Talend ESB Container Administration Guide

5.0_b

Talend ESB Container: Administration Guide
Publication date 13 February 2012 Copyright © 2011-2012 Talend Inc.

Copyleft
This documentation is provided under the terms of the Creative Commons Public License (CCPL). For more information about what you can and cannot do with this documentation in accordance with the CCPL, please read: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ This document may include documentation produced at The Apache Software Foundation which is licensed under The Apache License 2.0.

Notices
Talend and Talend ESB are trademarks of Talend, Inc. Apache CXF, CXF, Apache Karaf, Karaf, Apache Camel, Camel, Apache Maven, Maven, Apache Archiva, Archiva are trademarks of The Apache Foundation. Eclipse Equinox is a trademark of the Eclipse Foundation. SoapUI is a trademark of SmartBear Software. All other brands, product names, company names, trademarks and service marks are the properties of their respective owners.

Table of Contents
1. Introduction .............................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Structure of this manual ................................................................................... 1 2. Directory Structure .................................................................................................... 3 3. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Runtime ......................................................................... 5 3.1. Starting Talend ESB Runtime ........................................................................... 5 3.2. Stopping Talend ESB Runtime .......................................................................... 6 4. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Infrastructure Components ................................................. 8 4.1. Starting the Service Locator .............................................................................. 8 4.2. Stopping the Service Locator ............................................................................ 8 4.3. Starting Service Activity Monitoring .................................................................. 9 4.4. Stopping Service Activity Monitoring ................................................................. 9 4.5. Starting the Security Token Service (STS) ........................................................... 9 4.6. Stopping the Security Token Service (STS) ......................................................... 9 4.7. Starting all three Talend ESB infrastructure services .............................................. 9 4.8. Stopping all three Talend ESB infrastructure services ........................................... 10 5. Using Console ........................................................................................................ 11 5.1. Viewing commands from the Karaf console ....................................................... 11 5.2. Karaf Console command summary ................................................................... 12 6. Deploying Multiple Karaf Containers .......................................................................... 18 6.1. Deploying multiple containers using configuration adaption scripts ......................... 18 7. Remote Console ...................................................................................................... 20 7.1. Configuring remote instances .......................................................................... 20 7.2. Connecting and disconnecting remotely ............................................................. 21 7.3. Stopping a remote instance ............................................................................. 22 8. Commands supplied by Apache CXF and Camel ........................................................... 23 8.1. Commands supplied by CXF ........................................................................... 24 8.2. Commands supplied by Camel ......................................................................... 24 9. Security ................................................................................................................. 25 9.1. Managing users and passwords ........................................................................ 25 9.2. Managing roles ............................................................................................. 25 9.3. Enabling password encryption ......................................................................... 26 9.4. Available realms ........................................................................................... 26 9.5. Deploying security providers ........................................................................... 29 10. Logging System ..................................................................................................... 31 10.1. Configuration .............................................................................................. 31 10.2. Console Log Commands ............................................................................... 32 10.3. Advanced Configuration ............................................................................... 32 11. Deployer .............................................................................................................. 35 11.1. Features deployer ........................................................................................ 36 11.2. Spring deployer ........................................................................................... 36 11.3. Wrap deployer ............................................................................................ 36 11.4. War deployer .............................................................................................. 38 12. Servlet Context ...................................................................................................... 39 12.1. Configuration .............................................................................................. 39 12.2. Configuring the context ................................................................................ 40 13. Provisioning .......................................................................................................... 41 13.1. Example: Deploying a sample feature .............................................................. 41 13.2. Repositories ................................................................................................ 42 13.3. Commands ................................................................................................. 46 13.4. Service configuration ................................................................................... 47 14. Web Applications .................................................................................................. 48 14.1. Installing WAR support ................................................................................ 48 14.2. Deploying a WAR to the installed web feature .................................................. 50 15. Monitoring and Administration using JMX ................................................................. 51 16. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service ..................................................... 52 16.1. Introduction ................................................................................................ 52

Talend ESB Container Administration Guide

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........... Supported platforms ....... 17....................... Memory Allocation Parameters ............................................................................................ On Linux ..........................3............................2......... 17.............................1................... 17.............4.............................................................. 52 53 54 57 57 58 58 Talend ESB Container Administration Guide iv ............ 16............................................. Installation on Linux .2.......................... Installation ........................................ On Windows ............... Troubleshooting Talend ESB .........3.................................. 16...................................................................................16........................ 17..................

... 12 12 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 17 19 24 24 51 Talend ESB Container Administration Guide v ............................ 8.. 5.......... config Scope commands ................. 5...................................................................................6............................................. admin Scope commands ...................................................................5............. 15............................... 5... 5.............................................................9..........1.. log Scope commands ................................................ 5.....4........................................................................2.............10................ CXF commands ............. 5......................................1....................... Camel commands .................................... 5...8....................................................................... jaas Scope commands .................. Shell Scope commands ...................................... Miscellaneous Scope commands .. Karaf Management MBeans .................... 6..........7............................................................1... 5...............................................1......2.....................................................................List of Tables 5.................................................................................. 5.............. dev Scope commands .............................. OBR Scope commands .......................................... 8. OSGi Scope commands .............................. features Scope commands ............. Ports configured by the configuration scripts .........................3........................................

Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Runtime describes the various options that are available to start and stop Talend ESB. except when explicitly stressed otherwise. Structure of this manual The following chapters are in this manual: • Chapter 2. It is NOT a tutorial on getting started with Karaf .Chapter 1. Note As the Talend ESB container is based on Apache Karaf. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Infrastructure Components describes how to start and stop the infrastructure components of Talend ESB. • Chapter 6. the two terms are used interchangeably within this document. Directory Structure describes the directory layout of a Talend ESB installation. This container administration manual is intended to provide information on Karaf tooling commands and general administration. • Chapter 4. Deploying Multiple Karaf Containers describes how to adapt the configuration to deploy multiple containers at the same machine. Using Console gives a list of the console commands available.please see Talend ESB Getting Started Guide for this. • Chapter 5.1. Introduction Talend ESB provides an Apache Karaf-based ESB container preconfigured to support Apache Camel routing and Apache CXF-based services (both REST and SOAP-based). • Chapter 3. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 1 . 1.

Troubleshooting Talend ESB describes how to fix problems related to JVM memory allocation parameters running Talend ESB. Monitoring and Administration using JMX lists the MBeans available to monitor and administrate Karaf using any JMX client. Thus when you install a feature and it will install all of its bundles defined under it. • Chapter 10. Security describes how to configure security with Talend ESB. • Chapter 13. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 2 . Provisioning describes how the provisioning system uses xml repositories that define sets of features (bundles). Logging System describes configuring and using the logging system. • Chapter 14. Deployer describes deploying bundles or re-defined groups of bundles (called features). Remote Console describes how to access Talend ESB using a remote console. Web Applications describes deploying WAR-based web applications into Talend ESB Runtime.Chapter 1. • Chapter 8. • Chapter 15. • Chapter 17. • Chapter 9. Commands supplied by Apache CXF and Camel describes commands provided by CXF and Camel. • Chapter 11. Introduction • Chapter 7.

laid out as a Maven 2 repository Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 3 . The standard directory layout of a Talend ESB installation is as follows: • /bin: startup scripts • /etc: configuration files • /keystores: KeyStore files for JobServer SSL connection • /data: working directory • /cache: OSGi framework bundle cache • /generated-bundles: temporary folder used by the deployer • /log: log files • /deploy: hot deploy directory • /instances: directory containing child instances • /lib: contains the bootstrap libraries • /lib/ext: directory for JRE extensions • /lib/endorsed: directory for endorsed libraries • /system: OSGi bundles repository. Directory Structure The Talend ESB software may be downloaded from http://www.php.com/download.Chapter 2.talend.

Chapter 2. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 4 . If you want to restart from a clean state. Directory Structure Note The data folder contains all the working and temporary files for Karaf. you can wipe out this directory. which has the same effect as using the clean option [6].

Chapter 3.1. 3. e. So even if the console is already available. Starting Talend ESB Runtime Wait initally for commands to become available After starting Talend ESB Runtime. 3.g. On Windows From a console window. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 5 . you need to wait a few seconds for initialization to complete before entering the commands. Karaf starts the non core bundles in the background.1. the job commands may not..1. go to: cd [karaf_install_dir] where karaf_install_dir is the directory in which Karaf was installed. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Runtime This chapter describes how to start and stop Talend ESB Runtime and the various options that are available. For the binary distribution. change to the installation directory and run Talend ESB Runtime. ${Talend-ESBVersion}\container .

Starting Talend ESB Runtime without console Karaf can be started without the console if you don't intend to use it (one can always connect using the remote ssh access) using the following command: bin\trun. For the binary distribution. 3. add clean to the above start command. change to the installation directory and run Talend ESB Runtime.2. for example: /usr/local/${TalendESB-Version}/container . 3. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 6 . Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Runtime Then type: bin\trun.Chapter 3. with an optional -f (force) flag to avoid a yes/no confirmation. On Linux From a console window. Stopping Talend ESB Runtime Within the Karaf console.3. 3.4.1. as that will terminate Karaf (unless Karaf was started using the nohup command).1. do: cd [karaf_install_dir] where karaf_install_dir is the directory in which Karaf was installed.1. Starting Talend ESB Runtime in the background Karaf can be easily started as a background process using the following command: bin\start.2. Then type: bin/trun Warning Do NOT close the console or shell in which Karaf was started.bat (Windows) bin\start (Linux). Karaf can be reset to a clean state by simply deleting the [karaf_install_dir]/data folder.bat 3. you can perform a clean shutdown of Karaf by using the osgi:shutdown command. Alternatively.bat server (Windows) bin\trun server (Linux).

from a command shell. exiting the shell using logout or Ctrl+D will also terminate the Karaf instance. The time argument can have different formats. it's also possible to delay the shutdown using the time argument.Chapter 3. you can run bin\stop. Examples: The following command will shutdown Karaf at 10:35am: osgi:shutdown 10:35 The following command will shutdown Karaf in 10 minutes: osgi:shutdown +10 Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 7 . in which hh is the hour (1 or 2 digits) and mm is the minute of the hour (in two digits). The argument now is an alias for +0. in which m is the number of minutes to wait. Second. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Runtime If you're running from the main console. it can be an absolute time in the format hh:mm. it can be in the format +m. First.bat (Windows) or bin/stop (Linux). Further. For more advanced functionality.

