ATLAS

Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide, Atlas V Addendum

FOREWORD
This Atlas V Addendum supplements the current version of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (AMPG) and presents the initial vehicle capabilities for the newly available Atlas V launch system. Atlas V’s multiple vehicle configurations and performance levels can provide the optimum match for a range of customer requirements at the lowest cost. The performance data are presented in sufficient detail for preliminary assessment of the Atlas V vehicle family for your missions. This guide, in combination with the AMPG, includes essential technical and programmatic data for preliminary mission planning and spacecraft design. Interface data are in sufficient detail to assess a first-order compatibility. This guide contains current information on Lockheed Martin’s plans for Atlas V launch services. It is subject to change as Atlas V development progresses, and will be revised periodically. Potential users of Atlas V launch service are encouraged to contact the offices listed below to obtain the latest technical and program status information for the Atlas V development. For technical and business development inquiries, contact: COMMERCIAL BUSINESS INQUIRIES Telephone: (691) 645-6400 Fax: (619) 645-6500 Postal Address: International Launch Services, Inc. P.O. Box 124670 San Diego, CA 92112-4670 Street Address: International Launch Services, Inc. 101 West Broadway Suite 2000 San Diego, CA 92101 U.S. GOVERNMENT BUSINESS INQUIRIES Telephone: (303) 977-5250 Fax: (303) 971-2472 Postal Address: Commercial Launch Services, Inc. P.O. Box 179 Denver, CO 80201

Street Address: Commercial Launch Services, Inc. P.O. Box 179 MS DC1400 12999 Deer Creek Canyon Road Littleton, CO 80127-5146 A current version of this document can be found, in electronic form, on the Internet at: http://www.ilslaunch.com

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ATLAS LAUNCH SYSTEM MISSION PLANNER’S GUIDE ATLAS V ADDENDUM (AVMPG) REVISIONS
Revision Date Rev No. Change Description December 1999 8 8 • Section 1—Updates Include – Revised Summary Performance Values • Section 2—Updates Include – Revised Summary Performance Values – Updated Sequence Timelines – Revised Ascent Profiles – Revised Performance Curves and Tables • Section 3—Updates Include – Updated Load Limit Factors – Clarified Static Pressure (PLF Venting) Wording – Added Clarification to Contamination Control Wording • Section 4—Updates Include – Clarified Configuration of Centaur Forward Load Reactor – Clarified Lateral Load Factors in Figure 4.1.2.3-2 in Section 4.1.2.3 • Section 5—No Changes • Section 6—No Changes • Section 7—No Changes • Section 8—Updates Include – Added Section on Solid Rocket Booster Addition to Atlas V 400 Series • Appendixes—No Changes Approval

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1-7 ATLAS V CONCLUSION..........................4...........................1-2 LAUNCH SERVICES ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION ........2 2................................2 2....3....2-8 Atlas V Separation Pointing Accuracies.....5......3..................2........................................................................2-9 Centaur Short-Burn Capability..............................2-1 ATLAS V MISSION PERFORMANCE-LEVEL PHILOSOPHY.....................................................2-9 Atlas V 500 .....................................................................3................5 2.2-10 iv .........................4 2.................................................4......1-2 ADVANTAGES OF SELECTING ATLAS V....3...........................................2-9 Centaur Long-Coast Capability ......................................................................................................................................1-4 Atlas V Vehicle and Ground System Interfaces ...3.............................................................5 1.......3 1...2-9 Heavy-Payload Lift Capability.................................................1.......1 2........1-2 Atlas V Launch System........................................3 2.....2 1.1-1 ATLAS V SUMMARY.......................................1 2.................................1-4 Atlas Launch Operations ..................................................................................5..........1-7 Supplemental Information ..............4 2....................2-1 ATLAS V MISSION DESCRIPTIONS ....................................................2-9 Atlas V 400 .....5..............................2-8 Attitude Orientation/Stabilization...................................................................................................1-4 Atlas Mission Integration and Management ................0 2.......................................................................2..........1-4 Atlas V Launch System Environments.......................................2-9 GEOSYNCHRONOUS LAUNCH MISSION TRAJECTORY AND PERFORMANCE OPTIONS.............3..........................5......................................................2-6 Centaur Phase........................................................3 1.........................2-9 PERFORMANCE GROUND RULES ........3................................8 1..........................2-2 Booster Phase..............................7 1........1-7 2........2 2....................................................5.5 ATLAS V INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................................................2.....................................6 1......................3 2...............4 1.............2......2 2.............................2-1 ATLAS V ASCENT PROFILE...........................................................9 1..................3.....................................2-9 Payload Systems Weight Definition...1 2..............5.........1 2...............0 ATLAS MISSION DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE: ATLAS V........................2 1..............2-8 Separation Velocity..2-7 Injection Accuracy and Separation Control..........................5.......CONTENTS Page 1..................................................................1..........................1 2.............................6 2............................................................4............................................................................2 2........................1-4 Spacecraft and Launch Facilities ...........................................2-7 Atlas V 500 ............................4...3 2.........................4 1...........2 2.................................................2-9 Launch Vehicle Performance Confidence Levels.....................6 2.....4....1-2 Atlas V Mission Design and Performance.............3 2........................................................................0 1.......4...................3.....................................................5 1..........................3 2.....5.................................3........3........4.....1-1 LAUNCH SERVICES ................................................2-2 Atlas V 500 ................................................................................................................................................2-9 Payload Fairings....5...........................................................4............................2-2 Atlas V 400 ...........1-2 ATLAS V LAUNCH SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AND INTERFACES............................2-7 Atlas V 400 .......................................................................3.......1-7 Atlas V Enhancements ...........1 2.........................................................4 2.......................................................................................1 1.......3......1 1.....................

...........1...............9 2...........4 3............3-9 Static Pressure (PLF Venting) ...........2.......3-9 Atlas V Contamination Control...........................2...............2..............3-2 Spacecraft-Generated Environment Limitation ............................2...................2-10 ATLAS IIA PERFORMANCE DATA ....................2..........................7 3.....2........1......6..................................3-5 Vibration ......1 3...................................................................................................................7...............2 3............................................2-10 Right Ascension of Ascending Node (RAAN) Control ........7............................3 3................................................................2-10 ATLAS IIAS PERFORMANCE DATA .................................................................................................3-5 Acoustics............3-3 Contamination Control Before Spacecraft Encapsulation...........3-4 Coupled Loads Analysis....................................1 3.....2......................................................................................2 3........................................................13 3....3-2 Launch Range Electromagnetic Environment ........................................................................................................................2 3.....3-11 Atlas V PLF Separation...............................................3-7 Thermal ...................5 3........3-11 Atlas V Particle Redistribution.........2............3...................................3-7 Shock ..3-1 ATLAS V PRELAUNCH ENVIRONMENTS ........................................................................1...........................................................1 3....................................................................................................................3 3.................................................................2............................................1 2..........3-1 Atlas V Radiation and Electromagnetics .........3-3 Contamination Control After Encapsulation ...........3-11 Radiation and EMC............3-11 Atlas V Molecular Outgassing and NVR Redistribution ...........................6...............................1 3.1........3.................................11 2........................................................2......3............3 MISSION OPTIMIZATION AND ENHANCEMENT.........6 3.............................3 2......4 3..............7 3..3-10 Upper Stage Reaction Control System (RCS) ..........0 3...3......6 2...........3-3 Payload Fairing Helium Environment During Prelaunch Operations ...............................................7.........2-10 ATLAS V 400 PERFORMANCE DATA ......................3-11 SPACECRAFT COMPATIBILITY TEST REQUIREMENTS ..........................2-10 ATLAS IIIA PERFORMANCE DATA ...........................................2 3...........4 3........3 3..................7....2 2.........................2..2-10 Minimum Residual Shutdown (MRS) (Atlas V) .......................................3-2 Launch Vehicle-Generated Electromagnetic Environment............3 3......................2................................................................................2....2...............................................................................................................1 3..1.....2-10 Inflight Retargeting (IFR).................................2 3.............1.........................3 3..............6...4 3...3-10 Atlas V Booster Separation .............2............................1..1 3...............3-11 Separation Event .............................2......2.......1............12 2...1....3-11 v .8 3.............2..........................................................2..................2....10 2....................3-1 Atlas V Thermal........3-2 Contamination Control Before Launch-Site Delivery.........3-11 Upper-Stage Main Engine Blowdown..................................................................................................1.........................7...2 3..............................................................................2-10 ATLAS V 500 PERFORMANCE DATA ....................................................7 2.............2...................3-2 Atlas V Contamination and Cleanliness ..............................2 3...................1 3....................................................3-4 ATLAS V LAUNCH AND FLIGHT ENVIRONMENTS ............3-4 Spacecraft Design Loads ................5 3..........................7.2-10 ATLAS IIIB PERFORMANCE DATA ..............................................................6 3...............2-10 ATLAS V ENVIRONMENTS...........................................................................1.........1...........................................8 2...................................................2-10 MISSION PERFORMANCE DATA ..........3-2 Launch Vehicle-Generated Radio Environment ................3-4 Design Load Factors........................7.1.2.

.......... B-1 APPENDIX C—SPACECRAFT DATA REQUIREMENTS.................4-1 Mechanical Interface—Payload Fairings (PLF) ..........8-4 APPENDIX A—ATLAS HISTORY.............1 4......1..............................1 8.........4.2 4........................... AND PRODUCTION ................................................................................2.........................4-7 Payload Support System Structural ..............4-1 Atlas V PLF Configurations...................................1 8....2 4........6-1 LAUNCH OPERATIONS ............G-1 vi ...................................................5 8..................................8-1 ATLAS EVOLUTIONARY ENHANCEMENTS....................................8-2 117-in....................................................4-6 Atlas V Payload Adapter Interfaces.....................1 4....................................4-10 MISSION INTEGRATION.....1.................0 6...........1 8................................................1................1...........................................3 8.........................4-1 SPACECRAFT-TO-LAUNCH VEHICLE INTERFACES.....4-1 Atlas V Static Payload Envelopes ...1........................1............. VEHICLE DESIGN.................................0 4.........................................3 5........................................................1........................................3 4................5-1 SPACECRAFT AND LAUNCH FACILITIES...............................................................................................................................3 4........................................................8-1 Atlas V 500 Shock Levels .............8-4 Addition of Solid Rocket Boosters to Atlas V Series Launch Vehicle ....................................4-5 Mechanical Interface—Payload Support Systems ............1 ATLAS V SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS.........................1 4.......................C-1 GLOSSARY....................................................-Diameter Payload Truss...........3.......4-6 173-in.......4.........1 4..................2 4......1..................................8-2 ATLAS V 400 SERIES PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT .........8-1 ATLAS V HEAVY-LIFT ENHANCEMENTS......................................................2...........4-7 Electrical Interfaces....7-1 8.........4-10 SPACECRAFT-TO-GROUND EQUIPMENT INTERFACES .-Diameter Payload Truss..........2 4...........1.....8-1 ATLAS V SHOCK ENHANCEMENTS...............................0 7...................................................................................................4-10 RANGE AND SYSTEM SAFETY INTERFACES .......0 SPACECRAFT INTERFACES.................................5...................................................................2 8....................8-1 MISSION-UNIQUE ENHANCEMENTS......................................0 8...................................................................4 8..2.................1...................................A-1 APPENDIX B—MISSION SUCCESS AND QUALITY ASSURANCE ........................................................................................

.......2-18 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (GCSEnglish).............................................................2-13 Atlas V 401 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (English) ......................2-23 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (MRS-Metric)..........................................1.........33-sigma GCS-Metric) .............................1-1 1............................12-7a 2........................................................................2-4 Typical Atlas V 552 LEO Ascent Profile .........4-1 3.....12-4b 2..............................................................13-2a 2...............................2......6-1 4..........................12-2a 2......................................................1-1 The Atlas V launch vehicle family offers flight-proven hardware.....2-1 3..................................2-20 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (MRSEnglish).........4-1 5-m Payload Fairing Acoustic Protection .....................................................................13-4b 2..2-3 Typical Atlas V 551 GTO Ascent Profile.......2-5 Atlas V 401 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (Metric) ...................13-3a 2...13-5b 2..........5.2.................................1-3 The Atlas V 400 launch system is capable of meeting a wide variety of mission requirements..1-5 The Atlas V 500 launch system is capable of meeting a wide range of mission requirements.2-2 3............3-8 Maximum Expected Atlas V 500 Shock Levels at the SIP Due to Launch Vehicle Events ................3-7 Maximum Expected Atlas V 400 Shock Levels at the SIP Due to Launch Vehicle Events .........................................3-6 Estimated Acoustic Levels for Atlas V 5-m Short PLF (180-in............................................4-2 Atlas V 500 Standard Access Door Configuration ...............33-sigma GCS-English)...........13-5a 2.......2-26 Atlas V 552 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2...........................................................12-7b 2..................3-8 Typical Payload Compartment Pressure Decay Rate for the LPF/EPF..3-1 2...........................1......................3-3 2..............3-10 Atlas V 500 5-m Payload Fairing (5-m Short Shown)........................13-3b 2.....................................................................2-21 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (GCS-Metric) ........................4-2 3...........2-22 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (GCS-English)...........2-19 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (MRSMetric) ......................................1.............................2-16 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (GCSMetric) ......5.........2-15 Atlas V 402 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2...........................1-3 The Atlas V Launch Vehicle Family ...........................................12-4a 2..............................1-2 1......................................2..................................................1................13-4a 2...................................13-2b 2.............Figure 1.................................................1-2 4.......................................2-25 Atlas V 552 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2......1.......................................5.2-24 Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (MRS-English) ................2-12 Atlas V 401 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (Metric)....12-2b 2..............................1-1 4..............1-6 Typical Atlas V 401 GTO Ascent Profile....................3-2 2.......1......................................................................................................4-3 vii ... Diameter Payload Volume with Enhanced FAP) ......................................................2-11 Atlas V 401 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (English)......2-14 Atlas V 402 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2......13-7a 2.............33-sigma GCS-English)........2.......................13-7b 3....................................................................................................2-27 Acoustic Levels for Atlas V 400 with LPF and EPF (with Acoustic Blankets) ..........................................................1-3 2.............2....................1-1 1..............................................................................................33-sigma GCS-Metric) .......

.......2-6 Summary of Guidance and Control Capabilities ..1-2 8.................................................1............................................................2..3......2..............1-1 8...........8-3 Atlas V 500 and Atlas V HLV Payload Fairing Configurations with the 117in.............1...2-30 Gas Conditioning Capabilities (A/C and GN2) ...........-Diameter Interface Definition ................................................................................2-6 Typical Atlas V 552 LEO Mission Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds..................4-6 Payload Truss Adapter 173-in..........................................................................3-3 Spacecraft Limit Load Factors for Atlas V 400 and Atlas V 500 ..4-9 Atlas V 500 Allowable cg Location ....3-1 4.............................................................13-2b 3.........................................8-1 117-in................................2-28 Atlas V 501.............2-1 4...2-6 Typical Atlas V 551 GTO Mission Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds .......4-10 Maximum Allowable Spacecraft-Produced Shock at Equipment Module Interface ..4...........2-2 4..1.............2-29 Atlas V 531...................................................................................4-9 Atlas V 400 Allowable cg Location ...............2-1 4...........................2-1 2..........1...4.8-2 117-in................3-2 8.................................................2-10 Atlas V 401 Elliptical Transfer Orbit Performance ....................... Diameter—18 Equally Spaced Hard Points..................................1-1 8..............................6..............................................................................................................1....1-4 4.............................5.......2-17 Atlas V 401 Performance to Reduced Inclination Orbit—PSW vs Orbit Inclination ..................... 511.........................................3-1 Worst-Case RF Environment for CCAS from Controlled Emitters Only ......................1........................1-3 Table 2-1 2..1.............................1-1 8..............................................................1-1 3................3...............2..................-Diameter Payload Truss..........................1......................................... Truss Adapter......1................... 541..........................2......................3-2 2........1...13-2a 2..........................2......................................... 521 Performance to Reduced Inclination Transfer Orbit— PSW vs Orbit Inclination ......2-8 Atlas V 401 and 551 3-sigma Performance Variations with MRS..................2-1 2.........................................3-3 2..2-17 Atlas V 500 Series Elliptical Transfer Orbit Performance...........4-4 Atlas V 500 5-m Payload Envelopes .........1-1 5-m Short Payload Fairing Payload Access Door Available Location Areas................8-4 viii ................3-1 3.12-2 2..3.......3-1 2...................................2-1 Typical Atlas V 401 GTO Mission Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds ......4-8 Atlas V 500 Standard Mechanical Interface for 173-in.............4.......1....... 551 Performance to Reduced Inclination Transfer Orbit— PSW vs Orbit Inclination ...13-1 2.................................................................................................2-1 4.........3-4 Atlas V 400 Versus 500 Series Performance Summary with Solid Rocket Boosters.............................................4-5 Atlas V Standard Interface Plane (SIP) ...8-3 Atlas V 400/500 Performance Capabilities Summary ... Interface..................................2.....12-1 2.......................4...1..

