NEIGHBORHOOD

protection report

2011

Dear neighbors:
Thank you for your tremendous support of the Chicago Cubs in 2011. Each year, we are proud to share with the community our efforts aimed at helping to enhance the quality of life of Lakeview residents, while ensuring the fan and visitor experience inside and outside Wrigley Field is the best in baseball. We kept this commitment in 2011 and through our annual investment of more than $750,000, we reduced traffic congestion in the area, proactively communicated to residents about events and activities in the neighborhood and helped keep our community clean and safe. We also made some notable achievements in 2011 which are highlighted below.

• Nearly 50,000 fans took the free shuttle to Wrigley Field from the remote
parking lot at DeVry University helping alleviate traffic.

• More than 6,000 bicyclists took advantage of the free valet service during the
regular baseball season.

• Reached more than 8,000 subscribers with our neighborhood newsletter which
included regular updates about activities inside and outside the ballpark. The Chicago Cubs also continued our support of CubFund, a $1 million, 12-year commitment by the team to fund unanticipated neighborhood protection and improvements for matters related to Cubs baseball games and other events at Wrigley Field. To date, the Cubs have donated more than $800,000 to the fund. We are also proud of our investments in the community. In 2011, the Chicago Cubs provided charitable grants of more than $1.9 million to deserving area non-profit organizations. The team also donated 60,000 tickets to nearly 400 community and social service organizations throughout the year. We continue to actively participate in community organizations and activities, while working hard to address concerns and issues raised by neighbors. Thank you for your help long the way. We look forward to seeing you in 2012.

Julian Green Vice President, Communications and Community Affairs

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REmOtE PaRkING OPERatION
In the eight years since the Cubs assumed operation of the remote parking lot at DeVry University at the request of the City of Chicago, the parking lot has continually experienced overwhelming success. During the 2011 season, which includes 52 night and weekend games and two concert dates, nearly 17,000 cars parked at DeVry University and more than 46,000 fans rode the free shuttle to Wrigley Field. Every car using the remote parking facility helps reduce traffic congestion around Wrigley Field. The Cubs are required to pay the City a penalty tax on total revenue because fewer than 1,000 cars use the lot. In 2011, the Cubs paid a penalty tax of $73,634 to the City of Chicago. In addition, the operation of the lot costs the Cubs more than $100,000 a year. This season the remote parking lot was operational for 54 dates including every Cubs night and weekend game during the season and the two musical performances. Highlights of the year include:

2011 season began. Fans could also download information about the remote facility from the Cubs’ Web site, www.cubs.com. Brochures explaining the shuttle bus and other transportation options were distributed by hotels in and around the Chicago area. Transportation alternatives were also suggested on the back of season parking and daily sale coupons for all Cubs parking lots.

• Total cars parked: 16,997. • Total fans using the lot: 46,109. • Average number of cars per night game
(regular season): 297.4.

The team and the City worked together to continue use of the electronic message boards on Western Avenue, Irving Park Road and Addison Street, near Rockwell to promote the remote parking facility. These signs were in place for all night and weekend games at locations adjacent to City streets. Static signage on many streets in the area, as well as on the Edens and Kennedy expressways, further helped direct cars to the lot.

• Average number of cars for all games
(regular season): 308.25.
1200  

2011  DeVry  RiderShip  Average  

• Average number of cars for Sunday games
(regular season):356.91.
1000  

• Largest single game usage: 515 cars. • Largest concert usage: 524 cars.
The Cubs created television and radio advertising for the remote parking facility to help encourage its use. The advertising highlighted its convenient location and affordability. Cubs season ticket holders and online purchasers were sent information with their ticket orders before the

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BIkE CHECk SERvICE
In 2011, the Chicago Cubs once again offered its popular free bicycle check service from its valet location on Clark Street, just north of Waveland Avenue. The bike check operated throughout the regular season and continued for all event dates at Wrigley Field, including musical performances. Bike service began three hours before the scheduled event time and ended one hour after the conclusion of the event. A total of 6,063 bikes used the free service during the regular baseball season.

tRaffIC maNaGEmENt autHORIty
The Office of Emergency Management and Communication’s Traffic Management Authority was again instrumental in working with the Cubs and the community to reduce traffic congestion and coordinate traffic flow during events. The flexibility of TMA personnel is key to addressing shifting traffic needs. The number of TMA personnel increased or decreased, as attendance varied and traffic patterns changed, or with availability of staff. Typically 48-49 traffic aides are posted in the streets around Wrigley Field to control vehicular traffic for event dates. The Cubs reimburse the City of Chicago for the cost of TMA traffic aides. In 2011, the total payment through September 19 was $383,448.40. The following traffic pattern ideas have been offered by neighbors and businesses during the course of the season. Each should be evaluated as a way to determine best practices to address Cubsrelated traffic around Wrigley Field:

• Stop traffic on Sheffield Avenue for all
games beginning when stadium gates open two hours prior to game time.

