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American

Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


Course Description
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the Colonial and Romantic periods in American Literature. In our study of these periods, we will include the major movements, genres, and authors. We will place the literature in a relevant cultural and historical context and examine how history and literature interrelate. We will use the fundamental tools of literary interpretation in the discussion, analysis, and evaluation of the literature. In this class students will: Understand and appreciate literature as a valuable source of intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic experience reflecting and enriching the human experience. Read literature within such contexts as nationality, historical period, ethnicity, and culture. Apply appropriate critical theories to literary texts. Continue developing library skills for literary research and document formal writing according to MLA guidelines. Integrate secondary texts into written work. reading notes you have taken (not notes written in your book, however).Quizzes cover the days reading and can take three different forms: 1) formal five question quizzes, 2) cold call quizzes where I call on students randomly to respond to questions orally, and 3) various in-class writing tasks. These quizzes cannot be made up under any circumstances except University excused absences. Since each quiz is only worth five points, missing one or two will not damage your grade, but be careful as these points do add up.

Reading/Writing Discussion Boards


About once a week, we will have discussion board responses based upon what we read. Usually students enjoy this project because it is a forum to express your own opinion about what you have read, and it is also interesting to see what other people think. We may, at times, use your responses as starting points for in-class discussions, and your writing could be selected and read aloud in class.

Reflective Learning Blog


At the end of each week, you will reflect on your experiences related to our class on a blog on our I-Learn page, discovering what you have learned through your reading and studying, in-class discussions, research, writing, etc. You will respond to questions such as What have you learned this week? How have you participated this week in class?

Course Organization
Texts
Baym, Nina, ed. The Norton Anthology: American Literature.7th ed. Vols. A & B. New York: Norton, 2007. Print.

I-Analysis
For the I-Analysis, you will pose an insightful question about a work and then find passages from the reading that help you develop conclusions about your question. This assignment can be used as prewriting for the short paper if you would like.

Assignments
The course will be comprised of the following assignments (point totals are approximate and subject to change):

Quizzes and In-class Writing Reading/Writing Discussion Boards Reflective Learning Blog I-Analysis Short Paper Informal Criticism Research Presentations Oral Presentation Discussion Group Writing Portfolio 5 Page Paper Revised Short Paper I-Analysis 3Discussion Board Responses Final Exam
Late Assignments Not Accepted All assignments due at beginning of class

150 75 30 25 50 10 50 10 150

Short Paper
You will write a short three page paper which responds to and interprets a work from our reading.

Informal Criticism Research Presentations


At some point in the semester, you will be asked complete a couple of informal research tasks that deal with a critical theory in relation to a work we are studying. You will report your findings to small groups in several five minute presentations. You will also turn in a write-up summarizing what you found in your research.

100

Oral Presentation
You will sign up for one oral presentation that you will do in groups of two or three. The presentation will be about one historical events or periods listed on the course outline.

Daily Quizzes

Quizzes will be given at the beginning of most classes. The purpose of these quizzes is not to trick you but to reward you with points for attending class and for doing your reading carefully. To illustrate my goodwill, during the quiz you can use any handwritten Darin L. Hammond Rigby Hall 300

Discussion Group
For this assignment, you will simply come to class, prepared to discuss an assigned work with a group of about four students. 496-4382 email: hammondd@byui.edu

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


Students will be brought into the group randomly, so it is important to come well prepared on the days where discussion groups are due. The class will form a circle around the small group and observe the conversation. The discussion group will then bring the class into the discussion. You will be evaluated on your level of participation, preparation, and insight. forms will become revision guides as you move from assignment to assignment. The third form of feedback that you will receive from me is an end note at the bottom of the feedback form. I usually keep these very brief and address my comments to you personally. All three forms of feedback are intended to coach and help you. You will be most effective in progressing as a writer if you accept the feedback with humility and a desire to improve rather than becoming defensive about your writing. Please remember that I am on your side, and I want you to succeed. Nothing will make me happier than every student in the class raising their skills to a level where everyone receives an A. A = 100- 94% 93-90% 89-87% 86-84% 83-80% 77-79% 76-74% 73-70% 69-67% 66-64% 63-60% 59-0%

Writing Portfolio
This is our major project for the semester, and the centerpiece of the portfolio will be a 5 page paper about one of the works we have read during the semester. This paper must include research on the critical history of the work, and it might include historical or other research as it is relevant. I anticipate that you will need at least 3-5 sources to accomplish this effectively. Also, this portfolio will include your revised short paper, I-Analysis, and 3 model discussion board responses.