4.Chapter 4. 4.2. Starting the Service Locator After starting the Talend Runtime container.1. enter the following command at the console prompt: tesb:start-locator Standalone version of the Service Locator Alternatively there is a standalone version of the Service Locator described in the Talend ESB Getting Started Guide. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Infrastructure Components This chapter describes how to start and stop the infrastructure components of Talend ESB. Stopping the Service Locator Within the Talend Runtime container you can shutdown the Service Locator by typing: tesb:stop-locator Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 8 .

enter the following command at the console prompt: tesb:start-sts 4. you can shutdown the Security Token Service (STS) by typing: tesb:stop-sts 4. Stop all infrastructure services using tesb:stop-all and restart them after adapting the configuration.6. a port conflict may arise while starting an infrastructure component.3.4. Starting all three Talend ESB infrastructure services After starting Talend Runtime container.5. enter the following command at the console prompt: tesb:start-all Port Conflicts If there is another Talend Runtime container running at the same machine and you forgot to adapt the configuration of the used ports. Starting Service Activity Monitoring After starting the Talend Runtime container.7. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 9 . Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Infrastructure Components 4. Stopping Service Activity Monitoring At the console. enter the following command at the console prompt: tesb:start-sam 4. There are configuration scripts simplifying this task.Chapter 4. Stopping the Security Token Service (STS) At the console. In this case tesb:start-all will not try to start the remaining infrastructure components. you can shutdown Service Activity Monitoring by typing: tesb:stop-sam 4. Starting the Security Token Service (STS) After starting Talend Runtime container.

8. Starting/Stopping Talend ESB Infrastructure Components 4.Chapter 4. Stopping all three Talend ESB infrastructure services At the console you can shutdown all three Talend ESB infrastructure services by typing: tesb:stop-all Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 10 .

type the command followed by --help or use the help command followed by the name of the command: karaf@trun> features:list --help DESCRIPTION features:list Lists all existing features available from the defined repositories. SYNTAX features:list [options] OPTIONS --help Display this help message -i. Viewing commands from the Karaf console To see a list of the available commands in the console press the tab at the prompt.1. Using Console 5. Depending on the commands. --installed Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 11 . completion may be available on options and arguments too. type the first letters and hit tab. To view help on a particular command.Chapter 5. The tab key toggles completion anywhere on the line. so if you want to see the commands in the osgi group.

change-rmi-server. Stops an existing container instance. Changes the RMI registry port (used by management layer) of an existing container instance. Creates a new container instance.2.2.1. Admin Scope The commands within the admin: scope involve administration tasks. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 12 . Changes the secure shell port of an existing container instance. 5. Destroys an existing container instance. including starting and stopping Karaf instances and connecting to them remotely.2.2.Chapter 5.) Updates take effect immediately without need of restarting Karaf.[options] name port port change-ssh-port connect create destroy list rename start stop [options] name port [options] name [command] [options] name [options] name [options] [options] name new-name [options] name [options] name 5. View the command-line or online help as discussed in the previous section for information about the various arguments and options available with each command. config Scope commands Command cancel Parameters [options] Description Cancels the changes to the configuration being edited. 5. Renames an existing container instance.1. Table 5. Table 5. Connects to an existing container instance. grouped by scope (family of commands). Karaf Console command summary The following tables summarize the out-of-the-box commands available with Karaf. admin Scope commands Command change-opts change-rmiregistry-port Parameters [options] name javaOpts [options] name port Description Changes the java options of an existing container instance. Changes the RMI server port (used by management layer) of an existing container instance. Starts an existing container instance. Using Console Display a list of all installed features only Help for each command is also available online at the Apache Karaf website.2. Lists all existing container instances. Config Scope The commands within the config: scope are used to modify configuration data of Karaf instances (data stored in the /etc folder of the Karaf instance. Note there is also a ConfigMBean that can be used to do this configuration within JMX.

dev Scope commands Command create-dump dynamic-import framework print-stack-traces restart show-tree watch Parameters [options] [name] [options] id [options] [framework] [options] [print] [options] [options] id [options] [urls] Description Creates zip archive with diagnostic info. Watches and updates bundles. Features Scope The commands within the features: scope are used to provide support for Karaf features. Creates or edits a configuration. in the currently edited the propdel proplist propset update [options] property [options] [options] property value [options] Saves and propagates changes configuration being edited. Using Console Command delete edit list propappend Parameters [options] pid [options] pid [options] [query] [options] [query] Description Delete a configuration.3. Prints the full stack trace in the console when the execution of a command throws an exception. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 13 . Dev Scope The commands within the dev: scope are used to providing logging and other system output help to the administrator. Shows information about selected information. Deletes a property from the edited configuration.3. Table 5. Shows the tree of bundles based on the wiring information. Lists existing configurations. which are predefined collections of bundles used to implement specific services. Restart Karaf. OSGi Framework options. 5. Table 5.2.Chapter 5.4. features Scope commands Command addUrl info Parameters [options] urls [options] name [version] Description Adds a list of repository URLs to the features service. from 5.2. Sets a property configuration. Appends the given value to an existing property or creates the property with the specified name and value.4. Lists properties from the currently edited configuration. Enables/disables dynamic-import for a given bundle.

Reloads the list of available features from the repositories. Lists the modification on the active realm/module. 5. Update JAAS realm. Delete a role from a user. Lists all existing features available from the defined repositories. Displays a list of all defined repositories. Add a user. Displays a list of all defined repository URLs. JAAS Scope The commands within the jaas: scope are used for management of JAAS users and realms. Uninstalls a feature with the specified name and version. Table 5. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 14 . Lists the users of the active realm/module.Chapter 5. Log Scope The commands within the log: scope are used for management of system logs.2. Lists all versions of a feature available from the currently available repositories. Using Console Command install list listRepositories listUrl listVersions refreshUrl removeRepository removeUrl uninstall Parameters [options] feature [options] [options] [options] [options] feature [options] urls [options] repository [options] urls [options] features Description Installs a feature with the specified name and version.5.6. Removes the given list of repository URLs from the features service. Lists the modifications on the active realm/ module. Removes the specified repository features service. jaas Scope commands Command cancel realms manage pending roleadd roledel update useradd userdel users Parameters [options] [options] [options] realm [options] [options] username role [options] username role [options] [options] username password [options] username [options] Description Cancel the modification of a JAAS realm. Table 5. log Scope commands Command clear Parameters [options] Description Clear log entries.5. Add a role to a user. 5. Manage user and roles of a Jaas Realm.6.2. Delete a user.

Installs one or more bundles.8. Using Console Command display display-exception get set tail Parameters [options] [options] [options] [logger] [options] level [logger] [options] Description Displays log entries. Downloads the sources for an OBR bundle.Chapter 5. OBR Scope commands Command addUrl deploy find info list listUrl refreshUrl removeUrl resolve source start Parameters [options] urls [options] bundles [options] requirements [options] bundles [options] [packages] [options] [options] [urls] [options] [urls] [options] requirements [options] folder bundles [options] bundles Description Adds a list of repository URLs to the OBR service. starting and stopping. Displays detailed information of a given bundle. Shows the resolution output for a given set of requirements. 5. [options] id [startLevel] Gets or sets the start level of a given bundle.7. Shows the currently set log level. Reloads the repositories to obtain a fresh list of bundles.) as well as some container-level actions. Table 5. etc.8. Continuously display log entries.7. OSGi Scope The commands within the osgi: scope handle bundle maintenance (installation. Lists OBR bundles. Displays the repository URLs currently associated with the OBR service.2. Table 5. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 15 .2. Displays the last occurred exception from the log. 5. Sets the log level. OBR Scope The commands within the obr: scope are used to link to OSGi bundle repositories (OBRs) and install bundles defined within them. OSGi Scope commands Command bundle-level headers info install Parameters [options] [ids] [options] [ids] [options] [urls] Description Displays OSGi headers of a given bundle. Find OBR bundles for a given filter. optionally providing the given packages. Removes a list of repository URLs from the OBR service. Deploys a list of bundles using OBR service. Prints information about OBR bundles. Deploys and starts a list of bundles using OBR.

