Chess in Indiana Vol XV No. 2 Sep 2002

Volume XV Number 2

. INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
- Indiana Class Championships in Evansville - Interview of Aviv Friedman at Terre Haute Chess Camp .i - Tactics Gallery, State Championship Info - Cates Annotates; other games from recent events - ISCA's rated

Tense Moments at the 2002 ISCA Quick Championship
(Above: State Blitz and Quick Champion Anders Larsson (right) in his third round game against Bernard Parham at this year's Quick Championship in Logansport; in the background are Garrett Smith (left) and Josh Bousum

"Uncle ISCA" Wants YOU ... To Play at the Indiana State Championship: September 21-22

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ISCA Directors
PRESIDENT: Gary Fox
134 Wheatland Ave Logansport IN 46947 Ph. (574) 722-4965 E-mail: garyjfox@juno.com VICE PRESIDENT: Mike Zabawa 647 Geeting Dr Anderson IN 46012 Ph. (765) 644-1139 E-mail:mzabawa@acsc.net SECRETARY: Thomas J. Harris 8117 Farmhurst Ln. Indianapolis IN 46236 Ph. (317) 823-7498 E-mail:tharris78@home.com TREASURER: Roger E. Blaine PO Box 353 Osceola IN 46561 Ph. (219) 257-9033 E-mail:r.blaine@mppl.lib.in.us EDITOR: Jay Carr 105 Diplomat Ct Apt 2 Beech Grove IN 46107 Ph. (317) 786-0218 E-mail:indianagradcc@aol.com PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Wick Deer 7875 Cardinal Cove S Dr Indianapolis IN 46256 E-mail: Wickdeer3@cs.com E-mail: (files)Wickdeer@aol.com HISTORIAN: Wick Deer 7875 Cardinal Cove S Dr Indianapolis IN 46256 E-mail:Wick@surf-ici.com E-mail: (files) MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Joseph A. Riegsecker 55605 County Road 33 Middlebury IN 46540-8740 Ph. (219) 825-9218 Fax: (707) 929-8950 E-mail:joepye@concentric.net SCHOLASTIC DIRECTOR: John Cole 2525 College Ave Goshen IN 46528 Ph. (219) 533-5057 E-mail:tinytal@yahoo.com DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE: Steve Steppe 53 E. Antler Dr Terre Haute IN 47802 Ph. (812) 299-5111 E-mail:Ssteppe@aol.com DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE: Thomas Byers 430 10th St Logansport IN 46947-3535 Ph. (219) 722-1137 E-mail:toolnite@netusa1.net

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Gold Card: Silver Card:

Editor: Jay A. Carr PrinterlPublisher: Bill Corbin - UN Printing Contributors: Ken Hamilton, Jason Crismore, Steve Cates, John Cole, Torn Cook, Gary Fox, Nate Criss, Craig Hines Proofreading: Ken Hamilton, Jay Carr Contributing Photographers: Jay Carr, Ken Hamilton, Torn Cook

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ISCA Champions ~

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Indiana State Champion: Jason Doss State Reserve Champion: Jon Lewis Class Champions: M- vacant E-Jay Carr, A-Torn Harris & Ben Inskeep, B-Dallas Loven, C- Torn Pickett, D-Anthony Golike E - vacant State Team Champions: "Nd4" (consisting of: Mike Herron, Glenn Snow, Jay Carr, Torn Harris) State Quick Chess Champion: Anders Larsson State Blitz Champion: Anders Larsson State Blitz Reserve Champion: vacant State H.S. Blitz Champion: vacant ISCA SCHOLASTIC CHAMPIONS: HS Champion: John Cole 9th & Under Champion: Ben Inskeep 6th & Under Champion: Jon Kelly 3rd & Under Champion: Kyle Calabria and McClain Bishop 9th & Under Junior Varsity Co-Champions: Seth Grimes, Travis Geisel 6th & Under Junior Varsity Co-Champions: Scott Schmelzer, Casey Lecklider, Brandon Ratliff Grade Champions: High School: Matthew Krause Grade 8: Mark Bauman Grade 7: Michael Harris Grade 6: Cameron Donis & Kevin Krenk Grade 5: Corbin Krenk & David Bicknase Grade 4: Daniel Ryker Grade 3: Fengyee Zhou & Tyler HouserGrade 2: Mitchell Broughton Grade 1: Alek Jansen Kindergarten: Yushi Homma TEAM CHAMPIONS: High School: Anderson HS (Anderson) 8th & Under: Honey Creek MS (Terre Haute) 6th & Under: The Orchard School (Indianapolis) 3rd & Under: The Orchard School (Indianapolis)

ISCA Membership Regular Junior (Under 18) Family Subscription: Affiliate: School Affiliate

Fee_s:

$12.00/yr $ 6.00/yr $ 3.00/yr (addtl at same addr.) $ 1O.OO/yr $ 17.00/yr $ lO_OO/yr (B.S. or below) Patron Memberships

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President's Message:

(8/23/2002)

IT'S THAT TIME

AGAIN! The 61st Annual Chess Indiana State Championship is knocking at our door. This is a real exciting time for ISCA, and here it is about a month away with several people already signed up to compete. I will be posting entries about two weeks before on the www.indianachess.org web site. You can confirm your entry there. This year the State Championship will be downtown Indy. There will be numerous prizes and State Titles for players to compete for. This is the largest prize fund we have had in years and, with 30 grand prix points at stake, who knows who will show up. Wow! On Sunday, September za=, 2002 the annual Membership Meeting will commence at 2:00pm. We will elect officers and discuss the format for the State Championship. I am also going to recommend adding two officer positions to the Board of Directors bringing the total to twelve members. The first position is one we discarded last year (which is the Publicity Director) and the other, which is new, would be called News Director. The News Director's main responsibilities would be to seek news throughout the State Primarily reporting the activities of our affiliates, but not limited to them. The News then can be forwarded to the Web Site and or the Editor for publication. This will help assist the editor. The News Director will also make contacts with newspapers around the State reporting our activities. It seams like we have lots of activities going on all across the Hoosier arena but this information gets left out to the general public. The Publicity Director's name will change to the Public Relations Director. The PR Director's duties will change slightly also. This person will work with TD's that are running State Titled Events in getting the word out to the public before the event. Last but not least, I would like to thank our editor, Jay Carr, for all of his work in putting together this magazine and the others. I know how excited we were two years ago when he jumped back aboard as editor. I know after time passes the polish starts to wear off, and the appreciation doesn't come in as often. So again, I would like to say THANK YOU Jay for the work of the past two years, and that you are appreciated. Give Jay a thank you when you see him at the State. Gary JFox President, ISCA garyjfox@juno.com

Issue Contents: This one feels a little thin, but I feel we do have some entertaining stuff. It would have been even thirmer without the help of Ken Hamilton, (who I can always count on for material and support) Jason Crismore (who did a lot of the thankless work of inputting games into ChessBase), and Stephen Cates (who came through with some annotated games). Thanks guys. (below: a rare photo - the editor at WORK! ....J We didn't have many scoresheets from the recent ISCA Class Championships, so you're stuck with a couple of my games and one from Class D wilmer, Anthony Golike. Ken Hamilton provides an interesting interview with Aviv Friedman, renowned Coach and chessplayer who has several Indiana connections. The "Tactics Gallery" makes another appearance, as does the ISCA 100 list. Regarding the latter, I'm always a bit dismayed when we put that together, as I realize how many players who should be on the list aren't; simply because their membership has lapsed. I challenge all to keep their membership current and not just renew "when you have to" to play in a State Championship event. I was a bit disappointed in the fact that the "Mailbag" was virtually empty this time, as I enjoy sharing the magazine's correspondence with the readers. Don't be shy- write to Chess in Indiana, even if it's just to say "Hello." (e-mail meatindiangradcc@aol.com ) SILVER ANNIVERSARY As I was sitting around, talking to a bunch of fellow players (none of whom was older than my chess set) between games at the recent ISCA Class Championships, I began to wonder what they would think of tournament chess as it was when I first started playing. Since 2002 marked 25 years since my first tournament game, this is kind of my "Silver Anniversary." Yeah! When I first played there was smoking allowed at the board(!) This would seem like an 'outrage' at today's events, but I guess it was more accepted in general back then, too. Equipment was a lot simpler too. 3 or 4 kinds of chess sets made up about 99% of the sets you'd see at a tournament. Most were the USCF Club Special pieces that we still see today; those players of "greater means" often had a "Player'S Choice" set (see Doug Todd or Mike Herron for current examples) or a "French Wood" set (I still see a couple of those from time to time - Josh Bousum springs to mind). There were only 2 or 3 different clocks then too, the "old reliable" BHB, and the Jerger with an occasional "Alpha" clock or the bizarre metallic-cased "Heuer" clock thrown in. Nothing digital, of course! A lot of events had paper boards, that had to be taped down to lie flat (really!). Rated events were a lot more rare in those days, but there were four big tournaments in Indy almost every year: The State Championship, The Indy 500 Open, The Circle City Open, and The Crossroads of America Open. I miss those days... Rated scholastic events were almost unheard of, although there was an annual competition with regionals that evolved into the current SCI tournaments of today. Oh, and there were no computers and no Internet Chess Club Was there even an internet? (I'll have to check with Al Gore on that one... ©) -Jay

Editor's Comments: Gee whiz, Gary. Printing the president's message makes me feel kind of self-serving! But seriously, it has been a privilege and an honor to serve. I only wish I had more time to spend on Chess in Indiana.

