday.
“We make it all ourselves.”
Joe’s favorite cannoli is chocolate with
pistachios.
The brothers’ grandparents moved to
the Bay Area from Italy in 1958, bringing
along their special desert recipes.
Romolo’s has been at the same spot on
37th Avenue since 1970 and the brothers
spent many a summer at the shop during
their summer vacations from Southern
California.
As children, the bubblegum ice cream
was their favorite.
“We would go straight for the bub-
blegum box and stuff our faces,” Mike, 26,
said.
As their grandparents got older, they
would return to Italy for summers and
close the shop for months.
In 2008, the grandparents invited the
brothers to take over the shop and they
spent countless hours training side by side
with their grandparents learning the craft.
“This was my first job,” Joe, 30, said. “I
loved the ice cream store and I couldn’t
stand the thought of it going away.”
So, the two brothers relocated from
Southern California and are continuing
the family business.
“It is important we preserve the family
name’s reputation,” Joe said. “Every prod-
uct we sell is important since it says
Romolo’s on the door.”
Cannolis are baked or fried shells filled
with ricotta or ice cream, topped with
nuts, cherries or other delights.
The brothers swear by the ice cream,
too.
“We have the best spumoni in the Bay
Area. Maybe a couple of chefs around
here can do as well,” Joe said about the
Italian desert.
Spend some time in the shop and you
can see the brothers enjoy each other’s
company.
“This is a great job. We’re not getting
rich but I get to hang out with my brother
all day and take ice cream breaks whenev-
er I want,” said Joe, who is getting married
next month.
Mike, on the other hand, is single and
available, they joked.
Romolo’s Cannoli and Spumoni
Factory is currently closed Mondays and
Tuesdays but open the rest of the week. It
closes a little earlier on Sundays as the
37th Avenue business district gets quiet,
Joe said.
The brothers’ grandparents still live
locally but are set to return to Italy as they
are officially retired.
For more information visit
www.romolosfactory.com.
Continued from page 1
CANNOLI
THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Resign yourself to the
fact that everything you want to do currently is likely to
take the maximum effort in order to get even minimal
results. Fortunately, you have the patience required.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t get caught off
guard and allow yourself to get tapped for a task
involving a club or social organization that everyone
else has artfully avoided, with good reason.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Unfortunately, you may
be inclined to use tactics that could end up defeating
your own purposes. If you insist on tripping over your
own feet, nothing will get accomplished.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If at all possible, avoid a
friend who is frequently afficted with biased view-
points that rub you the wrong way. You aren’t likely to
have the necessary tolerance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It’s one of those days
when everything will be out of proportion, including
poor behavior. Don’t hesitate to refuse someone who
is always borrowing this or that.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- One of the major reasons
you are not likely to get much cooperation from
companions might be that you’re too insistent about
everything being done your way.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Perhaps the only way to
get past you ignoring sensible health-habits today is
to make yourself see what this kind of behavior is do-
ing to others. If you look, you won’t like what you see.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you see some-
thing disturbing brewing between two friends, try to
steer clear. You won’t want to be forced into choosing
a side.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Do your best to help
resolve a domestic altercation that arises between
two warring family members as quickly as possible.
If it can’t be settled, the chill will linger.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Don’t be so self-
involved that you fail to hear the suggestions of those
who have your best interests at heart. If you get too
wrapped up in your own ideas, you’ll miss out.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It behooves you to be
extremely prudent in the management of your funds.