Both Atlas V 400 and 500 configurations incorporate a stretched version of the flight-proven Centaur upper stage (CIII). which can be configured as a single-engine Centaur (SEC) or a dual engine Centaur (DEC).8-m (12. The Atlas V 500 series combines the CCB with a larger and newly available 5-m-class-diameter payload fairing.752) (11.913) (8. the second digit indicates the number of solid rocket motors used (zero for Atlas V 400 and zero to five for Atlas V 500). an Atlas V 531 configuration includes a 5-m PLF.1 ATLAS V SUMMARY The Atlas V launch vehicle system is based on the newly developed 3. In addition. The Atlas V 400 series combines the CCB with either the large payload fairing (LPF) or the extended-length large payload fairing (EPF). An Atlas V 402 configuration includes a standard Atlas 4-m PLF and a DEC.270 6. the Atlas V 500 series can tailor performance by incorporating from zero to five solid rocket boosters (SRB).1-1 The Atlas V Launch Vehicle Family 1-1 .1-1. This Addendum expands and refines the Atlas V launch vehicle family information for the Series 400 and 500 configurations to include technical planning data that allow the user to assess the compatibility of the user’s spacecraft with the various interfaces that comprise the Atlas V system. three SRBs. For example. Figure 1.114) (SLC-3W) to support various mission needs.285 7. Two lengths of the 5-m PLF are available: the 5-m Short. A three-digit naming convention was developed for the Atlas V launch vehicle system to identify it’s multiple configuration possibilities.1. kg (lb) (CCAS) Launch Complex 41 (LC-41) or Vandenberg 4.5-ft) diameter Common Core BoosterTM (CCB) powered by a single RD-180 engine. The Atlas V family of launch vehicles can be Atlas V 400 Atlas V 500 401 501 511 521 531 541 551 launched from either Cape Canaveral Air Station Performance to GTO. The Atlas V 500 payload fairing (PLF) is a derivative of the composite PLF currently used on the Atlas V Ariane 5 vehicle.950 3.7-m (68-ft) long or the 5-m Medium.618) (13. and is indicated as follows: the first digit identifies the diameter class (in meters) of the payload fairing (4 or 5 m). To meet the growing needs of our payload users.0 ATLAS V INTRODUCTION The Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (AMPG).856) (15. which is 23.970 5. and an SEC.980 8.670 Air Force Base (VAFB) Space Launch Complex 3W (10.200 7. Atlas V Addendum is designed to provide current and potential Atlas launch services customers with information about the newly available Atlas V launch vehicle family and related spacecraft services.873) (17. which is 20. Selected performance capabilities for these configurations are shown in Figure 1.4-m (77-ft) long. the third digit represents the number of Centaur engines (one or two). the 5-m payload fairing can be selected in either short or medium lengths to accommodate spacecraft volume growth.593) (19. 1. Revision 7 of the AMPG previously introduced the Atlas V launch vehicle family as system enhancements in Section 8.

1.1 Atlas V Launch System The Atlas V 400 and 500 series configurations consist of a CCB.and high-inclination satellite missions. 2) Payload launch environments (e. 1. covering Atlas V vehicle processing facilities. the Atlas V launch system is comprised of a number of hardware. heavy-lift.1-1 illustrates key components of the Atlas V launch vehicles. a stretched Centaur upper stage (CIII) with either single (SEC) or dual (DEC) engines. geosynchronous orbits (GSO). 7) A flexible mission design capability providing maximum spacecraft onorbit lifetime through optimized use of excess launch vehicle capabilities. and operations processes designed to properly interface the spacecraft with our space transportation vehicle. including all projected government missions in the EELV National Mission Model. planetary missions.2 LAUNCH SERVICES Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 8) The combined resources and experience of the Atlas launch services team to meet the challenging commercial and government launch services needs of the future. manufacturing. 7).and software-based subsystems and engineering.5 ATLAS V LAUNCH SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AND INTERFACES From the user’s perspective.5. Figure 1. 1. and the Atlas V 500 configuration that will incorporate the 5-m Short or 5-m Medium payload fairings. shock. Each section corresponds to a section in the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. The following paragraphs summarize the major interface and process components of the Atlas V system. Agreements are in development to support Atlas V launches.The Atlas V 400 and 500 series are under development for initial launch capability in the year 2002 from the Eastern Range. Lockheed Martin is focusing its resources on the continuing development of the Atlas V 400 and Atlas V 500 series launch vehicles for future missions. acoustic. up to five strap-on solid rocket boosters (Atlas V 500 series).S. and range support at CCAS and at VAFB.g. 4) Launch pads at CCAS and VAFB to accommodate low. 5) An experienced team that has launched more than 480 orbital missions over almost 40 years. 7). The Atlas V 400 and 500 series vehicles will be the cornerstone launch vehicles offered well into the next decade. 1.3 LAUNCH SERVICES ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. With the evolution of commercial and government launch services requirements. services. 1. vibration.5. The Atlas V launch vehicle family includes the Atlas V 400 configuration that will incorporate either the standard Atlas LPF or EPF. 1-2 . and a PLF. thermal) that are the same as or better for the payload than those of other launch vehicles. 7) where more detailed information on the same subject can be found.4 ADVANTAGES OF SELECTING ATLAS V All government and commercial agreements required to conduct Atlas V launch services are maintained for our customer. 3) A streamlined launch processing approach to ensure launch schedules and maintain commitments. low-Earth orbit missions. U.. 6) Mission design flexibility demonstrated in a diverse array of mission types. Our launch vehicles and services provide the following key advantages: 1) Atlas V flight vehicle and ground system hardware and processes that are derived from flightproven Atlas systems. and numerous geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) missions.

5.1-1 The Atlas V launch vehicle family offers flight-proven hardware.Upper Stage Single/Dual-Engine Centaur (CIII) • Stretched 66 inches from Atlas IIAS • Pratt & Whitney RL10 Engines – Liquid Hydrogen/Liquid Oxygen – More than 200 Engines Flown – More than 340 In-Space Starts Atlas LPF 5-m Medium PLF RL10A-4-2 Single or Dual-Engine Centaur (CIII) Atlas EPF Common Equipment Module 5-m Short PLF Avionics • Honeywell Inertial Navigation Unit – Strapdown System – Ring Laser Gyros – Dual String GVSC Processor – 512k Random Access Memory • BF Goodrich Data Acquisition System – 1553 Data Bus Interface – Solid State Electronics – High Data Resolution RD-180 Engine – Pratt & Whitney/NPO Energomash RD-180 Derivative of Flight Proven RD-170 Engine with 70% Commonality Common Core Booster™ Atlas IIIB Atlas V 400 RD-180 Atlas V 500 Figure 1. 1-3 .

5.3 Atlas V Launch System Environments The Atlas V launch system provides spacecraft preflight and flight environments that are enveloped by those available with other launch systems. which is especially beneficial to large spacecraft flying to low-Earth orbits.5.5. which supports the spacecraft on the launch vehicle and provides separation. 20. all compatible with Atlas V 400 and Atlas V 500 configurations (subject to structural capability limitations specified in Section 4) (refer to Figure 1. Two standard Atlas payload fairings. shock. 1.4 Atlas V Vehicle and Ground System Interfaces The Atlas V launch system offers a range of interface options to meet spacecraft mission requirements. 1.0 describes these components and specifies our flight vehicle and ground system interfaces with the spacecraft. The Atlas program currently has eight standard payload adapters. 7) for spacecraft facilities. Launch facilities are TBS. 7]). acoustic. The Atlas V 500 series vehicles also provide the capability to directly insert spacecraft into geosynchronous or geostationary orbits (GSO).4-1. and is manifested on Atlas IIIB vehicles starting in 2000. This capability is enabled by encapsulation of the Centaur within the PLF. A number of flight-proven mission trajectory and targeting options can be offered to maximize the benefits of the Atlas V system to the spacecraft mission.0 discusses the launch vehicle mission and performance capabilities available for Atlas V 400 and 500 series missions. additional performance is available using a dual engine configuration. Figure 1. the LPF and the EPF. and the payload fairing.5.. A new 5-m (17. All environments specified for the Atlas V launch system (e.5. electromagnetic) are based on engineering analyses of existing and evolved hardware. in the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [Rev.5 Atlas Mission Integration and Management Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. thermal. vibration.5. 1-4 .7-ft)-diameter payload fairing is available for Atlas V 500 missions in two lengths. are available for Atlas V 400 missions. and IIAS vehicles. The environments to which spacecraft are exposed are fully discussed in Section 3.4 m (77 ft).5. Lockheed Martin has extensive experience flying GSO missions with the Titan IV Centaur upper stage. which encloses and protects the spacecraft during ground operations and launch vehicle ascent.g. avoiding the need for the spacecraft to purchase and integrate an apogee kick motor stage. For certain missions. The primary interfaces between the launch vehicle and spacecraft consist of the payload adapter. Verification that the launch service user’s flight environments remained within specified levels can be obtained with use of instrumentation that will measure spacecraft environments. 1. and Figure 1.2 Atlas V Mission Design and Performance The Atlas V system is designed to deliver payloads of various volumes and masses to precisely targeted orbits. Section 4. allowing the installation of the thermal protection required for the longer duration GSO missions. Section 2. and will be validated with test and flight telemetry data from the Atlas V vehicle configurations.6 Spacecraft and Launch Facilities Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.The Atlas V 400 and 500 series vehicles are the latest evolutionary versions in development and will be phased into service beginning in 2002.7 m (68 ft) and 23. A DEC currently flies on Atlas IIA. 7).1-3 summarizes the characteristics of Atlas V 500 series.1-2 summarizes the characteristics of the Atlas V 400 series.0 of this Addendum. The DEC performance increase is primarily from the additional thrust of the second engine.5. 1. 1.

5-N Lateral Hydrazine Thrusters (DEC) 2 Hydraulically Actuated 51-cm Columbium Extendible Nozzles (12) 40. ISP = 337.089-kg LO2 & RP-1 From Upper Stage Structurally Stable Aluminum Isogrid Tanks.3 s Vac 100% Thrust = 4.46-m Length 20. Navigation & Control.13-m Length 374 kg Aluminum Lithium Skin Stringer & Frame Low-Cost Atlas Separation System 4-m EPF (shown) Aluminum Skin Stringer & Frame Clamshell Aluminum Skin Stringer & Frame Clamshell Pyro Bolts & Spring Thrusters CCB CONICAL INTERSTAGE ADAPTER Features Size: Mass: Structure: 3. Computer-Controlled Pressurization System Fluid—Integral with Engine Provides Gimbal Control Flight Control. 1-5 .05-m Dia x 12.81-m Dia x 32.65-m Length 3.58.1 m 2.05-m Dia x 3.914 kg/2.152 kN.087 kg Extended (Std) 4. Electrical Power Insulation: Polyvinyl Chloride Foam (1.2 m 13.05-m Dia (Top) x 1. Composite Heat Shield 8 Retro Rockets Pratt & Whitney/NPO Energomash RD-180 Booster Engine (2 Chambers) SL 100% Thrust = 3. Modified Adhesive Bonding Features Size: Inert Mass: Propellant: Guidance: Subsystems Structure: 3.68-m Length with Extended Nozzle 1.5.8 s Helium (Pressure Tanks).5-N Lateral Hydrazine Thrusters Pneumatics: Helium & Hydrogen Autogenous (Tank Pressurization) Avionics: Guidance.2 m 2.4 kN (DEC) — ISP: 450.5 s (SEC) 1 Electromechanically Actuated 51-cm Columbium Fixed Nozzle 4 27-N Hydrazine Thrusters 8 40. Flight Termination.106 kg 20.827 kN.2 m 12. Tracking. Range Safety Command. Vehicle Sequencing.672-kg LH2 & LO2 Inertial Fixed Foam Insulation Centaur ISA-Short CCB Conical ISA Common Core Booster™ (CCB) LO2 ATS Heat Pressure Stabilized Stainless Steel Tanks Separated by Common Ellipsoidal Bulkhead Propulsion: 1 or 2 Pratt & Whitney Restartable Engine(s) — Model: RL10A-4-2 — Thrust: 99.255 kg CENTAUR INTERSTAGE ADAPTER (CISA SHORT) Features Size: Mass: Subsystems Structure: Separation: 3.83-m Dia (Bottom) 420 kg Composite (Graphite Epoxy) with Aluminum Ring Equipment Module PLF Boattail Stub Adapter Centaur CIIIS Upper Stage CENTAUR UPPER STAGE(CIII) Features Size: Inert Mass: Propellant: Guidance: Subsystems Structure: 3.3 m PAYLOAD FAIRING (PLF) Features Diameter: Length: Mass: Subsystems Fairing: Boattail: Separation: Large (Non Std) 4.743 kg 284. Integrally Machined Aft Transition Structure. Separation: Propulsion: Pneumatics: Hydraulics: Avionics: Aft Transition RD-180 Figure 1. Telemetry.6-cm Thick). Computer-Controlled Vent & Pressurization. ISP = 311.2 kN (SEC) 198. Telemetry.1-2 The Atlas V 400 launch system is capable of meeting a wide variety of mission requirements.

81-m Dia x 32.4 m 59. Composite Heat Shield 8 Retro Rockets Pratt & Whitney/NPO Energomash RD-180 Booster Engine (2 Chambers) SL 100% Thrust = 3.5-N Lateral Hydrazine Thrusters Features Size: Mass: Subsystems Structure: 3.83-m Dia x 0.4 m 20. 1-6 .4 kN (DEC) 450.83-m Dia x 3.46-m Length 284.4 m 4. Redundant Rate Gyros.81-m Length 1.173 kg for 55X Configuration From Upper Stage Structurally Stable Aluminum Isogrid Tanks.3 s Vac 100% Thrust = 4.5.68-m Length with Extended Nozzle 1.914-kg/2.085 kg 5m-Medium (Non-Std) 5. Integrally Machined Aft Transition Structure.8 s Helium (Pressure Tanks).827 kN.672-kg LH2 & LO2 Inertial Pressure Stabilized Stainless Steel Tanks Separated by Common Ellipsoidal Bulkhead One or Two Pratt & Whitney Restartable Engine(s) RL10A-4-2 99.106-kg 20.494 kg (Each Fueled) 1.1-3 The Atlas V 500 launch system is capable of meeting a wide range of mission requirements. Sandwich Construction with Graphite Epoxy Face Sheets & an Aluminum Honeycomb Core Vertical Separation by a Linear Piston & Cylinder Activated by a Pyrotechnic Cord.361 kN (Each) 275 s 3° 5m-Short PLF (Shown) Centaur Forward Load Reactor (CFLR) Equipment Module Bisector.2 kN (SEC) 198. Flight Termination. ISP = 311.7 m 4. Electrical Power (DEC) Aft Transition Skirt (ATS) RD-180 Solid Rocket Boosters ATS Heat Shield Pneumatics: Common with Atlas V 40X Avionics: Insulation: Common with Atlas V 40X Common with Atlas V 40X Pneumatics: Hydraulics: Avionics: Figure 1. Activated by a Pyrotechnic Cord CENTAUR INTERSTAGE ADAPTER (C-ISA LARGE) Features Size: Mass: Subsystems Structure: 3. Computer-Controlled Pressurization System Integral with Engine Provides Gimbal Control Flight Control. ISP = 337.7 m Features Diameter: Length: Mass: Subsystems Fairing: Separation: 5m-Short (Std) 5.8-m dia CCB Cylindrical ISA Features Size: Inert Mass: Propellant: Guidance: Subsystems Structure: Propulsion: — — — Model: Thrust: ISP: (SEC) CCB CYLINDRICAL INTERSTAGE ADAPTER 3.089-kg LO2 & RP-1 21.152 kN.5m-Medium PLF 62.5-m Length 46.266 kg Composite Sandwich (Aluminum Core/Graphite Epoxy Face Sheets) CENTAUR UPPER STAGE (CIII) Centaur CIIIS Upper Stage 5-m PLF Boattail Centaur Conical ISA Common Core TM Booster (CCB) Centaur Aft Stub Adapter Centaur ISA 3.4 m 23.32-m Length 278 kg Aluminum Machined Rolled-Ring Forging Features Size: Propellant: Inert Mass: Guidance: Subsystems Structure: Separation: Propulsion: All Common with Atlas V 40X 3.05-m Dia x 12.649 kg SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS (SRB) Zero-to-Five Size: Mass: Thrust: ISP: Nozzle Cant: Ground-Lit 155-cm Dia x 19.5 s One Electromechanically Actuated 51-cm Columbium Fixed Nozzle Four 27-N Hydrazine Thrusters Eight 40. Horizontal Separation by an Expanding Tube Shearing a Notched Frame. Telemetry.5-N Lateral Hydrazine Thrusters Two Hydraulically Actuated 51-cm Columbium Extendible Nozzles (12) 40.

1.9 Supplemental Information Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Details of Atlas V Launch Operations are TBS.6 ATLAS V CONCLUSION The members of the Atlas V team are eager to assist in the definition and development of potential future Atlas V missions.1. 3) Multiple satellite capabilities (Ref Sect. 1. Enhancements include: 1) 117-in. Potential launch services customers may refer to the foreword of this document for information regarding the appropriate ILS/CLS representative to contact for their mission needs.0 is designed to provide the Atlas V user community insight into Lockheed Martin’s plans for enhancing the Atlas V system to meet the world’s launch services needs of the 21st century.1 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [(Rev. interface for heavyweight satellites >9. 7]).5. 1. 7]). 7) for general Atlas Launch Operation guidelines.5. 8.8 Atlas V Enhancements Section 8. Contact information for additional information requests can be found in the Foreword of this Addendum. 1.2.1 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [(Rev.072 kg (>20 klb). 1-7 .7 Atlas Launch Operations Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 8.5. 2) Updated spacecraft-to-Atlas V 500 allowable shock. 7). 4) Heavy lift capabilities (Ref Sect.

