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The Jewelry Project

Logic Model, May 2012

Project Updates
—  3 interns —  Target demand side first in order to gauge the level of interest and know how much jewelry to purchase —  Small, personal scale; primarily approach stores and NGOs we have established connections with —  Shipment of jewelry through courier service in Quito

Inputs
—  My time —  C.V. Starr funding —  3 undergraduate interns from Brown —  $1,500 from each intern to cover general costs, including the purchase of jewelry and contributions to the Education Fund —  Time and resources of Secoya women (to make jewelry)

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Activities
—  Weekly meetings with interns —  Homestay in Sewaya —  Laying the foundations for a cooperative structure —  Speaking individually with each of the women; maintain/foster personal relationships —  Purchasing jewelry; recording inventory; creating reference binder —  English teaching —  Networking; contacting NGOs and stores —  Marketing and making publicity materials (including tags, website, and a promotional video) —  Raise money for the Education Fund

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Outputs
—  Income for Secoya women —  Money for Education Fund —  Foundational cooperative structure —  Income generated for community members through homestay and paying tour guides —  Approx. 300 pieces of jewelry to sell in the U.S. through various markets

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Outcomes
—  Interns invested in The Jewelry Project and the welfare of the Secoya community—this could result in future involvement and potential student leadership within the initiative —  Increased female economic independence —  Alleviating the need to work for oil companies or engage in destructive agricultural practices in order to entirely support one’s family —  Sustainability of the project

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