You are on page 1of 2

How to teach computer science in schools - rising to the digital challenge 21 June 2012, London 09.30 - 16.30 09.

00 Registration 09.30 An update on the DfE and Vital consultation on the 'ICT' curriculum and Vital's work to support computer science in schools There has been a great deal of confusion about what is happening with the ICT curriculum following Gove's BETT speech in January 2011. In this session Peter will clarify some key terminology and then provide an update of developments following the DfE's 'ICT disapplication' consultation and discussions involving key players including Naace, CAS/BCS and others. Peter will conclude by providing a summary of the support that Vital (www.vital.ac.uk) can provide for teachers of computer science Dr Peter Twining, director of Vital & senior lecturer, Open University 10.10 Agile pedagogy Drawing on some of the principles of open source development, Miles and Clare explore a more learner centred approach to the study of computing such as learning through play or discovery and flexible lesson planning. Also looking at alternative approaches to assessment such as badges, collaborative projects and hackdays Miles Berry, subject leader for ICT Education, University of Roehampton and chair of Naace Clare Sutcliffe, co-founder, Code Club 10.55 Engaging your computing community Learn how to create an energetic buzz, raising the profile of computing in your school through uniting families, local developers and large industry organisations together in your computing community. Alan O'Donohoe (@teknoteacher) is a teacher of computing who has collaborated with the BBC, Microsoft, Google, The Guardian, Computing at School and more to create exciting opportunities and experiences with Hack To The Future events (http://bit.ly/xLZuIA). Alan wants to share with you the rich rewards and secrets to engaging your wider community & industry partners, enabling you to create a diverse range of amazing events and activities in your school Alan O'Donohoe, principal teacher of ICT, Our Lady's High School, Preston 11.40 Computer Science - the fourth science Computer Science is the fourth science. The government is now encouraging every school to offer computer science as part of their curriculum, from primary school onwards. Michael Gove has indicated that, in future, it may become a contributor to the English Baccalaurate. What is the thinking behind this announcement and how can schools respond? Simon Humphries, coordinator, Computing at school 12.10 Lunch and informal networking 13.10 Parallel sessions (delegates will be split into two groups and attend each session for an hour): Session A: Hands on session - coding and computer science resources Guardian Education and developer team Session B: Facilitated discussion and networking groups - hints, tips and ideas to enhance/improve/ embed computer science in your school Facilitators: Mike Britland, head of ICT,Oakmead College of Technology - LeAF Campus Matt Britland, head of ICT, Kingston Grammar School Genevieve Smith-Nunes, computing teacher, Dorothy Stringer school Peter Kemp, MIS development manager and computing teacher, Christ the King Sixth Form College Alan O'Donohoe, principal teacher of ICT, Our Lady's High School, Preston Clare Sutcliffe, co-founder, Code Club

15.10 Afternoon break 15.40 The role of the teacher - facilitating expert advice The prospect of teaching computer science and coding can be daunting for some teachers. This session will examine the importance of being a lifelong learner and help you identify and engage experts (whether they are inside or outside the classroom) that you can access in cost effective and innovative ways to help inspire your students Genevieve Smith-Nunes, computing teacher, Dorothy Stringer school Peter Kemp, MIS development manager and computing teacher, Christ the King Sixth Form College 16.30 Close