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2002 ISCA Class Championships.
This year's Class Championships were held on August 10th at the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville. The site was excellent, but turnout was disappointing, even though aided by the participation of some of our neighbors from Kentucky. Class titles were awarded to: Expert: Jay Carr (Beech Grove) Class A: Tom Harris & Ben Inskeep (Indianapolis) Class B: Dallas Loven (Evansville) Class C: Tom Pickett (Evansville) Class D: Anthony Golike (Evansville) The Master and Class E titles are 'vacant' until next year. I wasn't able to collect that many scoresheets, and many were illegible (as always!), but I do have one interesting game from the class D winner, Tony Golike, and a couple interesting games of mine from the Exp/ A- section. ft Anthony Golike Sicilian Defense B50
(annotations by Jay Carr)

RbS [25 ...Qxb6 looks risky, but Black appears to be OK after 26.axb6 Rb8 27.Rxa6 Rd6] 26.Qc5 RbcS 27.Qe5 Qc6 2S.Raa2 Preparing to challenge on the d-file. 2S... Qb7 29.Rad2 QbS 30.RxdS+ RxdS 31.QxbS RxbS 32.Rd2 Kf8 33.Rd6

33 ... RaS 34.e5 Ke7 35.f4 Ra7

:t David Hall

(above: Anthony Golike receives trophy from TD Craig Hines)

the Class D

l.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d3 White aims for a King's Indian Attack. 3... Nf6 4.g3 b6 A bit unusual. 5.Bg2 Bb7 6.0-0 e6 7.Rel QcS S.Nc3 a6 9.a4 Be7 10.e5 dxe5 I1.Nxe5 Bxg2 12.Kxg2 0-0 13.Bf4 Bd614.Qf3 Nbd7 This precipates some wholesale exchanges. 15.Nxd7 Qxd7 16.Ne4 Nxe4 17.dxe4 Bxf4 IS.Qxf4 RfdS 19.Re2 Now Black controls the d-file. Giving up this control costs him the game. 19.•.Qc6 20.Qe3 h6 21.c3 RacS 22.a5 b5 23.b3 c4 24.b4 Qb7 25.Qb6

36.Kf3 Rd7 A desperate attempt at counterplay; Black's position seems hopeless either way. [36 ...f6 37.Ke4 Rd7 (37...g6

38.Kd4 fxe5+ 39.fxe5 Rd7 40.Rxd7+ Kxd7 41.Kc5 Kc7 42.h3+-) 38.Rxa6
f5+ 39.Ke3 Rd3+ 40.Ke2 Rxc3 41.Rb6 Rc2+ 42.Ke3 Rxh2 43.Rxb5 c344.a6+-] 37.Rxa6 Rd3+ 3S.Ke4 Rxc3 39.Rb6 Rd3 40.Rxb5 RdS 41.Rc5 Rd5 42.Rxc4 Rb5 43.Kd4 f6 44.a6 1-0 ftJay Carr (2009) :t Ben Inskeep (1920) Sicilian Defense B53
(annotations by Jay Carr)

I'd been playing a lot of 1. f4 & 1. c4 lately, but on this "special occasion" I thought I'd revert to the king-pawn, as I felt there would be a good chance to get into a pet line of mine, and I was still smarting from a defeat at Ben's hands in this year's Challenge Companion tournament. .. 1...c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4!? Inspired by a recent NIC Yearbook opening survey ... 4 •••a6 Aw, Rat spit! The opening survey only covered the 4 ... Nc6 line ... 5.c4?! Less accurate than the modem approach with S. Be3, as after this move Black can try S...Bg4! 5... Nc6 6.Qd2 Nf6 7.Nc3 g6 S.b3 Bg7 9.Bb2 0-0 A Maroczy Bind-type of position with the unusual twist of opposing darksquared, fianchettoed bishops. 10.h3 b6 1l.Bd3 Bb7 12.0-0 ReS 13.Radl Qe7 14.Rfel RfdS 15.Qe2 Ne516.Nd4 Offering to give up the minor exchange after 16...Nxd3, but White's light-squared bishop is not an impressive piece in this position. 16... Nfd7 17.Bbl Indicating my feeling that the lightsquared bishop would not be "bad" forever. 17... Nf6 The oscillating knights give one the impression that Black is drifting a bit It is sometimes hard to be patient in Maroczy positions, and I've won a few as White where I honestly believe Black just got bored ... IS.f4 Nc6 19.Nd5!? The critical point in the game. I was hesitant to go in for the wholesale exchanges of minor pieces here, but I felt I would have strong pressure on the e-file and a good chance to play fS to improve my "bad bishop" and attack on the kingside. I almost decided against this move when I saw the pin with 22 ...QcS, but then realized I was okay after 23. Qf2. 19... Nxd5 20.exd5 Bxd4+ 21.Bxd4 Nxd4 22.Rxd4 Qc5 23.Qf2 Rc7

l.e4

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24.f5! Rcd7?! I believe Black's game is still quite tenable after 24 ...Rf8. 25.Kh2 b5 If there were no king-safety concerns, this pawn break would be of longterm consequence. 26.Qh4!

.It Ben Bentrup (2043)
lJay Carr (2009) Sicilian Defense B26

(annotations by Jay Carr)

(above: Dallas Loven (left) receives trophy from Craig Hines)

Class B

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 S.d3 d6 6.Be3 An annoying method of play in the Closed Sicilian. White's straight-forward plan of exchanging the dark -squared bishops is quite vexing... This move was a favorite of the old guard Closed Sicilian-ites like Spassky, Hort, & Smyslov. 6... e6 7.Qd2 QaS S.Nf3 Nd4 9.0-0 RbS?! I was unable to find this move in my library. [9 Bd7 A) 1O.Bf4 Qb6 (IO e5!? 1l.Nxd4 cxd4 l2.Nd5 Qd8 actually traps White's bishop, as pointed out by Gallagher in his popular "Beating the AntiSicilians" book.) 11.Rabl ReS 12.Rfe1 Ne7; B) 10.a3 10...Rc8 11.Rfb1 b6 12.Nh4 Ne7 13.f4 0-0 14.Qf2 f5= Augustin-Byrne, Lugano 1965.] 10.a3 a6 11.b4 Nxf3+ 12.Bxf3 cxb4 13.axb4 Qxb4 14.eS!!?

overlooked that I had 16...Bxe5 which holds things together, at least for the moment!] lS.d4 Bg7 16.Rfb1 Qc4 17.Ne4 BfS [17 ...Qc7 looked even worse. Black's development is a disgrace. 18.Qb4 BfS 19.Rxa6] lS.Bf4 Qc7 19.Qb4 e5 20.dxeS dxe5 21.Qb2 [With the kind of shocking moves my opponent had been playing, I was expecting the spectacular 21.Qd4! here:

analysis diagram 21. Qd4!

