Food Hardship in America 2011

Data for the Nation, States, 100 MSAs, and Every Congressional District
February 2012

2011

was another year of difficult economic struggles for American households, and the most recent food hardship data demonstrate that. When asked by the Gallup organization, “Have there been times in the last twelve months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your family needed?” more people answered “Yes” in the third and fourth quarters of 2011 (19.2% and 19.4%) than in any period since the fourth quarter of 2008. While the fourth quarter of 2011 saw more robust employment growth, a positive development which has continued in early 2012, economic progress in 2011 was painfully slow for tens of millions. Unemployment and underemployment rates stayed high. Median weekly earnings for wage and salary workers (adjusted for inflation) were lower in the fourth quarter of 2011 than in 2010. And particularly damaging to any recovery in food security was the rate of food inflation. While the overall inflation rate remained subdued, food inflation, especially for the types of cooking-from-scratch foods the government uses to construct its cheapest hypothetical diet, the Thrifty Food Plan, rose fairly rapidly. As a result, the Thrifty Food Plan cost 6.2 percent more in December 2011 than in December 2010. In short, economic struggles largely persisted, and the struggles of the millions of households at the bottom of America’s increasingly unequal income distribution to put adequate food on the table got worse. In broad swaths of the country more than one in six households (16.7% or more) answered the Gallup question “Yes.” These areas included:   the Southeast (21.9%), Southwest (21.2%), Western (18.7%) and Midwest (17.4%) regions 30 states

 

64 of the 100 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas1 269 of 436 congressional districts

These areas are not alone, however, in having a problem of many families unable to afford adequate food. Hunger is a national problem, with high rates pervasive in states, metropolitan areas and congressional districts. Mississippi may have the worst rate among states, with one in four (24.5%) of households reporting food hardship, but the “best” state, booming North Dakota, has one in ten households struggling with hunger – just as unacceptable a problem given its economy. The worst MSAs may be in California (Fresno and Bakersfield), but 96 of 100 MSAs have at least one in eight (12.5% or more) households reporting food hardship. The five worst congressional districts may be in Arizona, California, Florida, New York and Texas, but 384 congressional districts have rates of 12.5% or more. What this report shows is that the need for efforts to reduce hunger are essential to every state, every MSA, every congressional district. Americans don’t always recognize how pervasive hunger is, or that it is a problem where they live. In our communities it is often hidden by families that don’t want to share their economic struggles. Sometimes it hides behind doors of nice houses with mortgages in default or the heat turned off. And often it goes unseen by those not looking for it. In a poll conducted in 2011 for Tyson Foods and FRAC, two-thirds of Americans rated hunger as a worse problem at the national level than at the community level. But what the Gallup data show is that Americans in every community are hungry. Fortunately, polls demonstrate that Americans in every community want the federal government to attack hunger aggressively, not slash anti-hunger efforts. In a poll conducted for FRAC in January 2012, seven in 10 (69%)
Regional and State data in this report are for 2011. MSA and Congressional District data are for 2010-2011 combined, in order to produce adequate sample sizes to reduce margins of error.
1

voters said the federal government should have a major role to ensure that low-income families and children have the food and nutrition they need. Only 12% of voters, roughly one in eight, thought the federal government is spending too much money on hunger, while 78% of voters say the federal government should be spending more money on solving hunger or should continue to spend the same amount. When voters are told that Congress is considering cutting billions of dollars to reduce government spending, by 77% to 15% they say cutting food assistance programs like the food stamp program is the wrong way to reduce government spending. And these attitudes cross party lines. The data in this report are a tool to help opinion leaders, policymakers and advocates build on this public support and assure that city and state officials and state and national elected representatives tackle hunger with the zeal that both the situation and the public will demand.

This report looks at new Gallup data for 2011 and examines 2011 food hardship rates (or, for smaller geographic areas, 2010-2011 rates). The appendix contains charts providing the data:  for the nation, by month throughout 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011;  for all states in 2011;  for the 100 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in 2010-2011, alphabetically;  for all congressional districts, alphabetically by state, for 2010-2011 combined; and  for all congressional districts, in rank order by food hardship rate, for 2010-2011 combined.

Food Hardship in the Nation – What Happened in 2011
FRAC’s analysis for the nation as a whole in 2011 shows that 18.6 percent of respondents reported food hardship that year – up modestly from the 2010 level (18 percent).
National Food Hardship Rate, 2008-2011 Year Food Hardship Rate 2008 2009 2010 2011 17.8 18.3 18.0 18.6

About This Report
This report is one of a series in which the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) has been analyzing survey data collected by Gallup through the Gallup-Healthways WellBeing Index (“Gallup-Healthways”) and provided to FRAC. Before Gallup-Healthways launched its survey in 2008, there had never been a study with a sample size adequate to analyze food hardship data not just nationally and in states but at the Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and congressional district levels, or to look at food hardship data in the states on a yearly basis, or to look at national data on a monthly basis. Because Gallup’s partnership with Healthways is interviewing 1,000 households per day almost every day, year-round, that makes possible the depth and breadth of analysis in this report. (Further technical notes on the sample size and methodology appear at the end of the report.) The specific food hardship question that Gallup-Healthways poses is: “Have there been times in the past twelve months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your family needed?” In this report we define a “yes” answer as reflecting “food hardship.” FRAC uses this phrase to avoid confusion with the Census Bureau/USDA study that produces annual “food insecurity” numbers, but the concepts are comparable.