Gets or sets the system start level. Disconnects shell from current session.9.9. If/Then/Else block. [options] [options] condition ifTrue [ifFalse] [options] [options] className [arguments] [options] [options] [options] class [args] [options] format [args] [options] duration [options] [files] [options] script [args] [options] Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 16 . Shell Scope The commands within the shell: scope are used to provide terminal window commands in the OSGi shell. [options] values function Execute a closure on a list of arguments. Executes a Java standard application. 5. [options] [arguments] [options] command [options] pattern [options] [paths or urls] Displays the first lines of a file. Lists OSGi services. Resolve bundle(s). Stops and restarts bundle(s). Echoes or prints arguments to STDOUT. Executes system processes.2.Chapter 5. Stop bundle(s). Formats and prints arguments. File pager. Refresh a bundle. Creates a new java object. Starts bundle(s). Prints system information. Uninstall bundle(s). Table 5. Writes sorted concatenation of all files to standard output. Optionally writes the content to a file. Clears the console buffer. Shuts the framework down. Prints command history. Shell Scope commands Command cat clear each echo exec grep head history if info java logout more new printf sleep sort source tac Parameters [options] paths or urls [options] Description Displays the content of a file or URL. Using Console Command list ls refresh resolve restart shutdown start start-level stop uninstall update Parameters [options] [options] [ids] [options] [ids] [options] [ids] [options] [ids] [options] [time] [options] ids [options] [level] [options] ids [options] ids [options] id [location] Description Lists all installed bundles. Update bundle. Run a script Captures the STDIN and returns it as a string. Sleeps for a bit then wakes up. Prints lines matching the given pattern.

They're listed in the below table. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 17 . Miscellaneous Scope commands Command packages:exports packages:imports ssh:ssh ssh:sshd web:list wrapper:install Parameters [options] [ids] [options] [ids] [options] hostname [command] [options] [options] [options] Description Displays exported packages. 5.10. Connects to a remote SSH server. Install the container as a system service in the OS.Chapter 5. Table 5. Using Console Command tail Parameters [path or url] Description Displays the last lines of a file.10. Displays imported packages. Miscellaneous Scopes There are a few scopes that offer just one or two commands each.2. Creates a SSH server Lists details for war bundles.

and then run the Karaf configuration adaption script at the Karaf prompt to update and save the new settings.Chapter 6. there are Karaf configuration adaption scripts which automate the adjustment of potentially conflicting parameters. 6. Deploying Multiple Karaf Containers This chapter describes how to adapt the configuration to deploy multiple containers at the same machine.sh for the first container copy source scripts/configureC2. Deploying multiple containers using configuration adaption scripts In order to avoid conflicts between multiple container instances. In particular. Changes performed by the Karaf configuration adaption scripts are persistent and reflected in the configuration files in container/etc. after starting the container from the container directory. in the Karaf console.sh for the third container copy source scripts/configureC0. All necessary parameters adjustments are done using a single script call.sh resets the parameters to the default values Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 18 . Start the second container with default settings. use: source scripts/configureC1. They are based on the edit and propset commands described above.1.sh for the second container copy source scripts/configureC3. (Ensure the container with the default settings isn't running).

Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 19 . so change the ports in the Karaf configuration adaption scripts and rerun these to apply the changes. Deploying Multiple Karaf Containers The ports which are configured using the scripts are described in the table below: Table 6. If you are still getting the error.sh 8042 9003 1101 44446 8103 8020 8021 8908 configureC3. Troubleshooting If you get the "Port already in use exception" when starting alternate-container. but for the Jobserver parameters in Talend Enterprise ESB this is not yet possible. Ports configured by the configuration scripts Parameter HTTP Port HTTPS Port RMI Registry Port RMI Server Port SSH Port Command Port File Transfer Port Monitoring Port configureC0. Most of the parameter changes will be adapted "on the fly".sh 8041 9002 1100 44445 8102 8010 8011 8898 configureC2. it is recommended to shut down and restart the container after applying a configuration adaption script.Chapter 6. recheck that there is not already a container running using the default parameters. it may also be that the port is actually in use by an unrelated process.sh 8040 9001 1099 44444 8101 8000 8001 8888 configureC1.1.sh 8043 9004 1102 44447 8104 8030 8031 8918 Restart Container To make shure the new parameters are used.

util.karaf. it enables a remote console that can be accessed over SSH from any other Karaf console or plain SSH client.shell. Remote Console 7. // Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 20 . but you'll need to restart the ssh console in order for it to use the new parameters.key You can change this configuration using the config commands or by editing the above file.HashMap . Configuring remote instances It does not always make sense to manage an instance a Talend ESB instance using the local console.cfg configuration file with the following defaults values: sshPort=8101 sshHost=0.1. # define helper functions bundle-by-sn = { bm = new java.Chapter 7. $bm get $1 } bundle-id-by-sn = { b = (bundle-by-sn $1) . Talend ESB can be remotely managed using a remote console.apache. // each (bundles) { $bm put ($it symbolicName) $it } .0 sshRealm=karaf hostKey=${karaf.base}/etc/host. The SSH hostname and port number is configured in the [karaf_install_dir]/etc/ org. When you start Karaf.0. The remote console provides all the features of the local console and gives a remote user complete control over the container and services running inside of it.0.

ssh) 7.2. Security for more information. See Chapter 9.apache. karaf@trun> ssh:ssh -l tadmin -P tadmin -p 8101 hostname Warning The default password is tadmin but we recommend changing it. Karaf Karaf home Karaf base OSGi Framework JVM Java Virtual Machine . More usually. Remote Console if { $b } { $b bundleId } { -1 } } # edit config config:edit org.1-b02 7. run the following command from the karaf-install-dir directory: bin/client.shell config:propset sshPort 8102 config:update # force a restart osgi:restart --force (bundle-id-by-sn org.2.0 org. as shown.karaf. to quickly connect to a Karaf instance running in server mode on the same machine.eclipse.0 /local/apache-karaf-2. Using the Karaf client The Karaf client allows you to securely connect to a remote Karaf instance without having to launch a Karaf instance locally.Chapter 7.1.karaf. And. type: > bin/client --help Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 21 . username and password to connect to a remote instance.5. port.1. For example. Information about the currently connected instance is returned.osgi .apache. if you were using the client within a larger script. Connecting and disconnecting remotely 7.R35x_v20090827 Java HotSpot(TM) Server VM version 14.shell.2.. /local/apache-karaf-2. Using the ssh:ssh command You can connect to a remote Karaf's console using the ssh:ssh command.0..3. you could append console commands as follows: bin/client -a 8101 -h hostname -u tadmin -p tadmin features:install wrapper To display the available options for the client. you would provide a hostname. To confirm that you have connected to the correct Karaf instance. type shell:info at the karaf> prompt.2.0.

2.1.Chapter 7.3.3. Using the remote console If you have connected to a remote console using ssh:ssh or the Karaf client. you can stop the remote instance using osgi:shutdown. Using the Karaf client To stop a remote instance using the Karaf client. Using a plain SSH client You can also connect using a plain SSH client from your *nix system or Windows SSH client like Putty. Note Pressing Ctrl+D in a remote console simply closes the remote connection and returns you to the local shell without shutting off the remote instance. run the following from the karaf-install-dir/lib directory: bin/client -u tadmin -p tadmin -a 8101 hostname osgi:shutdown Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 22 . Remote Console Apache Karaf client -a [port] specify the port to connect to -h [host] specify the host to connect to -u [user] specify the user name -p [password] specify the password --help shows this help message -v raise verbosity -r [attempts] retry connection establishment (up to attempts times) -d [delay] intra-retry delay (defaults to 2 seconds) [commands] commands to run If no commands are specified. 7. press Ctrl+D. shell:logout or simply logout at the Karaf prompt.3.2.3.2. ~$ ssh -p 8101 tadmin@localhost tadmin@localhost's password: 7.4. Stopping a remote instance 7. Disconnecting from a remote console To disconnect from a remote console. 7. the client will be put in an interactive mode 7.

To view help on a particular command. type the command followed by --help or use the help command followed by the name of the command: karaf@trun> cxf:list-endpoints --help DESCRIPTION cxf:list-endpoints Lists all CXF Endpoints on a Bus. but you need to install Camel / CXF features in native Karaf to use these commands. Note CXF and Camel are already preconfigured in the Talend OSGi container. SYNTAX cxf:list-endpoints [options] [bus] ARGUMENTS bus OPTIONS --help Display this help message The CXF bus name where to look for the Endpoints Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 23 . Commands supplied by Apache CXF and Camel These are commands that are related to Apache CXF and Camel functionality.Chapter 8.

Table 8.x.1.1. Table 8. Tip Use TAB key for completion on the name parameters below.org/. which is the current version used by Talend ESB.apache. Camel commands Command camel:list-contexts camel:list-routes camel:info-context Parameters [options] [options] [options] name Description Lists the Camel contexts available in the current Karaf instance Displays the list of Camel routes available in the current Karaf instance Displays detail information about a given Camel context Starts the given Camel context Stops the given Camel context Provides detail information about a Camel route Renders the route in XML Starts the given route Stops the given route camel:start-context [options] name camel:stop-context [options] name camel:info-route camel:show-route camel:start-route camel:stop-route [options] name [options] name [options] name [options] name Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 24 .8.2. endpoint is the Endpoint name to stop. [options] bus endpoint 8.html. bus is CXF bus name where to look for the Endpoint. endpoint is the Endpoint name to start.apache. Commands supplied by Camel These commands related to Camel functionality. Help for these commands is available at http:// camel.2. see http:// cxf.org/karaf. bus is CXF bus name where to look for the Endpoint. For more information on CXF. starts a CXF Endpoint on a Bus. These are for version Camel 2. Commands supplied by Apache CXF and Camel 8. CXF commands Command cxf:list-busses cxf:list-endpoints cxf:stop-endpoint busid endpointName cxf:start-endpoint busid endpointName Parameters [options] [options] [bus] [options] bus endpoint Description Lists all CXF Busses bus is the optional CXF bus name where to look for the Endpoints stops a CXF Endpoint on a Bus. Commands supplied by CXF These commands related to CXF functionality.Chapter 8.

each line defining a user. Managing users and passwords The default security configuration uses a property file located at karaf-install-dir/etc/ users.Chapter 9. The default role name is configured in the etc/system. Security 9.2.1. The default user name is tadmin and the associated password is tadmin too.properties Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 25 .role]. Managing roles JAAS roles can be used by various components. 9. We strongly encourage you to change the default password by editing the above file before moving Karaf into production.properties to store authorized users and their passwords.properties file contains one or more lines..role][. its password and the associated roles: user=password[. The three management layers (SSH. The users are currenly used in three different places in Karaf: • access to the SSH console • access to the JMX management layer • access to the Web console Those three ways all delegate to the same JAAS based security authentication.. The users. JMX and WebConsole) all use a global role based authorization system.