Sounding the attack with tempo by attacking the e7 -pawn. 26.•.Qc727.Qh6 This game was somewhat surreal in the way that White's queen sort of nonchalantly strolls up to the kingside- but with great effect. 27... f62S.fxg6 [I almost played the diabolical 2S.Re6, which kind of "corks" Black's queenside, seeing at first only 28 ... Rf8? 29.fxg6 Rf7 30.gxf7+ Kxt7 31.Qxh7+ Kf8 where both 32. Bg6 and 32. Rg4 will mate. But then realized that, instead, 28 ... g5 makes a quick win problematical.] 1-0

21...exd4 22.Bxc7 RaS 23.Be5 f6 24.Nxf6+ Nxf6 25.Bxf6 Rg8 and who knows when Black will stop giving back pawns ...] 21...Bg7 22.Rd1 Ne7? Somewhat shell-shocked, I don't offer the best defense. 22 ...f6 makes White have to work harder. [22 ...f6 23.Nd6+ Kf8 24.Be3 f5] 23.Nd6+ Kf8 24.Bxe5 Bxe5 25.Qxe5 RgS 26.NfS!! God!! There's no end to it!! (ed. note: this position is diagrammed in the Tactics Gallery) 26 ... NdS 27.Qxc7 Nxc7 2S.RdS+ NeS 29.Re1 "Pretty good stuff." I said as I turned down my king ... 1-0
(Craig Hines & Terry Winchester man the TD's table at the ISCA Class Championships)

Enterprising play. I had only looked at 14. d4, where I planned to beat a retreat via Qc4-c7 and hoped to hold onto my extra pawn. 14..•BxeS [o14 ...d5 as suggested by Bentrup after the game. I was worried that White would win his pawn back too easily after 15.Rfb1 Qe7 16.Rxa6 but

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A Chat with Aviv Friedman at Craig Stauffer's Terre Haute Chess Camp ...
by Ken Hamilton

On a sunny day late in June I headed west out of Indianapolis on Route 70, took a Terre Haute exit and after managing to overshoot the elementary school campsite by about seven miles, eventually wound up in the school's' gymnasium amid some thirty excited kids under the tutelage of Craig Stauffer, assisted by senior masters Aviv Friedman and Jan van de Mortel. While Craig distributed an assortment of prizes (it seemed every kid was a winner) and then embarked on the closing session (an hour of bughouse), I cornered Aviv for an interview. Aviv, a newly-minted U.S. citizen, is a chess professional. A senior master with a FIDE rating around 2400, he doesn't play chess for a living - instead, he is among the most widely-Irnown chess journalists in the world; in particular, readers of Chess Life and the ICC's website are familiar with his reports from Corus, Linares and other major tournaments. A stocky, intense man whose accent reflects his upbringing in Israel, Aviv is a straight-forward, purposeful individual with a wry sense of humor, who calls Teaneck, N.J. home - but for much of the year his travels take him all over the world. We started by talking about his introduction to chess. " When I was young, I was a big soccer fan, and a fairly good player until I suffered a knee injury and my soccer career was ended. So I had to find other pastimes, arts, crafts and chess; - chess won! My father ran a chess cafe but I never became involved in it - I knew the moves, of course , but I was a late starter; I was nearly seventeen years old before I

played in my first chess tournament. I lived in Rehovot, a little town south of Tel Aviv. I had to take three bus rides to get to the tournament, sometimes in the rain; I'm not sure I'd do that today! With chess, you are gripped by it, or you are not - when it happens, it happens. I took a liking to it, it became my major hobby and, with time, my profession.

study. Playing over games on the board while juggling two or three books isn't easy - fortunately, I'm a very methodical person. Nowadays you have databases with all the important games, many with analysis, and you can add your own, so with that and a book or CD or two you have most of the knowledge you need. I always loved to go over games and and

(above: chess coaches van de Mortel, Stauffer,

SO,I started to play chess at 17, when I was 18 I had to enlist in the Israeli army for three years obligatory service -not much chess! But I'd say by 1986, about seven years after my first tournament, I had reached senior master level. By then I made a pretty big decision, that chess was to be my calling. I came here in 1995. I loved the game, played a lot and studied a lot..."
and Friedman)

compositions. Openings were never my forte; I had basic knowledge of opening lines but perhaps I could have done more. Instead, I studied many, many endgames and played through many games. Middlegame theory hasn't developed very much but those who come to a tournament with well-prepared opening lines are often able to gain a big time advantage." We talked about how Aviv set about forging a full-time career out of chess: "Top ten players like Kasparov, Kramnik, Anand and others make a lot of money; even the top twenty players can make a decent living from tournaments and appearances, but below that level there are many GMs

As one who dips, unsystematically, into a wide variety of chess books I was interested to learn how Aviv had gone about studying the game... " Mainly using Chess Informants there was no ChessBase then ...in fact, I look back with some sorrow as it would have been so much easier to

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who have to play many open tournaments with modest prize money to earn a living. I turned to teaching and journalism as my main source of income and through perseverance and developing many contacts over the years I have become well-known and sought after in both fields. This is not to say my playing career is over - I have two International Master norms and one of these days maybe I'll find the time and opportunity to get the third. I might have played in the· Chicago Open this year, but I was coaching a young U.S. team in the Pan American Games in Argentina (we got one gold, three silver, two bronze out of eight categories - that's not too bad!). My local club hasn't seen me for years - I play mostly on the ICC; I'm an administrator there and yes, I know Jason Doss who also spends a lot of time online! I keep pretty busy. I seem to spend most of my time traveling, whether it's to cover tournaments like Corns or to teach at chess camps with people like my good friend Craig, who is a very good coach and organizer. Next week we go to Chicago then when I get back home maybe I'll find time to play in the U.S. Open; if I'm not too tired maybe I'll have a shot at getting that final I.M norm ...Then I'll be off to other chess camps in Pennsylvania, New York and Wisconsin. There's no particular age group I like to teach. I've taught all ages, from 5 to 80 years old; maybe 5 and 6 year olds are the hardest, as you have to work at keeping their attention, but when you see a kid with the sparkle in his eyes that I had when I got started in chess, then you know your efforts will be worthwhile." I was curious why Aviv's article on Linares did not appear until the July edition of Chess Life, several months after he presumably had filed his report in February .....

"The USCF still has financial problems. To help reduce expenses they cut the number of pages in Chess Life magazine, but I'm puzzled that they did not consider Corns and Linares worthy of priority coverage. I guess they feel coverage of domestic, open tournaments is of more immediate interest to their readers. I hope the new Board of Directors will make more progress in solving the Federation's financial difficulties .... " And then we talked about the problems and pleasures of life as a chess journalist. .. I asked Aviv if he had any horror stories about losing luggage in his constant travels around the world - and whether the rigors of a life of trains, planes and hotel rooms were compensated by the privilege of mingling with the chess elite: " ... (laughs) No, I've never lost my luggage, or missed a tournament or had many bad experiences in my travels. I'm a very organized person and I leave little to chance. Some trips are not easy - for example, playing in Argentina means traveling 24 hours from door to door, from my home to the hotel. It involves changing planes, bus rides, taxis- if you've ever watched the show "The Amazing Race" on TV, this is very close to that. I honestly felt I was doing that, the schedule was so hectic. 10 hours to get to Buenos Aires, then take a car to another airport, then fly to Cordova where someone picked me up for a long drive over semi-paved roads to the tournament site." I'd heard to ... Linares was hard to get

and train schedules to make sure I had a good chance of making my connections; from the airport a cab ride to the train station and then a 4 hour train-ride to Linares - boring, but OK! On the way back you have to catch a train at 4 a.m. and you have to be wide awake or you might be separated from your luggage, which happened to some of my colleagues." But once there, it must be enjoyable to get together with the world's greatest players and maybe have a drink or two at the bar .... "Sometimes! Once you get to know them, some are very nice and friendly. But not all; Kasparov, for example, is not. We were very upset at Linares because the players were not accessible. By contrast, at Corns they were generally available for interviews and questions; Joel Lautier, Peter Leko, Leuk Van Wely were among those who answered questions ranging from their personal lives to how they studied chess. At Linares we had dinner with the Mayor and as a result next year the players' contracts will require that they meet with the journalists. Kasparov's mother was there - she is very protective of him - and she told us Garry would never be available for individual interviews in the middle of the tournament, but maybe in the end ...however, at the end he didn't even hold a press conference. Others, like Vishy Anand, are very nice to us - he and his wife are a tremendous couple. He's not bigheaded, though he obviously has a right to be! Instead, he's very down-to-earth, extremely modest. It was also pleasant to have dinner with Arvind Aaron, an Indian journalist who knows Anand very well, and to strike up a lasting friendship." It was a hot day, and it was easy to picture my favorite GM, Mickey