This is the highest annual rate in the four years FRAC has been analyzing the Gallup data. Similarly, the rates in the third and fourth quarters in 2011 (19.2 percent and 19.4 percent, respectively) were the highest since the last quarter of 2008. And the rate in October 2011 was the highest since November 2008. This bump-up in late 2011 seems to be the result of rising food prices, continuing high unemployment and underemployment, and flat food stamp benefits. The interplay of these three factors – unemployment, food prices, and SNAP benefits and eligibility – has been crucial during the four years Gallup has been collecting the data. In the first year, 2008, there was a dramatic rise in food hardship (from 16.3 percent in the first quarter to 19.5 percent in the fourth quarter) – a rise that tracked the hard fall into recession during that year. Unemployment rates rose and food prices rose as well.

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National Food Hardship Rate by Quarter, 2008-2011 Quarter 1st 2008 2nd 2008 3rd 2008 4th 2008 1st 2009 2nd 2009 3rd 2009 4th 2009 1st 2010 2nd 2010 3rd 2010 4th 2010 1st 2011 2nd 2011 3rd 2011 4th 2011 Food Hardship Rate 16.3 17.1 18.2 19.5 18.8 18.0 17.9 18.5 18.0 17.5 17.9 18.7 17.9 18.0 19.2 19.4

A separate FRAC analysis in 2011 based on USDA-generated data from 2000-2010 (2011 data are not yet available) showed that median food spending for all households had plummeted during the decade, and especially in the recession. Median spending on food for all Black households and Hispanic households fell to the point where it was only a tiny bit above (101 percent for Black households) or was actually below (96 percent for Hispanic households) the amount needed to purchase the Thrifty Food Plan. The 2011 food hardship data strongly suggest that 2011 purchasing power will prove to have eroded further.2

Food Hardship by Region
Looking at the rates of food hardship in the USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s seven geographic regions, the hardest hit regions in 2011 were the Southeast and Southwest, and the regions with lower rates were the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Mountain Plains. This largely tracked the state and local rates, as will be seen in later sections. Every region except the Mountain Plains had a higher rate in 2011 than in 2010. (To see which states are in each Food and Nutrition Service region, go to www.fns.usda.gov/fdd/ contacts/fsnro-contacts.htm.)
Food Hardship by Region, 2011 Food Hardship Rate 16.2 17.4 16.3 16.3 21.9 21.2 18.7

Then, after late 2008, the food hardship rate flattened out and declined modestly in 2009. While the nation’s economic crisis continued and unemployment rates kept climbing in 2009, food prices stopped rising and fell back, to a degree; SNAP/Food Stamp beneficiaries received a significant temporary increase in monthly benefits as part of the 2009 economic recovery legislation; and food stamp participation rose rapidly to meet the needs of newly unemployed people and those whose hours of work or wages fell. The food hardship rate dropped nearly two full points in mid-2009, before edging back up. In 2010, little changed, for better or worse. The deep pain of the recession continued. Job losses, fewer hours of work and reduced wages kept the food hardship rate high. The 2010 food hardship rate for the year as a whole was 0.3 percentage points lower than in 2009, but the difference was very small. This modest deterioration continued in 2011, particularly late in the year. Likely this resulted from: too little bounce-back in the job market, especially for workers with lower pay to begin with, less education, and lesser prospects for re-employment; and serious food inflation – 6.2 percent over the year – in the components of the Thrifty Food Plan. The 2009 boost in SNAP benefits was accompanied by a suspension of the annual costof-living increase in benefits. In effect, then, in 2011 beneficiaries lost 6.2 percent of their food purchasing power.

Region

Mid-Atlantic Midwest Mountain Plains Northeast Southeast Southwest Western

Food Hardship in the States
There was considerable variation from state to state around the country – the worst state’s rate (24.5 percent) in 2011 was nearly two and a half times that of the state with the lowest rate (10 percent). Still, the problem of not having money to purchase needed food is a problem of significant dimension in every state – one in ten is hardly acceptable.