Chapter 9.jaas config:propset encryption. Security using the karaf. Encrypted passwords are prepended with {CRYPT} so that are easy to recognize. passwords and roles from.karaf. each line defining a user. the passwords can be stored encrypted in the configuration file.jaas.. Available realms Karaf comes with several login modules that can be used to integrate into your environment.properties configuration file the first time the user logs in..PropertiesLoginModule" flags="required"> users = $[karaf.apache. It uses a properties text file to load the users. All users authenticating for the management layer must have this role defined. <jaas:config name="karaf"> <jaas:module className= "org.apache.enabled true config:update # force a restart dev:restart The passwords will be encrypted automatically in the etc/users. 9.apache. This file uses the properties file format. Note that roles can be changed for a given layer using ConfigAdmin in the following configurations: Layer SSH JMX Web PID org.jaas.admin. The syntax for this value is the following: [classname:]principal where classname is the class name of the principal object (defaults to org.apache.1.properties. This can be easily enabled using the following commands: # edit config config:edit org.properties </jaas:module> Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 26 .base]/etc/users.modules.4. its password and the associated roles: user=password[.4.apache. PropertiesLoginModule This login module is the one configured by default. Enabling password encryption In order to not keep the passwords in plain text.karaf.shell org.karaf.management org. 9.karaf.karaf.role][.3.apache. The format of the properties are as follows.role system property and the default value is admin.role].webconsole Value sshRole jmxRole role 9.modules.karaf.RolePrincipal) and principal is the name of the principal of that class (defaults to admin).

jaas.JDBCLoginModule" flags="required"> datasource = osgi:javax.1.role Description The datasource as on OSGi ldap filter or as JDNI name The SQL query that retries the password of the user The SQL query that retries the roles of the user 9.2. Passing a data source as an OSGi ldap filter To use an OSGi ldap filter. Passing a data source as a JNDI name To use an JNDI name.role = SELECT ROLE FROM ROLES WHERE USERNAME=? </jaas:module> </jaas:config> 9. with the use of the following parameters.name=jdbc/karafdb) query.DataSource/ \\ (osgi.3.sql. the prefix jndi: needs to be provided.password = SELECT PASSWORD FROM USERS WHERE USERNAME=? query.jdbc. The example below assumes the use of Aries JNDI to expose services via JNDI.karaf.service. Security </jaas:config> 9. Name datasource query. See the example below: <jaas:config name="karaf"> <jaas:module className="org.apache. OsgiConfigLoginModule The OsgiConfigLoginModule uses the OSGi ConfigurationAdmin service to provide the users. JDBCLoginModule The JDBCLoginModule uses a database to load the users.3.4.karaf.3.password query.2. The data source and the queries for password and role retrieval are configurable. <jaas:config name="karaf"> <jaas:module className="org.Chapter 9. provided a data source (normal or XA).apache.modules.4.4. this configuration uses a pid value for the process ID of the configuration containing user definitions. passwords and roles from. passwords and roles. the prefix osgi: needs to be provided.jdbc.4.DataSource/ \\ Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 27 . 9.JDBCLoginModule" flags="required"> datasource = jndi:aries:services/javax.sql.jaas.modules.jndi. Instead of users for the PropertiesLoginModule.

algorithm ssl. LDAPLoginModule The LDAPLoginModule uses a LDAP to load the users and roles.password user. Admin password to connect to the LDAP.filter user.username connection. Only used if the connection.g.jndi.search.4. (uid=%u) where %u will be replaced by the username. e. e. e.factory ssl ssl. if it's not provided. Define the initial context factory used to connect to the LDAP server.url is ldaps. (member:=uid=%u) The LDAP role attribute containing the role string used by Karaf.context.g.karaf.search. Security (osgi. Define the authentication backend used on the LDAP server. e.filter role. e. ldap://hostname Admin username to connect to the LDAP. The default is simple.truststore Description The LDAP connection URL.ldap.Chapter 9. the LDAP connection will be anonymous.dc=apache.keystore ssl.dc=org The LDAP filter used to looking for user's role.dc=org The LDAP filter used to looking for user. The trust store must be deployed using a jaas:keystore configuration. an SSL connection will be used The provider name to use for SSL The protocol name to use for SSL (SSL for example) The algorithm to use for the KeyManagerFactory and TrustManagerFactory (PKIX for example) The key store name to use for SSL. The LDAP base DN used to looking for user. the role lookup will be recursive (SUBTREE).LDAPLoginModule" Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 28 . ou=role. The LDAPLoginModule supports the following parameters: Name connection. e.url connection.subtree authentication initial.LdapCtxFactory If "true" or if the protocol on the connection. cn If "true".modules.subtree role.g.username is specified. The key alias to use for SSL The trust store name to use for SSL.service.jaas.base.dc=apache. The LDAP base DN used to looking for roles.name=jdbc/karafdb) query.provider ssl.role = SELECT ROLE FROM ROLES WHERE USERNAME=? </jaas:module> </jaas:config> 9. If "true". the user lookup will be performed only at the first level (ONELEVEL).g.g.base. bind the users on the LDAP to check passwords.protocol ssl. The key store must be deployed using a jaas:keystore configuration. ou=user. A example of LDAPLoginModule usage follows: <jaas:config name="karaf"> <jaas:module className="org.sun. The default is com. the role lookup will be performed only at the first level (ONELEVEL).g.attribute role.apache.jndi. This parameter is optional. If "false".dn role.dn user. the user lookup will be recursive (SUBTREE).name.ldap.4. If "false".keyalias ssl.password = SELECT PASSWORD FROM USERS WHERE USERNAME=? query.

Security flags="required"> connection.ldap.apache.dn = ou=groups.security) in order to register them.ou=system user. namely.dn = ou=group.attribute = cn role.ou=system role.name.subtree = true authentication = simple </jaas:module> </jaas:config> If you want to use an SSL connection. the following configuration can be used as an example: <ext:property-placeholder /> <jaas:config name="karaf" rank="1"> <jaas:module className="org.jaas.search.base.dn = ou=user. it has a global effect and requires that all servers are configured accordingly.dc=org user.base.protocol=SSL ssl.truststore=ks ssl.dc=org role.LDAPLoginModule" flags="required"> connection.properties configuration file to add the following property: Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 29 .filter = (cn=%u) user. However Talend ESB offers a simple way to configure additional security providers: • put your provider jar in [karaf-install-dir]/lib/ext • modify the [karaf-install-dir]/etc/config.dc=apache.search.search.name.url = ldaps://localhost:10636 user.subtree = true authentication = simple ssl.ks" keystorePassword="secret" /> 9.filter = (member:=uid=%u) role.Chapter 9. One way to deploy such providers is to put them in the JRE folder at $JAVA_HOME/jre/ lib/ext and modify each provider's security policy configuration ($JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/ java.base.search.5.attribute = cn role. such as BouncyCastle. Deploying security providers Some applications require specific security providers to be available.karaf.subtree = true role.base.filter = (uniqueMember=uid=%u) role.dc=apache.algorithm=PKIX </jaas:module> </jaas:config> <jaas:keystore name="ks" path="file:///${karaf.home}/etc/trusted.dn = ou=users. The JVM imposes some restrictions about the use of such provider JAR files. that they need to be signed and be available on the boot classpath. While this approach works fine.url = ldap://localhost:389 user.subtree = true role.filter = (uid=%u) user.modules.

apache.osgi.jce.providers = \\ org.BouncyCastleProvider In addition. For example: org.bouncycastle.providers = xxx. you may want to provide access to the classes from those providers from the system bundle so that all bundles can access those.org.security.bootdelegation property in the same configuration file: org.yyy The value of this property is a comma separated list of the provider class names to register.bootdelegation = .karaf..framework.osgi. Security org..framework.bouncycastle* Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 30 .karaf.security. It can be done by modifying the org.provider.Chapter 9..apache.

In addition to being a standard OSGi Log service.Chapter 10. Logging System Karaf provides a powerful logging system based on OPS4j Pax Logging. Configuration file The configuration of the logging system uses a standard Log4j configuration file at the following location: [karaf_install_dir]/etc/org. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 31 . 10.ops4j.cfg You can edit this file at runtime and any change will be reloaded and be effective immediately.1.1.pax. Configuration 10. view and change the log levels.logging.1. it supports the following APIs: • Apache Commons Logging • SLF4J • Apache Log4j • Java Util Logging Karaf also comes with a set of console commands that can be used to display.