"I'd read a very good article by John Henderson about how he barely made it there, and I checked all the flight

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Adams, who at one time was rumored to be a heavy drinker, having a beer or two at Linares. "Yes, there's a good story about Adams: in 1990 he ended up in a three-way tie at a zonal tournament. All efforts to break the tie were unsuccessful, so to arrive at a winner they decided to spin a roulette wheel. Each player picked a number, and whoever's number came up first. would be declared the winner. Adams picked 10 - 10 and behold, 10 came up first and Mickey went on to the Interzonal. Afterwards they asked him why he chose 10. He answered: " Because that was how many pints of beer I drank last night." But he's not the only British player with a funny reputation; David Norwood, who is probably the richest GM in the world - not from chess, but from some amazingly successful investments - I think he's worth about $20 -30 million, once played a game while piling up 13 empty margarita glasses next to the board, and he won the game." Because the other guy had 14? (laughs) " No, no, his opponent had none." Aviv and I had been chatting in a quiet area away from the gymnasium; kids at chess camps are as noisy as kids having fun anywhere. The final, frenetic bughouse session was coming to an end, so we wandered back to rejoin the scene. Craig was chasing around picking up chess pieces and making sure parents were on hand to pick up their bright young offspring; a perspiring Jan Van de Mortel wandered over and I grabbed the chance to have a few words with him. Jan is a 27 year-old native of Holland with a 2400 FIDE rating. I Chess in Indiana

talked with him about his chess activities and life in general

At 27 you've achieved a lot and you have a lot of life ahead of you...

I enjoy spending summers over here...through Aviv I got to know the American chess scene and got to know lots of people. If they like you, you get invited to chess camps like this. I'm not playing much tournament chess anymore, I used to be an active player but after studying and working I became more of a chess teacher and journalist than a player. Chess isn't my profession, though I'm an options trader. There are lots of similarities between my work and chess, which was one of the reasons I was hired. Ability to operate under pressure and to deal with negative emotions -like from losing a chess game or losing money in trading - is key. Everyone makes mistakes at times! I look at almost everything I do and say it's a game. I keep up my interest in chess by playing in a national league with many top-level players. As for ICC - I spend too much time on it! "
cc

(above: Jan &Aviv oversee the action)

(with a big grin) " I'm not afraid of life!" Aviv and Jan are two delightful people who gave me the impression they are following their dreams in life. Craig Stauffer is a chess master well known to many ISCA members. He has made significant contributions to chess in Indiana through the chess camps he has organized for the past several years and his development of the Terre Haute Chess Center. He told me he has found new, expanded premises for the Chess Center and looks forward to increased club activities in the coming months. You can look up the Center on the web: http://www.home.earthlink.netl~thche ss. And if you play on ICC, you can see what Aviv and Jan are up to by fingering Sveshi or Buzzo, respectively.
-Ken Hamilton ("Staunton" on ICC).

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2002

A HERITAGE 61ST

EVENT!

A NN UA L

ian a State Championship
Convention Center &_RCA Dome Grand Prix points available $$3200 Prize Fund based on 120 players in Championship and Reserve Sections Top two prizes in Championship are Guaranteed

Date: Sept. 21·22, 2002 Registration: 8·9:30am Rounds: Sat. 10-3-8 Sun. 10-3:30
Location: Indiana Convention Dome Center & RCA

Championship Section (Open to All): Entry Fee: $50 if received by 9116, $60 at door Prizes: 1st $700, 2nd $300, Under 2300 $170-85, Under 2100 $160-80 Under 1900 $150-75, Upset Prize $50 Reserve Section (Under 1700): Entry Fee: $45 if received by 9116, $55 at door Prizes: 1st $550, 2nd $200, Under 1500 $150-75, Under l300 $140-70 Under 1100 $130-65, Upset Prize $50 Time Control: 30 moves in 90 minutes, Game/60, 5 round swiss system USCF and ISCAmembership required. (ISCAdues $12, $6 ifunder 18)

100 S. Capitol A ve., Indianapolis,

Send entries by 9/16 to: ISCA, Clo Gary J Fox 134 Wheatland Ave. Logansport, IN 46947 Phone: 574·7224965 Email: garyjfox@uno.com

Ind iana State Begin ners Class Championships
Sept. 21, 2002, 6 Sections, 18 Awards
4 round SN iss ~stem, Game/30, Class E (1199-1000): Aw ardsto 1st, 2nd, Top under 1100 Class F (999-800): Aw ardsto 1st, 2nd, Top under900 Class G(799-600): Awards to 1st, 2nd, Top under 700

Hotel Rates: Marriott Hotel connected by walkway: $99·99·99·99, 877·640·7666 or 317 ·822 -3500 Cou rtyard by Marriott (TG IFridays) Block away: $85.85.85-85 800·589·3302 317·6354443 Reserve by 8123, ask for ISCA block
0r

For Indiana Chess information State W ide check out: Web Site: www .indianachess.org

Class H(599·400): Awards to 1st, 2nd, To p under 500 Class 1(399-200): Awards to 1st, 2nd, To p under 300 ClassJ(199·Unr.): Aw ardsto 1st, Top Unr., Top under 100

Special Entry Rates:
If you enter any of the tournaments with

A II Sections: Entry Fee: $10 if received by 9/16, $15 at door Registration: 11·12:30am, Rounds 1·2·34 USCF and ISCAmembership required. (ISCAdues $12, $6 if under 18)

a group of 4 or more by 9/9 you receive 10% off your advance entry fee

I

~

Tactics Gallery
Real positions from games played by Indiana players!
What would you do in the following positions? Some are just interesting, but most have an immediate winning continuation. Look on page 14 to see what actually happened in the games. Positions with Black to move are noted with "... '1'1'1",White to move . just "'1'1'1"

Williams-Frank

14 ... '1'1'1

Tanov-Schwartz

20 ... '1'1'1

Tabor-Stinson Neff-Williams 21.'1'1'1

10.'1'1'1

Inskeep-Harris

17.???

Inskeep-Frank Blaine- LaWall 26 ... ???

24 ... ???

Bentrup-Carr

26. ???

Doss-Parham II 32.'1'1'1

Stinson-Fried

11 ... ???

Cole-Benman 29 ... '1'1'1

Chess in Indiana

Page 10

September 2002

Three From Steve Cates.
One of Indiana's many rapidly improving young players is Steve Cates of Lapel. He provided the following impressive games for Chess in Indiana. First, From the US Masters:

And, finally, from the 2002 Scholastic Nationals:

.tMinas Nordanyan (2248)
French Defense C02 (annotations by Steve Cates)

ft Steve

Cates (2009)

it 1M Dominik Pedzich (2435FIDE) .t Steve Cates (2133FIDE) Four Knight'S Game c66
l.e4 e5 2.NO Nc6 3.Ne3 Nf6 4.Bb5 d6 5.d4 exd4 6.Nxd4 Bd7 7.~ Be7 S.Rel 0-0 9.h3 Nxd4 10.Qxd4 Bxb5 11.Nxb5 Nd7 12.Qe4 e6 13.Nd4 Nb6 14.Qd3 d5 15.e5 ReS 16.b3 e5 17.Nf5 BfS lS.Bb2 Qd7 19.Rad1 RadS 20.QO Qe6 21.Be3 g6 22.Nd6 Bxd6 23.exd6 Qxd6 24.Bf6 ReS 25.Bg5 Re6 26.e4 ReeS 27.Rfl d4

One of my favorite openings, Black gives the queen for two pieces and the initiative. 10.Qf2 10. Bf2? Nxfl 11. Bxh4 Nxd2 and Black has stolen a pawn. 10... Nxfl11.Qxh4 Nxe3 12.Ke2 Nc2 As far as I know, this move is new, in previous games black has played Nxc4, but I feel the knight is better placed on d4. 13.Re1 Nd4+ 14.Kd3 rs lS.b4? A mistake. lS...aS 16.bS Nd7 17.Nce2 fxe4+ lS.fxe4 Bf6