Be particularly careful about making a personal loan
to anybody, especially a close relative.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If it seems like every-
thing is going against you at this moment in time,
you must keep your cool if you’re to have any hope
of making things come out your way. Tolerance is
all-important.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
5-17-12
THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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1 Pooh-pooh
6 Soup server
11 Volunteer
12 Ploy
13 Coarse
14 Flowering shrub
15 No longer wild
16 Juan’s three
17 Wild guess
19 Ex-frosh
23 Music genre
26 Right after
28 Funny Charlotte --
29 Pillar
31 Willow twig
33 Sweater letter
34 Overseas
35 Mare’s tidbit
36 Mountain goat
39 Country lodging
40 Hidden obstacle
42 Toward shelter
44 Friend
46 Union demand
51 Was a working cat
54 Emergencies
55 Compares
56 Lots and lots
57 Consecrate
58 Money-hunger
DOwN
1 Vaccines
2 Close-mouthed person
3 Sheriff Taylor’s kid
4 Wards off
5 Cook bacon
6 Enjoy the hammock
7 Gather together
8 Two-bagger, for short
9 Tell a fb
10 Depot info
11 Alt.
12 Mata Hari portrayer
16 Spigot
18 Large cask
20 Hunter constellation
21 Joyous outburst
22 Ranch concern
23 Chariot race bettor
24 Prince Val’s wife
25 Jowly canine
27 San Francisco hill
29 Dove sounds
30 -- tai cocktail
32 Herr in Madras
34 Guitar, slangily
37 Loses hair
38 Famous cathedral town
41 Oxygen and helium
43 Wrong move
45 Hubble component
47 White House staffer
48 Speck on a globe
49 Kernel
50 Dangerous curve
51 Sammy Sosa’s org.
52 Friction easer
53 Banjo cousin
54 Gear
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
24 Thursday • May 17, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
INSIDE SALES /
TELEMARKETING
The Daily Journal has two openings for high
output sales professionals who know their way
around a phone.
The ideal candidate will enjoy selling products
and services over the telephone, using the fax.
email, and social media as support tools. Ulti-
mately, you will need to be comfortable making
sales calls over the phone, and once in awhile,
seeing clients in person.
Must be reliable, professional, and with a drive
to succeed. We expect you to be making calls.
To apply, call Jerry at 650-344-5200.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
We’re a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906 or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
MARKETING/SALES POSITION
Insurance restoration contractor located
in Belmont looking for a marketing rep for
SF Peninsula to promote its services.
Part time to start. Reliable car a must.
$12-$15/hr plus expenses. Please
fax resume to: (650)631-1302
110 Employment
VAN CLEANER
San Carlos
Sun. 8 hrs, $12/h, Physically fit,
clean DMV, legally work in CAL,
long term. Send resume To:
Manager@smilindogs.com
TELEPHONE -
Appointment Setter - Fantastic
leads. Top pay & bonuses.
Call Mr. Tammer (650)372-2810
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250121
The following person is doing business
as: Phoenix Stained Glass, 1130 Balboa
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Do-
na Edlund, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Dona Edlund /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/12, 05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250136
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sustainable Landscape and
Gardening, 1125 Park Place Apt. 308,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Chen
Wang, 3443 Finnian Way, Dublin, CA
94568 and Logan John Campbell, same
address. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Chen Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/26/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 513528
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Raine Marie Collar
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioners, Raine Marie Collar filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Raine Marie Collar
Proposed name: Raine Marie Armanino
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 12,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/01/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/01/2012
(Published 05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12,
05/24/12)
CASE# CIV 513617
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Katlin Gee
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioners, Katlin Gee filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Katlin Gee
Proposed name: Katlin Zitung Gee
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 28,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/0142012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/11/2012
(Published05/17/1 05/24/12, 05/31/12,
06/07/12)
26 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249845
The following person is doing business
as: Paradise’s Flowers and Gifts, 2853 El
Camino Real, Redwood City, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Jesus Rafael Torres & Rosa
Funes, 636 MacArthur Ave., Redwood
City, CA 94063. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Rosa Funes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/12, 05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249839
The following person is doing business
as: Fog City Wireless and Repair, 6754
Mission St., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Barnes Real Estate Group, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Anthony Barnes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/12, 05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250181
The following person is doing business
as: Animal Club, 134 N. B St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Xochitl Castellanos,
15 South Idaho St. #E, SAN MATEO, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Xochitl Castellanos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250174
The following person is doing business
as: Vella Construction, 316 28th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Vella Con-
struction Enterprises, INC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/01/2012.