300* (22.540 (7.530* (32.5° Inclination: 185-km Circ (100-nmi Circ).645* (23.0 ATLAS MISSION DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE: ATLAS V To ensure each vehicle meets design expectation.5° & LEO Polar Performance Is with DEC • GTO.618) N/A 10.699)* 12. Atlas V configurations are planned to launch from both Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) in Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California.950 (10.5° inc 4.285 (13.029)* 4 7. In addition.856) 2.000 lb) may require mission-unique accommodations.060* (35. I = 0° Atlas V 400 • LEO Polar: 185-km Circ (100-nmi Circ).576) 17. Table 2-1 illustrates the performance capabilities of the Atlas V 400 and 500 series families.033)* 17.913) N/A 10.955* (41. multiple smaller satellites populating LEO constellations (Ref Sect. and Earth-escape trajectories. These engineering estimates of Atlas family performance capabilities reflect flight-qualified hardware performance characteristics and our knowledge of developed hardware.270 (11. Atlas V launch vehicle performance is projected through engineering analyses using conservative estimates based on our experience with more than 1. available with either a large. I = 27°.208)* 15.786-km Circ (19.029)* 7. versatile launch system capable of delivering payloads to a wide range of lowand high-circular orbits.980 (17.324 nmi).500* (27.788 km (≥90 x 19.788)* 5 8.5° Launch from CCAS.750* (23. As suggested by the data in the table. LEO Polar • Quoted Performance Is with EPF from VAFB Note: *Payload systems weight above 9. 8.114) 3.520* (45.970 (8.752) N/A 9.680 (5. kg (lb) 6.590* (27. Each Atlas V 400 launch vehicle. The Atlas V 500 launch vehicles with greater performance and larger fairings are well suited for launching single large satellites. we can meet performance requirements by tailoring mission and trajectory designs for specific missions.1 ATLAS V MISSION PERFORMANCE-LEVEL PHILOSOPHY Lockheed Martin has significantly increased the performance levels available to the Atlas launch services customer with the introduction of the new Atlas V configurations (Table 2-1). The trajectory design for each mission can be specifically Table 2-1 Atlas V 400/500 Performance Capabilities Summary Atlas V 400 0 Orbit Type GTO GSO LEO Polar LEO 28. Lockheed Martin offers performance capability levels as part of its standard launch services package to meet evolving commercial satellite mission launch requirements. is dedicated to a single launch services customer.908) 12.or extended-length large payload fairing (LPF or EPF).873) 3. Centaur (DEC) ωp = 180° • Quoted Performance Is with 5-m Short PLF • GSO: 35.558)* 3. or a mix of primary and secondary satellites.707)* 5.033) 14.365* (38.804) 16.1 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [Rev. 2-1 .756)* 1 Atlas V 500 Number of Solids 2 3 PSWC.406)* 18. 2. elliptical transfer orbits.000 Atlas and Titan launches.952) 10.2. I = 90° • LEO 28.238)* Note: Atlas V 500 • PSWC: Payload Systems Weight Capability • GTO & GSO Performance Is with Single Engine Centaur (SEC) • GCS: Guidance Commanded Shutdown • LEO 28.283)* 20.2 ATLAS V MISSION DESCRIPTIONS Atlas V is a reliable.670 (19. I = 28. This section further describes Atlas V 400 and 500 series mission and performance options available for both East and West Coast launches. 2.5° & LEO Polar Performance Is with Dual Engine • GTO: ≥167 x 35.5° • GTO Performance Is with SEC • LEO 28.890 (8. GSO & LEO 28.190 (7.593) 3.080* (38.200 (15.250* (38.072 kg (20.468)* 12.795* (28.323-nmi Circ).050 (19. 7]).

This type of profile combines the parking orbit ascent to a geosynchronous transfer burn with a long coast followed by the third burn. A vehicle health check is made before achieving full throttle. the vehicle begins pitching over into the prescribed ascent profile.000 ft). respectively. This mission could be flown by an Atlas V 500 configuration. after reaching 24.3-1. 2. After a coast to the desired location for transfer orbit injection.1.576 m (120. The Atlas V 400 retains the payload fairing through the booster phase of flight.000 ft) until approximately 36. The Centaur main engine is ignited for a third time near the apogee of the transfer orbit. maximum weight to transfer orbit). These data are representative. Atlas mission ascent profiles are developed using one or more Centaur upper stage main engine burns. After passing the health check. information is provided in the following paragraphs regarding typical Atlas V mission designs. At about 2. and Atlas V 552 LEO park orbit ascent missions. The vehicle is held down during start and a portion of throttle up.3-2.1 Booster Phase 2. 2. After a short vertical rise away from the pad.3. 2-2 .3. maximum satellite orbit lifetime. 2.5 ±0. while satisfying satellite and launch vehicle constraints. Geosynchronous Orbit (GSO) Mission—The GSO mission is a three-burn Centaur mission profile.000 ft). and 2. closed-loop guidance steering is enabled. The first Centaur burn starts just after Common Core Booster™ (CCB)/Centaur separation and is used to inject the Centaur/spacecraft into a mission performance-optimal parking orbit.3-3 show the corresponding mission sequence data for the illustrated Atlas V ascent profiles. Tables 2. The core engine cutoff sequence is initiated when a propellant low-level sensor system indicates that the booster is about to deplete all available propellants. Direct Ascent Missions—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.3-3 show sequence-ofevents data for a typical Atlas V 401 geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO).380 m (80. At this time. Near the end of the CCB phase.tailored to optimize the mission’s critical performance parameter (e. actual sequencing will vary to meet the requirements of each mission. the second Centaur engine burn provides the impulse to place the spacecraft into the transfer orbit. Atlas V launch vehicles can be launched at any time of day to meet spacecraft mission requirements. the vehicle enters a pitch and yaw angle-of-attack profile phase to minimize aerodynamic loads. the RD-180 is throttled down to minimum power level and the engine is shut down. A long transfer orbit coast follows the second burn.3 ATLAS V ASCENT PROFILE To familiarize users with Atlas V mission sequences..5-g axial acceleration level is not exceeded. the hold-down bolts are blown.1 Atlas V 400—The booster phase begins with ignition of the RD-180 engine system. Figures 2. the vehicle is committed to launch. The booster phase steering profile through the end of alpha-biased steering is implemented through our launch-day wind-steering system. Parking Orbit Ascent Missions—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Above an altitude of 244 m (800 ft).g. At the end of alpha-biased steering. This final burn provides the energy to circularize at synchronous altitude and reduces the inclination to 0°. Atlas V 551 GTO. For Atlas V 400.3-1. Each mission profile type is suited for one of the following missions types. 7). which enhances launch availability by reducing wind-induced flight loads. the RD-180 engine is continuously throttled so that a 5. 2. 7). an alpha-bias angle-of-attack steering technique may be used to reduce steering losses while maintaining aerodynamic loading within acceptable limits. and throttle up is completed. and 2.3-2. the vehicle begins to roll from the launch pad azimuth to the appropriate flight azimuth.438 m (8.

350 s (Typical) Accel.3 km (667 nmi) Hp = 157.661 ft) Centaur MES1 Time = 251 s Centaur MECO2 Time = 1.3 kPa (529 psf) Time = 92 s Alt = 13..Payload Fairing Jettison Time = 259 s Alt = 135. s 250 Dynamic Pressure 30 Dyn Press.0 km (42. % 40 0 Time from Launch.502 s Centaur MECO1 Time = 937 s Alt = 222.3-1 Typical Atlas V 401 GTO Ascent Profile 2-3 .4 km (85 nmi) Acceleration 6 Core Jettison Time = 241 s Alt = 112.324 nmi) S/C Sep Time = MECO2 + 225 s (Typical) End Centaur CCAM Time = MECO2 + 2.1% Throttle Throttle.788 km (100x19.0 km (442.904 ft) Centaur MES2 Time = 1.2 km (120 nmi) Ha = 1.7 km (369. g 0 0 Time from Launch.. kPa Throttle Profile Max Q: 25.720 s 185x37.562 ft) 100 Liftoff Core at 99. s 250 0 0 Time from Launch.234. s 250 CCAS Figure 2.

350 s (Typical) SRB Jettison 1. kPa 0 0 Liftoff Core at 99.544 ft) FLR Jettison Time = 217 s Centaur MES2 Time = 1.1 km (30.. g 0 0 Time from Launch.1% Throttle 40 CCAS Throttle. 5: Time = 100 s Accel.3-2 Typical Atlas V 551 GTO Ascent Profile 2-4 ..2 km (394.1 kPa (900 psf) Time = 46 s Alt = 9.324 nmi) 6 Acceleration S/C Sep Time = MECO2 + 225 s (Typical) End Centaur CCAM Time = MECO2 + 2.7 km (90 nmi ) Centaur MECO2 Time = 1.4 km (403 nmi) Hp = 166.788 km (100x19. 3.837 ft) 2. 4: Time = 99 s Alt = 37.669 s 185x37. % 0 Time from Launch. s 300 Time from Launch. s Throttle Profile 300 45 Dynamic Pressure Max Q = 43.027 ft) 100 Dyn Press. s 300 Figure 2.7 km (123.Payload Fairing Jettison Time = 212 s Alt = 120.307 s Centaur MECO1 Time = 801 s Alt = 223.6 km (121 nmi) Ha = 746.

242 s 450-km Circ (243-nmi Circ) S/C Sep Time = MECO2 + 225 s (Typical) Acceleration End Centaur CCAM Time = MECO2 + 2.230 s Centaur MECO1 Time = 694 s Alt = 218 km (118 nmi) Ha = 450 km (242 nmi) Hp = 148 km (80 nmi) Centaur MECO2 Time = 4. s Throttle Profile 250 Dynamic Pressure 45 Dyn Press. kPa 0 0 100 Max Q: 41.8 km (497.Payload Fairing Jettison Time = 209 s Alt = 118. 4: Time = 99 s Alt = 11.1% Throttle 40 CCAS Throttle. 5: Time = 100 s Accel.975 ft) Centaur MES1 Time = 263 s 6 Centaur MES2 Time = 4.. g 0 0 Time from Launch.9 km (25.3 kPa (900 psf) Time = 42 s Alt = 7. s 250 Figure 2. s 250 Time from Launch.653 ft) 2.3-3 Typical Atlas V 552 LEO Ascent Profile 2-5 . % 0 Time from Launch.319 ft) FLR Jettison Time = 214 s Core Jettison Time = 253 s Alt = 151.6 km (130.6 km (389.869 ft) Liftoff Core at 99. 3..350 s (Typical) SRB Jettison 1.

The RD-180 start sequence Time from is similar to the Atlas V 400 while still on the Atlas V 552 Event Liftoff.045 4. 5) Payload Fairing Jettison (PFJ) Core Engine Cutoff Core Jettison Centaur Main Engine Start (MES1) Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO1) Start Turn to MES2 Attitude Centaur Main Engine Start (MES2) Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO2) Start Alignment to Separation Attitude Separate Spacecraft (SEP) Start Turn to CCAM Attitude Centaur End of Mission Time from Liftoff. Centaur End of Mission 6.Start Alignment to Separation Attitude Separate Spacecraft (SEP) 4.528 m (110.840 1.307 1. and with the booster engine throttled to the 0 desired power level.3-2 Typical Atlas V 551 GTO Mission Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds Atlas V 551 Event Guidance Go-Inertial Liftoff Strap-On SRM Jettison (SRM 1.380 m (80.994 4. Centaur Main Engine Start (MES1) 263 At approximately 2.720 1. Before payload fairing jettison. 4) 99 thrust for liftoff.000 ft).162 1. the core RD-180 engine is throttled down to maintain acceleration at 2.000 ft) until approximately 33.000 ft) to reduce steering losses and maintain aerodynamic loading within acceptable limits.Table 2.019 2.679 1. s -11 0 236 241 251 259 937 1.252 phase is implemented through the launch-day wind. 2-6 .730 1. 100 seconds into flight.5 g.3-3 Typical Atlas V 552 LEO Mission of a CCB combined with zero to five strap-on solid Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds rocket boosters (SRB). The strap-on SRB jettison sequence is initiated after burnout.070 Table 2.3-1 Typical Atlas V 401 GTO Mission Launch Vehicle Sequence Time in Seconds Atlas V 401 Event Guidance Go-Inertial Liftoff Core Engine Cutoff Core Jettison Centaur Main Engine Start (MES1) Payload Fairing Jettison (PFJ) Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO1) Start Turn to MES2 Attitude Centaur Main Engine Start (MES2) Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO2) Start Alignment to Separation Attitude Begin Spinup Separate Spacecraft (SEP) Start Turn to CCAM Attitude Centaur End of Mission Time from Liftoff. s -11 0 99 100 212 252 257 267 801 907 1. all SRBs are ignited to provide Liftoff Strap-On SRM Jettison (SRM 1.2 Atlas V 500—The Atlas V 500 consists Table 2. 3.Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO1) 694 cle enters into a nominal zero-pitch and zero-yaw Start Turn to MES2 Attitude 3.894 1. For Atlas V 500 missions.438 m (8. 3. The last SRBs are then jettisoned.384 m (80.945 2. the payload fairing is jettisoned during the CCB phase. At 99 seconds into flight.000 ft). At the end of alpha-biased steering. which enhances launch availability Start Turn to CCAM Attitude 4. Zero pitch and yaw angle-of-attack steering 4.230 angle-of-attack phase to minimize aerodynamic Centaur Main Engine Start (MES2) Centaur Main Engine Cutoff (MECO2) 4.3. the vehi.242 loads. Typically. 5) Payload Fairing Jettison (PFJ) 209 target azimuth.502 1. s Guidance Go-Inertial -11 ground.567 by reducing wind-induced flight loads.467 steering system.592 The zero pitch and yaw angle-of-attack phase is terminated at 24. the first three SRBs are jettisoned. For Atlas V 500. At an altitude of 244 m (800 ft) and Core Engine Cutoff 248 time from liftoff greater than 10 seconds. an alpha-bias angle-of-attack steering technique may be used after reaching 24.830 4.1. closed-loop guidance steering is enabled. the vehicle Core Jettison 253 begins its initial pitch-over phase.669 1. 4) Strap-On SRM Jettison (SRM 2. after which the vehicle begins a roll to the Strap-On SRM Jettison (SRM 2. The flight begins with a short ver100 tical rise.

For typical Atlas V 400 missions. the Centaur stage ignites its main engine (MES1). Centaur can accommodate roll axis alignment requirements and provide commanded roll rates from 0. the core RD-180 engine is throttled back up. payload fairing jettison can be delayed later into the flight with some performance margin loss. During the coast period (about 8 minutes for a typical geosynchronous transfer mission). With parking orbit ascent missions.135 W/m2 (360 Btu/ft2-hr). Accommodation of larger roll rates can be evaluated on a mission-unique basis.1 Atlas V 400—The Atlas V 400 Centaur can use either a dual engine configuration (DEC) or single engine (SEC) configuration. The core engine cutoff sequence is initiated when a propellant low-level sensor system indicates that the core booster is about to deplete all available propellants. the Centaur first burn injects the spacecraft into an elliptical performance-optimal parking orbit. the RD-180 engine is continuously throttled so that a constant axial acceleration level is not exceeded. the first Centaur burn (typically the longer of the two) injects the spacecraft into an elliptical performanceoptimal parking orbit. most spacecraft do not require special pointing or roll maneuvers. Centaur main engine start (MES) occurs after the CCB stage is jettisoned. After first-burn main engine cutoff (MECO1). In addition. 2. Centaur can align to any attitude for separation. For direct ascent missions. the Centaur normally aligns its longitudinal axis along the velocity vector. the Centaur aligns its longitudinal axis along the velocity vector.2 Atlas V 500—The Atlas V 500 Centaur can use either a dual engine (DEC) or single engine (SEC) configuration. the Centaur main engine is reignited and the vehicle is guided to the desired orbit. After reaching the target. the Centaur main engine burn injects the spacecraft into the targeted orbit and then performs a series of preseparation maneuvers.2 Centaur Phase 2. During the coast period (about 10 minutes for a typical geosynchronous transfer mission).5 rpm about the roll axis can be accommodated. the payload fairing is jettisoned 8 seconds after MES1. With parking orbit ascent missions.2. After payload fairing jettison. the Centaur and spacecraft enter a coast period. by which time the 3-sigma free molecular heat flux has typically fallen below 1. For direct ascent missions. a pitch/yaw plane transverse spin mode can be used. Centaur conducts a collision and contamination avoidance maneuver (CCAM) to prevent recontact and minimize contamination of the spacecraft. the main engine is shut down (MECO2) and Centaur begins its alignment to the spacecraft separation attitude. Should a spacecraft require attitude maneuvers during longer coast phases.3. the core RD-180 engine is throttled down to minimum power level and the engine is shut down. For sensitive spacecraft. 2. For sensitive spacecraft. A blowdown of remaining Centaur propellants follows. At a guidance-calculated start time.5 to 1. After Centaur first-burn main engine cutoff (MECO1).3.the PLF is jettisoned when the 3-sigma free molecular heat flux falls below 1. Before the second Centaur burn main engine start (MES2) the vehicle is aligned to the ignition attitude and the engine start sequence is initiated. the Centaur main engine burn injects the spacecraft into the targeted orbit and then performs a series of preseparation maneuvers. Because typical parking orbit coasts are of short duration.2.3. At this time. Near the end of the CCB phase.0 ±0. the Centaur and spacecraft enter a coast period. payload fairing jettison can be delayed later into the flight with some performance loss. After Centaur/spacecraft separation.5°/s in either direction during nonthrusting periods. Should a 2-7 2 2 .135 W/m (360 Btu/ft -hr). Preseparation spinups of up to 5. After the Atlas V core/Centaur separation.