• Stop NB traffic on Racine (from Addison to
This free bike check service continues to host a regular clientele of riders and continues to be a major contributor to reductions in vehicular traffic in the community. In addition to the Cubs official bicycle check service area, hundreds of fans locked their bikes to one of the many bicycle racks around the park. Many Cubs employees and vendors 2011 Bike Check Monthly Totals serving the ballpark also used the bike valet service.
2011 Bike Check Monthly Totals

Grace) in the 30 minutes after each game. Objective: Help keep NB Clark Street clear for bus traffic.

• Night Games — Coordinate traffic signals
on Irving Park WB to Western Avenue after games. Objective: Keep WB Irving Park available for cars headed to expressway. Note: Must fix the stoplight at Southport and Irving Park so it coordinates.

• Night Games and weekend games —
April May June July August September April May June July August September

503 1,362

452 1,119

Facilitate a bus lane on NB Clark Street from Waveland to Irving Park. Objective: Smooth post-game traffic flow.

1,228 1,362

503

452

1,399 1,119

• Stoplights at the intersection of Clark Street
with both School and Roscoe streets to replace the stop signs.

1,228

1,399

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The City of Chicago implemented an offset centerline on Westbound Irving Park Road between Clark Street and Ashland Avenue. The new striping allows two lanes of Westbound traffic at all times and should help facilitate traffic exiting the area after stadium events. The Cubs supported this effort. The two westbound lanes are an asset to assist traffic operations.

the following assisted with traffic issues in 2011, promoting alternate means of transportation and other ways to reach the Friendly confines:

• In-game announcement during Cubs television and radio broadcasts. • Promotion of CTA service on Wrigley Field scoreboard. • In-park announcements during games. • Detailed information available at all times on cubs.com. • Printed brochures distributed to hotels and other visitor venues.

PROmOtION Of altERNatE tRaNSPORtatION
The Chicago Cubs continue to use valuable television and radio broadcast time and print advertising to promote public transportation and alternate means of getting to the ballpark, including CTA, Pace, the remote parking lot at DeVry University and the bike valet operation. Brochures mentioning these services have been printed and distributed for the past eight years.

PERmItS
On July 1, 2008, in an effort to increase the availability of parking for the residents of the 44th and 46th Wards, Residential Parking Zone 383 replaced the LV2 Night Game Parking Program on most streets between Broadway on the east, Ashland Avenue on the west, Belmont Avenue on the south, and Irving Park Road on the north. The Residential Permit Parking Ordinance was amended to add towing protection for night baseball between the hours of 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. As a result of these changes, residents in Residential Permit Parking Zone 383 do not qualify for LV-2 Parking Passes. LV2 Parking Passes are only valid in areas designated as LV-2 Zones. These changes have significantly reduced the printing costs. Printing costs for the Neighborhood Night Game Parking Permit stickers, guest vehicle placards (Single Game and All Game Placards) and Access Passes in LV-2 zones are the responsibility of the Chicago Cubs. In 2011, the Cubs paid $5,351.22 for the City’s permit program.

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CHICaGO tRaNSIt autHORIty
Fan surveys during the 2011 season found significate numbers of Cubs fans took CTA and other forms of public transportation. Additional rail service was provided for weeknight Cubs games via southbound Purple Line Express trains, which stop at Sheridan; and Yellow Line trains, which operate two hours later than the regular schedule from Howard. Cubs’ fans can also access detailed information published in the Cubs monthly magazine, Vine Line and Cubs Yearbook. Information was also provided to season ticket holders and other ticket purchasers. Fans can also access Wrigley Field from several CTA bus routes, including #8 Halsted, #22 Clark and #152 Addison. Riders traveling to the game on the Purple line often use the Sheridan station located one block north of Wrigley Field. Season ticket holders as well as online purchasers were sent information about public transportation with their ticket orders before the 2011 season began.