/s/ Tony Vella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250210
The following person is doing business
as: Dine-In Delivery, 1650 S, Amphlett
Blvd., Ste 101, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: JP’S Food and Beverage, INC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Joseph P. Liu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/01/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/03/12, 05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249934
The following person is doing business
as: Holimology Institute, 1185 Laurel St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Total
Health Solutions, INC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ William Jing /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249933
The following person is doing business
as: ZaviTech, 702 Bair Island Rd., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Anthony L.
Zavilenski, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Anthony L. Zavilenski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250195
The following person is doing business
as: B & E Restoration, 378 Richmond Dr.
Apt #2, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ber-
nardo Diaz Molina, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Bernardo Diaz Molinai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250313
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Beauty Salon, 951 Old
County Rd., #4, BELMONT, CA 94002,
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Thanh Tien Le, 2600 Senter Rd.
#279, San Jose, CA 95111. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Thanh Tien Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/10/12, 05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12).
NOTICE OF ABANDONED VESSEL
The City of Brisbane Marina,
400 Sierra Point Parkway,
Brisbane, CA 94005.
Any party with legal interest in the
listed vessel, call Ted Warburton at
(650) 583-6975.
1974 55” Ferro Cement Ketch
“Desiree”
This vessel will be destroyed if left
unclaimed after 15 days.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250050
The following person is doing business
as: Alliance Phones, 212 Shaw, Unit #4,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94083
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Stiliyan Bezhanski, 215 Callippe
Court, Brisbane, CA 94005. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Stiliyan Bezhanski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/20/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250301
The following person is doing business
as: Outerstyle, 30 W. 39th ave., #102,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: OPP Brand
Solutions, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 05/01/2012
/s/ Matthew Lehr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250315
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Cate & Chloe 2) 30bythirtynine, 3)
Tru Appeal, 30 W. 39th ave., #102, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: OPP Brand Solu-
tions, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/01/2012
/s/ Matthew Lehr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250415
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Costa Sole 2) Tripsclusive, 30 W.
39th ave., #102, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: OPP Brand Solutions, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/01/2012
/s/ Matthew Lehr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250454
The following person is doing business
as: Lifes-Longevity, 3129 La Selva Cir.
#2, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ah-
mondo Nevels, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ahmondo Nevels /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250265
The following person is doing business
as: Riparian Massage and Bodywork,
121 Lorton Ave, #4, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jiraporn Hongsila, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Jiraporn Hongsila /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/04/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/17/12, 05/24/12, 05/31/12, 06/07/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 14, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
EDWARD MCGRAW, JOAN MCGRAW
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
864 EL CAMINO REAL
BELMONT, CA 94002-2304
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 17, 24, 31, 2012
210 Lost & Found
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others CLAIMED!
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
295 Art
6 FRAMED colored modern art pictures
36" by 26" $90 for all or $15 each
(650)345-5502
296 Appliances
DRYER HEAVY Duty electric, like new,
Roper, all instructions $40.00.
BURLINGAME. (650)344-6565
HEATER, ELECTRIC Radiator, top per-
fect $15.00 (650)344-6565 Burlingame
ICE CREAM Maker, Electric, Perffect, all
instructions $10 Burlingame,
(650)344-6565
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 (650)458-8280
LARGE REFRIGERATOR works good
$70 or B/O SOLD!
LARGE REFRIGERATOR- Amana
Looks and runs great. $95 OBO,
(650)627-4560
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TOWER FANS Lasko, like new, 2 availa-
ble. $25, Burlingame (650)344-6565
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new $49, (650)494-1687
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, Retails at $3,900, new.
$1,000/obo. (650)627-4560
WINDOW A/C, still in box. Soleus 6200
BTU $75, (650)344-6565
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK - Roof mounted, holds 4
bikes, $65., (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $30
each or best offer.(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLE FUFAYAWA / Arita Jap-
anese pattern dinnerware set for 8 great
price $100, SOLD!