Requirement) ±0. °.0 ±0.5 ditions for a particular spacecraft are assessed as • Spin Rate Accuracy. 1. Half Angle • Spin Rate.Separation Parameters Prior to Separation Command (with No Spin Requirement) ration is a function of guidance system hardware. °.3 Injection Accuracy and Separation Control Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Table 2. a pitch/yaw plane transverse spin mode can also be used.1 Attitude Orientation/Stabilization— Control Capabilities Coast Phase Attitude Control Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s • Roll Axis Pointing.3. In the nonspinning precision pointing • Body Axis Rates. After reaching the target.3.5 to 1. (per Axis). 7). and Separation Parameters Following SC Separation (with roll axes.2 than 0.5 to 1.7 the attitude and rates of a nonspinning spacecraft • Pitch. Yaw & Roll Axis Pointing.3. 7). (Half-Angle) Centaur can also provide a transverse spin Spacecraft Separation Parameters Following SC separation mode in which an end-over-end tumble is Separation (with ≤5-rpm Longitudinal Spin Rqmt) ≤5. • Passive Thermal Control Rate. Although No Spin Requirement) ≤0. 0.2-1 Summary of Guidance and Planner’s Guide (Rev.2. °/s Centaur and the spacecraft) are highly dependent on – Pitch ±0.0 axis for typical spacecraft.5°/s in either direction during nonthrusting periods. °/s 0.3. °/s – Pitch ±0. Centaur can accommodate all roll axis alignment requirements and provide commanded roll rates from 0. Centaur main engines are reignited and the vehicle is guided to the desired orbit. Before the second Centaur burn main engine start (MES2).7°/s per axis.2-1). Body Spacecraft Separation Parameters Prior to Separation axis rates are typically less than 0.2 Atlas V Separation Pointing Accuracies—Pointing accuracy just before spacecraft sepa. Centaur can align to any attitude for separation.2. °/s ≤30. 2. 2. °/s ≤7.75 part of a mission-specific separation analysis.3.2 mode. Preseparation spinups to 5. Yaw & Roll Axis Pointing.5 (Clockwise or Counterclockwise) 2. main engines are shut down (MECO2) and Centaur begins its alignment to the spacecraft separation attitude.0 with any tip-off effects induced by the separation Note: Capabilities Are Subject to Spacecraft Mass Properties Limitations system and any spacecraft principal axis mission 2-8 . Accommodation of larger roll rates can be evaluated on a mission-peculiar basis.5 rpm about the roll axis can be accommodated. Separation con.6 the mass properties of the spacecraft. rpm • Spin Axis Pointing Accuracy. respectively (Table 2. In addition.3. ° capabilities. at SC Separation Command For a mission requiring preseparation spinup.25 than 0. Half Angle ≤3. After Centaur/spacecraft separation.3. attitude can – Roll ±0.6°/s in the pitch or Command (with ≤5-rpm Longitudinal Spin yaw axis and 0. °.0 Guide (Rev. Centaur conducts its collision and contamination avoidance maneuver (CCAM) to prevent recontact and minimize contamination of the spacecraft.5 typically be maintained within 0. the vehicle is aligned to the ignition attitude and the engine start sequence is initiated. °. yaw.0 rate of up to 7°/s is possible about the pitch or yaw • Momentum Pointing. • Pitch. At a guidance-calculated start time. the system can maintain attitude errors of less – Yaw ±0. ° after separation (after loss of contact between the • Body Axis Rates.6 – Yaw ±0. ≤0.7° and attitude rates before separation of less – Roll ±0.7 guidance software.5°/s in the roll axis.25°/s about the pitch. and autopilot attitude control (per Axis). Half Angle ≤5.0 initiated before separating the payload.3. Separation ParametersRequirement) (with Transverse Spin conditions just before spacecraft separation combine • Transverse Rotation Rate.spacecraft require attitude maneuvers during coast phases.0±3. and 0. A rotation • Nutation.3.

The launch vehicle trajectory.3 Launch Vehicle Performance Confidence Levels Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. including the separated spacecraft. 7). which is defined as the total mass delivered to the target orbit. but for GTO (Atlas V 401) and LEO (Atlas V 402) missions. 2.6 Heavy-Payload Lift Capability Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.3. Higher performance is available for those payloads that fit in the 0. momentum pointing and maximum nutation errors following separation are typically less than 3. 2. Additional fairing information can be found in Section 4. 2. 2.alignments to produce postseparation momentum pointing and nutation errors.4. the gains are approximately 32 kg (71 lb) and 53 kg (117 lb). shielding on the Centaur aft bulkhead.9 ft/s) for spacecraft weights up to 4.3 kg (131 lb) for the Atlas V 511 and 521.75-ft)-diameter EPF. respectively. For Atlas V 500 configurations that use the 5-m medium PLF.4. For spacecraft that require greater volume. Additional fairing information may be found in Section 4.3. harnessing). the spacecraft-to-launch vehicle adapter. Typical performance gains are vehicle configuration and trajectory design-dependent.2m (13. addition of two 250-amp-hr main vehicle batteries.4 Centaur Short-Burn Capability Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.27 m/s (0. 2. spacecraft mass.2 Payload Fairings 2. the 5-m medium PLF is available. 2.3 Atlas V 400—Atlas V 400 performance shown in this document is based on use of the 4.6 kg (147 lb) for the Atlas 501 GTO missions. to 66. Longer duration missions can be supported by the 500 series with the addition of a fourth helium bottle.4.4.. respectively.4 PERFORMANCE GROUND RULES Atlas V performance ground rules for various missions with launch from CCAS in Florida or VAFB in California are described in this section.4 Atlas V 500—Atlas V 500 configuration performance is based on use of the 5-m short PLF. and mission target orbit can affect the performance contributions of each mission-peculiar item.g.4. 7). an additional second hydrazine load. Our separation systems provide a minimum relative velocity of 0. These items include 150-amp-hr main vehicle battery. payload flight termination system. Thus equipped. and all other hardware required on the launch vehicle to support the payload (e.4.1. Here.536 kg (10. 2-9 . the 500 series can support a full three-burn GSO mission.9-m (3-ft) shorter LPF. 7).4. 2. 2.1. Although dependent on actual spacecraft mass properties (including uncertainties) and the spin rate.3 Separation Velocity—The relative velocity between the spacecraft and the Centaur is a function of the mass properties of the separated spacecraft and the separation mechanism. the typical range of performance degradation is 59. unless noted otherwise. and three helium bottles.2. and an LH2 tank sidewall radiation shield.2.000 lb) and are designed to preclude recontact between the spacecraft and Centaur.1 Payload Systems Weight Definition Performance capabilities quoted throughout this document are presented in terms of payload systems weight (PSW).0 and 5.5 Centaur Long-Coast Capability The standard Atlas V 400 and 500 series designs incorporate items supporting park orbit coast times up to 65 minutes.0°. 2.4. nutation is defined as the angle between the actual space vehicle geometric spin axis and the spacecraft momentum vector.

13-6 are TBS. 2.33-sigma 3-sigma curves in Sections 2. consistent with the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7).7. 7).6.12-7b and Tables 2.13-4b.4 m/s and Atlas V 500.6.3 Right Ascension of Ascending Node (RAAN) Control Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. for Atlas V orbit capability descriptions.13 for the Atlas V 400 Atlas V 400 99. 2. 2.13-7b and Tables 2. respectively. 2.1 through 2.12-2 illustrate the performance of Atlas V 400 vehicle configurations to orbits described in Section 2.1.2 Minimum Residual Shutdown (MRS) (Atlas V) Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 2. 2.11 ATLAS IIIB PERFORMANCE DATA Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Performance data presented in this addendum are only for selected Atlas V vehicles. 2.7. and 2.2. 2-10 .13-5b 2. 7).13-1 and 2. 2.7 m/s become the typical operations mode for GTO-type (305 ft/s) (383 ft/s) missions.7 m/s 123.12-1. MRS has been suc(327 ft/s) (405 ft/s) cessfully executed for 24 Atlas missions and has Atlas V 500 93. 2.12 and 2.6 MISSION OPTIMIZATION AND ENHANCEMENT Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.13 ATLAS V 500 PERFORMANCE DATA Figures 2. 2. 7).8 ATLAS IIA PERFORMANCE DATA Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.12-4a. 7). 2. 2.12-4b.10 ATLAS IIIA PERFORMANCE DATA Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 2.9 ATLAS IIAS PERFORMANCE DATA Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.12-5. 2.7.6. 2.13-5a. 2.2-1 and in the performance Perigee Velocity Dispersions 2. and 2. 7).13-1. 2. 2.12-1 and 2. 2.4. 2.13-4a. and 2.6.7 MISSION PERFORMANCE DATA Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.13-2b illustrate the performance of Atlas V 500 vehicle configurations to orbits described in Section 2.13-7a.6. Sections 2.7. Table 2. 2. 7).13-3a.8. 7).2.12-7a.2-1 Atlas V 401 and 551 3-sigma The Atlas V performance variations associated with Performance Variations with MRS MRS are in Table 2. 7) for a description of MRS.7. Note that Figures 2. 7).5 GEOSYNCHRONOUS LAUNCH MISSION TRAJECTORY AND PERFORMANCE OPTIONS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7).12-2b. 2. 2. and 2. 2.7 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Note that Figures 2.13-2a. 7) Sections 2.12-2a.13-2b.7.0 m/s 116.7 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.1 Inflight Retargeting (IFR) Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.12-3.13-3b 2.12 ATLAS V 400 PERFORMANCE DATA Figures 2.13-2a. 7). and 2.7. 2.12-6 are TBS. 2.

000 6.200 3.000 MRS 2.000 125.800 5.200 5. km Figure 2.000 150.000 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude.800 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-401 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.400 7.000 50.8.600 4.0° 7.12-2a Atlas V 401 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (Metric) 2-11 .200 GTO 7.000 100. kg 6.0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Inclination: 27.600 Payload Systems Weight.800 0 25.33-sigma GCS 4.400 5.000 75.

000 9.000 MRS 11. nmi Figure 2.000 40.000 0 10.000 GTO 18.000 15.000 16.000 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-401 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Inclination: 27.000 Payload Systems Weight.19.000 13.000 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude.0° 17.000 12.000 50.000 80.000 2.000 70.33-sigma GCS 10.000 8.000 30.000 60.12-2b Atlas V 401 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (English) 2-12 .0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180. lbm 14.000 20.

200 5.0° Payload Systems Weight.000 4.12-4a Atlas V 401 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (Metric) 2-13 .33-sigma GCS 4.0 23.0 24.700 2.0 31.0 29.500 4.0 21.400 4.800 4.0 28.0 Transfer Orbit Inclination.5.100 4.0 26.0 30.200 4.0 25.000 3.600 4.900 4.788 km TO Argument of Perigee: 180.0 22.0 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-401 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.0 20.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Apogee Altitude: 35.300 4.100 MRS 5.0 27. ° Figure 2.900 18. kg 19.

0 20.0 31.800 MRS 10.200 11.0 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-401 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Apogee Altitude: 19.600 9.324 nmi TO Argument of Perigee: 180.0 24. ° Figure 2.0 23.600 Payload Systems Weight.400 9.0 22.800 9.12-4b Atlas V 401 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (English) 2-14 . lbm 10.200 2.0 Transfer Orbit Inclination.33-sigma GCS 10.0 25.0 30.200 9.000 9.11.0 21.0 27.800 18.400 10.0 29.400 11.000 8.000 10.600 11.0 26.0 28.0° 19.

000 Circular Orbit Altitude.000 28.000 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-402 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1. kg 28.000 55.600 1.0° Payload Systems Weight.400 1.000 Two Burn 63.1.6° 11.13.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Altitude: As Specified TO Inclination: As Specified 12.12-7a Atlas V 402 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2. 7.4° 8.000 200 400 600 800 1.000 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 55.000 1.6° Single Burn 10.800 2.3-1 may require mission-unique accommodations.4° 9.2.0° 63.200 1.33-sigma GCS-Metric) 2-15 . km Figure 2.

4° Two Burn 55.000 20.000 15.6° Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-402 Payload Fairing: EPF Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Altitude: As Specified TO Inclination: As Specified SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.6° 25. nmi Figure 2.3-1 may require mission-unique accommodations.100 Circular Orbit Altitude.000 26.000 1.000 28.12-7b Atlas V 402 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2.4° 63.000 Payload Systems Weight.28.000 27.1.000 Single Burn 22.000 17.000 21. lbm 24.000 16.000 19.000 100 63.0° 23.33-sigma GCS-English) 2-16 .000 55. 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1.000 18.0° 28.2.

355) (10.932) 7.229 (9.513 4.928 (17.375) (11.000) 5.054 5.816 (8.288 4.5 29.870) (10.653) 4.966 (20.5 25.594 (9.823 (10.787 (10.480 (9.983 (10.497) (9.586 4.722 (12.537 (10.833 (12.952 (13.304) (11.752) 11.634 (29.082 4.000) 7.309 (11.500) 5.219) 120.0 19.913) 37.427 (7.638 4.525) (10.247) 6.Table 2.302) 4.981) (10.500) 8.879 4.372 (11.732 4.697 4.595) (10.5 27.850 (15.677 (16.000) 4.000) 6.149 5.134) 131.000) 4.268 (59.458) 4.081 (8.000) 4.744 (22.991) (10.160 5.078 (26.112 (6.143) (11.173 (11.231) 6.000) 5.186 (5.0° • Argument of Perigee = 180° Table 2.500) 7.968 (34.500) 4.379) 4.205 (8.415 4.092) 57.5 23.500) 5.158 5.000) 4.818 (12.208 (9.150 (12.757) (10.281) 51.475 4.000) 4.451 (12.770 (14.056 (8.301) 5.911) 4.946 (17.788 (19.351) (11.260 (5.372 (11.332) (11.542 (10.788 km (19.995 (11.937 (10.438) 7.930 4.226) (10.762) 4.455 (14.224) (10.556 (3.378 4.000) 4.33-sigma GCS 4.000) (9.337 (9.0 20. kg (lb) Apogee Altitude Atlas V 401 km (nmi) MRS 2.0 29.371) (11.643 (10.754) 74.783) 40.050) 5.186) 54.495 (12.334) 4.365) (11.439) 31.454) (9.912) 8.500) 4.978 4.763) 14.913) (10.0 21.414 (9.669) 4.856 (28.140 5.706 (15.733) (9.324) 109.5 22.500) 6.057) 142.412 (31.300 (25.774 4.972 4.288 (9.000) 4.066 (11.606) 6.882 (10.386 (9.276) 4.924) 6.614) 20.500) 5.5 21.600 (50.753 4.559) 87.000) 7.388) 49.950 (10.916 (15.997) 153.12-2 Atlas V 401 Performance to Reduced Inclination Transfer Orbit—PSW vs Orbit Inclination Payload Systems Weight.417 (14.234 (9.33 sigma GCS 4.492 (71.884) 4.080 (40.704) 28.432) (10.324 mn) • Argument of Perigee = 180° 2-17 .156) (9. ° 18.127 5.250) 5.000) 4.630 (2.264 (11.5 26.437) 5.015) 4.438) 12.217 (15.712 (10.153 4.038 (6.083 5.235 4.803) (9.395) 4.000) 4.946 4.383) 98.974) (10.324) 5.079 (15.156 (13.422) 16.705) (10.5 19.205) (11.708 (10.0 22.744 (10.012) 35.484) 9.848 4.907 4.716 (83.5 24.984) (10.243 (13.985) Inclination.532 4.586 (10.519) 5.500) 5.578 (10.336) (9.919 (13.000) 4.090) 7.000) 4.942) (10.686 4.236) 4.000) 4.687) (10.610) (10.135 W/m2 (360 Btu/ft2-hr) • Parking Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Orbit Inclination = 27.750) 6.902 4.891 (10.189 (11.0 27.0 28.0 Note: • EPF Jettison at 3-sigma qV < 1.818) (10.397) 23.107 5.353 4.259) (11.256 (9.606) 5.250) 6.924) 6.5 30.296 (13.257 (15.996 (11.108 (9.633) 43.408 (4.981 4.806 4.222 4.549 (14.160 (9.168) 4.0 18.380 (65.071) (11.876) 68.000) 4.297 (9.12-1 Atlas V 401 Elliptical Transfer Orbit Performance—PSW vs Apogee Altitude Payload Systems Weight.331) (10.691 (14.435 (16.0 23.044 (47.334 (4.649) 79.262 (18.730) 4.0 24.524 (37.102) 10.859) 18.904) (10.018) 25.5 20.986 5.982 4.022 5.636 (43.680 (16.625) 6.843) 5.090) (10.033 (13.000) 4.447 (9.573) 5.963 4.950) (10.478) (10.803) 4.482 (3.000) 6.991) (11.496 (9.813 4.336 (9.376) 4.652) (9.404) 4.000) 4.950 4.424 (9.147) 13.484 (17.115) 5.206 (18.156 (53.209) 34.023 (15.155 5.500) 4.014) 62.663 (10.500) 6.832 (10.479) 7.999) 7.392) 7.808) (10.604 (77.307) (9.555) 4.143 (9.447 4.182 (9.961) (10.456 (16.856 4.928 (14.111) (10.0 25.084 (11.507) 46.638 4.111) 4.865) (9.000) 5.500) 6.642 (12.135 W/m2 (360 Btu/ft2-hr) • Parking Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude = 35.522 (23.623 (12.474) 4.123) 17.827) 5.003) 4.000) 4.454) 92.620 (10.983 (9.0 26.088 (13.000) 7.881) 6.941) Note: • EPF Jettison at 3-sigma qv ≤1.377 (9.127 (11.766 (10.562) 4.634 (14.577 4. kg (lb) Atlas V 401 MRS 2.262 (9.500) 7.308 4.5 28.596) (9.

000 40.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 14.000 80. km Figure 2.000 13.13-2a Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (GCS-Metric) 2-18 .000 11.000 551 541 GTO Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.000 30.000 4.000 511 8. 2.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Inclination: 27.0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180.000 501 6.000 521 Payload Systems Weight.000 9.000 3.33-sigma GCS 531 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude.000 50.000 7.000 20.000 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.1. kg 10.000 60.15.0° Shutdown Type: 2.000 12.000 70.000 0 10.000 5.2.

