Figure 1. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument: Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 2. Casa Grande: Site map of compounds. (General Information Regarding Casa Grande Ruin, Arizona. United States Department of the Interior. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1913. 16-17.)

Figure 3. Coronado State Monument: Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 4. Dorgan House, Big Bend National Park: Site photo. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 5. Dorgan House: 1950s after abandonment, prior to preservation work. (Castolon Historic District: Big Bend National Park, Texas. Division of Interpretation and Visitor Services, Big Bend National Park, Feb. 1997, 16).

Figure 6. Dorgan House: Fallen mud plaster has piled up against the wall base. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 7. Fort Craig National Historic Site: Site photo. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 8. Fort Davis National Historic Site: Site photo. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 9. Fort Selden State Monument: Site photo. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 10. Fort Selden: Trees planted on or near their historic locations to shield the historic walls from damage by windborne particles. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 11. Fort Union National Monument: Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 12. Fort Union: Photo of the Mechanic’s Corral, 1866. A typical example of the territorial style of adobe architecture used at the Fort. (<http://www.nps.gov/archive/foun/adhi/fig5.jpg> 5/20/07).

Figure 13. Paquimé (Casas Grandes): Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 14. Pecos National Historical Park: Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 15. Tumacacori National Historical Park: Site photo. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 16. Tumacacori: Marks caused by water damage visible on the interior of the church building. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 17. Fort Selden: Walls constructed for the test wall project conducted on the site. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 18. Paquimé: Historic walls covered in multiple layers of new old adobe mud. The photo depicts deterioration of the protective earthen plaster. While the plaster should not be allowed to accumulate at the wall bases, the coating does not need to be reapplied immediately upon deterioration, as many layers must deteriorate before the historic material is reached. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 19. Example of the use of wall caps for the conservation of earthen walls at Pecos. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 20. Fort Union: Original brick cornices remaining on adobe walls. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 21. Fort Selden: Coving and undercutting is occurring to many of the wall bases at the Fort. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 22. Fort Selden: Deteriorated sections are removed before new adobes are placed in the wall bases. (Caperton, Thomas J. “Stabilization of Fort Selden’s Ruins.” Association for Preservation Technology (APT) Bulletin 22, No. 3 (1990): 32.)

Figure 23. Fort Craig: Deterioration pattern to the earthen remains of the storehouse caused by rain and lack of a good drainage system. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 24. Fort Craig: Plants growing around the ruins. Vegetation on earthen sites should be planned and/or controlled. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 25. Pecos: Vegetation growing out of a historic wall. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 26. Fort Union: Wall braces. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 27. Fort Selden: Wall brace, more visually intrusive than those used at Fort Union. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 28. Casa Grande: Ruins, prior to construction of the first shelter in 1902. (Photo from: <http://www.nps.gov/archive/cagr/adhi/fig12.jpg> 5/20/07)

Figure 29. Casa Grande: First site shelter, constructed in 1903. (Photo from: <http://www.nps.gov/archive/cagr/adhi/fig14.jpg> 5/20/07

Figure 30. Casa Grande: Current shelter. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 31. Fort Davis: Concrete bond beam installed on top of the adobe walls causing damage to the historic material. (Photo by author, Jul. 2006).

Figure 32. Tumacacori: The deteriorated church building in 1886. (Photo from: <http://www.nps. gov/archive/tuma/Pres_Efft.html> 5/20/07

Figure 33. Coronado: Reconstructed room. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

Figure 34. Coronado: Outlining of historic wall locations through the laying of adobe brick. (Photo by author, Aug. 2006).

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