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, $8. each, (650)364-
7777
DEP GLASS - Black cloverleaf 36
pieces, will split. Prices vary. Large ash-
tray @ $125., SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GIANTS BOBBLEHEADS -(6) Barry
Bonds, Lon Simmons, etc., $15. each
obo, (650)589-8348
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
298 Collectibles
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
VINTAGE ‘50s Motorola hi-fi phono-
graph, it works $100 obo (650)589-8348
VINTAGE ‘50S RCA victor black and
white TV, $50 obo (650)589-8348
VINTAGE FISHING LURES - (10) at be-
tween $45. & $100. each, CreekChub,
Helin Tackle, Arbogast, some in original
boxes, SOLD!
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
SAMSUNG 3G PHONE - Boost mobile
telephone, touch screen, paid $200.,
$100.obo, SOLD
SONY TRINITRON TV, 27 inch, Excel-
lent picture Quality, Picture in Picture,
video outlet, remote, $60.00,
(650) 578 9208
TOSHIBA 42” LCD flat screen TV HD in
very good condition, $300., Call at
SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ALL WOOD Kitchen Table 36” plus leaf,
William-Sonoma, $75 OBO, (650)627-
4560
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53”X66”, $19., (650)583-8069
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
304 Furniture
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6’ x 2.5’, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MADE IN ITALY, 7pc. Dining Set. Inlaid
with burlwood with 2 extensions. Must
sell, $700 obo, (415)334-1980
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $50 each or both for $80. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair (flowery pat-
tern) great condition $100 (650)853-8069
WOOD PLANT stand, unused, 45 inch
wide, 22 high, 11 deep, several shelves
$15.00, (650) 578 9208
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
(650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON 15 HP motor - runs fine, $80.,
SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
3,450 RPM $50 (650)347-5373
DELTA 15 amp. 12" Compound meter
saw excellent condition $95
(650)704-0434
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
650 593-7553
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS of Christmas vintage drinking
Glasses 1970 Color prints Prefect
condition original box $25 (650)873-8167
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
29 BOOKS - Variety of authors, $25.,
SOLD!
3 CRAFT BOOKS - hardcover, over 500
projects, $40., SOLD!
30 ADULT Magazines, 18 Adult VHS
movies & $ Dvds $40., also 50 Computer
Game Magazines $40., SOLD!
30 DISNEY Books $1.00 each
SOLD!
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 CUP electric coffee marker $8.00
SOLD!
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
27 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Result of a dough
shortage?
5 Java neighbor
9 “Godzilla Raids
Again” setting
14 End of a court
game
15 Finished
16 One learning the
ropes
17 Gene Rayburn-
hosted program
with a six-
celebrity panel
19 Key component
20 City south of
Juneau
21 Org. that works
with vets
23 Photog.’s blowup
24 Telly Savalas
trademark
28 Home near a fire
32 Protected side
33 Nancy’s comics
cohort
34 Assortment
35 Sitcom that
received 17
Emmy
nominations in
2011
37 Cal Ripken, for
one
40 Long-billed birds
41 2000s high school
drama
45 Nobel Institute city
46 Rubbed off
47 Sot’s shakes
50 Watcher
51 Down
52 Hail, to Caesar
53 “The Loco-Motion”
singer Little Eva’s
last name
55 Iraqi port
57 Traffic light signal
60 Jon Stewart
vehicle, with
“The”
64 “Mean Girls” star
65 Cookie Monster
pal
66 Meeting place for
Plato
67 Plunders
68 Deeply
absorbed
69 “__ knowledge ...”
DOWN
1 Distressed gal?
2 Lancelot’s
unrequited lover
3 War component
4 Bit of time
5 Peat source
6 Gardner of film
7 Moon vehicle
8 Words spoken in
a huff, perhaps
9 Crude org.
10 Like quarks
11 G.I. Joe’s
address?