000 GTO 551 30.000 0 5.35.000 15.000 30.0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180.000 501 10.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude. lbm 521 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Inclination: 27.000 511 15.13-2b Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (GCS-English) 2-19 .000 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 40.1.000 10.000 25. 5.000 35.000 Payload Systems Weight.000 541 531 25. nmi Figure 2.000 20.33-sigma GCS 20.2.0° Shutdown Type: 2.

135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Inclination: 27.000 11.000 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude.000 501 6.000 9.000 4.0° Shutdown Type: MRS 541 13.000 8.000 20.0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180. 60.000 30.000 40.000 3.1.000 70.000 7. kg 511 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 50.000 531 521 Payload Systems Weight. km Figure 2.000 10.000 14.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 0 10.000 5.000 2.2.13-3a Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (MRS-Metric) 2-20 .000 80.000 551 GTO Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.15.000 12.

000 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.1.000 0 5.35. nmi Figure 2.000 Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude. 5.000 511 15.000 30.13-3b Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Performance to Elliptical Transfer Orbit (MRS-English) 2-21 .000 10.000 35.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 40.2.000 501 10.000 25.000 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Inclination: 27.000 20.0° Shutdown Type: MRS 541 531 25.000 15.000 521 Payload Systems Weight.0° TO Argument of Perigee: 180.000 GTO 551 30. lbm 20.

0 26.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Apogee Altitude: 35.0 501 3.0 24. ° Figure 2.0° Shutdown Type: 2.0 22.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations. 0 18.0 23.0 31.000 30.33-sigma GCS SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.0 Transfer Orbit Inclination.1.000 541 531 7.0 20.788 km TO Argument of Perigee: 180.0 25.0 27.000 521 6.000 1.000 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.0 28.13-4a Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (GCS-Metric) 2-22 .000 4.000 551 8.9.000 Payload Systems Weight.000 2. kg 511 5.0 29.2.0 21.0 19.

000 541 17.000 18.324 nmi TO Argument of Perigee: 180.0 30.1.000 Payload Systems Weight. 19.2.0 Transfer Orbit Inclination.000 15.0 31.0 27.13-4b Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (GCS-English) 2-23 .0 25.0 22.000 12.0 20.0 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi 531 551 501 TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Apogee Altitude: 19.000 521 13.0 23.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 18.20.33-sigma GCS SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 5.000 19.0 24.000 4.0° Shutdown Type: 2. ° Figure 2.000 7.000 10.000 9.000 511 11.0 29.0 26.000 6.000 16.0 21.0 28. lbm 14.000 8.

0 19.0 31.0 22. 0 18.0 30.0 4.2.0 21.000 511 5.788 km TO Argument of Perigee: 180.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.13-5a Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (MRS-Metric) 2-24 .000 Transfer Orbit Inclination.0 24.0° Shutdown Type: MRS SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 1.0 25.000 551 541 8.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Apogee Altitude: 35.000 9.1.0 27.0 23. ° Figure 2.000 501 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.0 29.000 2.0 28.0 26.000 521 Payload Systems Weight. kg 6.10.000 531 7.000 3.0 20.

324 nmi TO Argument of Perigee: 180.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 11.21.000 16.0 29.0 31.000 14. lbm 15.000 18.000 7.000 9.0 19. Transfer Orbit Inclination.0 25.0 20.0 26.000 Payload Systems Weight.000 13.000 12.000 8.0 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 501-551 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi 501 TO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Apogee Altitude: 19.000 551 19.13-5b Atlas V 501-551 CCAS Reduced Inclination Elliptical Orbit Performance (MRS-English) 2-25 .0 24.000 20.000 18.1.000 10.000 6.0° Shutdown Type: MRS 511 521 531 541 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.0 27. ° Figure 2.0 30.0 22.000 17.2.000 5.0 23.0 28.0 21.

000 28.000 Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-552 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.6° 17.000 200 400 600 800 1. 14.200 1.600 1.000 1.000 28.000 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.33-sigma GCS-Metric) 2-26 .000 Circular Orbit Altitude.800 2.135 W/m PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km TO Altitude: As Specified TO Inclination: As Specified 15.21. kg Single Burn 18.13-7a Atlas V 552 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2.000 19.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 Payload Systems Weight. km Figure 2.1.6° 20.000 Two Burn 16.400 1.2.

000 100 SC wt vs cg locations greater than allowable limits shown in Figure 4.000 Payload Systems Weight.000 1.100 Circular Orbit Altitude.000 34.000 Two Burn 36.6° 28.000 44.000 37.6° Launch Vehicle: Atlas V-552 Payload Fairing: 5-m Short Launch Site: CCAS LC-41 2 PFJ on 3-sigma qV ≤ 360 Btu/ft -hr PO Perigee Altitude ≥ 90 nmi TO Altitude: As Specified TO Inclination: As Specified 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1.33-sigma GCS-English) 2-27 .13-7b Atlas V 552 CCAS Low-Earth Orbit Performance (2.000 43.000 Single Burn 41.000 39. 28.2. lbm 40. nmi Figure 2.1.46.000 32.000 38.000 42.000 35.000 33.3-2 may require mission-unique accommodations.000 45.

365 7.799) (13.539 6.093 6.967) (14.086 7.280) (10.129 7.089) (14.178) (16.770 7.539 3.398) Atlas V 501 2.100) (8.716 5.200 7.423 7.574 8.776) Note: 2 2 • 5-m Short PLF Jettison at 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.609 (21.827) (16.175 10.625) (14.288 4.789 6.061) (15.083) (13.172) (14.865 5.504) (16.996) (16.855) (17.297 7.33-sigma GCS 10.486) (13.670 8.237) (16.553 8.106 10.998 7.934 4.984) (15.007) (7.099) (10.343 7.589) (11.782 3.813 7.414 8.33-sigma GCS 6.968) (19.618) (11.599 (19.999) (17.679) (18.879) (16.266) (15.146 5.846 3.680) 9.669 5.873) (15.070 7.33-sigma GCS 11.703) (12.556) (20.078) (16.020 3.498 3.000 (nmi) (2.826) (17.511 7.110 7.000 50.000 35.981 7.368) Atlas V 521 2.251) (17.076) (12.204 6.841) (22.264) (17.517 11.097) (37.255 8.898) Atlas V 541 2.822) (20.582 4.339) (8.196) (16.970 3.284 8.279 8.075 5.087) (16.762) (12.342 6.996 4.553) (19.843 6.241) (13.086) (13.392) (12.568) (16.615) MRS 13.797) (41.266 7.000 15.365) (16.000 25.000 10.712) (20.450) (20.952) (12.789 5.887 7.582 8.598) (24.096) (18.864) (10.345) (11.898 9.662 8.000 km 5.199) (19.231 9.250 6.949 9.856) (13.797) (41.101) (11.184) (22.000 30.874 3.482) (13.128 4.803) (16.741 (23.679) (10.000 60.571 6.709 7.549 6.901) (18.799) (13.706) (20.858) (11.951 4.324) (21.875 5.897 7.172 7.752) (8.302 9.298) (26.778) (19.749) (14.439) Atlas V 551 2.003 (28.894) (19.832 7.397) (35.632 7.980 7.285 6.066 7.748) (18.120 6.652 5.116) Apogee Altitude Atlas V 531 2.499) (16.801) (12.549) (18.370) (11.791) (17.617 6.285 7.304 (25.330) (24.158) (14.480 4.602) (12.632 3.684) (21.931 5.882 4.577) 6.698) (32.087) (10.101) (9.332) (8.998) (29.181) (11.934) (20.788 40.998) (29.638) (14.354) (18.926 8.515 7.33-sigma GCS 13.000 55.705 5.985 6.844 4.528) (9.894) MRS 12.714 4.478 8.33-sigma GCS 14.786) (16.512) (15.474 8.262 7.919) (18.292) (17.208) (8.000 25.114) (18.334) (17.964 8.335) (12.542) (8.118 4.800 7.788 40.578) (11.067) (16.270 5.975 7.633) (17.528) (10.441) 10.677) (12.799) (25.925 3.433) (16.000 50.663 4.006 5.649 7.225) (16.815 MRS (19.076 8.723 3.410) (17.Table 2.000 15.971 8.216) (12.461) (12.454 7.323 8.448 (14.452) (9.488 7.135 W/m (360 Btu/ft -hr) • Parking Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Orbit Inclination = 27.095 6.299) (27.982) (13.508) (15.459 6.448 5.595 5.000 65.157 5.651 12.652) (8.036 6.928 4.877) (9.147) (14.015) (10.400) (8.878 (32.489 5.000 60.985 5.980) Atlas V 511 2.095 7.439) (13.389) (17.335 6.744 6.367) (13.289 9.322 4.388 6.417) (14.169) (8.055 9.000 30.249 (29.33-sigma GCS 8.732 5.305) (10.976) (21.815) (15.115 5.577) (nmi) (2.698) (32.437) (13.906) (7.099) (10.087 11.853) (24. kg (lb) Apogee Altitude km 5.257 5.958 8.782 9.334) (18.000 20.078) (8.398) (15.976) (13.0° • Argument of Perigee = 180° 2-28 .763) (10.792 7.484 5.622 7.397 11.499) (16.091) (11.747 7.167 8.517 6.324) (21.496 (19.239) (14.807 5.775 4.189) (15.782) (17.000 45.393) (10.705 3.844 6.747 4.000 70.000 65.641 3.135 3.700) (5.000 70.690 6.751 7.750 5.164 8.627 6.634 6.000 77.869) (14.116) (8.589) (14.478) (8.224) (17.641) (15.000 77.373) (21.581 MRS (14.180 (31.779 3.595) (17.000 10.993 (26.000 55.140) MRS 10.379 5.097) (37.876 6.593) (17.878) (10.13-1 Atlas V 500 Series Elliptical Transfer Orbit Performance—PSW vs Apogee Altitude Payload Systems Weight.398 (22.423 10.812) (15.598) (24.484) (22.697) (15.397) (35.730 9.981 5.559) (15.486 7.000 20.802) (7.931) (12.711) (7.637) (12.866) (19.586 3.185) (12.512 4.704 (23.773 6.029 4.531 (26.199) (19.770 8.232 8.262) 11.400) (8.736) (19.209) (19.862) (8.000 45.922) (17.677) (13.152) (10.915) (10.027) (7.576) MRS 14.196) (12.340 5.011 8.683) (18.406 9.602) 8.072 4.933) (14.009) (15.674 3.466) (9.700) (5.924) 8.200) (17.009) (17.871 6.000 35.753 9.298) (26.

390) (14.953 3.141) (11.053) (10.500 6.038) (9.579) (11.727) (9.054 5.513) (8.33-sigma GCS 3.167 5.606) (7.210 5.494) (10.481 Atlas V 521 2.118 4.311) (10.279 5.0 20. 521 Performance to Reduced Inclination Transfer Orbit—PSW vs Orbit Inclination Inclination.723 5.257 5.103) (14.689) (13.518 4.098) (9.260 5.741) (13.530 3.286 6.977 4.455 (9.296 6.880) (13.236) (12.880 5.957 5.858) (13.152 5.949 (7.296 6.437 4. kg (lb) Atlas V 511 MRS 2.739 5.285 6.961) (9.092 5.0 27.502 3.752) (8.638) (11.885 5.127 4.493 5.0 Atlas V 501 MRS 2.951 6.119) (12.782) (7.492 6.5 23.280) (13.821 4.092) (9.262 6.105 6.944 3.638) (8.191 5.767) (8.126) (8.981) (12.905 3.420) (8.047) (12.598 4.915) (11.861 3.961) (10.331) (14.901) (8.801 3.271 5.513) (11.550 3.5 27.459) (13.379) (8.833 3.173 6.024 6.977 3.350) (10.743) (8.085 4.776 3.289) Note: 2 2 • 5-m Short PLF Jettison at 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.556) MRS 5.896) (10.372) (7.560 4.006 4.891 4.646) (11.326) (8.618) (11.0 26.832) (12.390) (14.412 4.397 6.345 5.156) (12.095 (7.124 4.300 6.475 3.068) (9.531 6.249) (13.324 nmi) • Argument of Perigee = 180° 2-29 .979 3.067) (11.384) (9.120) (13.793) (12.0 24.040 4.962) (13.449) (8.242 (9.33-sigma GCS 5.222 5.767) (8.135 W/m (360 Btu/ft -hr) • Parking Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude = 35.029) 3.880) (13.078) (9.629 4.640 5.584 3.999) (14. ° 18.601) (13.493 5.954 6.264) (14.0 21.264) (11.113 4. 511.907) (8.517 6.819 3.760 4.313) (14.091) (12.050) (12.33-sigma GCS 4.464 5.344 3.318 5.392) (11.5 24.590) (11.620) (11.682) (8.758) (13.434) (12.694) (8.763 3.136) (10.279 5.438 6.823) (13.209 6.677 4.111) (12.767) (8.0 23.283 5.006) (9.100 4.118 4.751 4.977) (12.044) (9.974) (13.036) (12.399) (14.628) (10.485 5.5 25.018) (8.5 26.782) (11.Table 2.367) (14.270 5.459 5.227) (11.517 6.102 4.686 3.450 3.929) (11.491) (7.004 5.489 4.270 6.500) (13.910) (11.753) (8.803 5.724) (11.5 28.466 5.977 3.966 3.970 3.402 5.367) (14.652) (12.350 6.491) (12.970 3.956 3.507) (8.497 5.169 6.781) (10.720) (8.251 5.527 6.718 3.695 4.359) (11.078) (9.714) (8.127) (13.124 6.638 3.398 3.233 6.228) (8.609) (13.856) (13.13-2a Atlas V 501.0 25.0 29.859 3.951 5.806 5.0 22.367 5.5 21.595 3.252 (11.610) (8.5 20.591 5.335 4.092) (9.288 6.470 6.826) (7.597) (11.026) 4.806) (13.252 5.5 29.363) (11.0 28.109 5.721) (7.435 5.020) (8.366) (13.618) (12.063 6.124 4.527 6.154 5.666 5.550 5.5 19.474) (10.112) (8.0 18.938 3.193) (14.111) (12.485) (11.363 5.918 3.257 4.783) (9.706) Payload Systems Weight.862) (13.092) (12.204) (10.514 5.895 3.788 km (19.576) (11.485 5.832) (8.890 4.821 4.197) (8.660) (7.783) (10.297) (8.033) (11.732 3.433 5.5 22.925) (8.327) (12.889) (13.638) (11.5 30.630) (10.444) (11.020 5.240 6.680 3.557) (9.801) (12.0 19.010 6.822) (11.637 3.064 4.586) (8.785) (11.773) (8.

531 6.117) (19.213 7.654 8.615) (17.470 7.767 6.0 20.332 7.874) (16.186) (17.0 MRS 6.586 7.965 7.501 6.938 (14.971 8.470) (16.550) (16.685 8.756) (15.725) (16.5 28.0 22.454 7.467) (15.440) (16.809) (19.495 7.650) (16.618 8.691 8.410 7.274 8.033 7.552) (17.455) (19.332) (16.426 7.896 7.054) (16.552 7.801) (18.671) Atlas V 521 2.165) (16.974 6.615) (18.500) 7.229) (18.951 7.362 6.657) (19.671 8.0 18.303 7.624 (15.890) (17.155) (16.0 19.809) (19.Table 2.169 8.187 7.789) MRS 6.469 8.621 6.174) (18.984) (17.765 7.171) (13.205 8.862 6.5 24.5 19.239 8.101) (15.672) (18.5 26.459) (16.255 8.444 8.980 7.560) (17.142) (19.337) (16.849 7.788 km (19.740) (14.244 8.33-sigma GCS 6.089 7.381) (15.026) (14.864 7.507 7. kg (lb) Atlas V 531 Inclination. 551 Performance to Reduced Inclination Transfer Orbit—PSW vs Orbit Inclination Payload Systems Weight.813) (18.439 7.639 8.147 7.582 7.770 7.932) (15.991 8.728) (16.008) (18.850 6.967 7.121 8.981) (18.624) (17.175) (18.715) (16.981 7.360) (15.5 22.225 8.0 21.732) (14.773 6.196 6.162 (13.148) (19.398) (14.5 23.853 7.901) (15.13-2b Atlas V 531.471) (17.844) (15.082 7.33-sigma GCS 7.408 7.613) (15.733 6.579 8.160) (19.156 7.598) (14.269) (15.685 8.528 8.194 7.372) (16.305) (17.299 6.199) (18.132) (18.101) (16.570) (19.682 6.877 8.155 7.282 7.977 7.089) (18.255 8.612 6.211 (15.873) (15.916 8.537) (14. ° 18.5 29.953 8.843 6.990 8.612 8.045) (19.624) (17.487) (17.827) (14.635) (17.075 6.065 8.333) (14.124 7.730) (17.986) (19.114) (19.985 8.903) (18.393) (13.816) (15.012) Note: 2 2 • 5-m Short PLF Jettison at 3-sigma qV ≤ 1.777) (19.971 8.322) (19.079) (19.496) (18.704 7.875) (15.378) (18.910 6.884) (17.052 7.951 7.739) (19.777) (15.343) (18.240) (18.998) (19.546) (15.130) (17.825 7.260) (16.200 7.795 7.217 7.413 (13.595) (17.594 6.118) (17.390) (16.200) (18.530) (17.466 7.315 7.658 7.400) (16.919) (15.846 6.911) (15.670 8.936 8.016 7.926 7.775) (15.523) (16.999 7.244 8.164) (18.0 26.401 7.128) (15.958) (16.459) (16.174 7.051 8.533 8.593) (17.086) (15.925 7.938 8.901) (15.268 8.111) (14.457 7.200 7.344) 2.101) Atlas V 541 2.686 6.434 7.233) (15.683 8.324 nmi) • Argument of Perigee = 180° 2-30 .432) (16.156 8.704) (19.448 6.338) (17.781) (17.750) (17.932 7.213 7.336 8.316) (16.042 8.0 23.214 7.401 6.433) (16.631) (15.148) (19.454 7.5 25.905) (16.174 6.093) (15.956) (18.090 7.588 7.911) (17.5 21.888) (14.825 8.913) (18.5 20.506) (15.611) (13.0 29.764 8.0 28.250) (17.994 7.145 8.822) (19.024) (17.328 7.375 7.985 8.629) (15.576) (14.5 27.229) (18.844) (15.922 MRS (16. 541.0 24.671 7.239 7.661 7.312) (17.33-sigma GCS 5.0 25.272 6.778) (19.390 8.201 7.659) (13.325) (15.135 W/m (360 Btu/ft -hr) • Parking Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Perigee Altitude ≥ 167 km (90 nmi) • Transfer Orbit Apogee Altitude = 35.216) (14.408) (17.722 7.961 8.496) (17.268 8.320 8.860) (16.128) (16.0 27.994 7.466 7.5 30.706) (15.