PaCE
Use of the Pace bus program was very strong during the 2011 season. In part, this was due to the promotion on radio broadcasts and in Wrigley Field. Pace operated its Schaumburg shuttle from the Northwest Transportation Center and a nonstop shuttle service from the Yorktown Shopping

Center in Lombard, Illinois. Up to six buses are staged on Clark Street and ready for the return trip one half hour after the last out of the game. The service is well received by Pace users and offers a convenient way to get to Wrigley Field from the western suburbs on most game days and all night and weekend games. In 2011, the ridership on the Wrigley Field Express from Schaumburg was 25,797, and ridership from Lombard was 14,662 for a combined total of 40,459 Pace riders.

Brochures explaining transportation options were sent to local hotels in and around the Chicago area. Transportation alternatives were suggested on the back of daily parking coupons for all Cubs parking lots. Information on public transportation and remote parking at DeVry was also placed in all Cubs game-day programs.

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lIttER, tRaSH REmOval
Among the efforts undertaken by cubs in 2011:

• Cleaned area bounded by Clark Street,
Sheffield Avenue and Waveland Avenue. This included emptying garbage bins on opposite sides of the street.

• Picked up trash after games and following
morning.

• Emptied public trash bins every Saturday,
after each event and on holiday weekends and other times when City service is lessened and garbage is increased, even when unrelated to Cubs games.

• Emptied trash bins around the park during
games.

• Power-washed sidewalks immediately
adjacent to Wrigley Field (north side of Addison Street, west side of Sheffield Avenue, south side of Waveland Avenue, east side of

• Emptied public and Cubs-owned or -placed
trash bins at corners or locations in the area bounded by Halsted Street, Montrose Avenue, Damen Avenue and Belmont Avenue, and in the area bounded by Kenmore Avenue adjacent to Challenger Park and Kelly Park and Seminary Avenue adjacent to Kelly Park after Night Games, and in all Cubs (or affiliate) owned-or-operated Wrigley Field parking lots on all game days (typically three hours after a game).

• Cleaned and swept streets near the park,
including Sheffield, Wilton, Fremont, Grace, Waveland, Racine, Seminary, Kenmore, Clifton, Alta Vista, Byron, Patterson, Eddy and Cornelia.

• Hand cleaned neighborhood using
Clark Street) at least once per homestand. These sidewalks adjacent to all Wrigley Field parking lots owned by Cubs were power washed several times during the season. “Cleanstreet” on Saturdays when the team is away.

• Offered a recycling program around the
exterior of the ballpark.

• Made in-park announcements during each
game (e.g., throw away trash in bins before leaving the park and throw trash only in bins outside of the park).

• Neighborhood clean up and trash
removal was performed by Cubs staff and By the Cleanstreet crew.
After each game, Cubs operations crews began their work approximately three to four hours after the game ended. The crews worked three zones dressed in bright shirts identifying them as “Cubs Night Crew.” Each group had a blue dumpster with Cubs logo to help further identify them. The Cubs hired Allied Waste, Inc., to empty public trash bins and additional cans in an area of approximately a two square mile boundary. Halsted, Belmont, Ashland and Montrose are the boundary area. This area contained approximately 215 trash containers; all were emptied after each game as well as selected non game days, including Saturdays in April through October. Cleaning also took place after all special events.

• Stationed trash bins and personnel at exits
to ask people to deposit trash, non-souvenir cups, wrappers, etc. in bins before exiting the park.

• Posted signs to remind fans to throw away
trash in bins before exiting the park and throw away trash in bins outside the park.

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GamE tImES
Cubs played 30 regular season night games in 2011. No baseball games were scheduled during the Pride Parade. The 2012 Cubs schedule is currently available at www.cubs.com and was made available as a pocket schedule to fans and residents during the last homestand. Early notification of the schedule was found helpful in facilitating neighborhood and community event planning.

behavior. Following the music performances this summer, additional private security teams of off-duty police officers were placed at key intersections until the early morning hours to further this effort.

• To sign up for neighborhood alerts, visit
cubs.com/neighbors

Additional Game Day protections
cubs provided and funded the following in 2011:

COmmuNICatIONS
• Sent monthly newsletter and alerts to
municipal entities and neighborhood leaders during the course of the season.