12 Clan members
13 Rita Hayworth
husband __ Khan
18 “Star Wars” hero
22 Side views
25 Rival of the past
26 Color chart
component
27 Cabinet dept.
29 Some Ivy
Leaguers
30 Where many a
felucca is sailed
31 Plays (with)
35 Lake transport
36 Follow, as rules
37 Reed in a pit
38 Far from bleak
39 Man, for instance
42 Poker
43 Former Egypt-
Syr. alliance
44 Seiji Ozawa led it
for nearly 30 yrs.
47 Race for, as the
finish line
48 Den, often, and in
a way, what 17-,
35-, 41- and 60-
Across end in
49 Saint Lawrence __
54 Dominates
56 Second: Abbr.
57 The whole
enchilada
58 Literary hopper
59 Air density
symbol
61 Chef’s recipe
words
62 Sitter’s challenge
63 Fortune
By Steve Salitan
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
05/17/12
05/17/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others $10 each
650-364-7777
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD hard-
back books. 4 at $3.00 each or all for
$10., Call SOLD!
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER BBQ Grill, LP Coleman,
Alaskan Cookin’ Machine, cost $140 sell
$75. 650-344-8549
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5” long X 17”
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - “Fighting Aircraft of WWII”,
Jane’s, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
310 Misc. For Sale
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, 200 Mystery, sus-
pense, romance, fiction, many famous
authors, hardback and soft, 50 cents
each OBO, (650) 578 9208
BRUGMANSIA TREES in old grove pots
$15 ea (650)871-7200
CAMPING EQT - Eureka Domain 3
dome tent, med sleeping bag, SOLD!
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm,
(650)344-8549
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JANET EVANOVICH (4) hardback
books $3/each, SOLD!
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45”L, 20”W, 3”H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LARGE PRINT. Hard Cover. Mystery
Books. Current Author. (20) $1 each
SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unopened, Plate
set of 4 William Sonoma white/black/red
$12.00 SOLD!
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unused, Hard
covered Recipe book, marinades, cook-
ing, BBQ, over 500 pages $12.00, paid
$30 (650) 578 9208
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $50
(650)593-7553
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, sealed
book Past Campaigns From Banners to
Broadcasts, insight on politics, $10.00
(650) 578 9208
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
310 Misc. For Sale
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TODDLER car seats, hardly used.
SOLD!
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WALNUT ARMOUR with 2 drawers on
bottom and brushed gold knobs. Good
condition for $85. Kim Pizzolon
(650)455-4094
WATER PITCHER Royal Blue Wal-
greens Brand Top 2 Quart New in Box
$10 Ea use all brand Filters 650-873-
8167
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ELECTRIC STARCASTER Guitar
black&white with small amplifier $75.
SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Free Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Mubel
near mint condition, $1750.,P
PIANO DARK MAHOGANY, spinet $400
(415)334-1980
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - cage,
tunnels, 30 pieces approx., $25.,
(650)594-1494
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $30
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
316 Clothes
HAT: LADIES wide brim, Leghorn
straw, pouf/bow, pink/red velvet vintage
roses. From “Hats On Post”, SF-- orig.
$75. Yours for $25. OBO.
SOLD!
HAT: LADIES’ black wool felt Breton
with 1” grosgrain ribbon above broad
brim. Sophisticated--fin the Easter Pa-
rade! $18., SOLD!
LADIES 3 PC. SEERSUCKER, (shorts,
slacks, jacket (short sleeves), blue/white
stripe. Sz 12, Excellent condition. $12.
all, SOLD!
LADIES DOWN jacket light yellow with
dark brown lining $35. SOLD!
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MEN’S jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MEN’S PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 650 245-3661
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
PICTURE HAT: Leghorn straw, pouf
bow, vintage red/pink velvet roses. Fem-
inine Easter Bonnet! From: “Hats On
Post”, SF @ $75. Steal at $20., SOLD!