3.8-72. and flow rate. Gas to the payload compartment is supplied through a ground/airborne disconnect on the PLF and is controlled by prime and backup environmental control units.2 (50-300) Atlas V 400 22. In both cases. and controlled after mate to the launch vehicle. both during ground processing and in flight.6 kg/min (160 lb/min) for EPF/LPF ECS Flow Rate & 136. after which GN2 with a maximum dewpoint of -37°C (-35°F) is used. During ground transport from the payload processing facility (PPF) to the vehicle integration facility (VIF) at CCAS. °C (°F) TBS EPF.0 ATLAS V ENVIRONMENTS This section describes the environments to which the spacecraft is exposed.1 Atlas V Thermal The spacecraft thermal environment is controlled during prelaunch activity.8-72.2 kg/min (300 lb/min) for 5m Short/Medium ECS Flow Rate 3-1 . 2) Inlet Temperature: Setpoint from 10-29°C (50-85°F).1. Detailed spacecraft environmental data are provided for Launch Complex 41 (LC-41) at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). Atlas V Prelaunch Environments are described in Section 3. Table 3. the transporter maintains the temperature between 10 and 27°C (5080°F). At VAFB. with conditioned air and a GN2 backup system.2.1. °C (°F) TBS 5-m Short. maintained during ground transport. and Spacecraft Compatibility Test Requirements in Section 3.1. If required. Capability* kg/min (lb/min) 10-29°C (50-85°F) Atlas V 400 22.4°C (40°F) is used until approximately 5 hours before launch.6 (50-160) Atlas V 500 22.6 (50-160) Atlas V 500 22. After spacecraft mate to Atlas V.3. and Space Launch Complex 3W (SLC-3W) at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB).1-1 Gas Conditioning Capabilities (A/C and GN2) Temperature Range Inside Payload Fairing** Atlas V 400 Atlas V 500 Inlet Inlet Flowrate Temperature Capability.2 (50-300) Location Post-LV Mate Through Move to Launch Configuration Post-Move to Launch Configuration LPF. Table 3. the relative humidity remains at or below 50%.8-136. If required. humidity. gas conditioning is provided to the PLF at the required temperature. These units provide air or GN2 conditioned to the following parameters: 1) Cleanliness: Class 5. an air conditioning unit can maintain air temperatures between 10 and 25°C (50-77°F). the temperature within the payload fairing (PLF) remains between 4 and 30°C (40-86°F).1 ATLAS V PRELAUNCH ENVIRONMENTS 3. During hoisting operations the encapsulated spacecraft is purged with dry GN2 and relative humidity is maintained at or below 50%. Air with a maximum dewpoint of 4. °C (°F) 5-m Medium.3.000 per FED-STD-209. °C (°F) TBS TBS 10-29°C (50-85°F) TBS TBS TBS TBS Notes: * Inlet Temperature is Adjustable (Within System Capability) According to Spacecraft Requirements ** Temperature Ranges Are Based on Worst-Case Minimum & Maximum External Heating Environments Ranges Shown Assume a 72. Atlas V Launch and Flight Environments in Section 3. a high-flow-rate conditioned air system can be used during hoist operations at the VIF. with positive pressure provided by a gaseous nitrogen (GN2) purge.11 summarizes prelaunch gas conditioning temperature capabilities for the nominal configuration without a thermal shield in the PLF.8-136.1.

3 Atlas V Contamination and Cleanliness Launch vehicle hardware that comes into contact with the spacecraft environment is designed and manufactured according to strict contamination control requirements and guidelines. 7).1. 3. The PLF air distribution system will provide a maximum air flow velocity in all directions of no more than 9. 3.75 mps (32 fps) for the Atlas V 400 and 10. Data can be provided for other locations upon request. The conditioning gas is vented to the atmosphere through one-way flapper doors below the spacecraft. Ground operations at the launch site have been designed to 3-2 3) 4) 5) . or associated with the air conditioning outlet. There will be localized areas of higher flow velocity at.38–1. on Atlas V 400. and the interior surface of the PLF.2. 3.2.1 Launch Vehicle-Generated Radio Environment—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Internal ducting defectors in the PLF (refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [Rev. 3. nearby cruise ships or Navy vessels) may cause RF environments to exceed the levels shown in these tables.1.1.2. This hardware is defined as contamination-critical and.3-1 documents EM emitters in the vicinity of CCAS. An EMC analysis will be performed to ensure EMC of the spacecraft/launch vehicle interface with the range environment. contamination-critical hardware includes that described for Atlas V 400 including the interior surfaces of the payload module of the 5-m PLF plus the centaur forward load reactor (CFLR) deck (Ref Sections 3.5 lb/min). Flow Rates a) Atlas V 400: 0. 7].1.e.2). Reduced flow velocities are achievable using lower inlet mass flow rates.1.1. Field intensities at LC-41 are provided.1. 7). includes the Centaur common equipment module.. These data are based on an EM site survey conducted at SLC-3 in June 1997. the flow can be divided so that up to 40% of the gas flow is directed to the base of the payload compartment for use in battery cooling or other operations.2.2°C (-35°F) GN2.2 Launch Vehicle-Generated Electromagnetic Environment—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.4°C (40°F) air.4 Spacecraft-Generated Environment Limitation—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.2. For the Atlas V 500 configuration. Launch trajectory and uncontrolled emitters in the area (i.095 kg/s (50–300 lb/min ±12. and more of the Centaur stub adapter surfaces.2. Table 3. The conditioned air is typically delivered near the top of the PLF.21 kg/s ±0. 7).2 standard cubic meters/hour (500 standard cubic feet/hour).27 kg/s ±0.1-1) direct the gas upward to prevent direct impingement on the spacecraft.38–2. Filtration: 99. Fig. near.97% HEPA not dioctyl phthalate (DOP) tested. 6) Dewpoint (Maximum): 4.2.2 Atlas V Radiation and Electromagnetics Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. b) Atlas V 500: 0.4 and 4. 7) lists EM emitters in the vicinity of VAFB. 3.1. adapters.2°C (-35°F) of specific satellite components can be provided for up to 14. Table 3. -37.67 mps (35 fps) for the Atlas V 500. Maximum air flow velocities correspond to maximum inlet mass flow rates. 3. 7).3 Launch Range Electromagnetic Environment—The EM environment resulting from emitters controlled by the launch range is based on information in TOR-95 (5663)-1.1. When required.3-2 in the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.1.2. Mission-specific arrangements for dedicated grade B or C GN2 purges with a maximum dewpoint of -37. 3.038 kg/s (50–l60 lb/min ±5 lb/min).Inlet Temperature Control: ±3°C (±5°F).

3-1 Worst-Case RF Environment for CCAS from Controlled Emitters Only Emitter Name Radar 0. MHz 5690 5690 5690 & 5800 5690 5690 5690 9410 1265 & 1345 2750 & 2840 5625 2879 1784 2025 & 2120 1761 & 1842 LC-41 Theoretical Intensity.17) Are Typically 20 v/m ensure a clean environment for the spacecraft.0008 0. 3) Particulate Obscuration—Ultraviolet light inspection.9 56.0 8.0064 0.0 4.0016 0. 7).8 Radar FPS-66 Radar GPN-20 WSR-74C WSR-88D GPS Gnd Station NASA STDN TVCF Frequency.14 Radar 1. For Atlas V 400s.6 11. 1.1. 4) Particulate and Molecular Fallout—Witness plates. Cleanliness Verification—Contamination-critical hardware surfaces are visually inspected to verify Visibly Clean Level 2 criteria described above.6 1.3 2.14.Table 3. & 19.1 59. Additional verification techniques shown below can be provided on a mission-unique basis: 1) Particulate Obscuration—Tape lift sampling.” 5/95 • Avg.3. the encapsulation is completed by closing the aft opening with a ground support equipment (GSE) reinforced plastic film diaphragm.3 Contamination Control After Encapsulation Contamination Diaphragm—Contamination barriers are provided to assist in protecting the spacecraft from possible contamination during Centaur operations performed after spacecraft mating.14.16 Radar 1.1.1.3. Some guidelines and practices used in the plan can be found in the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.0 10.0016 0. v/m Duty Cycle 76. 3.1 Contamination Control Before Launch-Site Delivery Design and Assembly—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.0 16.005 0.14 Radar 19.00064 0.9 114. 7).1. “Radio Frequency Environment.39. For Atlas V 500s. The doughnutshaped diaphragm stretches from the payload adapter to the aft end of the PLF cylinder and creates a protected environment for the spacecraft through mating to the Centaur. v/m = Pk.0022 0. 7).0012 0. 19. v/m* sqrt (Duty Cycle) • CW = Continuous Wave • Shaded Blocks Indicate Emitters Without Specific Mechanical or Software Mitigation. 7).17 Radar 28. PLF Cleaning Techniques—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.14 Radar 1. Materials Selection—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.6 2. A comprehensive Contamination Control Plan has been written to identify these requirements and procedures.9 0. 1.1 6.3.4 60. after the two halves of the PLF are joined. the conical 3-3 .0008 0. 3.006 CW CW CW Mitigation Procedure Mask Procedure Mask Procedure Mask Procedure Mask Procedure Mask Topography Procedure Mask None None None None Ops Min 3° None Ops Min 5° Note: • Source Taken from Aerospace Report TOR-95(5663)-1.39 Radar 19. 2) Nonvolatile Residue (NVR)—Solvent wipe sampling.0016 0. Eastern Range. Measures • Inflight Levels for Tracking Radar (0.2 Contamination Control Before Spacecraft Encapsulation Cleanliness Levels—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Contamination-critical surfaces are also verified to have less than 1 mg/ft2 of nonvolatile residue (NVR). 7). 3.16.2.

1-1) are used for pre. g Axial 1.2. Load factors are intended for application Load Condition Direction Steady State.5 ±0.2 ±0.6 evaluation of Atlas V suitability for an existing Atlas V 500 Atlas V 500 spacecraft.5 during launch and flight with the Atlas V.• Sign Convention: lbm) weight class with first lateral modes • Longitudinal Axis: + (Positive) = Compression .4 ±1.0 ±2.000 standards. 3-4 .8 environments defined in this section are maximum Flight Winds Axial 2. PLF Purge—After encapsulation. All flight Launch Lateral — ±0.1. stiffness.(Max Axial) Lateral — ±0.0 1) 907-kg (2.1.interstage adapter is temporarily sealed during ground operations to isolate the spacecraft compartment from the Centaur engine compartment. 7).5 craft as follows: Lateral — ±1. hoist. This access is used for encapsulated spacecraft mate and subsequent incursions inside the payload fairing through the access doors.0 ±2.4 Payload Fairing Helium Environment During Prelaunch Operations—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.5 expected levels and do not include margins typically Lateral ±1.1.2 ATLAS V LAUNCH AND FLIGHT Table 3. and postmate operations.3.1-1 Spacecraft Limit Load Factors for ENVIRONMENTS Atlas V 400 and Atlas V 500 This section describes general environmental Load Atlas V 400 Atlas V 400 conditions that may be encountered by a spacecraft Condition Direction Steady State.6 properties.0 Lateral — ±0.5 a conservative design envelope for a typical space.0 3.2 ±0. g Dynamic.0* ±0.000-lbm) MECO Axial 4.0 mary structure.1 Spacecraft Design Loads Lateral — ±1.2 liminary design of the primary structure and/or (Max Lateral) Axial 0.4 ±0. and work procedures are controlled to maintain the environment surrounding the PLF to Class 100.5 ±0.5 Hz and first axial mode above 15 Hz • • Pitch Axis: ± May Act in Either Direction (Atlas V 500 only).072-kg (20.5 coupling. BECO Axial 5. Load factors given are intended to provide Strap-On SRM Axial Separation Lateral — ±0. the PLF environment is continuously purged with filtered nitrogen or air filtered with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to ensure the cleanliness of the environment and preclude ingestion of windborne contamination during transport to the launch vehicle. 3.000.5 Lateral ±0.8-0. • Yaw Axis: ± May Act in Either Direction Load factors for the 500 series represent the • Lateral & Longitudinal Loading May Act Simultaneously During Any Flight Event lightest typical payload on the more severe configuration.(Negative) = Tension above 2.0* ±0.6 ±0.0 Lateral — ±0.4 associated with qualification tests.1 Design Load Factors—Design load MECO Axial 4. The response of a spacecraft to Lateral — ±2.8-0.2. Access to the encapsulated spacecraft is performed from workstands. g at the spacecraft’s center of gravity to evaluate pri. mate.2. g Dynamic. the 55X. Personnel garmenting.5 factors (DLF) (Table 3.6 400 only).000-lbm) to 9.BECO Axial 5. Clean Work Area—The Atlas V includes provisions for PLF access that maintain the spacecraft environment within the PLF to Class 100. 3.2 Hz and first axial mode above 15 Hz (Atlas V (Max Lateral) Axial 0.6 ±2. Heavier payloads and fewer SRMs • Loading Is Induced Through the cg of the Spacecraft Note: * Decaying to Zero generally result in lower load factors.000-lbm) to 19.536-kg (10.0 ±0.0 launch vehicle transients will depend on its mass Flight Winds Axial 2.000 standards.Launch Axial 1. activities. and amount of axial-to-lateral 3.1.5 weight class with first lateral modes above 8 (Max Axial) Lateral — ±0.2.5 3. 2) 4.051-kg (42.

and verification of minimum margins of safety. and notching of the base input in this frequency band is recommended. Although interface bending moments.1. and Centaur main engine cutoff (MECO) events may be analyzed. Total load factors in a direction are obtained by adding the steady-state and dynamic portion of the load factors. In this method. as required by the ICD verification matrix.1-1 include a dynamic uncertainty factor (DUF) of 1. Verification of minimum factors of safety (structural capability versus predicted load) are typically accomplished with a combination of static and sinusoidal base acceleration testing of the spacecraft. The flight verification loads cycle (VLC) requires a test-verified dynamic model of the spacecraft. Not all events are analyzed in each loads cycle. 3.2. shears. 3. airloads (at several Mach numbers). The determination of coupled responses early in the design and integration schedule allows optimization of spacecraft structure for Atlas V environments and reduces the risk of costly redesign after hardware manufacture. when the acoustic energy of the engine exhaust is being reflected by the launch pad. and to verify that Atlas V loads remain within allowables. along with a static test to verify structural capability.25–1.2. are performed. as specified by the interface control document (ICD). This factor is typically applied to preliminary coupled loads analysis responses to conservatively account for design changes or modal corrections before the final design load cycle. a modal survey test to validate the spacecraft dynamic model. Notching philosophy is the subject of early integration meetings. Lateral load factors are total and can be in any azimuth normal to the flight (longitudinal) axis. Fidelity of CLA is typically 0–50 Hz. Some events may not be analyzed dynamically if class analyses or flight experience show them to be benign.1. and deflections for drawing release. Two portions of flight have significantly higher acoustic levels than the others.25. test planning.2 Coupled Loads Analysis—Atlas V coupled loads analyses (CLA) are performed to provide the spacecraft customer with accelerations. Centaur main engine start (MES). primary structure capability is validated by static testing. Transient load analyses during integration will provide the actual loads on the space vehicle for both primary and secondary structure.2 Acoustics The spacecraft is exposed to an acoustic environment throughout the boost phase of flight until the vehicle is out of the atmosphere. Lockheed Martin does not guarantee that this will be the case for all spacecraft and DUF combinations. Following these tests. a comparison of analytical loads to allowables from test is accomplished. for determination of maximum expected flight loads.2. A DUF appropriate for preliminary models is typically in the 1.1-1 load factors are separated into a quasi-steady-state and oscillatory dynamic.Load factors for preliminary design in Table 3. Liftoff. The PDLC is typically performed with a spacecraft dynamic model representing the preliminary sizing of hardware before drawing release or qualification testing. The incorporation of a DUF to account for the preliminary nature of the dynamic characterization of the spacecraft is recommended. For heavy payloads that exceed shaker testing capabilities. booster engine cutoff (BECO).2. loads. Consult Lockheed Martin if questions exist concerning this issue. depending on the maturity of the spacecraft dynamic model. Table 3.1. These responses are provided to the spacecraft customer for calculation of spacecraft minimum margins of safety for submittal to Lockheed Martin. and axial forces calculated from preliminary design loads cycle (PDLC) analyses are generally enveloped by DLFs. The other significant level occurs for approximately 20 seconds during the transonic portion of flight and is caused by the interaction of shock 3-5 . while the more complex dynamic responses from the sinusoidal base acceleration test verify that the primary and secondary structure can withstand the dynamic loads environment. The highest acoustic level occurs for approximately 10 seconds during liftoff.50 range.