A- = B+ = B =

Excellent Very good

Final Exam
We will have a final exam in our room at the date and time on the official testing schedule (see the last entry in our course outline below).

B- = C+ = C =

Average

Optional Assignment
You have the option of memorizing and reciting a poem or a passage (you can recite in a group if you would like). Each recitation you do will be worth 5 points, and you can recite up to two times. These must be completed BEFORE midterm, no exceptions.

C- = D+ = D =

Below average Incomplete

D- = F =

Of course a grade will be attached to your written work, based upon the project as a whole. This is called holistic grading, and it means that the grade reflects the overall effectiveness of the project with all of the individual parts and skills taken into consideration. The grade will be applied in accordance with the following scale.

Policies and Procedures


Grading
In giving feedback on your written work, I see myself as a coach. In this role, I try to encourage you in things that you are doing well. I also try to provide you with constructive feedback as a reader of your paper. You will notice that I react to your paper as I read through it, with notes in the text and in the margins that reflect what I am thinking as I read your paper. Since audience awareness is essential in effective writing, these comments are intended to help you see and understand how someone besides yourself reacts to your written message. In addition to these comments directly on the text of your paper, I will provide you with a feedback form which will give you a quick view of your performance on specific skills pertaining to each assignment. In this class you are not in competition with each other for a grade, but you are evaluated on your mastery of the skills essential to the writing task. I will provide you with the feedback form for each task when you receive the assignment. This will allow you to become familiar with each of the criteria prior to my evaluation of your work. I hope that these feedback Darin L. Hammond Rigby Hall 300

I am always happy to discuss any graded assignment with you, but to encourage you to take responsibility for your own work, I need you to do a couple of things for me. First, wait 24 hours to schedule an appointment with me. This will give both you and I some distance from the paper and some objectivity. Second, this will also provide some time for you to think of some revision ideas for your paper. Please come to this conference with at least three ideas to improve your paper, and this will be a starting point for our discussion. Please be aware that no single paper or assignment can destroy your grade. I make an effort in the class to balance the points that come from the papers with other assignments such as quizzes and draft work.

Attendance

Since much of our learning will take place in class as we discuss, analyze, and write together, attendance is mandatory. You can earn an extra percentage point or two on your final grade with your perfect attendance. You are allowed two absences for whatever reason (illness, funerals, weddings, etc.), and each absence thereafter will result in a final grade reduction of one percent. Eight absences or more will be grounds for failure of the course. The only excused absence must be university approved (field trips, conferences, etc. for other classes), so plan your absences 496-4382 email: hammondd@byui.edu

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


accordingly. Three late arrivals (after the prayer) will equal an absence. Absence is never an excuse for a late assignment, no exceptions, so talk with me before the due date if you are having problems. Also, quizzes cannot be made up under any circumstances.
Humility and dedication in applying feedback from past

assignments to current assignments

Passion and commitment in writing, reading, and learning

Awesome Help for All Students


Go to http://www.byui.edu/AcademicLearning or the McKay Library 272 for information about how the writing, reading, math, and study skills centers can help you increase success in all of your classes. To schedule a tutor for a specific class, log on to Tutor Request under Student Services and follow the instructions.

Class Participation
You are expected to come to class daily with your reading and writing assignments accomplished and ready to discuss ideas with the class and small groups as suggested in the BYU-I Learning Model. If you do not participate in class, your learning will be hindered, and your grade will be affected. Your grade can be reduced by up to 20% if over the course of the semester you have failed to be an active participant in the learning of the class. You will account for your participation and learning in weekly reflective learning blog entries.

Academic Honesty/The Honor Code

Blackboard and Email


For this class you will be expected to monitor your campus email and blackboard daily. Frequently you will receive assignments, instructions, reminders, etc., and you will be expected to access those before our class period. In addition, lost or missed handouts can be accessed through blackboard. All major assignments will be posted as attachments on discussion boards. If you access your campus email rarely, forward your mail to the address you use.

The BYU-Idaho Catalog clearly describes academic honesty on; I highly recommend that you review this section. Please consult the catalog for specific definitions of plagiarism (for example, you can plagiarize unintentionally) and dishonesty as well as the associated penalties (for example, expulsion and/or failing the class). In addition, adhering to the Honor Code will help bring the spirit into our classroom. Failure to follow the guidelines included in the Honor Code will result in a conference with me and an absence for the day in the case of physical appearance.