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE LIGHT beige mink coat $99
SOLD!
317 Building Materials
PROFESSIONAL STEEL LUMBER
RACKS for 8 foot bed. Will go over
camper shell, $85., Mike Pizzolon
(650)455-4095
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BOXING gloves $8. 341-8342
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
318 Sports Equipment
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS (148) $30 (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19. per dozen,
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF BALLS in new carton Dunlop,
Wilson, & Top Flight $9.00 650 341-8342
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
YOUTH GOLF Bag great condition with
six clubs putter, drivers and accessories
$65. SOLD!
320 Spas & Hot Tubs
SUNDANCE SPAS HOT TUB - Cameo
model, 5-6 people, purchased 2000, new
cover, new motor in 2010, runs great,
$3000/obo, 650-401-8224
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
Saturday,
May 19th
9AM to 2PM
127 Huron Ave.,
San Mateo
Tools, kitchen
items, beds, table
saw, clothing,
electrical
materials, books…
No early birds please
GARAGE SALE
REDWOOD
CITY
50 Horgan Ave.
(just off Woodside Rd)
Saturday
May 19th
8 am - 3 pm
Downsizing!
Furniture, antiques,
housewares, clothes,
sets of dishes.
Everything priced
to sell!
MOVING SALE
MENLO PARK
1342 Hillview Dr.
(x-st.-off Valparaiso Ave.)
Sat., May 19
10 am - 3 pm
Household items, golf items,
books, clothing, luggage,
computers, record albums
and much more!
28 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
POTTED PLANTS (7) $5/each
650-207-0897
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR RENT $750 per Month,
(650) 245-4988, Furnished
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
ROOMS FOR RENT
Weekly/Monthly
Shared bath, close to public transpo-
ration, cable TV, microwave, freezer,
WiFi, no pets.
Rates: $175. & up per week
Burlingame Hotel
287 Lorton Ave., Burlingame
(650)344-6666
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
BMW 530 ‘95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, 165K miles,
$3,850 (650)349-0713
CADILLAC ‘93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
HONDA 2000 CIVIC LX, 4 door air con.
All power, 1 owner, $3,900
(650)346-6326, (650)966-1552
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC OLDS CUTLASS SU-
PREME. 81K orginal miles, new paint,
excellent condition. $4500 OBO
(650)868-0436 RWC.
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
NISSAN ‘87 Centura - Two door, man-
ual, stick shift, 150K miles. Clean title,
good body, $1,250., SOLD!
PLYMOUTH ‘72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - ‘88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
1995 FORD Cargo Van 130K
6 Cylinder, good condition, $1100, OBO,
(650)634-9542
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PLEASURE BOAT, 15ft., 50 horsepow-
er Mercury, $1,300.obo SOLD!
PROSPORT ‘97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
RV. ‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiberglass
Bubble Top $2,000. Will finance, small
downpayment. Call for appointments.
(650)364-1374
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
“WE FIX CARS”
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
670 Auto Service
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
67-68 CAMERO parts, $85., (650)592-
3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CARGO COVER, (black) for Acura MDX
$75. 415-516-7060
CHEVY SMALL Block Chrome Dressup
Kit. 1 timing chain cover, 1 large air
cleaner and a set of valve covers. $30.,
SOLD!
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
THULE CAR rack load bars, with locking
feet. $100 (650)594-1494
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors /
Building & Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484
www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
MENA’S
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
• Move in/out
• Steam Carpet
• Windows & Screens
• Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning Concrete
Construction
BELMONT
CONSTRUCTION
Residential &
Commercial
Carpentry & Plumbing
Remodeling &
New Construction
Kitchen, Bath,
Structural Repairs
Additions, Decks,
Stairs, Railings
Lic#836489, Ins. & Bonded
All work guaranteed
Call now for a free estimate
650-766-1244
Kevin@belmontconstructionca.com
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
Gutters
ESTATE
SHEET METAL
Lic.# 727803
Rain Gutters,
Service & Repairs
General Sheet Metal,
Heating,
Custom Copper Work
Free Estimates
(650)875-6610
29 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
Gutter Cleaning - Leaf Guard
Gutter & Roof Repairs
Custom Down Spouts
Drainage Solutions
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Insured
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Water Damage,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
• General Home Repairs
• Improvements
• Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
B BROS
HAULING
Free Estimates
Junk & Debris Removal
(650)619-5943
10% Off with this ad!