This game was important to me because a year earlier in Kansas City Minas stopped my nationals run in the same opening, and I was eager to try again! l.e4 e6 2.d4 dS 3.eS cS 4.Qg4 Ne6 5.NO exd4 6.Bd3 Nge7 7.0-0 Ng6 S.Rel Be7 9.Nbd2 Qe7 10.Qg3 Nb4 11.Nxd4 Nxd3 12.exd3 Bd7 13.N20 0-0 14.h4 f6 lS.hS NxeS 16.NxeS fxeS 17.NO Bd6 lS.h6 g6 19.NxeS BxeS 20.RxeS RfS 21.Bf4 Qb6 22.RxfS exfS 23.Re1 ReS 24.RxeS+ BxeS 2S.BeS

Endings of OCB are often drawn, but with 2S.Qxb7 Qe6 29.Qxe6 Rxe6 30.Rfe1 Rxe1+ 31.Rxe1 f6 32.Bd2 Kf7 33.Kfl Nd7 34.a3 Ne5 35.f4 Nd7 36.Ke2 Ra6 37.Ra1 g5 3S.fxg5 fxg5 39.Kd3 Rb6 40.Rb1 Ne5+ 41.Ke2 h6 42.Re1 Kf6 43.Rfl+ Kg7 44.Rf5 Re6 45.a4 ReS 46.a5 Kg6 47.g4 Re6 4S.RfS Ne6 49.Kd3 Ne5+ 50.Ke2 Ne6 51.Kd3 Ne5+

The white queen starts to run out of squares! 19.Qh6 NeS+ 20.Ke3 Bg7 21.Qh4 hS 22.QgS Kh7 23.Qe7 Bd7 24.Nxd4 exd4+ 2S.Ke2RaeS

YZ-YZ
From the World Open in July:
(Steve Cates- shown here in action against frequent rival, John Cole)

.t Steve

it Thomas Magar (2205)

Cates (2030) King's Indian Defense E87

(annotations by Steve Cates)

l.d4 Nf6 2.e4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.0 0-0 6.Be3 e5 7.dS NhS S.Qd2 Qh4+ 9.g3 Nxg3

Black's pieces are swarming. 0-1

queens on the board the side with the initiative still has the advantage, in this position blacksdark squares are too weak . 2S...QdS 26.Bd4 Qe7 27.Bxa7 gS 2S.Be3 g4 29.Qf4 Bg6 30.Qd4 Qd7 31.Qf6 Qe7 32.BeS! Qf7 33.QdS+ QeS 34.QxdS+ Qf7 3S.QdS+ QeS 36.QxeS+ BxeS 37.Kf1 f4? 3S.0 Kf7 39.Bd6 and white won the ending two pawns up 1-0

Chess in Indiana

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September 2002


One pleasant surprise of this year's Donley Open was the "reappearance" of Muncie's Carl LaWall. I think he was still shaking off the rust at the end of the tournament, but he did have a couple nice moves in the following. (Sorry, Roger, but I just can't resist publishing those From's Gambits!) Kg61-O The ISCA Quick Championship held between rounds two and three of the Donley Open provided a lot of excitement as there were half a dozen or so players capable of beating anyone in the event. In the end, however, it was newly minted hoosier, Anders Larsson, who kept his cool and rolled to a 4-0 score in the event. His [mal round showdown with master Tim McEntee was an exciting game, with Tim employing an offbeat defense and seemingly just holding his position together throughout the game. Eventually, though, Larsson's relentless pressure broke through. .ftMark Frank (1611) .t Drew Hollinberger (1846) English Defense AlO 1.e4 b6 2.Nc3 Bb7 3.e4 e6 4.f4 Bb4 S.d3 Qe7 6.Nge2 dS 7.exdS exdS S.d4 dxc4 9.a3 BaS 10.Qa4+ Bc6 11.Qxe4 bS 12.Qd3 a6 13.dS Bb7 14.g3 Nd7 lS.Bg2 NeS16.Qe3 Nb3 17.Qxe7+ Nxe7 lS.Rbl BxdS 19.0-0 Bb6+ 20.Kh1 Bxg2+ 21.Kxg2 Nxc1 22.Rbxe1 Rd8 23.Ne4 0o 24.fS NdS 2S.Khl RfeS 26.N2e3 Ne3 27.Rf3 Nc4 2S.Re2 f6 29.Nf2 Re1+ 30.Kg2 Ne3+ 31.Rxe3 Rxe3 32.Ng4 Red3 33.Ne4 Kf7 34.h4 hS 3S.Ngf2 R3d5 36.g4 hxg4 37.Nxg4 Rxf5 3S.Kh3 Rd3+ 0-1 .ftNate Criss (1883) .tMark Frank (1611) Reti Opening A09 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 d4 3.g3 eS 4.b4 exb4 S.a3 Nc6 6.Bg2 eS 7.axb4 Nf6 S.bS Nb4 9.Nxe5 Qe7 10.f4 Nd7 1l.Nxd7 Bxd7 12.d3 Bf5 13.0--0 as 14.Re1 Qe7 lS.e4 dxe3 16.Bxe3 Be7 17.b6 Qd7 lS.BcS 0o 19.Rxe7 QdS 20.Bxb4 Qd4+ 21.Kh1 Qxa122.Bc3 Qa2 23.Re2 Qa4 1-0 .ftDrew Hollinberger (1846) .t Nathaniel Greene (1640) Sicilian Defense B20 l.e4 c5 2.d3 dS 3.Nd2 dxe4 4.dxe4 g6 S.g3 Bg7 6.Bg2 Nf6 7.Ngf3 0-0 8.0-0 Qe7 9.Qe2 b6 10.a3 Bb7 11.e5 NeS 12.e6 fS 13.Nc4 QcS 14.BgS Bf6 lS.Rfel Ng716.Bh6 Ba617.c3 RdS lS.NgS Bxe4 19.Qxe4 Rd6 20.Rad1 Rxd1 21.Rxd1 BxgS 22.BxgS Qxe61-O

ft Roger Blaine (1700) .t Carl LaWall (1839) From's Gambit A02
1.f4 eS 2.fxeS d6 3.Nf3 dxeS 4.NxeS Qh4+ S.g3 Qe4 6.Nf3 Ne6 7.Bg2 BfS . S.d3 Qe6 9.e4 0-0-0 10.0-0 Bg4 I1.Nbd2 f6 12.a3 BeS+ 13.Khl hS 14.Qel gS IS.b4 Bd4 16.Rbl h4 17.gxh4 Nge7 IS.Bb2 gxh4 19.Bxd4 Nxd4 20.Nxd4 Rxd4 21.Qf2 Rd6 22.Ne4 Re6 23.bS h3 24.Bxh3 Bxh3 2S.bxe6 Bxfl 26.Qxa7 Rxh2+!! 27.Kgl Qg4+ 2S.Kxfl Qf3+ 29.Kel Qh1+ 30.Qgl Qxgl# 0-1 This spring in Logansport "belonged" to Ben Inskeep: In nine games in the Challenge Companion and Donely Open he was undefeated, finishing clear first in the Companion and tying with Boyd Reed of Illinois in the Donley Open. Following is the game between the co-winners.

ft Anders Larsson (2300) .t Tim McEntee (2200) Nimzovich Defense BOO
1.e4 Ne6 2.Ne3 Nf6 3.d4 d6 4.Nf3 a6 S.a4 eS 6.dxeS NxeS 7.NxeS dxeS S.QxdS+ KxdS 9.Be4 KeS 10.f3 Bd6 l1.BgS Nd7 12.0-0-0 NeS 13.Be3 Ne6 14.NdS Bd7 lS.Bb3 bS 16.Nb6 RdS 17.Nxd7 Rxd7 lS.BdS NdS 19.axbS axbS 20.Rd3 e6 21.Bb3 Ke7 22.Rhd1 Nb7 23.Bb6 ReS 24.Kb1 f6 2S.e4 bxe4 26.Bxe4 RbS 27.Ba6 g6 2S.Kc1 rs 29.Be3 f4 30.Bf2 gS 31.b4 Rbd8 32.Bb6 RbS 33.BeS 1-0 The July Glendale Tornado in Indy was quite an entertammg affair. A surprisingly strong field showed up to "risk their rating points" at the G/30 time control. In the end, Jason Doss & Nate Criss ended up tying for first with 5-1 scores. Here are some games from the event. (Thanks go to Jason Crismore for inputting the scoresheets into ChessBase). .ftJason Fried (1617) .t Tom Harris (1903) Stonewall Opening DOO l.d4 dS 2.e3 Nf6 3.Bd3 g6 4.Nd2 Bg7 S.f4 eS 6.c3 b6 7.Ngf3 0-0 8.0--0 Bb7 9.NeS Nbd7 10.Qf3 NeS 11.Qh3 rs 12.Ndf3 NxeS 13.fxeS e6 14.Bd2 ReS IS.Bel h6 16.g4 exd4 17.exd4 Qe7 18.gxfS exfS 19.Nh4 Qe6 20.NxfS gxfS 21.BxfS RxfS 22.QxfS QxfS 23.RxfS Ne7 24.Bh4 RfS 2S.Rafl RxfS 26.RxfS BeS 27.Rf3 Ne6 28.Rg3 Kf7 29.Rf3+ KgS 30.Bf6 Bxf6 31.Rxf6 Kg7 32.Kf2 Bd7 33.Ke3 bS 34.b3 as 3S.Kd3 BeS 36.e4 bxe4+ 37.bxe4 dxe4+ 3S.Kxe4 NgS 39.dS Ne4 40.Rc6 Bh3 41.Rc7+