• Portable restrooms placed in each Cubsowned or affiliated parking lots.

• Bleacher restrooms available for one hour
after games.

• Communicated with neighbors via e-mail
through Cubs Community Connection

• Reached more than 7,600 who have signed
up for regular updates.

HOtlINE aND COmmaND CENtER
At the request of our neighbors, the Cubs funded a command center and hotline operated by the Chicago Police Department to address calls from neighborhood residents during Cubs home games. This command center is staffed by Chicago Police and used for roll call for both the CPD detail and the TMA units. The hotline is operated by Chicago Police Department personnel.

• In 2011, 782 new subscribers registered for
the newsletter.

• Approximately one e-mail per month was
sent to provide news and timely information about activities at Wrigley Field, schedule changes, etc.

• Promoted notice of game time changes. • Continued participation in community
meetings and neighborhood association meetings to keep in touch with the community, stay informed and share information. Attended more than 75 meetings in 2011.

Game day hotline: 866-4-cpD-toW on game days before, during and after the game. To contact Cubs about community concerns at other times: 773-404-4175. For emergencies: Always dial 9-1-1.

• Worked with members of the Wrigley Field
Traffic Operations Committee before and during the season to review performance and share notes and ideas.

• Continued neighborhood watch by Cubs
crowd management personnel to observe fans post-game and deter inappropriate

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muSIC
paul Mccartney Musical performances On July 31 and Aug 1, Paul McCartney continued the tradition of great music and entertainment at Wrigley Field with two sold-out performances. As a special offer to Lakeview residents, the Cubs offered an advance online pre-sale opportunity through the Cubs Community Connection Newsletter. Thousands took advantage of the presale opportunity, while several hundred people opted to enjoy the sounds from Waveland and Sheffield avenues outside the ballpark.

Authority, as well as executing pre-event publicity for public transportation all helped ensure a wellmanaged crowd and event. Sound reports indicate noise levels were within or below the expected range. There were few complaints, if any, about trash, noise or any other issue following the events. Wrigley Field has hosted 11 successful concerts since 2005. Each concert has been a great for music lovers, Lakeview residents, Chicago and the local economy. We are encouraged by the favorable responses we received in 2011 and hope to continue the tradition of attracting great events to keep Wrigley Field a thriving contributor to the excitement and quality of the Lakeview community and the City of Chicago.

BlOCk PaRtIES
Between June and August, the Chicago Cubs held three block parties during the Yankees, White Sox and Cardinals series, in an effort to improve the game day fan experience and offer another exciting event for the Wrigleyville neighborhood. The block parties attracted more than 1,000 attendees daily

As a result of the two performances, more than a half million dollars in taxes were generated for the City of Chicago and Cook County. Area businesses reported an increase in business on the nights of the shows, a big help in a slow economy. The Cubs stepped up its neighborhood protections in the community during the shows. Though the Cubs neighborhood hospitality team remained on the streets around the park to provide a visible deterrent to loud noise and disruptive behavior following each show, concert attendees departed stadium grounds in an orderly and respectful manner. Neighborhood reports indicated few issues, mostly related to the need for towing of illegally parked cars. The team’s collaboration with the Chicago Police Department, the Office of Emergency Management and Communications and the Traffic Management

and were free and open to the public. No game ticket was needed to enter. The events included food, drinks, family-friendly games and live music before and after Cubs games.

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Events like the Wrigley Road Tour from Wrigley Field to Miller Park in Milwaukee brought additional promotion for safe cycling in Lakeview. With 649 riders from 24 different states and three countries, the ride helped raised $320,000 for Chicago Cubs Charities and World Bicycle Relief educational programs.

In October, the Cubs 11th Annual Wrigleyville Neighbors Day welcomed more than 1,200 residents to the Friendly Confines for free food and refreshments and a chance to play catch on the field. The Cubs donated more than 60,000 tickets to nearly 400 community organizations throughout the year. The Cubs’ wives eighth annual food drive to benefit the Lakeview Pantry took place August 6 and brought in 17,000 pounds of food. The wives’ annual food drive helps the Lakeview Pantry to supply food to those in need and is the Pantry’s largest food drive each year. Chicago Cubs players and coaches were also active in the community, visiting hospitals, schools and taking part in on-field clinics for charitable purposes during the year. The Cubs charitable efforts extended to youth clinics for wheelchair softball with the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago; inner city youth at Wrigley Field and Little Cubs Field at Humboldt Park; visits to Children’s Memorial Hospital and Northwestern Memorial Hospital; ticket donations for youth groups; fundraising events to benefit UNICEF for Japanese tsunami; and, Dempster Family Foundation.