Grievances
I make every reasonable effort to consider your attitudes, values, beliefs, and feelings as I choose material to teach course-related concepts. I take great care in choosing the works we read. In the unlikely event that I offend you or, in your opinion, I overstep my bounds, please come talk to me about it. I promise to listen to your concern, to take it seriously, and to explain my actions, if necessary. Follow this advice, offered by the Savior: if a teacher offends you, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone (Mat. 18:15). Finally, consider the following from a 1995 Scroll article: There are several steps students can take if they have any concerns about a teacher, his/her teaching method, or the way students are treated in the classroom. The first and most effective way is to talk to the teacher directly. This step solves 90% of problems between teachers and students, [Max] Checketts [academic vice president at BYUI] said. If students dont understand what is being taught, they should go directly to the teacher for clarification. Students have the right to contact the professor and make an appointment with him or her to discuss concerns. Going to someone above the teacher first is a waste of time ... Students will have better luck if they start at the bottom; itll save a lot of extra headaches. Students end up talking to the teacher anyway. Teachers have the right to hear student concerns about them first. By going to someone above them, students are not giving teachers the opportunity to represent themselves fairly. ... Another concern students have is the subject material 496-4382 email: hammondd@byui.edu

Conferences
I always love to collaborate with you in your reading and writing. Please feel free to come by my office or chat after class. Remember as we meet together that I cannot take over your paper. In other words, I am here to be a sounding board and a reader for you. You cannot simply send me an email draft of your paper asking me to make it an A or to fix it for you. The paper would become mine instead of yours. So, come to our conferences with three or four areas you would like some feedback and input on. Remember that it is your paper, and I will always try to help you make it the best you can without taking it over. Also, students usually find the Writing Center extremely useful in revising their work.

Success
This is an intensive class, but you can succeed, and I want to assist you. Several things will help in meeting your goals for the semester: Regular attendance and active participation in class Thorough studying and application of readings 6 hours minimum studying and writing time outside of class per week An inquisitive and open mind with readingslooking for value rather than flaws Effective application of writing process on writing projects: prewriting, drafting, rewriting, editing Willingness to use resources such as writing center, tutors, textbooks, etc. to revise and polish written work Individual initiative in generating ideas and goals for improving reading and writing skills Darin L. Hammond Rigby Hall 300

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


being presented to the class. ... [BYUI] cant skip teaching sensitive issues. Were a Church school and we must give the same education as one would get at another [university].

Students with Disabilities


BYU-Idaho is committed to providing a working and learning atmosphere which reasonably accommodates qualified persons with disabilities. If you have any disability which may impair your ability to complete this course successfully, please contact the Services for Students with Disabilities Office at (208) 496-1158. Reasonable academic accommodations are reviewed for all students who have qualified documented disabilities. Services are coordinated with the student and instructor by this office. If you need assistance or feel you have been unlawfully discriminated against on the basis of disability, you may seek resolution through established policy and procedures by contacting the Personnel Office at (208) 496-1130.

Sexual Harassment

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination against any participant in an educational program which receives federal funds, including federal loans and grants. Title IX also covers student-to-student sexual harassment. If you encounter unlawful sexual harassment or gender-based discrimination, please contact the Personnel Office at (208) 4961130.

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Tentative Course Outline Follows

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


Tentative Course Outline
APR Introduction to the Course 19 T To Be Assigned in Class Discussion Board, Oral Presentation, Reflective Learning Blog, Quizzes 21 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday (This item will appear for each class period as a reminder for you) Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM (This item will appear for each class period as a reminder for you) Prepare for a quiz (including syllabus and assignment sheets) Read Syllabus and assignment sheets Stories of the Beginning 17-31 Columbus 31-35 Bartolome De Las Casas 35-39 Cabeza de Vaca 40-48 To Be Assigned in Class Discussion Group Sign-up sheets 26 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Read Bradford 104, 114-138 Bradstreet 187-188 o The Prologue 188-189 o The Flesh and the Spirit 202-204 o The Author to Her Book 204-205 o Before the Birth of One 205-206 o To My Dear and Loving 206 o For Deliverance from 211-212 o Here Follows Some 212-213 o To My Dear Children 214-217 Taylor 267-268 o Psalm Two 268-169 o Meditation 38 273-275 o Scan a few other Taylor poems 28 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: Beginnings to 1700 1-16 Read Mather 307-308, 308-313 Calef 334-335, 335-342 To Be Assigned in Class I-Analysis Discussion and Activities The Salem Witch Trials MAY Due 3T Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Discussion Group Read Edwards 384-386, 386-396 Woolman 587-595 Pearl of G. P. JSH 1:1-54 To Be Assigned in Class Optional Assignment, Midterm and Final Exam Study Sheet Discussion and Activities Conversion narratives 5 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: American Literature 17001820 357-367 Read Franklin 449-451, 463-473 Adams 616-617, 617-629 Paine 629-630, 630-637, 643-649 Discussion and Activities John Adams movie clips 10 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: Native Americans: Contact and Conflict 437-449 Read Jefferson 649-651, 651-665 The Federalist 665-674