ft Boyd Reed (1817) .t Ben Inskeep (1888) Closed Sicilian B24
l.e4 eS 2.Ne3 Ne6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 S.d3 e6 6.f4 Nge7 7.Nf3 Nd4 8.0--0 0-0 9.Ne2 Nee6 10.e3 Nxf3+ 1l.Bxf3 as 12.eS Qd713.Qa4 Nd414.Qxd7 Nxe2+ [Perhaps Ben eschewed 14...Nxf3+ l5.Rxf3 Bxd7 , gaining the bishop pair, due to the looming closed nature of the game. As a result, we are treated later to a rare double-bishop endgame.] IS.Bxe2 Bxd7 16.Be3 b6 17.Rael RaeS IS.d4 e4 19.Bg4 hS 20.Bh3 bS 21.Bd2 RbS 22.g4 hxg4 23.Bxg4 Kh7 24.h4 Bh6 2S.Redl as 26.a3 RgS 27.Kg2 BfS 2S.Kf3 Be7 29.Rf2 Rg7 30.Rh1 RhS 31.Be1 KgS 32.Rth2 Rgh7 33.hS Kg7 34.Bg3 gxhS 3S.RxhS RxhS 36.RxhS RxhS 37.BxhS b4 3S.axb4 axb4 39.Kg4 Ba440.Kh3 [40.Bh4 Bdl+ 41.Kg3 Bxh5 (4l...Bxh4+ 42.Kxh4 Bxh5 43.Kxh5=) 42.Bxe7=] 40...Be2 41.Bh4 BfS+ 42.Kg3 BfS 43.Bf6+ KgS 44.Kh4 bxc3 4S.bxc3 Ba3 46.BdS KfS 47.KgS KeS 48.BaS Be7+ 49.Kh6 BfS+ SO.KgS Be7+ S1.Kh6 BfS+ S2.KgS Be7+ Y.-Y:

(Anderson's Nathaniel Greene) ***continued on page 14 ***

Chess in Indiana

Page 12

September

2002

Kibitzer's Corner
By Ken Hamilton

French Toast? Two Miniatures from Corus, 2002
January and February are among the favorite months for kibitzers on the ICC (Internet Chess Club); in January one of the top G¥ tournaments of the year is sponsored by steel company giant Corus in the windswept seaside town of Wijk aan Zee in the Netherlands and, in late February, a select group of six of the world's highest rated players assembles in Linares, Spain for a round-robin tournament. As usual, yours truly ("Staunton" on ICC) kibitzed the Corus action whenever I could, engaging in the usual banter with the several hundred other kibitzers watching the games at any given time. The winner was 35 yearold Evgeny Bareev - in the absence, for various reasons, of Kasparov, Kramnik and Anand. However, Evgeny came a cropper in his eleventh game of this thirteen round tournament, losing in 20 moves to former FIDE world champion Alexander Khalifman. Khalifman - Bareev [CI0] l.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4

there's no clear way of crashing through." If you want to sharpen your analysis skills, check out other 17th moves for Black, including Bf6, Rd8 and (this is a fun one) Kh8?! Instead, Bareev chooses a clever move that unleashes his QB but blows up in his face .

17 Nf4 18.Bxf4 eS 19.Qh6 exf4 20.RgS!!
Black resigned. If it takes you much more than half an hour to figure out the possibilities, take up checkers. So that was the shocker in Corns round 11. Lo and behold, in the (penultimate) round 12, Van Wely decided to play the Rubinstein variation against Morozevich. Morozevich - Van Wely [CI0] The game goes for a dozen moves as in Khalifman-Bareev:

struggle after 35 moves. Why did Supatashvili eschew 1O...Qd5? Read on .

10 QdS
John Henderson, reporting on the London Chess Centre/TWIC site, quotes Khalifman as saying "I analyzed this a long time ago. I didn't remember anything except the assessment White is better. "

1l.Kbl
Sadler-Miles, Hove 1997 went II.Bc3 Qg5+ 12.Kbl Nd5 13.Be5 Qxg2 and White went on to win with an interesting, pinning motif on f6; I've appended the full game at the end of this article.

l.e4 e6 2.d4 dS 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 S.Bd3 Ngf6 6.Qe2 cS 7.Nxf6+ Nxf6 8.dxcS Bxc5 9.Bd2 0-0 10.0-0o Qd5 1l.Kbl Qxg2 12.Nf3 Qxf2 13.QeS
Now we're at a critical point. Remember I said 13 Qxf3 was unclear? It was all too clear to Supatashvili playing the Black pieces against Ivanisevic at Green, 1998: 13.... Qxf3 14.Qxc5 b6 15.Qg5 h6 16.Qh4 Qh5 (Qg5 looks better) 17.Qg3 Kh8 18.Rhgl Rg8 19.Rdfl Bb7 20.Bc3 e5 (White threatened Rxf6) 21.Bxe5 Rae8 22.Rf5 Rxe5 (Qg6 is destroyed by 23.Rxf6) 23.Rxe5 Qf3 24.Qxf3 Bxf3 25.Re7 and White won easily. Now you know why, three years later, Supatashvili opted for 10...Qc7 rather than 10 Qd5 in his game with Nedev.

1l ...Qxg212.Nf3 Qxf2 13.QeS
13.Qxf2 Bxf2 14.Bb4 Bd7 15.Rhfl wins the exchange, but White is still 2 pawns down with a roughly equal position. 13.Qe5 keeps the queens on the board, retaining more attacking chances - but here 13..... Qxf3 14.Qxc5 b6 15.Qg5 h6 is unclear.

Nd7 The Rubinstein variation

5.Bd3
5.Nf3 is more usual

13...Be7 14.Rdfl QcS IS.Qg3 NhS 16.Qh3 g617.Rhgl
You're Black; what do you do now? All of White's pieces are aiming at your king, while you have a rook asleep at a8, a (dim?) knight on the rim and a swiss-cheese kingside pawn position. But, as the Romans were fond of saying, "dum spiro spero," or "hang in there, Snoopy." 17..Bf6 looks like a possible resource, but the defense favored in post-game analysis, per Henderson, was 17...Ng7 18.Qh6 Qh5 (18 ...e5? 19.Ne5!, or 18...f5? 19.Bc3 R:f7 20.Ne5) 19.Qf4 Bd7 20.Ne5 Bc6 21.Bc3 when White "has a nice postion for the pawns but

5...Ngf6 6.Qe2 c5 7.Nxf6+ Nxf6 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.Bd2
Probably most of us would go 9.Bg5., which could transpose into Spielmann-Petrov, Margate 1938 and who knows how many other games ...