1. do something . You will want to set its logging level to DEBUG in the org.. but offers a number of additional features. The log commands have a separate configuration file: [karaf_install_dir]/etc/org.rootLogger property • the out appender is the one enabled by default.2.karaf. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 32 .threshold=WARN . You can easily change the parameters to control the number of files using maxBackupIndex and their size maxFileSize. Changing the log levels The default logging configuration sets the logging levels so that the log file will provide enough information to monitor the behavior of the runtime and provide clues about what caused a problem.logging. Console Log Commands The log scope comes with several commands -. the default configuration will not provide enough information to debug most problems. • the sift appender can be used instead to provide a per-bundle log file. Configuring the appenders The default logging configuration defines three appenders: • the stdout console appender is disabled by default. If you plan to run Karaf in server mode only (i.appender.see Section 5.ops4j. The example below shows how to set the root logger to DEBUG but limiting the information displayed on the console to >WARN.. you should edit the configuration file mentioned above using the config commands or directly using a text editor of your choice. However. osgi:VmLogAppender . with the locale console disabled). log4j.3.cfg file.2.e. stdout. The most useful logger to change when trying to debug an issue with Karaf is the root logger..6.rootLogger=DEBUG. log4j.. For example.2. 10. out..1. To configure those in a persistent way. < log:display Note that the log levels set using the log:set commands are not persistent and will be lost upon restart. When debugging a problem in Karaf you may want to change the level of logging information that is displayed on the console..apache. The default configuration uses the bundle symbolic name as the file name to log to 10. out.stdout.rootLogger=DEBUG. osgi:VmLogAppender log4j. It logs events to a number of rotating log files of a fixed size.log.pax. “Log Scope” for a full list. Logging System 10.Chapter 10.3.. Advanced Configuration The logging backend uses Log4j. if you want to debug something.cfg 10.. you might want to run the following commands: <log:set DEBUG . you can turn on this appender on by adding it to the list of configured appenders using the log4j.

Error handlers Error handlers can be added using the following syntax: log4j. Filters Appender filters can be added using the following syntax: log4j.3.LevelRangeFilter log4j.id: the id of the bundle from which the class is loaded • bundle.appender.[appender-name].4.version: the version of the bundle 10.errorhandler.[filter-name]=[filter-class] log4j.appender.[appender-name].filter.[appender-name].f1.appender.errorhandler.appender.LevelMin=DEBUG 10.3.jms=org. 10.appender.[filter-name].filter.appender. OSGi specific MDC attributes Pax-Logging provides the following attributes by default: • bundle. MDC sifting appender An MDC sifting appender is available to split the log events based on MDC attributes.logger-ref=[logger-ref] log4j.3.appenders= // [comma-separated-list-of-appender-names] Below is a real example: log4j.name: the symbolic-name of the bundle • bundle.filter.2.3.varia.[option]=[value] Below is a real example: log4j.apache.net.3.log4j.appender.appender-ref=[appender-ref] 10. Logging System 10.JMSAppender .LevelMax=FATAL log4j.1.async=org.appender.filter.3.log4j.errorhandler=[error-handler-class] log4j.appenders=jms log4j.appender. Nested appenders Nested appenders can be added using the following syntax: log4j.[appender-name].root-ref=[true|false] log4j..[appender-name].out. Below is a configuration example for this appender: Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 33 .apache.[appender-name].5.f1=org.log4j.out.Chapter 10..errorhandler.appender.async.apache.out.[appender-name].filter.appender.appender.appender.AsyncAppender log4j.f1.

console:2.pax.felix.appender.data}/log/$\\{bundle.default=karaf log4j.java:169)[21:org.sift.shell.run(Thread.runtime.felix.IllegalArgumentException: Command not found: *:foo at org.apache.shell.6.3.apache.MDCSiftingAppender log4j.0] at org.felix.Closure..sift.felix.shell.ops4j.apache.name log4j.logging.apache.console:2.appender.sift=org.karaf.execute (CommandSessionImpl.shell.1.lang.sift.log log4j.shell.apache.16t | %-32.karaf.layout.logging.lang. } Then you need to package the appender in a jar with a Manifest like this: Manifest: Bundle-SymbolicName: org.1. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 34 .log4j.1.0] at org.myappender Fragment-Host: org.Closure.jline.0] at java. Logging System log4j.console:2.appender=org. This way.apache.ConversionPattern= \\ %d{ABSOLUTE} | %-5.gogo.1.log4j.felix.appender. The information is appended at the end of each line in the following format id:name:version as shown below: java.execute (Closure.layout=org..Thread.gogo.runtime.appender.shell.CommandSessionImpl.appender.Pipe. For each line of the stack trace.java:637)[:1. the underlying logging system will be able to see and use your appenders.1.apache.java:162)[21:org.apache.name\\}.execute (Closure.32C %4L | %m%n log4j.PatternLayout log4j. Using your own appenders If you plan to use your own appenders.apache.java:101)[21:org. Enhanced OSGi stack trace renderer This renderer is configured by default in Karaf and will give additional informations when printing stack traces.appender.java:79)[21:org.apache.0] at org.appender. This information can greatly help diagnosing problems in some cases.32c{1} | %-32.sift.runtime.runtime.pax-logging-service ..apache.shell.ops4j.0] at org.karaf.appender.0] at org.run (Console.console.apache.executeStatement (Closure.sift.log4j.append=true 10.appender.console:2.apache.gogo. Now you can use the appender in your log4j config file like shown in the config examples above.gogo.console:2.gogo.appender.Chapter 10.run (Pipe.Closure.java:71)[21:org.pax.sift.3.shell.karaf.6.0_20] 10.karaf.sift.runtime. you need to create an OSGi bundle and attach it as a fragment to the bundle with a symbolic name of org.file=${karaf.karaf.apache.5p | %-16.shell.sift.shell.1.console:2.karaf.shell.Console.apache.. it will display OSGi specific informations related to the class on that line: the bundle id.appender.shell. the bundle symbolic name and the bundle version. So for example you write a log4j appender: class MyAppender extends AppenderSkeleton { .FileAppender log4j.key=bundle.mydomain.appender.7.pax-logging-service.java:225)[21:org.

The following diagram describes the architecture of the deployer. Deployer The Karaf deployer is used for deploying bundles or groups of bundles (called features) into the Karaf container. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 35 .Chapter 11.

Provisioning.0. If you need to customize the generated manifest.xml will lead to name = my-config and version = 1.nmr/apache-servicemix-nmr/ 1..apache.servicemix. A bundle will be created and its installation (automatic) will trigger the installation of all features contained in the descriptor. The deployer will transform on the fly any spring configuration file dropped into the deploy folder into a valid OSGi bundle. If you want to install a single feature. Wrap deployer The wrap deployer allows you to hot deploy non-OSGi jar files ("classical" jar files) from the deploy folder.2.create-asynchronously:=true Import-Package: [required packages] DynamicImport-Package: * The name and version of the file are extracted using a heuristic that will match common patterns.> <manifest> Require-Bundle= my-bundle </manifest> 11. Spring deployer Karaf includes a deployer that is able to deploy plain blueprint or spring-dm configuration files. Deployer 11. The jar files is considered as non-OSGi if the MANIFEST doesn't contain the Bundle-SymbolicName and Bundle-Version attributes. you can do so by writing a feature descriptor like the following: <features> <repository>mvn:org.3.0.1. It's a standard deployer (you don't need to install additional Karaf features): karaf@trun> la|grep -i wrap [ 1] [Active ] [ ] [ 5] OPS4J Pax Url .0/xml/features</repository> <feature name="nmr-only"> <feature>nmr</feature> </feature> </features> For more informations about features. Features deployer To be able to hot deploy features from the deploy folder.0.2.1.1.. you can do so by including an xml element in your Spring configuration: <spring:beans . The non-OSGi jar file is transformed into an OSGi bundle.publish-context:=false. The deployer tries to populate Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 36 . see the Chapter 13.wrap: (1. \\ 11. Removing the file from the deploy folder will uninstall the features. The generated OSGi manifest will contain the following headers: Manifest-Version: 2 Bundle-SymbolicName: [name of the file] Bundle-Version: [version of the file] Spring-Context: *. or if there is no MANIFEST at all. For example my-config-1.5) [32] [Active ] [Created ] [ 30] Apache Karaf :: Deployer :: Wrap Non OSGi Jar Karaf wrap deployer looks for jar files in the deploy folder.Chapter 11. The default imported packages are extracted from the Spring file definition and includes all classes referenced directly. you can simply drop a Feature descriptor on that folder.

3 Specification-Vendor = Apache Software Foundation Implementation-Version = 2.lang.3.) Implementation-Title = Commons Lang Manifest-Version = 1.lang X-Compile-Source-JDK = 1.commons. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 37 .apache.apache.lang.commons.apache.commons.apache.builder.uses:="org. org.commons.apache.apache.0_21 (Sun Microsystems Inc.math.commons.org.resolution:=optional.math.commons. org.99-SNAPSHOT/deploy/commons-lang-2.org.0.apache. you will see: karaf@trun> la|grep -i commons-lang [ 41] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] commons-lang (2.commons.apache.commons.lang.apache.commons.") Ant-Version = Apache Ant 1.exception. if you simply copy commons-lang-2.1_09-85 ("Apple Computer.mutable.resolution:=optional.jar (which is not an OSGi bundle) into the deploy folder.lang.lang.apache.uses:=org.resolution:=optional.exception".text.apache.commons.uses:="org.commons.apache.0 Bnd-LastModified = 1297248243231 X-Compile-Target-JDK = 1. org.apache.mutable.uses:=org.exception.uses:=org.lang.3.apache.time.commons.lang. org. org.uses:=org.commons. org.math.commons.builder.lang".apache.3 Generated-By-Ops4j-Pax-From = wrap:file:/home/onofreje/workspace/karaf/ assembly/target/apache-karaf-2.3 Implementation-Vendor-Id = org. org.commons.commons.apache. org.lang.apache.apache.resolution:=optional.lang.1 Originally-Created-By = 1.commons. org.lang.lang.commons.enums.lang.apache.apache.commons. Inc. For example.6.apache.resolution:=optional. uses:="org.3 Extension-Name = commons-lang Implementation-Vendor = Apache Software Foundation Bundle-Name = commons-lang Bundle-SymbolicName = commons-lang Bundle-Version = 2.jar$ Bundle-SymbolicName=commons-lang&Bundle-Version=2.lang.3 Bundle-ManifestVersion = 2 Import-Package = org.lang.commons.3) If you take a look on the commons-lang headers. org. you can see that the bundle exports all packages with optional resolution and that Bundle-SymbolicName and Bundle-Version have been populated: karaf@trun> osgi:headers 41 commons-lang (41) ----------------Specification-Title = Commons Lang Tool = Bnd-0.commons.commons.lang. org.Chapter 11.apache Created-By = 1.builder.commons.lang.resolution:=optional.lang.resolution:=optional Export-Package = org.99.6. org.357 Specification-Version = 2.enum.apache.lang.lang.resolution:=optional.apache.enum.commons. org.lang.5 Package = org.apache. Deployer the Bundle-SymbolicName and Bundle-Version extracted from the jar file path.apache.lang. org.lang.commons.lang.3.lang.commons.math.resolution:=optional.commons.apache.lang.apache. org.enums.