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


12 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM I-Analysis Discussion Group Read Emerson 1106-1110 o Nature 1110-1113 (Intro. & Ch. 1) To Be Assigned in Class Short Paper/Portfolio Discussion and Activities Transcendentalism 17 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Read Freneau 742-743 o The Indian Burial Ground 745-746 o On Mr. Paines 748-749 o On the Religion of Nature 749-750 Wheatley 751-752 o On Being Brought 752-753 o To S.M., a Young African 760-761 o To His Excellency 761-762 o Letters 763-764 26 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Short Paper Read Irving 951-953 (read his stories kind of quickly as you are familiar with the plots) o Rip Van Winkle 953-965 o The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 965-985 To Be Assigned in Class Critical Theory Activity Discussion and Activities Critical theory 31 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: Irving, Poe, Hawthorne and the Evolution of the Short Story Informal Research Presentationscritical theory summary Read Hawthorne 1272-1275 o The Ministers Black 1311-1320 o The Birthmark 1320-1332 o The May-Pole of Merry 1304-1311 To Be Assigned in Class Notes on Theory Discussion and Activities Notes on Theory JUN Due 2 TH Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Informal Research Presentationsjournal article summary Read Poe 1528-1532 o The Fall of the House 1553-1565 o A Tell-Tale Heart 1589-1592 o The Purloined Letter 1599-1611 o The Cask of Amont. 1612-1616 To Be Assigned in Class Final Paper 7 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Read Poe o The Raven1536-1539 o The City in the Sea 1534-1535 o Annabel Lee 1542-1543 Longfellow 1495-1497 o The Slave Singing 1498-1499 o The Jewish Cemetery 1502-1504 Whittier 1507-1508, 1509-1510

19 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral PresentationNative Americans: Resistance and Removal 1252-1271 Read William Apess 1051-1052, 1053-1058 The American Scholar 1138-1151 The Divinity School 1151-1163 Discussion and Activities Primary texts 24 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: American Literature 18201865 Discussion Group Read Henry David Thoreau 1853-1857 o Resistance to Civil 1857-1872 o Walden, Ch. 2, 1914-1924

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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American Literature Pre-Colonial to Romantic ENG 334


9 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation: Slavery, Race, and the Making of American Literature 16821698 Read Lincoln 1627-1628, 1628-1636 Whitman 2282-2284 (stanzas 1-7) Stowe 1698-1701, 1780-1792 14 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Discussion Group Read Jacobs 1808-1809, 1809-1829 16 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Read Douglass 2060-2064, 2064-2082 Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral Presentation Section, Region, Nation 16821698 Read Douglass 2082-2108 23 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Discussion Group Read Douglass 2108-2129 28 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Discussion Group Read Whitman o Song of Myself 2210-2254 (read only sections 1-10; 12-14; 16-30; 44-52) o When I Heard 2274 o The Wound Dresser 2279-2281 21 T 30 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Read Melville 2304-2308, 2405-2436 Discussion and Activities Discuss portfolio format JUL Due 5T Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Discussion Group Read Herman Melville 2436-2461 7 TH Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Portfolio To Be Assigned in Class Final Exam Discussion and Activities Catch up and Review 12 T Due Discussion board 15 minutes before class, Tuesday Learning blog, Friday by 5:00 PM Oral PresentationWhitman and Dickinson Answer Emersons Call for American Literature Read Dickinson 2554-2558, read at least 10 of her poems that look interesting Discussion and Activities Be prepared with questions about Midterm/Final Exam Study Sheet Review for Final Exam

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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