13 Nd7
Instead of Bareev's 13...Be7, Van Wely chooses a line he had played against Anand in 2001.

9...0-0 10.0-0-0
(see diagram at top of next column) This is the key position. 10..... Qd5 beckons, but in Nedev-Supatashvili, Leon 2001 Black went 10..... Qc7 and eventually won an unremarkable

14.Bxh7+ Kxh7 16.Rhgl Be3

IS.QhS+

Kg8

Anand played 17.Bc3 and after 17...f6 18.Rdfl Qe2 19.Rel Qf2 20.Refl Qe2 21.Rel Qf2 22.Qg4 R:f7 23.Rgfl Nf8 24.Rxf2 Bxf2 25.Rfl the game lasted

Chess in Indiana

Page 13

September

2002

only five more moves. Henderson kibitzed the post-mortem and leamed that Van Wely had planned to answer 17.Bc3 with ...e5!. However, Morozevich had a long think and played: 17.Bxe3 Qxe3 IS.Rg3 Again, reverting to John Henderson's on the spot commentary (which I hope you are able to visit at chesscenter.com) the players felt Black's best chance was 18....Nf6 19.Qh4! Ne4 20.Ng5 Qxg5 21.Rxg5 Nxg5 22.Qxg5 1'6 23.Qg2! e5 24'h4 Be6 25. Qxb7 Rab8 26.Qa6. John gives several other lines (as does Fritz, of course) including 18 Qf4, but all seem winning for White. IS Qe5 19.Qh6 Curtains .... As promised, here is the Sadler-Miles game from Hove, 1997, Sadler diverging with 11.Bc3: l.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Ne3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Bd3 Ngf6 6.Qe2 e5 7.Nxf6+ Nxf6 S.dxe5 BxeS 9.Bd2 0-0 10.0-0-0 QdS I1.Be3 QgS+ 12.Kbl Nd5 13.BeS Qxg2 14.Qh5 f5 15.NfJ Qg4 16.Rhgl Qxh5 17.Rxg7+ KhS IS.RgS+ Nf6 19.Rxh5 Bxf2 20.Rd2 Be3 21.Rg2 Bd7 22.NgS BxgS 23.Rgxg5 Rf7 24.Rh6 Raf8 2S.b3 Be6 26.Be4 Bd7 27.a4 a6 2S.a5 BeS 29.Kb2 Bd7 30.Rgg6 BeS 31.Bxf6+ Rxf6 32'Rxf6 Rxf6 33.Rxf6 Kg7 34.Rxe6 Bxe6 35.Bxe6 f4 36.Bd5 Resigns <lJ (continued from page 12) .ftJosh Bousum (2016) 1 Steve Cates (2065) Modern Defense B06 l.d4 d6 2.e4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.f4 e6 S.Be3 dS 6.e5 h5 7.Be2 Nh6 S.NfJ 0-0 9.0-0 NfS 10.Bf2 b6 1l.Qd2 Ba6 12.Bxa6 Nxa6 13.Rael e6 14.h3 h4 15.Ndl Bh6 16.Nh2 eS 17.Ng4 Bg7 IS.e3 exd4 19.exd4 ReS 20.Nde3 Qe7 21.NxfS gxf5 22.Ne3 Qb4 23. Qxb4 Nxb4 24.Bxh4 Ne2 2S.Nxe2 Rxe2 26.Rf2 RfeS 27.Ree2 Re1+ YZ-YZ .ftSteve Cates (2065) lJason Doss (2348) Sicilian Defense B33 l.e4 e5 2.NfJ Ne6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Qb6 5.Nb3 Nf6 6.Ne3 e6 7.Bd3 a6 S.Be3 Qe7 9.a4 b6 10.0-0 Be7 1l.f4 d6 12.Qel Nb4 13.a5 Nxd3 14.exd3 bxa5 15.Nxa5 0-0 16.h3 RbS 17.Qf2 d5 IS.Rfc1 Qd7

19.e5 NeS 20.Na4 Rb5 21.Nb6 Rxb6 22.Bxb6 f6 23.Ne6 fxe5 24.Nxe7+ Qxe7 1-0

1 Steve Caputi (1715)
Modern Defense B06

.ftJason Wycoff (1396)

l.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.f4 e6 4.NfJ d5 5.e5 h5 6.Bd3 Nh6 7.0-0 Bf5 S.Ng5 e6 9.e4 Bxd3 10.Qxd3 NfS I1.Ne3 a6 12.e5 Nd7 13.Be3 b6 14.b4 Qe7 15.Rfbl Bh6 16.exb6 Nxb6 17.a4 Ne4 IS.Bf2 h4 19.b5 Bxg5 20.fxg5 Rh5 21.Rel Rxg5 22.Ndl Qd7 23.Ne3 Nfxe3 24.Bxe3 Rh5 25.Bd2 exb5 26.axb5 Qxb5 27.Bb4 as 28.Be5 Nxe5 29.Qfl Ne4 30.Qf6 Qd7 31.Rfl QdS 32. Qxf7# 1-0 .ftBernard Parham (Sr.) (2002) lJosh Bousurn (2016) Alekhine's Defense B02 l.e4 Nf6 2.eS NdS 3.QhS g6 4.Qh4 Bg7 S.d4 d6 6.f4 dxe5 7.fxe5 Nb4 S.Na3 BfS 9.Qf2 e5 10.BbS+ N8e6 1l.NfJ 0-0 12.Bxe6 Nxe6 13.e3 exd4 14.exd4 Be4 15.Be3 QaS+ 16.Qd2 Qxd2+ 17.Nxd2 Bxg2 18.Rgl BdS 19.NbS Rae8 20.Ne3 Nb4 21.Ke2 Rfd8 22.a3 Ne2 23.Nxd5 Rxd5 24.Rac1 Nxd4+ 25.Bxd4 Rxc1 26.Rxc1 Rxd4 27.Re8+ Bf8 28.Re7 Bh6 29.NfJ Re4+ 30.Kt2 Bf4 0-1 .ftJason Doss (2348) 1 Bernard Parham II (1858) Queen Pawn Opening D02 I.NfJ d5 2.d4 Bg4 3.Ne5 Nf6 4.e4 e6 5.Nc3 Nbd7 6.Nxg4 Nxg4 7.e4 Ngf6 8.exd5 Bb4 9.dxe6 fxe6 10.Bd3 Bxe3+ 1l.bxc3 Nb6 12.0-0 Qe7 13.a4 a6 14.Qb3 Rb8 15.e5 Nfd7 16.f4 g6 17.aS Ne8 18.Be4 b5 19.Bxe6 e5 20.QdS Nf8 21.Qe6+ KdS 22.Bh3 Rg8 23.dxe5 Nd7 24.Rdl Rg7 25.e6 Na7 26.Qd5 Ke7 27.exd7 Rd8 2S.Bd2 Ne6 29.Rel Qf8 30.Re6 Rdxd7 31.Rxe6+ Kd8 32.Bxd7 Rxd7 33.Re8+ Kxe8 34.Qa8+ Ke7 35.QxfS Rxd2 36.Rel Rd8 37.Re7+ Ke8 38.Re8 Rxe8 39.Qxe8+ Ke7 40.Qe7+ Ke6 41.Qd6+ Kb7 42.Qd7+ Ka8 43.e6 g5 44.Qb7# 1-0 .ftBen Inskeep (1902) 1 Mark Frank (1611) Sicilian Defense B92 l.e4 e5 2.NfJ Nf6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 d6

5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 Ne6 7.Be3 Bd7 8.0-0 e6 9.f4 g6 10.Khl Bg7 11.Qel 0-0 12.Rdl Nxd4 13.Bxd4 Qe7 14.e5 dxe5 IS.Bxe5 Qe8 16.Qh4 Ne8 17.Ne4 Bxe5 18.fxe5 Be6 19.Nf6+ Nxf6 20.exf6 Kh8 21.Qh6 Rg8 22.Rd3 Qf8 23.Qh4 hS 24.Bxh5 Qh6 25.Rh3 gxhS 26.Rg3 Rxg3 27.hxg3 Rg8 28.Rel Rg4 29.Qh3 QgS 30.Kh2 h4 31.Rdi Rxg3 32.Rd8+ Kh7 0-1