commons.lang.math". org.lang. Deployer org.lang.time.uses:=org.apache. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 38 . Web Applications for information on web application (war) deployment.commons.apache.lang. org.uses:=org.apache.lang 11.commons.apache.Chapter 11.commons.commons.text. War deployer See Chapter 14.4.apache.

osgi.apache.web. The configuration of the servlet context for the OSGi HTTP Service is specified in a file at the following location: [karaf_install_dir]/etc/org. for building services.ops4j. using a servlet transport. CXFServlet.cxf. Karaf and CXF provide servlet context custom configuration.cfg The configuration of the port for the OSGi HTTP Service is specified in: [karaf_install_dir]/etc/ org. Servlet Context A servlet context defines a set of methods which allows a servlet to communicate with its servlet container.pax.Chapter 12. For example. Please read the Servlet Transport on the Apache CXF website for additional information about this servlet context. First we look at the configuration files. The following section explains servlet context configuration in more detail.cfg You can edit these files at runtime and any change will be reloaded and be effective immediately. 12. you can deploy into a servlet container.1. Configuration Note The paths [karaf_install_dir]/ and [Talend-ESB-Version]/container are equivalent. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 39 .

cfg file specified prefix for the services is: org.1.osgi.context=/services The org.Chapter 12.2.web.port=8040 12. For example.service.pax.apache. the org.GreeterImpl" address="/Greeter1"/> <jaxrs:server id="greeterRest" serviceClass="org.cfg file specified port for the services is: org.servlet.apache.ops4j.http. Servlet Context 12.GreeterImpl" address="/GreeterRest"/> The cumulative result of these changes is that the endpoint address for the servlet will be: http:// {server}:8040/services/Greeter1 and http://{server}:8040/services/GreeterRest Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 40 .2.hello_soap_http. given an implementation class called GreeterImpl with endpoints greeter and greeterRest.apache.apache.hello_soap_http. Configuring the context When editing the files.osgi.cxf. Relative endpoint address The CXFServlet uses a relative address for the endpoint rather than a full http address. the relative endpoint addresses would be configured as: <jaxws:endpoint id="greeter" implementor="org.cxf.

0/xml/features features:install camel-example-osgi The example installed uses Camel to start a timer every 2 seconds and output a message on the console. These features:addUrl and features:install commands download the Camel features descriptor and install this example.Chapter 13. The output is as follows: >>>> SpringDSL set body: >>>> SpringDSL set body: >>>> SpringDSL set body: Fri Jan 07 11:59:51 CET 2011 Fri Jan 07 11:59:53 CET 2011 Fri Jan 07 11:59:55 CET 2011 Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 41 . we'll run a sample Apache Camel feature already present in the Talend ESB distribution. The provisioning system uses xml "repositories" that define a set of features. Example: Deploying a sample feature In the rest of this chapter.1.camel/camel-example-osgi/2. But as a quick demonstration. Such a mechanism is mainly provided by a set of commands available in the features shell. Provisioning Karaf provides a simple.5. yet flexible. 13.apache. run the following commands: features:addUrl mvn:org. we describe in detail the process involved in provisioning. In the console. way to provision applications or "features".

0/xml/features</repository> <repository>mvn:org.0. It will allow Karaf to validate your repository before parsing.org/xmlns/features/v1.Chapter 13.RELEASE</bundle> <bundle>mvn:org.RELEASE</bundle> <bundle>mvn:org.camel.1.apache.RELEASE"> <bundle>mvn:org. Be careful when you define them as there is a risk of 'cycling' dependencies.4. each one representing an application that can be installed.4.2/xml/features </repository> . Provisioning 13.0.karaf/apache-karaf/2..RELEASE </bundle> </feature> </features> A repository includes a list of feature elements.RELEASE</bundle> <bundle>mvn:org. We recommend using this XML schema.1.0_1</bundle> <bundle>mvn:org.apache.4.springframework/spring-core/3.apache. 13.springframework/spring-aop/3.0.karaf/apache-camel/2. run the following command: features:uninstall camel-example-osgi 13. Here is an example of such a repository: <features xmlns="http://karaf.RELEASE</bundle> <bundle>mvn:org.springframework/spring-context/3.servicemix.nmr/apache-servicemix-nmr/ \\ 1. For example.0/xml/features </repository> <repository>mvn:org.0"> <repository>mvn:org.servicemix. Note: By default. Bundles The main information provided by a feature is the set of OSGi bundles that defines the application.. first we look at feature repositories.0.0.0"> <feature name="spring" version="3.2. all the features defined in a repository are not installed at the launch of Apache Karaf (see Section 13.springframework/spring-beans/3.aopalliance/1.2.4.1. References to features define in other repositories are allow and can be achieved by adding a list of repository. even from IDE level.1.4.bundles/ \\ org.springframework/spring-context-support/3.apache.org/xmlns/features/v1.apache. You may also verify your descriptor before adding it to Karaf by simply validation.0. The feature is identified by its name which must be unique amongst all the repositories used and consists of a set of bundles that need to be installed along with some optional dependencies on other features and some optional configurations for the Configuration Admin OSGi service. one would write the following definition: Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 42 .3.5.servicemix.bundles.apache.apache.0. Such bundles are URLs pointing to the actual bundle jars. “Service configuration” for more information). <features xmlns="http://karaf. Stopping and uninstalling the sample application To stop this demo.4.0. Repositories So. The complete xml schema for feature descriptor are available on Features XML Schema page.4.

Chapter 13. Provisioning

<bundle>http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/apache/servicemix/nmr/ org.apache.servicemix.nmr.api/1.0.0-m2/ \\ org.apache.servicemix.nmr.api-1.0.0-m2.jar</bundle>

\\

Doing this will make sure the above bundle is installed while installing the feature. However, Karaf provides several URL handlers, in addition to the usual ones (file, http, etc...). One of these is the maven URL handler, which allow reusing maven repositories to point to the bundles.

13.2.1.1. Maven URL Handler
The equivalent of the above bundle would be: <bundle> mvn:org.apache.servicemix.nmr/org.apache.servicemix.nmr.api/1.0.0-m2 </bundle> In addition to being less verbose, the maven url handlers can also resolve snapshots and can use a local copy of the jar if one is available in your maven local repository. The org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn bundle resolves mvn URLs. This flexible tool can be configured through the configuration service. For example, to find the current repositories type: karaf@trun:/> config:list and the following will display:

Pid: org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn BundleLocation: mvn:org.ops4j.pax.url/pax-url-mvn/0.3.3 Properties: service.pid = org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.defaultRepositories = file:/opt/development/ \\ karaf/assembly/target/apache-felix-karaf-1.2.0-SNAPSHOT/ \\ system@snapshots org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.repositories = http://repo1.maven.org/maven2, http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/servicemix/m2-repo below = list of repositories and even before the local repository The repositories checked are controlled by these configuration properties. For example, org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.repositories is a comma separated list of repository URLs specifying those remote repositories to be checked. So, to replace the defaults with a new repository at http://www.example.org/repo on the local machine:

karaf@trun:/> config:edit org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn karaf@trun:/> config:proplist service.pid = org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.defaultRepositories = file:/opt/development/karaf/ assembly/target/apache-felix-karaf-1.2.0-SNAPSHOT/system@snapshots org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.repositories = http://repo1.maven.org/maven2, http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/servicemix/m2-repo below = list of repositories and even before the local repository karaf@trun:/> config:propset org.ops4j.pax.url.mvn.repositories http://www.example.org/repo karaf@trun:/> config:update By default, snapshots are disabled. To enable an URL for snapshots append @snapshots. For example: http:// www.example.org/repo@snapshots. Repositories on the local are supported through file:/ URLs.

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13.2.1.2. Bundle start-level
By default, the bundles deployed through the feature mechanism will have a start-level equals to the value defined in the configuration file config.properties with the variable karaf.startlevel.bundle=60. This value can be changed using the xml attribute start-level. <feature name='my-project' version='1.0.0'> <feature version='2.4.0'>camel-spring</feature> <bundle start-level='80'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-dao</bundle> <bundle start-level='85'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-service</bundle> <bundle start-level='85'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-camel-routing</bundle> </feature>

\\ \\ \\

The advantage to define the start-level of a bundle is that you can deploy all your bundles including those of the project with the 'infrastructure' bundles required (e.g : camel, activemq) at the same time and you will have the guaranty when you use Spring Dynamic Module (to register service through OSGI service layer), Blueprint that by example Spring context will not be created without all the required services installed.