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
•Sprinkler systems • New fences
• Flagstone • Interlocking pavers
• New driveways • Clean-ups
• Hauling • Gardening
• Retaining walls • Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
• New Lawns
• Lawn Renovations
• Sprinklers
• General Clean-Up
• Commercial/ industrial
(650) 347-2636
www.fisher-garden-
landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES
QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Workmanship
• Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
JK PLASTERING
Interior • Exterior
Free Estimates
Lic.# 966463
(650)799-6062
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
FAMILY LAW/DIVORCE
30 Year Experienced
Top Quality Attorney
Offers Reduced Rates
For New May Clients.
1840 Gateway Drive, 2nd Floor,
San Mateo
Ira Harris Zelnigher (“Ira Harris”), Esq.
(650) 342-3777
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona
®
,
VelaShape II™and
VASER
®
Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Español
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specific directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
30 Thursday• May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way • San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
Insurance
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
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WORLD 31
Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Vladimir Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — Russian police
arrested about 20 protesters on
Wednesday night at a central
Moscow square where demonstra-
tors had moved after police uproot-
ed them from a camp, the latest
move in a broadening crackdown on
the forces opposing President
Vladimir Putin.
The detentions at Kudrinskaya
Square come as the opposition tries
to maintain momentum following a
series of massive protests over the
winter.
Several hundred demonstrators
had gathered at the square outside
one of the city’s iconic Stalinist
Gothic skyscrapers after an early
morning police raid on activists
who had set up a camp in a park in
the center of Chistoprudny
Boulevard.
Video from the square streamed by
Ekho Moskvy radio’s website
Wednesday night showed police forc-
ing demonstrators into buses while
other protesters yelled angrily.
Hundreds of demonstrators remained
on the square after the arrests
Police said about 20 people were
detained. The state news agency
RIA Novosti cited police as saying
the detentions began when police
were investigating food deliveries to
the demonstrators and their attempt
to set up a field kitchen. News
reports also said prominent opposi-
tion figure Ilya Yashin was among
those detained.
As they try to intimidate Putin’s
opponents, authorities have put
leading protest organizers behind
bars, threatened others with
reprisals and proposed legislation
introducing a 300-fold increase in
the fine for taking part in unsanc-
tioned rallies.
Some opposition leaders hope
that the tough measures will foment
anger and fuel bigger rallies. But
others fear the repression will blunt
the protest movement by scaring
away many of the mostly middle-
class protesters who turned out in
the tens of thousands for peaceful
demonstrations this winter.
A demonstration of at least
20,000 a day before Putin’s May 7
inauguration turned into a fierce
battle with police as some of the
protest participants tried to march
on the Kremlin. Scores were injured
in clashes between stone- and bot-
tle-throwing demonstrators and
police who fought back with trun-
cheons and tear gas. In the next few
days police chased the opposition
around city, rounding up hundreds
on the streets and in cafes.
Then the crackdown eased, allow-
ing the opposition to stage a camp
on tree-lined Chistoprudny
Boulevard, one of the most iconic
and attractive places in central
Moscow.
Police move against new protest in Moscow
REUTERS
Members of the Russian Interior Ministry detain opposition activists near
a protest camp, demonstrating against Russian President Vladimir Putin’s
presidency, which moved to a new location near the Barrikadnaya metro
station from the site at Chistiye Prudy park, in central Moscow.
32 Thursday • May 17, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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