COmmuNIty affaIRS
In 2011, Cubs associates participated in more than 75 meetings of community organizations and served on the boards of neighborhood associations, chambers of commerce and non-profit groups. Chicago Cubs Charities and the McCormick Foundation, through its fund Cubs Care, together granted more than $1.9 million to Chicago nonprofit organizations in 2011. Cubs fundraising events and donations raised more than $2.2 million in 2011 representing the largest amount ever raised. The fifth annual Race to Wrigley 5K hosted more than 7,600 runners and raised more than $175,000 for Chicago Cubs Charities and Children’s Memorial Hospital. The Inaugural Cubs Bricks and Ivy Ball raised more than $1 million. Other events included: Cubs Convention, Wrigley Field Tours, Wrigley Road Tour, MLB online auctions, “Meet the Team, Have a Ball,” “Hey Dad, Wanna Have a Catch?” and 50/50 Raffle. The Cubs also participated in the 2011 Pride Parade on a Cubs-themed Trolley with team owner Laura Ricketts. The trolley also appeared at the Bud Billiken Parade on the South side. Last January, the Cubs Caravan began its annual trek with Chicago Cubs players, coaches and front office personnel visiting six cities, two Boys & Girls clubs, five elementary schools and two high schools. The Caravan also made stops at Chicago’s Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the USO of Illinois at the Great Lakes Naval Academy. The Caravan stopped in Lakeview, including visits to Lake View High School, St. Luke Academy, Mt. Carmel Academy and Burley Elementary School.

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CuBfuND RECOmmENDatIONS
CubFund is a $1 million commitment made by Cubs to fund unanticipated needs in the community over a ten year period. The Cubs contributed more than $148,574 to CubFund for 2010 and the fund maintains an available, unspent balance of an anticipated $972,428. CubFund is available to be used in furtherance of neighborhood protection and improvement for matters related to Cubs baseball games and other events at Wrigley Field. It is intended to fund unanticipated expenses related to the impact of Cubs baseball games on the area surrounding Wrigley Field. CubFund may be used within the area bounded by the North Branch of the Chicago River, Diversey Parkway, Lake Michigan, Buena Avenue, Clark Street from Buena Avenue to Montrose Avenue and adjacent blocks, and at or around any remote parking lots. Uses are determined by the aldermen of wards neighboring Wrigley Field after input from the Cubs, the City of Chicago and the community. During the past few years, a number of suggestions have been made by Cubs and area residents for potential uses of CubFund. Among them are:

• Increased lighting in the blocks immediately
west of Wrigley Field.

• A private hospitality team to be a deterrent
on neighboring streets after night games, much like the teams used for musical performances.

• Re-naming the Red line Addison ‘el’ stop
“Cubs-Addison” (similar to “Sox35th”) to encourage greater use by fans visiting from out of town.

• Crosswalk at Irving Park and Seminary (plus
stoplight).

• CTA fare card machine for Wrigley Field. • Enhanced or variable message boards. • Update/Replace electronic message
boards.

• Additional lighting at Challenger Park.

• Additional buses for the remote parking lot
to help reduce the time it takes to return to the lot after games and thereby promote additional use of the lot.

We hope you enjoyed reading about the Cubs Neighborhood Protection and Improvement program and its role in being a good neighbor and steward in the community. These efforts remain an important part of the on-going partnership between the Cubs and our neighbors and will continue into 2012.

• A traffic study designed to identify the
most efficient ways to direct traffic west of the ballpark after games.

• Creation of “No Parking” zone on NB
Clark Street following games to facilitate traffic flow from the neighborhood. This would take out of commission two pay boxes, roughly 15 cars for three hours. The City may need to reimburse its private parking meter “pay-and-display” vendor for the loss of revenue during such hours. Such reimbursement is a legitimate use of CubFund dollars.

thank you for your help making these efforts possible. We look forward to seeing you in and around the community in the year ahead.

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