waves with a highly turbulent boundary layer. The acoustic level inside the PLF will vary slightly with different spacecraft. This is because the acoustic absorption of each spacecraft depends on its size, shape, and surface material properties. Acoustic sound pressure levels for the Atlas V 400 configuration with both the LPF and EPF are provided in Figure 3.2.2-1; levels for the Atlas V 500 are provided in Figure 3.2.2-2. The acoustic environment shown is for the standard PLF with acoustic attenuation systems as described in Section 4.1.1.3. As a mission-unique service, additional acoustic protection can be provided with resulting reduction of payload envelope. Conversely, a payload that is not sensitive to acoustics may wish to fly without the standard acoustic protection package. The levels presented are for typical spacecraft of square cross-section with 50–60% fill of the fairing by cross-sectional area. An acoustic analysis is required for spacecraft with other fill factors to bound the acoustic environment. The spacecraft should be capable of functioning properly after a 1-minute exposure to this level. For the LPF/EPF with acoustic panels, special consideration should be given to components located within 76 cm (30 in.) of PLF vents.
140.0 135.0 Sound Pressure Level, dB 130.0 125.0 120.0 115.0 110.0 105.0 100.0 32 100 160 200 250 400 500 630 800 1000 1250 1600 2000 2500 3150 4000 5000 6300 8000 40 50 63 80 125 315 10000 Atlas V 400 60% Fill (OASPL = 140.5 dB)

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Figure 3.2.2-1 Acoustic Levels for Atlas V 400 with LPF and EPF (with Acoustic Blankets)

3-6

140.0 135.0 130.0 Sound Pressure Level, dB 125.0 120.0 115.0 110.0 105.0 100.0 Atlas V 550 60% Fill Estimate (OASPL = 140.3 dB) Atlas V 530 60% Fill Estimate (OASPL = 139.4 dB) Atlas V 500 60% Fill Estimate (OASPL = 136.3 dB)

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315

1/3 Octave Band Center Frequency, Hz

Figure 3.2.2-2 Estimated Acoustic Levels for Atlas V 5-m Short PLF (180-in. Diameter Payload Volume with Enhanced FAP) 3.2.3 Vibration Estimated sine vibration levels for Atlas V 400 are similar to existing Atlas vehicles (Ref the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide [Rev. 7]). Atlas V 500 levels are TBS. 3.2.4 Shock Three pyrotechnic shock events occur during flight on the Atlas V 400 family of vehicles that potentially affect the spacecraft: (1) payload fairing jettison (PFJ), (2) Centaur separation from the Common Core Booster™ (CCB), and (3) spacecraft separation. For mission-unique Atlas V 500 applications, separation of the Centaur forward load reactor (CFLR) from the forward end of the Centaur provides a fourth pyrotechnic shock event affecting the spacecraft. The CFLR provides a structural connection between the top of the Centaur and the 5-m PLF, resulting in greater PLF stiffness and reduced loss of clearance within the payload compartment. Because the system for Centaur separation from the CCB is located far from the spacecraft, the shock is highly attenuated by the time it reaches the spacecraft and does not produce a significant shock at the spacecraft interface. This is also true for the 5-m PLF PFJ and for separation of the Atlas V 500 strap-on boosters from the center CCB. Separation devices for the Atlas V 400 PFJ are located closer to the spacecraft; thus, the shock at the spacecraft interface is noticeable. The spacecraft separation device located at the top of the payload adapter is typically closest to the spacecraft/Centaur interface and generally produces the highest shock. Figure 3.2.4-1 shows the maximum expected shock levels at the standard interface plane (SIP) (Ref Sect. 4.1.2 for SIP locations) resulting from launch vehicle events for the Atlas V 400 configurations. Figure 3.2.4-2 shows the maximum expected shock levels at the SIP resulting from launch vehicle events for the Atlas V 500 configurations. These figures represent the maximum expected environment based on a 95% probability with a 50% confidence, and a resonant amplification factor, Q = 10. The maximum allowable shock level at the equipment module interface from the spacecraft separation event is shown in Figure 3.2.4-3 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7). This shock limit capability is planned to be updated by mid-2002 (Ref Sect. 8.3.1 in this Addendum.) 3-7

10000

10000 Q=10

1000 Acceleration, g

Legend: 100 Atlas V 400 PLF Separation Atlas V Type A & A1 PLA—937 mm (37 in.) Atlas V Type B & B1 PLA—1194 mm (47 in.) Atlas V Type D PLA—1666 mm (66 in.) 10 100 1000 Frequency, Hz 10000

Figure 3.2.4-1 Maximum Expected Atlas V 400 Shock Levels at the SIP Due to Launch Vehicle Events
10000 Q = 10

1000 Acceleration, g 100 Legend: Atlas V 500 FLR Separation Atlas V Type B & B1 PLA–1194 mm (47 in.) Atlas V Type D PLA–1666 mm (66 in.) 10 100

1000 Frequency, Hz

10000

Figure 3.2.4-2 Maximum Expected Atlas V 500 Shock Levels at the SIP Due to Launch Vehicle Events 3-8

3.2.5 Thermal Within Fairing—The PLF protects the spacecraft during ascent to a nominal altitude of approximately 122,000 m (400,000 ft). Aerodynamic heating on the fairing results in a time-dependent radiant heating environment around the spacecraft before fairing jettison. The fairings use cork on the external surface to minimize fairing skin temperatures. The spacecraft thermal environment is further attenuated by the acoustic suppression system that is baselined for the PLF cylinder and the lower portion of the respective nose cones. Inner surfaces of the Atlas V 400 PLF cone and cylinder have a low-emittance finish (ε < 0.1). The inner surfaces of the composite 5-m PLF cone and cylinder have an emittance of 0.9. The peak heat flux radiated by the inner surfaces of the cone and cylinder of the Atlas V 400 PLF is less than 400 W/m2 (125 Btu/hr-ft2 ), and peak temperatures remain below 212°C (414°F) at the warmest location. The peak heat flux radiated by the inner surfaces of the cone and cylinder of the 5-m PLF is less than 914 W/m2 (290 Btu/hr-ft2 ), and peak temperatures remain below 93°C (200°F) at the warmest location. After Fairing Jettison—Fairing jettison typically occurs when the 3-sigma maximum free molecular heat flux decreases to 1,135 W/m2 (360 Btu/hr-ft2). Jettison timing can be adjusted to meet specific mission requirements. Typical free molecular heating (FMH) profiles are highly dependent on the trajectory flown. Peak FMH levels can be reduced by raising the parking orbit perigee altitude. However, raising perigee altitude will have a minor negative effect on delivered launch vehicle performance. The spacecraft thermal environment following fairing jettison includes free molecular heating, solar heating, Earth albedo heating, and Earth thermal heating, plus radiation to the upper stage and to deep space. In addition, the spacecraft is conductively coupled to the forward end of the Centaur upper stage through the payload adapter. Solar, albedo, and Earth thermal heating can be controlled as required by the spacecraft by specification of launch times, vehicle orientation (including rolls), and mission design. The Centaur nominally provides a benign thermal influence to the spacecraft, with radiation environments ranging from -45°C to 52°C (-50°F to 125°F) and interface temperatures ranging from 4°C to 49°C (40°F to 120°F) at the forward end of the payload adapter. Neither the upper-stage main engine plumes nor reaction control system (RCS) engine plumes provide any significant heating to the spacecraft. Main engine plumes are non-luminous because of the high purity of the LH2 and LO2 reactants. 3.2.6 Static Pressure (PLF Venting) The payload compartment is vented during the ascent phase through one-way vent doors. Payload compartment pressure rates are a function of the fairing design and trajectory. The LPF/EPF and 5-m PLF are designed to have a depressurization rate of no more that 6.2 kPa/s (0.9 psi/s). For the Atlas 400 series, the pressure decay rate will always be less than 2.1 kPa/s (0.3 psi/s), except for a maximum of about 5 seconds around transonic flight when the decay rate does not exceed 6.2 kPa/s (0.9 psi/s). For the Atlas 500 series, the pressure decay rate will always be less than 2.8 kPa/s (0.4 psi/s), except for a maximum of about 3 seconds around transonic flight when the decay rate does not exceed 6.2 kPa/s (0.9 psi/s). Typical depressurization rates are less than these values. Figure 3.2.6-1 illustrates typical depressurization rates for the LPF/EPF.

3-9

For the Atlas V 500. These analyses will draw heavily on the appropriate class analysis. Mission-unique contamination analysis incorporates thermal. 2) NVR redistribution.6 -0.3.0% particle obscuration.2 and 3. and configuration data. Retrorocket exhaust gases that expand around the boattail and impinge on the spacecraft are rarefied and only a small 3-10 . 3. After separation.7 Atlas V Contamination Control Depositions on spacecraft surfaces from all launch system sources are limited to 150-Å molecular and 1.0 -0.6-1 Typical Payload Compartment Pressure Decay Rate for the LPF/EPF 3.2.2. the boattail remains and shields the spacecraft from particles in the linear-shaped charge and retrorocket exhaust. however.3. eight retrorockets located in the booster intertank compartment are fired to ensure the expended booster moves away from Centaur.1.7.2. 4) PLF separation. Mission-unique verification analysis will be performed to verify spacecraft deposition requirements beyond those stated above and to verify the above requirements for mission or vehicle designs not anticipated by the system specification. the payload fairing has been jettisoned before booster separation. These deposition limits are verified by vehicle class analyses.2 Compartment Pressure Rate. The linear-shaped charge and retrorocket exhaust products pose no contamination threat to the Atlas V 400 spacecraft because the payload fairing is jettisoned after the booster separation event. These eight retrorockets use solid propellants and exhaust products consisting of small solid particles and very low density gases.0 -1. Launch system ground contamination sources were addressed in Paragraphs 3. 5) Booster separation.1 Atlas V Booster Separation—The booster is separated from Centaur with a linear-shaped charge located just aft of the Centaur aft tank ring.3.2 30 40 50 60 70 80 Time from Liftoff.1. 6) Centaur reaction control system. 3) Particle redistribution.8 -1. Launch system ascent contamination sources include: 1) Molecular outgassing.4 -0. psi/s -0. s 90 100 110 120 Figure 3.0. trajectory.

3 SPACECRAFT COMPATIBILITY TEST REQUIREMENTS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.7 Atlas V PLF Separation—LPF/EPF halves are separated by self-contained explosive bolts.1. 3. 7).fraction are condensable because spacecraft surfaces are still relatively warm from prelaunch payload compartment gas conditioning.2 Upper Stage Reaction Control System (RCS)—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.2. and migrate to spacecraft surfaces.7. 7). The separation force is provided by redundant spring actuators.1.8 Radiation and EMC The description of environments in Sections 3. 3-11 .2. Moderate molecular depositions can be expected on aft facing surfaces.2. Sheared rivets are also contained. 3.4 encompasses worst-case flight environments. Additional launch vehicle hardware cleanliness levels may be specified to meet mission-unique requirements. Satellite particulate contamination from this event has been shown by a combination of tests and analyses to be negligible. Satellite contamination from this system is expected to be negligible based on the results of analyses and tests.2.4 Separation Event—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7).3 Upper-Stage Main Engine Blowdown—Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.7.7.2. 3. 5-m PLF halves are separated by a vertical separation system that is fully contained in expandable bellows. Redistribution of NVR from launch vehicle hardware surfaces is limited because all launch vehicle sources exposed within the payload compartment will be verified to have less than 1. 3. 7).7.1–3.2. Moderate depositions to the satellite may be expected from these sources. The PLF is also vibrated as part of the cleaning process.2.7.2. 3. 3. 3. particles may be released from launch vehicle surfaces due to the vibro-acoustic environment.5 Atlas V Molecular Outgassing and NVR Redistribution—Spacecraft molecular depositions resulting from outgassing of launch vehicle materials are limited in the design phase by selecting only materials for the payload compartment that meet strict outgassing requirements. Depositions on the spacecraft will be small because the exposed launch vehicle hardware surfaces within the payload compartment will be cleaned and verified to Visibly Clean Level 2 criteria before encapsulation.0 mg/ft2 NVR before encapsulation of the satellite.7.6 Atlas V Particle Redistribution—During ascent. 3.2.

the base module that encapsulates the Centaur stage. 4.1.7-m (68-ft) or PLF 5-m Medium 23.1 Mechanical Interface—Payload Fairings (PLF) 4. Payload compartment cooling system provi.0 SPACECRAFT INTERFACES 4. The LPF/EPF used on the Atlas V 400 vehicle is identical to the Atlas II/III LPF/EPF and is described in Section 4.2 describe the payload fairings and payload support systems.1-1 Atlas V 500 5-m Payload sions are contained in the ogive-shaped portion of the Fairing (5-m Short Shown) 4-1 .1. The Atlas V user has a choice between the large payload fairing (LPF) or extendedlength payload fairing (EPF) for the Atlas V 400 configuration. 7). Adapter Payload Truss The Atlas V 5-m PLF (Fig. depending upon the vehicle configuration chosen by the launch service customer.1.4.1.1. Modifications to these envelopes and adapters may be accommodated on a mission-peculiar basis. and environmental enclosure for the payload and launch vehicle components during prelaunch and ascent. acoustic. electromagnetic. The PLF cylindrical module and ogive sections provide mounting provisions for various secondary systems.1 and 4. and either the 5-m Short 20.1. These standard components can be modified as necessary to provide missionspecific support services for the payload. and the cylindrical module that transitions into a constant radius CISA ogive nose section topped by a spherical nose cap 12.1 SPACECRAFT-TO-LAUNCH VEHICLE INTERFACES The primary interfaces between the Atlas V launch vehicle and spacecraft consist of a payload support system in which the payload is supported on top of the launch vehicle.1. and a payload fairing that encloses and protects the spacecraft during ground operations and launch vehicle ascent. The payload envelopes and vehicle interface information contained in these sections should be used only as a guideline. The Atlas program offers a range of standard payload support systems that adapt the spacecraft to the Atlas V standard interface plane (SIP) and payload fairings.1.4-m (77-ft) PLF for the Atlas V 500 configurations. The major compoBoattail nents of the fairing are the fixed conical boattail that attaches the PLF to the launch vehicle. This fairing Tank and its associated separation system are derived from an existing flight-proven system.1 of the Atlas Centaur Forward Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. Sections 4.Figure 4. This fairing is a bisector fairing with a structure made from sandwich panels with carbon fiber facesheets Centaur and a vented aluminum honeycomb core.1 Atlas V PLF Configurations—The payload fairing provides a protective thermal. Ultimate control of interface information for a given mission is governed through a mechanical interface control drawing (MICD) developed and maintained during the mission integration process.5 ft Dia which encapsulates the spacecraft.1-1) was developed along with the increased launch vehicle performance CFLR to accommodate growing spacecraft needs.1.1.1. 4.

Provisions for an RF transparent window. or an RF probe are provided on an asneeded basis.1.1-3) on the cylindrical portion of the PLF on as-needed basis. The 5-m payload fairings have four large doors in the base module portion of the PLF to provide primary access to the equipment module and the Centaur upper stage. 4.1-1 and 3.1. These doors provide an access opening approximately 914-mm (36.1. Typical access door locations are shown in Figure 4. Work platforms can be inserted through these doors into the payload compartment to allow access to spacecraft hardware near the aft end of the payload compartment.1.3-in. The Atlas V 500 can provide 600-mm (24-in. and thereby reducing the relative motion between the PLF and payload.2. reradiating antennas.2. increasing the effective stiffness of the upper section of the PLF.) tall and are located one or two per fairing quadrant. 4. Special Acoustic Absorber Foil Foam Payload Fairing Foam Disk Figure 4.1-2) is provided as a standard service to attenuate the sound pressure levels to the levels shown previously in Figures 3. Fairing acoustic protection (FAP) (Fig.1.1.1.2.1-4.) wide by 610-mm (24-in. They are also available to access the encapsulated spacecraft. Electrical packages required for the fairing separation system are mounted on the internal surface of the fairing.1. These doors can be located in most areas of the fairing cylindrical sections except near split-lines and interface planes.) in diameter spacecraft access doors (Fig.fairing.1-2 5-m Payload Fairing Acoustic Protection 4-2 . Clearance losses for payloads are minimized by the Centaur forward-load reactor (CFLR) system that stabilizes the top of the Centaur.1-2.2.

5 32 14.1.5 C -C 4.60 Co C S tructure 4.0 1 +0 0 +0.2 1.2 5 B 6.3 ∅ D -D M anufacturing (18.2 14 52 ∅ 21 ° 90 28 42 . 5° C 25 50 F D F Dimensions in Millimeters (Inches) Figure 4.05 External View Drawn Developed G F -F R3 6.2 ∅744 Remove Cork without Damaging Surface of Prepreg ° 13 11° ∅672 ∅660 ∅600 10° ∅596 ∅630 ∅666 ∅702 ∅740 ∅744 5 . 5° R5 6.25 14 ∅ 11° 11° 11° 10° . 0 .1.G-G (∅ 27) A H-H 10 .1 +0 0 .5 ’ ° 38.5 ° ° 11 11° A 10° ∅ 4 10° ∅6 B 11 ° 2 11 ° 13 ° Flight Direction 60 H 13 ° ° 13 3 3 2 H 600 mm Diameter (23.3 0.1) Surface for Sealing 1.25 26 45° S tructure D E-E 6.1-3 Atlas V 500 Standard Access Door Configuration 4-3 ∅9 .1 ∅ 32 R 92.) 5° E G 1 35 (19) 3.5) B-B 6.5 ° A-A Mounted (20.6 in.