Tactics Gallery Answers:
Neff-Williams: White has 21. Bc4+, where the king can't move to the corner because of22. Qxf8+, leading to mate. Black's relative best is 21... Qxc4, but after 22. Qxf8+ Rxf8 23. Rxf8+ Kxf8 24. bxc4 White is up a clean exchange and has an easy win. Blaine-LaWall: Carl's not too rusty to see that White is in a mating net after 26 ... Rxh2+: 27. Kxh2 (27.Kgl Qg4+ 28. Kxfl Qf3+ 29. Kgl Rhl#) 27 ... Qh3+ 28. Kgl Qg2# Doss-Parham II: White's already up material, but can remove the black queen as well with 32. Rc8+ Kxc8 33. Qa8+ W illiarns- Frank: Black storms the barricades with 14 ... Rxb2! where the rook can't be taken because of 15. Kxb2 Rb8+ followed by 16 ... Nxe4!! Tabor-Stinson: Even lower rated players can patzer check the queen, and have it pay off After Nd5, it turns out that Black's best move is to sac the queen by playing Nxd5 Bxe7 Nxe7. Although this one is very obvious, there are a lot of variations to calculate to attempt to get out of the mess. Inskeep-Frank: 24 ... Qh6 prevents mate, forces white to lose the bishop, and puts extreme pressure on g2. If 25. Rh3, with the idea of 25 ... gxh5 26. QxhS QxhS?? 27. RxhS mate, Black has the killer resource of26 ... Bxg2+! Stinson-Fried: There's no way around it: after 11.. .exd4 White must lose a piece. Tanov - Schwartz: We snuck an easy one in there: Black doesn't care about the skewering as-bishop because it's mate in two with 20 ... QgS+ Inskeep-Harris: White wrecks the black position and his game with 17. Bxf6 followed by 18. NdS. Bentrup-Carr: Already in big trouble, Black gets another big slap in the face with 26. NfS!! where the white queen is immune due to Rd8 mate. Cole-Benman: Black failed to snatch his "cubic centimeter of chance" against the High School champion. 29 ... Qxg2!! is a shocking perpetual with 30. Nxg2 Nf2+ 31. Kgl Nh3+ and the white king has to go back to the corner because of 32. Kfl Rf2 mate!

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Chess in Indiana

Page 14

September 2002

ISCA Top 100 List
(As of August

2002 Rating

Supplement

and August

ISCA membership

status)

f:::r:':'rr:rr':::::rm:':::::::ff:::r~iilimJMiMH:~.iH:fH::::::r::::::::::::'f::::::t:r::rrr:::m::,:,::::::::::::ttfm':':':':'::f:rjjj:jffffff:lfmj:::l:rr:iMMIM:i~~MM.@i~lMff::ttlr:t:rr:j::rrr:f:'f:::::::::r:::l:ffffff'rrjfjj:j: Rating
Rank Last name
1 DOSS 2 LARSSON 3 COLE 4 WISEMAN 5 ADAMS 6 MCENTEE 7 THOMAS 8 GEISLEMA.N 9 HERRON 10 URQUHART 11 POWELL 12 PARHAM 13 CARR 14 SNOW 15 KISTLER 16 BUFFIE 17 HARRIS 18 INSKEEP 19 MIHELICH 20 TRICKER 21 PARHAM 22 CRISS 23 FYR 24 HOLLINBERGER 25 TODD 26 MC CALESTER 27 SCHMUCKER 28 SHAPIRO 29 ARNOLD 30 BRYANT 31 HINES 32 TEMPLETON 33 SMITH 34 CLOUD 35 CORBIN 36 LEWIS 37 EVANS 38 KAMBER 39 SAVAGE 40 DONIS

First name

Rating 2336 2300 2226 2211 2209 2190 2120 2075 2067 2036 2013 2010 2009 2000 1968 1962 1934 1920 1912 1912 1895 1886 1851 1846 1841 1835 1800 1800 1793 1793 1785 1785 1784 1748 1744 1741 1739 1734

JASON ANDERS JOHN MICHAELD NICK TIMR TODD DENNISH MIKE DONALD RONALD BERNARD JAY GLENN LESLIE ED THOMASJ BEN PATRICK TROY BERNARD NATHANIEL KEVIN DREW DOUGLASL WRAY VIVIAN SAMUEL RICHARDJ DANlELJ CRAIG KEME GARRETT VERN BILL JOSH BILL GEORGE CHRISTOPHER CAMERON BEN DAN BRANDON ROGERE STEVEN JASON SOLOMONE KENNETH RICHARD JLEE J B S

£i!y CHARLOTTESVILLE GRANGER GOSHEN SHELBYVILLE

Rank Last name
51 ALKHATIB 52 CAPUTI 53 BLACK 54 NILES 55 FILlPCZAK

First name

£i!y

DAVID STEPHENP TOMD DAVID JOE UNDERWOOD JOHNK RONALDH JOE KURTP GORDON MARKR JESSEC WILLIAM DAVIDK KRISTOPHER JASON GARYJ NICK MICHAEL DAVID JON WILLIAME GERALDE JONATHAN JOSEPHA ALLAN ROBERT DAVIDP DEAN ANASTASIOS AARON DON JERRY WILLlAMK MARKJ A

1675 1674 1673 1665 1641 1638 1624 1618 1614 1612 1600 1600 1597 1597 1596 1578 1570 1569 1565 1558 1557 1557 1549 1539 1537 1537 1533 1530 1528 1528 1526 1521 1518 1513 1507 1500 1500 1500 1492 1490 1486 1485 1484 1472 1458 1454 1452 1451 1442 1441 1440

CAMBY INDIANAPOLIS GREENWqOD ROCHESTER INDIANAPOLIS GREENCASTLE FRANKFORT GREENWOOD INDIANAPOLIS CRAWFORDSVILLE GREENWOOD INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS GREENWOOD FISHERS LOGANSPORT ANDERSON GRANGER INDIANAPOLIS MICHIGAN GRANGER INDIANAPOLIS CHESTERTON MIDDLEBURY HATFIELD RICHMOND INDIANAPOLIS PLYMOUTH WEST LAFAYETTE MUNCIE FRANKLIN INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS F ARl:vILAND RICHOMOND TERRE HAUTE INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS FISHERS ANDERSON GOSHEN BLOOMINGTON INDIANAPOLIS NEWBURGH INDIANAPOLIS YORKTOWN GOSHEN HOBART INDIANAPOLIS CITY

FORT WAYNE INDIANAPOLIS FORT WAYNE FORT WAYNE INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS FORT WAYNE INDIANAPOLIS BEECHGROVE BEECHGROVE MISHAWAKA BLOOMINGTON INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS CARMEL INDIANAPOLIS LAFAYETTE FISHERS GRANGER BLOOMINGTON INDIANAPOLIS COLUMBIA GOSHEN SOUTH BEND INDIANAPOLIS MISHAWAKA EVANSVILLE WESTFIELD WESTFIELD SOUTH BEND CARMEL GOSHEN BLOOMINGTON CHESTERTON INDIANAPOLIS ELKHART SOUTH BEND GOSHEN MICHIGAN OSCEOLA TERRE HAUTE CARMEL INDIANAPOLIS INDIANAPOLIS BLOOMINGTON FORT WAYNE CITY CITY

56 DUDLEY 57 WORTINGER 58 WEST 59 SMITH 60 BRIDGHAM 61 SIMONS 62 FRANK 63 BENDER 64 JONES 65 HERRON 66 WILLIAMS 67 CRISMORE 68 FOX 69 ZEHNER 70 VIDULICH 71 CARTER 72 LEWIS 73 KUHN 74 THOMAS 75 PORTUGAL 76 RIEGSECKER 77 CASADA 78 CHRISTENSEN 79 KENNETT 80 RAGER 81 L YRINTZIS 82 MANEY 83 THOMAS 84 HILL 85 DEER 86 NEFF 87 WEBB 88 ROY 89 SANDERS 90 AGRAWAL 91 CARROLL 92 KEITH 93 BAUMAN 94 PIERCY 95 SEAL 96 ROTTMAN 97 FEINSTEIN 98 BALES 99 MILLER 100 MAREK STANLEY

TIM
JIM FREDC RISHI CHARLESE NATHAN MARK VAN A MIKE JOE DANlELH JASONL MATTHEW MICHAEL WILLlAMJ

1732 1730 1729 1726 1719 1708 1708 1698 1695 1691 1682 1681

41 DILLON
42 SHENK 43 HEUER 44 BLAINE 45 STEPPE 46 FRIED 47 KENNEDY 48 HAMILTON 49 BRADLEY 50 HAVENS

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Chess in Indiana

Page 15

September

2002

Mark Your Calendars Now!!! The State Championship is Returning to Indianapolis on September 21-22. The ISCA TEAM Championships will be in Evansville in December Let's all make plans now to attend both events and surpass last year's excellent turnouts!!!

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