13.2.1.3. Bundle stop/start
The OSGI specification allows to install a bundle without starting it. To use this functionality, simply add the following attribute in your <bundle> definition <feature name='my-project' version='1.0.0'> <feature version='2.4.0'>camel-spring</feature> <bundle start-level='80' start='false'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-dao</bundle> <bundle start-level='85' start='false'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-service</bundle> <bundle start-level='85' start='false'>mvn:com.mycompany.myproject/ myproject-camel-routing</bundle> </feature>

\\ \\ \\

13.2.1.4. Bundle dependency
A bundle can be flagged as being a dependency. Such information can be used by resolvers to compute the final list of bundles to be installed.

13.2.2. Dependent Features
Dependent features are useful when a given feature depends on another feature to be installed. Such a dependency can be expressed easily in the feature definition: <feature name="jbi"> <feature>nmr</feature> ...

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</feature> The effect of such a dependency is to automatically install the required nmr feature when the jbi feature will be installed. A version range can be specified on the feature dependency: <feature name="spring-dm"> <feature version="[2.5.6,4)">spring</feature> ... </feature> In such a case, if no matching feature is already installed, the feature with the highest version available in the range will be installed. If a single version is specified, this version will be chosen. If nothing is specified, the highest available will be installed.

13.2.3. Configurations
The configuration section allows to deploy configuration for the OSGi Configuration Admin service along a set of bundles. Here is an example of such a configuration: <config name="com.foo.bar"> myProperty = myValue </config> The name attribute of the configuration element will be used as the ManagedService PID for the configuration set in the Configuration Admin service. When using a ManagedServiceFactory, the name attribute is servicePid_aliasId_, where servicePid is the PID of the ManagedServiceFactory and aliasId is a label used to uniquely identify a particular service (an alias to the factory generated service PID). Deploying such a configuration has the same effect than dropping a file named com.foo.bar.cfg into the etc folder. The content of the configuration element is set of properties parsed using the standard java property mechanism. Such configuration as usually used with Spring-DM or Blueprint support for the Configuration Admin service, as in the following example, but using plain OSGi APIs will of course work the same way: <bean ...> <property name="propertyName" value="${myProperty}" /> </bean> <osgix:cm-properties id="cmProps" persistent-id="com.foo.bar"> <prop key="myProperty">myValue</prop> </osgix:cm-properties> <ctx:property-placeholder properties-ref="cmProps" /> There may also be cases where you want to make the properties from multiple configuration files available to your bundle context. This is something you may want to do if you have a multi-bundle application where there are application properties used by multiple bundles, and each bundle has its own specific properties. In that case, <ctx:property-placeholder> won't work as it was designed to make only one configuration file available to a bundle context. To make more than one configuration file available to your bundle-context you would do something like this: <beans:bean id="myBundleConfigurer" class= "org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfig"> <beans:property name="ignoreUnresolvablePlaceholders" value="true"/> <beans:property name="propertiesArray"> <osgix:cm-properties id="myAppProps" persistent-id="myApp.props"/> <osgix:cm-properties id="myBundleProps" persistent-id="my.bundle.props"/> </beans:property>

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It even might be help full to deploy a configuration file instead of a configuration for the config admin service since.xml). In that case.1. it can be handy to reload it in the Kernel without having to restart it or to remove then add again this URL. 13.xml">mvn:org. Commands 13. They use URLs pointing to features descriptors. Instead of using ctx:contextplaceholder we are using the "PropertyPlaceholderConfig" class. we are using SpringDM with osgi as the primary namespace. see the Spring-DM documentation. • features:addUrl: Add a list of repository URLs to the features service • features:removeUrl: Remove a list of repository URLs from the features service • features:listUrl: Display the repository URLs currently associated with the features service. For more informations about using the Configuration Admin service in Spring-DM.karaf/apache-karaf/ ${project.3. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 46 . the features will still be available. file and mvn. To achieve this the attribute finalname shows the final destination of the configfile.version}/xml/jettyconfig</configfile> \\ 13. a configuration file for jetty (jetty.4.Chapter 13. These URLs can use any protocol known to Apache Karaf.2. The default resolver will simply return the list of bundles provided in the feature description. while the value references the Maven artifact to deploy.3. Feature resolver The resolver attribute on a feature can be set to force the use of a given resolver instead of the default resolution process. the most common ones being http. the resolver will use the OBR service to determine the list of bundles to install (bundles flagged as dependency will only be used as possible candidates to solve various constraints). 13. Repository management The following commands can be used to manage the list of descriptors known by Karaf.apache. This element "returns" a properties bean. A resolver will be use to obtain the list of bundles to actually install for a given feature. <configfile finalname="/etc/jetty. • features:refreshUrl: Reload the repositories to obtain a fresh list of features Karaf maintains a persistent list of these repositories so that if you add one URL and restart Karaf. Configuration files In certain cases it is needed not only to provide configurations for the configuration admin service but to add additional configuration files e. Then we are passing in a beans array and inside of that array is where we set our osgix:cm-properties elements. The obr resolver can be installed and used instead of the standard one.5. Provisioning </beans:bean> In this example. The refreshUrl command is mostly used when developing features descriptors: when changing the descriptor.g.2.

jar</bundle> </feature> </features> Note the path again is relative to Apache Karaf installation directory.features. This configuration file contains two properties: • featuresBoot: a comma separated list of features to install at startup • featuresRepositories: a comma separated list of feature repositories to load at startup This configuration file is of interest if you plan to distribute a Apache Karaf distribution which includes preinstalled features.2.0"> <feature name="spring-web" version="2.2. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 47 .org/xmlns/features/v1.0.5.3.apache. features:uninstall. Examples To install features using mvn handler: features:addUrl mvn:org.SEC01"> <bundle>file:base/bundles/spring-web-2. you can use the following syntax to deploy bundles when they are located in a directory which is not available using Maven: <features xmlns="http://karaf.3.6.4.0.6.servicemix. and features:list. Provisioning 13. 13.SEC01.Chapter 13. Features management Common features: scope commands used in features management include features:install.cfg can be modified to customize the behavior when starting the Kernel for the first time.nmr/apache-servicemix-nmr/ 1. See Section 5.xml To deploy bundles from file system without using Maven: As we can use file:// as protocol handler to deploy bundles. “Features Scope” for more information on these commands.karaf. 13.3.4.apache.apache.0-m2/xml/features features:install nmr \\ To use a file handler to deploy a features file (note the path is relative to the Apache Karaf installation directory): features:addUrl file:base/features/features.5. Service configuration A simple configuration file located in [FELIX:karaf]/etc/org.

.0 karaf-2. 14.0] war [uninstalled] [2.2.2.0 karaf-2.0] webconsole [installed ] [2. 1. Installing WAR support The following steps will install the "war" feature (support for deploying WAR files with Servlet and JSPs into a Jetty server) into your Karaf instance. [uninstalled] [2. .2.karaf@trun> features:install war Note: you can use the -v or --verbose to see exactly what Karaf does Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 48 .2.2.0 karaf-2.1.2.0] ssh .2.0 karaf-2. .0] config [uninstalled] [2. List the available features karaf@trun> features:list State Name . 2.0 Install the war feature (and the sub-features it requires) . . Web Applications Karaf provides an ability to deploying WAR-based web applications within the Jetty server contained in the Karaf instance.2. karaf-2.2.2.2.2.0] obr [uninstalled] [2.Chapter 14.0] http [uninstalled] [2.0 karaf-2.

.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.1.8.0) Jsp Support (1. [ 32] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 33] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] jetty (6.asm [10] Installing bundle mvn:org.2 Found installed bundle: org.web/pax-web-deployer/0.2.0) Url .v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.99-SNAPSHOT Installing feature jetty 7.0) Extender .0 .8.web/pax-web-api/0.eclipse.6.jetty/jetty-server/7. .v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.1.Chapter 14.servicemix.2.0.apache.1.0] war karaf-2.6.pax.2.22.pax.8.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.99-SNAPSHOT Installing feature http 2.2.FileInstall Deployer (1.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org. .0.1.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.0.ops4j.0) Runtime (1.jetty/jetty-security/7.8.99-SNAPSHOT/xml/jettyconfig Installing bundle mvn:org. Verify the features were installed servicemix> features/list State Name .8.0) Web .6.1.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.6.specs/ geronimo-servlet_2.apache.6.2.0 [installed ] [2.eclipse.ops4j.4) Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 49 .8.0.1.jetty/jetty-http/7.ops4j.0.0.5_spec (1.jetty/jetty-util/7.jetty/jetty-servlet/7.pax.WAR (1.6.eclipse.eclipse. .6.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.1.war:.geronimo.eclipse.url/pax-url-war/1.4 3.web/pax-web-extender-whiteboard/ 0.2.0] http karaf-2.eclipse.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.1.1.0.web/pax-web-spi/0.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org. war-i: (1.ops4j.5_spec/1.jetty/jetty-io/7.eclipse.web/pax-web-extender-war/ 0. .0) Jetty (1.eclipse.karaf/apache-karaf/ 2.pax.pax.pax.8.web/pax-web-runtime/0.0) Service SPI (1.Whiteboard [ 42] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 41] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] Name geronimo-servlet_2.jetty/jetty-xml/7.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org. [installed ] [2.6.web/pax-web-jsp/0.8.v20100715 Checking configuration file mvn:org.0) OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax Web Web Web Web Web Web Web API (1.pax. Verify the installed bundles were started karaf@trun> osgi:list START LEVEL 100 ID State Level .2) Apache ServiceMix :: Bundles :: OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax OPS4J Pax (1.jetty/jetty-continuation/7.0.apache.pax. .ops4j.ops4j.ops4j.1.ops4j.1.1.6.2) [ 34] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 35] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 36] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 37] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 38] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 39] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] [ 40] [Active ] [ ] [ 60] Extender . 4.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.pax.1.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org. Web Applications karaf@trun> features:install -v war Installing feature war 2.ops4j.bundles.web/pax-web-jetty/0.1.2-SNAPSHOT Installing bundle mvn:org.v20100715 Installing bundle mvn:org.1.