268.53 750 37.53) 2.61) 8.04) (35.964.7 ( 950 (37.94") (36.53 ) 950 (29.851.75“) 5.744.18) TN(180°) SN (270°) Separation Plane T(0°/360°) 950 (37.53 ) 890 (35.72) 1.529 (99.201.48 924 (49.320 (130.529 2.53) (37.025 (79. S/SN Are Payload Fairing Axes Min Distance Between Two Door Centers .72") (68.57) 1.04) 4.40) (29.384.528 (335.50 1.1.38") 890 890 890 (35.916 (665.747.53) (29.682.75) View Draw Developed 2.500 (649.04)(35.529 (99.31 750 750 (72.300 1.7 (1 750 (29.04) 3.57) 16.62) Zone for Location of Centers of Payload Access Door 6.394.529 (99.5) SN (270°) S (90°) S (90°) Note: T/TN.08") 1.4 20.80) 3.45 (251.40) (29.57) 0 40 5) ∅ 15.67 (126.53) 2.280 (50.57) (99.40) S (90°) TN (180°) T (0°/360°) 950 (37.40 ( 750 (37.5 (223.73") C FLR L SIP (277.81") 2.75) C FLR L C Vent Ports L 0 40 5) ∅ 5.R16.1-4 5-m Short Payload Fairing Payload Access Door Available Location Areas 4-4 .300 (51.71) Preliminary 950 0) (37.200 Access Door Shape Circular = ∅ 600 Dimensions in Millimeters (Inches) Figure 4.1.05") 1.703 (815.18) (51.1.40) 750 (29.97 (186.39) 500 (23.98)(Calculated with ∅ 5.94 (116.53) 2.89) 950 ) ) (29.40) 750 950 750 (29.

7). manufacturing tolerances. Clearance layouts and analyses are performed for each spacecraft configuration and. if necessary.1.2-1 shows the usable spacecraft volume provided by the 5-m Short and 5-m Medium payload fairings. The spacecraft volume near the aft end of the static payload envelope is determined by the payload support system and is discussed Section 4.1. clearance between the spacecraft and payload fairing is maintained. Figure 4. out-of-round conditions.2. This envelope represents the maximum allowable spacecraft static dimensions (including manufacturing tolerances) relative to the spacecraft/payload adapter interface. To accomplish 4-5 .1.1.1. The useable volume for a spacecraft inside of the Atlas V 500 5-m payload fairing is defined by the static payload envelope. These envelopes include allowances for spacecraft and PLF static and dynamic deflections.2 Atlas V Static Payload Envelopes—The static payload envelope for the LPF/EPF used on the Atlas V 400 vehicle is identical to that used on the Atlas II/III LPF/EPF and is described in Section 4.1.1. They were established to insure that a minimum 1-in. critical clearance locations are measured after the spacecraft is encapsulated inside of the fairing to ensure positive clearance during flight.4. and misalignments.2 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.

The Type C2 Adapter B1 adapter has a 1. thermal shields) in the vicinity of the envelope or for protrusions that may extend outside the envelopes shown. The payload support system includes the mechanical and electrical interfaces between the launch vehicle and spacecraft. and trusses that mate the spacecraft to the launch vehicle.4-m (87-ft) length. The Type D adapter has a 1. 7).)-diameter forward interface ring Common Equipment and is compatible with the 1666A adapter. The Atlas V 500 5-m Medium PLF can be stretched an additional 3-m (10 ft) to a 26. Potential users should contact Lockheed Martin for more information..1 Atlas V Payload Adapter Interfaces—The Atlas V payload adapters are the same configuration as the flight-proven designs used on the Atlas II/III vehicles. These changes do not affect the spacecraft interface requirements.1. The Atlas V offers a range of payload adapters. These Module adapters are described in Section 4.1.0-in.2 Mechanical Interface—Payload Support Systems The payload support system provides the attachment point for the spacecraft and adapts the spacecraft to the Atlas V standard interface plane (SIP).1. 4. Stretches in length also require evaluation for impacts on flight dynamics and performance. however.2 of the At(CEM) las Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. All of the Atlas payload adapters and separation systems Split Line are designed so that they can be modified to allow the spacecraft to be oriented inside of the payload fairing to best meet mission requirements. 4.2-1).1.)-diameter forward interface ring and is compatible with the Truss (optional) 1194A adapter. it is important for the spacecraft description to include an accurate physical location (including the maximum manufacturing tolerances) of all points on the spacecraft that are within 50 mm (2 in.1. bolted interfaces.1. The SIP for the Atlas V depends upon the support configuration and occurs at either the forward ring of the Centaur common equipment module (CEM) or the top of the launch vehicle-provided payload support truss (Fig. payload processing facilities would need to be assessed.2. 4.) of the allowable envelope. antennas. For spacecraft secondary structures (e.this.Figure 4.215-mm (47.2. The Type B1 and D adapters are being upgraded to accommodate Atlas V weight class spacecraft. 7). alternate adapter designs can be developed on a mission-peculiar basis.g. Figures 4. Impacts to the launch site are minimal. The only differences that affect the payload interface are minor changes to the cross-sectional geometry of the payload adapter forward rings.666mm (66.0-in.2-3 and (SIP) 4-6 . which are identical to those shown in the Atlas Launch System Mission Plan. In addition. coordination with the Atlas V program is required to define appropriate envelopes.2-1 Atlas V Standard Interface Plane ner’s Guide (Rev. These adapters Payload use a launch vehicle-provided Marmon-type Adapter clampband payload separation system.

3 Payload Support System Structural—The allowable spacecraft weights and longitudinal centers of gravity for the Type B1and D adapter/separation systems. For spacecraft that provide their own adapter and separation system.1.2 173-in. which is similar to the type C1 except that it is 22 inches high. This mission-unique interface is described in Section 8.2. and E adapters. a 2.2.1. a bolted interface is provided by the equipment module or Type C. or C2) adapter is used. C1.2-2.2. 7).1. etc. In order to avoid overstressing the Centaur. The Centaur tank capabilities depend on the forward ring of the payload support truss. B. The interface to the spacecraft for this truss is shown in Figure 4. and an aluminum alloy forward ring (Fig.1.2. are also compatible with the Atlas V vehicle within their specified payload structural capabilities. 7). and C2 adapters.2. When this truss is used. A1.2-1). the standard adapters (B1. The 914-mm (36-in.) are installed on top of a type C2 adapter. Actual spacecraft design allowables may vary depending on interface ring stiffness and the results of spacecraft mission-peculiar coupled loads analyses.1. it must provide interfaces for ground handling.8g shown in Figure 4. encapsulation.1.1.971-mm (117-in.)-diameter bolted interface is being conceptually designed and could be available as a mission-unique option for future heavy payload needs. 4. 4-7 . The spacecraft interfaces and static envelopes for these options are identical to those currently used on the Atlas II/III and are described in Section 4.1. aluminum alloy forward and aft brackets. equipment module and 173 inch truss for the Atlas V 400 and Atlas V 500 are shown in Figures 4.1. The truss is composed of graphite epoxy struts. Spacecraft weight includes all payload systems weight including the payload support system. Coordination with the Atlas program is required to define the appropriate structural capabilities for spacecraft designs that exceed these generic allowables. spacecraft that exceed the allowable curve for Centaur tank capability may require an upper forward load reactor between the spacecraft or dispenser and the PLF. Additionally.2.1. Lockheed Martin will furnish a matchmate tool for use in positioning and drilling the bolt holes that mate to the equipment module. or payload support truss as appropriate.4 as a future enhancement.1. titanium alloy end fittings. raises the spacecraft in the payload envelope to avoid interference between the aft end of the spacecraft and the new torus required for the 5-m PLF. The reference point for the allowable spacecraft cg height is dependent upon the payload support system used and occurs at the forward ring of the payload adapters. For Atlas V 500.-diameter payload interface truss is being developed to meet future payload interface requirements.1. described in Section 4.-Diameter Payload Truss—A 173-in. and transportation equipment. These spacecraft mass and cg capabilities were determined using generic spacecraft interface ring geometry and a quasi-static lateral load factor as noted on the aforementioned figures. 4.2-4 for mechanical interfaces and Figures 4.2 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. In particular.1. the static payload envelope extends to the top surface of the payload support truss forward ring. C1.2-8 and 4. there will need to be mechanical provisions and envelope allowances for three torus arm fittings and an encapsulation diaphragm unless a launch vehicle-supplied intermediate (type C.3-2 respectively.2.2-11 for static payload envelopes. replacing the CFLR.3-2 are predicated on relatively light spacecraft. Centaur equipment module. 4.1. which is installed on top of the CEM. The existing Type A. Heavier spacecraft typically have lower load factors.3-1 and 4.4. The Atlas V series lateral accelerations of 1. The C2 adapter.2 of the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.2. If a customer-provided spacecraft adapter is used. D.) high truss interfaces with the forward stub adapter on the upper stage.

2-1 Payload Truss Adapter 173-in. Diameter—18 Equally Spaced Hard Points 4-8 .1.2.Forward Ring (Payload Interface) Forward Bracket Clevis Centaur Forward Load Reactor P/L Fairing Centaur Forward Ring (Payload Interface) Forward Bracket Forward Stub Adapter Interfacing Hardware Strut Aft Bracket Clevis & Spherical Bearing Strut Interface Ring to Stub Adapter Aft Bracket Stub Adapter Interfacing Hardware Figure 4.

System Requirements SIS V5.2 (3.5 g) Atlas V 400.0 (1. 3.00) Dimensions in Millimeters (Inches) ∅ 4.5 g) 10000 9072 8147 9072 9072 9072 8000 Spacecraft Weight.6 (1.2.375) Diameter Bolt 4 Pl Hole Pattern Detail 18 Pl Figure 4. 3. Equipment Module/Type B1 Capability (1. Equipment Module Capability (1.5 g.2.1.1.1 (1.00) 57. cm 400 0 500 Figure 4.1 (2. Equipment Module/Type D Capability (1.250) 28. 3.394 (173. 3.2-2 Atlas V 500 Standard Mechanical Interface for 173-in.0° 18 X Shear Hole for 9.5 g Lateral.500) 76. Interface Atlas V 400.394 (173.∅ 4. kg 8147 7784 6940 6518 6000 6237 5203 4740 4459 4000 3724 6368 5670 4667 4173 3469 2898 2000 0 0 100 200 300 Spacecraft cg Location Fwd of Sep Plane.5 g Compression) Atlas V 400.5 g.5 g) Atlas V 400.125) 38.3-1 Atlas V 400 Allowable cg Location 4-9 .5 (0.5 g.000) 20.

4. 4.2.1.20412 Spacecraft cg Location Above the Sep Plane.2 SPACECRAFT-TO-GROUND EQUIPMENT INTERFACES Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. cm Figure 4. 4-10 . 7).3 RANGE AND SYSTEM SAFETY INTERFACES Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7).3 Electrical Interfaces Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.3-2 Atlas V 500 Allowable cg Location 4.1. 7).

5-1 .0 MISSION INTEGRATION Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.5. 7).

0 SPACECRAFT AND LAUNCH FACILITIES Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.6. 7) for spacecraft facilities. Launch facilities details are TBD. 6-1 .

Detailed information is TBS.7. 7) for general launch operations information.0 LAUNCH OPERATIONS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7-1 .

1 Atlas V 500 Shock Levels Figure 8.1 MISSION-UNIQUE ENHANCEMENTS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 8. 10000 Q = 10 1000 Acceleration. Hz 1000 10000 Figure 8. g 100 Frequency. Hz 100 125 160 200 250 315 400 500 630 800 1.1-1 shows maximum allowable spacecraft-produced shock levels at the Centaur common equipment module (CEM).100 2.000 5.0 ATLAS V SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS The Atlas Mission Planners Guide (Rev. A number of additional enhancements are planned for the Atlas V launch vehicle configurations to increase the competitiveness of the Atlas V in the launch services market.000 5.3.) 8.2 ATLAS EVOLUTIONARY ENHANCEMENTS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev.600 10. 8. This capability is planned to be available by mid-2002. 7). 7) contains many enhancements to the Atlas family of launch vehicles.000 10 100 1000 Frequency. 7.3.000 Acceleration.8.1-1 Maximum Allowable Spacecraft-Produced Shock at Equipment Module Interface 8-1 .3 ATLAS V SHOCK ENHANCEMENTS 8.3. G Peak 150 175 220 260 320 400 500 725 1.

The payload envelope provided in the 5-m PLF using this interface is shown in Figure 8.4. 0. 2 Holes (36 Plcs) 1.378 in. The payload interface duplicates the existing Titan IV 2490 skirt interface (Fig.750 in. 8.)-diameter payload truss has been conceptually developed to meet future heavy lift spacecraft interface requirements.1-2).382 in. and an aluminum alloy forward ring (Fig. aluminum alloy forward and aft brackets.1-1 117-in. Diameter Target 5° 10° (36 Plcs) 0. The truss is being designed to carry heavy-lift spacecraft masses and their associated cg locations. This interface would be used inside the 5-m PLF on either the Atlas V 500 or Atlas V HLV configurations for evolutionary heavyweight payloads.4. The 914-mm (36-in. Figure 8.1 117-in.8.4 ATLAS V HEAVY-LIFT ENHANCEMENTS 8.-Diameter Interface Definition 8-2 .4.500 in.-Diameter Payload Truss A (117-in. 0. The truss is composed of graphite epoxy struts.1-3. Alignment Pins (4 Plcs) BC 117. titanium alloy end fittings.645-in.4.4.)-high truss interfaces with the forward stub adapter on the Centaur upper stage.1-1). 8.

1-3 Atlas V 500 and Atlas V HLV Payload Fairing Configurations with the 117in. Truss Adapter 8-3 .) High Payload Fairing Cylindrical Module Figure 8.-Diameter Truss 914-mm (36-in.-Diameter Payload Truss Payload Fairing Base Module Boattail & Interstage Adapter Structure Figure 8.Payload Fairing (PLF) Ogive Nose Section Standard IF Plane (117-in.1-2 117-in.4. Dia) Common Equipment Module Payload Truss Adapter Centaur Tank 117-in.4.

Table 8.155 kg 6.5.285 kg 8-4 .133 kg 5.5.5. Table 8.5 ATLAS V 400 SERIES PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT 8.1-1 Atlas V 400 versus 500 Series Performance Summary with Solid Rocket Boosters Number of SRBs 4x1 5x1 x=1 6.1-1 provides an example of the relative performance capability to GTO for 4x1 versus 5x1 configurations for one and two SRBs.1 Addition of Solid Rocket Boosters to Atlas V 400 Series Launch Vehicles The baseline Atlas V 400 launch vehicle configuration includes the provisions to accommodate the addition of up to four solid rocket boosters (SRB).8.270 kg x=2 7. This capability may be made available for future use in response to launch service market requirements.

AND PRODUCTION Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. 7).APPENDIX A—ATLAS HISTORY. A-1 . VEHICLE DESIGN.

7).APPENDIX B—MISSION SUCCESS AND QUALITY ASSURANCE Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. B-1 .

7).APPENDIX C—SPACECRAFT DATA REQUIREMENTS Refer to the Atlas Launch System Mission Planner’s Guide (Rev. C-1 .

Feet Gravity Guidance Commanded Shutdown Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Gaseous Helium Gaseous Nitrogen Ground Support Equipment Geostationary Orbit Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit High-Efficiency Particulate Air Horsepower G-1 .GLOSSARY AMPG AVMPG BECO Btu °C CCAS CCB CEM CFLR CLA cm Ø dB dBm dBW dc DEC DLF DUF ε EM EMC EPF °F FAP fps ft g GCS GEO GHe GN2 GSE GSO GTO HEPA hp Atlas Mission Planner’s Guide Atlas V Mission Planner’s Guide Booster Engine Cutoff British Thermal Unit(s) Degree(s) Celsius Cape Canaveral Air Station Common Core Booster™ Common Equipment Module Centaur Forward Load Reactor Coupled Loads Analysis Centimeter(s) Diameter Decibel(s) Decibel(s) Relative to 1 Milliwatt Decibel(s) Relative to 1 Watt Direct Current Dual-Engine Centaur Design Load Factor Dynamic Uncertainty Factor Emissivity Electromagnetic Electromagnetic Compatibility Extended Length Large Payload Fairing Degree(s) Fahrenheit Fairing Acoustic Protection Feet per Second Foot.

hr Hz ICD IFR Isp k kg klb km kN kPa kV kVA lb lbf LEO LH2 LHe lm LN2 LO2 LPF µV m M Max Max Q MECO MES mg MHz mils min mm mps mV N N2H4 nmi ns Hour(s) Hertz Interface Control Document Inflight Retargeting Specific Impulse Thousand Kilogram(s) Kilopound(s) Kilometer(s) Kilonewton(s) Kilopascal(s) Kilovolt(s) Kilovolt Ampere Pound(s) Pound(s)-Force Low-Earth Orbit Liquid Hydrogen Liquid Helium Lumen(s) Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Oxygen Large Payload Fairing Microvolt(s) Meter(s) Million Maximum Maximum Dynamic Pressure Main Engine Cutoff Main Engine Start Milligram(s) Megahertz Thousandths of an Inch Minute(s) Millimeter(s) Meters per Second Millivolt(s) Newton(s) Hydrazine Nautical Mile(s) Nanosecond(s) G-2 .

NVR Ω ωρ Pa PDLC PFJ PLF PSW PSWC RCS s SEC Sep SEPP SRB SRM VAFB VIF VLC Nonvolatile Residue Ohm(s) Argument of perigee Pascal Preliminary Design Loads Cycle Payload Fairing Jettison Payload Fairing Payload Systems Weight Payload Systems Weight Capability Reaction Control System Second(s) Single Engine Centaur Separation Systems Effectiveness Program Plan Solid Rocket Booster Solid Rocket Motor Vandenberg Air Force Base Vehicle Integration Facility Verification Loads Cycle G-3 .