html. Web Applications . Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 50 . The Jetty server should now be listening on http://localhost:8181/. . 1. but with no published applications available. .5-doc/appdev/sample/sample.2.Chapter 14. you could use the following command: karaf@trun> osgi:install -s webbundle:http://tomcat.apache.MF to include the required OSGi headers as described here: http://team. Deploying a WAR to the installed web feature The following steps will describe how to install a simple WAR file (with JSPs or Servlets) to the just installed web feature.war?Bundle-SymbolicName= \\ tomcat-sample&Webapp-Context=/sample Then open your web browser and point to http://localhost:8181/sample/index. 2. update its MANIFEST.org/wiki/display/paxweb/WAR+Extender Copy the updated WAR (archive or extracted files) to the deploy directory. HTTP ERROR: 404 NOT_FOUND RequestURI=/ Powered by jetty:// 14. 5. If you want to deploy a sample web application into Karaf.org/ \\ tomcat-5.ops4j. To deploy a WAR (JSP or Servlet) to Jetty.

apache. Monitoring and Administration using JMX Apache Karaf provides a large set of MBeans that allow you to fully monitor and administrate Karaf using any JMX client (for example. The list of MBeans available: Table 15.karaf:type value) Description admin bundles config dev diagnostic features log packages services system web obr administrates the child instances manipulates the OSGi bundles manipulates the Karaf configuration files (in the /etc folder) and the ConfigAdmin layer provides information and administration of the OSGi framework used to create information files (dumps) about Karaf activity manipulate the Karaf features manipulate the logging layer manipulate the PackageAdmin layer and get information about exported and imported packages to get information about the OSGi services to shutdown the Karaf container itself to get information about the Web bundles (installed with the war feature) to manipulate the OBR layer (installed with the obr feature) Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 51 . JConsole provided in the Oracle or IBM JDK). They provide more or less the same actions that you can do using the Karaf shell commands.1. Karaf Management MBeans MBean (org.Chapter 15.

the scripts shipped with Karaf also make it very easy to install the Talend Runtime container as a daemon process on Unix systems. and the ability to run services which interact with the desktop.2. Introduction The Talend Runtime container is based on Apache Karaf. Supported platforms The following platforms are supported by the Wrapper: • AIX • FreeBSD • HP-UX. The Wrapper correctly handles "user log outs" under Windows. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service 16. Likewise. service dependencies. 16.1. Karaf Wrapper (for service wrapper) makes it possible to install the Talend Runtime container as a Windows Service. 32-bit and 64-bit versions • SGI Irix Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 52 .Chapter 16.

to register Talend Runtime container as a service (depending on the running OS). simply type: trun@root> features:install wrapper Once installed.2. 2. Currently supported on both 32-bit and 64-bit sparc. To install it. wrapper feature will provide wrapper:install new command in the trun: trun@root> wrapper:install --help DESCRIPTION wrapper:install Install the container as a system service in the OS. 2008 and Windows 7. you can install Talend Runtime container as a service. (Default: Karaf) (defaults to karaf) -D. --description The description of the service.4. and Red Hat. Known to work with Debian. AUTO_START or DEMAND_START (Default: AUTO_START) (defaults to AUTO_START) -n. Also known to run on Windows 98 and ME. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service • Linux kernels 2. in automatic start mode. For instance. Installation The Wrapper is an optional feature. and x86 systems. (defaults to ) Using wrapper:install. however due the lack of support for services in the OS. but should work with any distribution.6. simply type: trun@root> wrapper:install -s AUTO_START -n TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER -d Talend-ESB-Container -D "Talend ESB Container Service" Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 53 .3. Currently supported on both 32-bit and 64-bit x86. --name The service name that will be used when installing the service. • Windows . the Wrapper can be run only in console mode. Solaris 9 and 10. SYNTAX wrapper:install [options] OPTIONS -d.x. Vista. Currently supported on both 32-bit and 64bit x86 and Itanium systems. • Macintosh OS X • Sun OS. 16. XP. 2003. Ubuntu.Chapter 16. and PPC systems.Windows 2000. --start-type Mode in which the service is installed.x. 2. Itanium. --display The display name of the service.x. --help Display this help message -s.

jar Setup complete.1\container\bin\ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-wrapper.0.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.Chapter 16.1\container\lib\ karaf-wrapper.0.jar Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.1/container/ bin/KARAF-wrapper Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.0.0.1/container/ Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 54 .0.1\container\lib\ karaf-wrapper-main.0.0.0.0.0.0.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.so Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5. to start the service run: C:> net start "TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER" Once running.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.jar Creating file: C:\work\5.0.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5. To install the service.0.1\container\lib\ wrapper.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5. Installation on Linux The same wrapper:install command may be executed on Linux.1\container\bin\ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service.0.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.0.conf before installing and starting the service.conf Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.0. You may wish to tweak the JVM properties in the wrapper configuration file: C:\work\5.0.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.4.0.1/container/ lib/karaf-wrapper.1\container\bin\ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service. trun@root> wrapper:install -s AUTO_START -n TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER \ -d Talend-ESB-Container -D "Talend ESB Container Service" Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.1\container\etc\ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-wrapper.0.bat install Once installed.1/container/ bin/KARAF-service Creating file: /home/onofreje/5.0.0.0.conf Creating file: C:\work\5.0.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.0.1\container\bin\ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service.1/container/ etc/KARAF-wrapper.0.1\container\etc\TALENDESB-CONTAINER-wrapper. run: C:> C:\work\5. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service Here is an example of wrapper:install command executing on Windows: karaf@trun> wrapper:install -s AUTO_START -n TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER -d Talend-ESB-Container -D "Talend ESB Container Service" Creating file: C:\work\5. to remove the installed the service run: C:> C:\work\5.0.dll Creating file: C:\work\5.1/container/ lib/libwrapper.0.bat remove 16.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.bat Creating file: C:\work\5.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.0.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5.0.1-release\Talend-ESB-V5. to stop the service run: C:> net stop "TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER" Once stopped.exe Creating file: C:\work\5.0.

1/container/bin/TALEND-ESB-CONTAINERservice /etc/init.4. You may want to tweak the JVM properties in the wrapper configuration file: /home/onofreje/apache-karaf-2.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service lib/karaf-wrapper-main.2.0.0.4. On Redhat/Fedora/CentOS Systems To install the service: $ ln -s /home/onofreje/5.0.1-release/Talend-ESB-V5.d/ To start the service when the machine is rebooted: $ update-rc.d/ $ chkconfig TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service --add To start the service when the machine is rebooted: $ chkconfig TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service on To disable starting the service when the machine is rebooted: $ chkconfig TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service off To start the service: $ service TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service start To stop the service: $ service TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service stop To uninstall the service : $ chkconfig TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service --del $ rm /etc/init.d -f TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service remove To start the service: Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 55 .Chapter 16.jar Setup complete.3/etc/KARAF-wrapper.d TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service defaults To disable starting the service when the machine is rebooted: $ update-rc.1/container/bin/ TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service /etc/init.1.0.conf before installing and starting the service. the way the service is installed depends upon your flavor of Linux: 16.1. On Ubuntu/Debian Systems To install the service: $ ln -s /home/onofreje/5.d/TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service 16. Subsequently.

Chapter 16. Installing the Talend Runtime container as a service $ /etc/init.d/TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 56 .d/TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service stop To uninstall the service : $ rm /etc/init.d/TALEND-ESB-CONTAINER-service start To stop the service: $ /etc/init.

Memory Allocation Parameters The Talend ESB start scripts define the JVM memory allocation parameters used for running Talend ESB. JAVA_PERM_MEM. This is a separate heap space that is normally not garbage collected. improve performance and avoid "Out of memory" exceptions. This is a separate heap space that is normally not garbage collected. Corresponds to the JVM parameter Xmx. JAVA_MAX_MEM. Increase if a "PermGen space" exception is thrown. Determines the maximum size of the Java heap memory. Increase if a "PermGen space" exception is thrown. Determines the start size of the Java heap memory. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 57 .Chapter 17. Higher values may reduce garbage collection and improve performance. JAVA_MIN_MEM. Determines the maximum size of permanent generation. Troubleshooting Talend ESB This chapter describes how to fix problems related to JVM memory allocation. Using Talend ESB many classes are loaded. Corresponds to the JVM parameter -XX:MaxPermSize Additionally the following parameters are used as default to enable class unloading from permanent generation which reduces the overall permanent generation space usage: -XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled and -XX: +UseConcMarkSweepGC. Determines the start size of permanent generation. Java classes are loaded in permanent generation. specially when using security features and deploying multiple services to the same container. Corresponds to the JVM parameter -Xms. Higher values may reduce garbage collection. 17.1. Corresponds to the JVM parameter -XX:PermSize JAVA_MAX_PERM_MEM.

On Linux Adapt the memory allocation parameters in the karaf start script at the following location: [karaf_install_dir]/bin/trun. On Windows Adapt the memory allocation parameters in the karaf start script at the following location: [karaf_install_dir]/bin/trun. Talend ESB Container Administration Guide 58 . Determined by the script variable $JAVA_SIXTY_FOUR you can set different values depending whether your JVM is 64-bit. 64-bit-JVMs need significantly more memory. Troubleshooting Talend ESB 17.Chapter 17.2.3. 17. 64-bit-JVMs need significantly more memory.bat. Determined by the script variable %Bit_64% you can set different values depending whether your JVM is 64-bit.

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