2 To read A Tightening Squeeze, visit www.frac.org/pdf/ cost_of_food_white_paper_2011.pdf

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Top 20 States for Food Hardship, 2011 State Mississippi Alabama West Virginia Kentucky South Carolina Georgia Tennessee Florida Texas Louisiana Oklahoma Arkansas North Carolina Delaware Arizona Indiana Nevada Ohio Missouri California Food Hardship Rate 24.5 23.4 22.5 22.3 21.9 21.7 21.7 21.6 21.6 21.3 21.3 21.1 21.1 21.0 20.5 20.3 20.0 19.8 19.5 19.3 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 8 8 10 10 12 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

central cities plus the surrounding counties with strong economic and social ties to the central cities. In looking at MSA food hardship rates, FRAC aggregated 2010 and 2011 data to yield sample sizes with smaller margins of error. Of the 100 MSAs with the largest number of respondents to the Gallup-Healthways survey in 2010-2011, 25 had at least one in five respondents answering that they did not have enough money to buy needed food at times in the last 12 months, and 79 of the 100 largest MSAs had 15 percent or more of households affirmatively answering this question. Again, while there was variation around the country, the inability to purchase adequate food was a serious problem in virtually every MSA. In only four MSAs was it below 12.5 percent (one in eight respondents).
Top 25 MSAs for Food Hardship, 2010-2011 Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Bakersfield, CA Fresno, CA Asheville, NC Greensboro-High Point, NC Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Orlando-Kissimmee, FL Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Dayton, OH Lakeland-Winter Haven, FL Oklahoma City, OK New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA Birmingham-Hoover, AL Columbia, SC Tulsa, OK Jacksonville, FL Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Knoxville, TN Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL Albuquerque, NM Memphis, TN-MS-AR San Antonio, TX Las Vegas-Paradise, NV Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL Baton Rouge, LA Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate 25.3 24.3 23.8 23.7 23.7 22.6 22.5 22.4 21.9 21.9 21.7 21.3 21.2 21.2 21.1 20.9 20.8 20.5 20.5 20.2 20.2 20.2 20.1 20.1 20.0 Rank 1 2 3 4 4 6 7 8 9 9 11 12 13 13 15 16 17 18 18 20 20 20 23 23 25

Seventeen states had at least one in five respondents (20 percent or more) answer that they did not have enough money to buy food at some point in the last 12 months. Forty-two states overall, including the District of Columbia, had 15 percent or more of respondents affirmatively answering this question. In only two states did fewer than one in eight respondents answer the question affirmatively. Mississippi, as in 2010, was the state where people were most likely to say that there were times when they did not have enough money to buy food. Of the top 14 states with the worst rates, eight were in the Southeast, four in the Southwest and two in the Mid-Atlantic region. Data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia are in the Appendix.

Food Hardship in Metropolitan Areas
The Gallup-Healthways survey also gives an in-depth look at food hardship in the nation’s Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). MSAs are Census Bureau-defined areas that include

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Despite the common impression that urban poverty and economic hardship are clustered in the Northeast and Midwest, most of the MSAs with the highest rates of food insecurity were in the Southeast and Southwest, plus California. Of the 25 MSAs with the worst rates, five were in Florida, three were in California, and two each were in Louisiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas.

the District of Columbia). FRAC aggregated 2010-2011 data to yield sample sizes with smaller margins of error at the congressional district level. The results show how widespread is families’ struggle to afford food. 48 congressional districts had a food hardship rate of 25 percent or more – at least one in four respondents answered the Gallup-Healthways question yes. 162 congressional districts – well over one third – had at least a 20 percent rate of households that faced food hardship, and 323 had rates of 15 percent or higher. Only 14 districts in the country reported a rate lower than 10 percent. In other words, virtually every congressional district in the country had more than one in
Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate 33.3 32.7 32.6 32.4 31.8 31.5 30.4 29.9 29.8 29.7 29.4 29.2 28.8 28.3 28.2 28.0 28.0 28.0 27.7 27.7 27.7 27.6 27.2 27.2 27.1 26.8 26.5 26.4 26.3 26.2 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 16 19 19 19 22 23 23 25 26 27 28 29 30

Food Hardship in Congressional Districts
The Gallup-Healthways survey also provides a large enough sample to enable the measurement of food hardship in every one of America’s 436 congressional districts (including

Top 30 Congressional Districts for Food Hardship, 2010-2011 State Texas New York Florida California Arizona Florida Florida California Michigan California Michigan California Texas California Texas California California Mississippi Kentucky North Carolina Texas California Alabama South Carolina Illinois Illinois Pennsylvania Alabama New York Louisiana District 29 16 3 34 4 23 17 35 13 20 14 18 30 43 28 31 37 2 5 1 9 38 7 6 2 4 1 1 10 2 Representative Gene Green José E. Serrano Corrine Brown Lucille Roybal-Allard Ed Pastor Alcee L. Hastings Frederica S. Wilson Maxine Waters Hansen Clarke Jim Costa John Coyners Jr. Dennis A. Cardoza Eddie Bernice Johnson Joe Baca Henry Cuellar Xavier Becerra Laura Richardson Bennie G. Thompson Harold Rogers G.K. Butterfield Al Green Grace F. Napolitano Terri A. Sewell James E. Clyburn Jesse L. Jackson Jr. Luis Gutierrez Robert A. Brady Jo Bonner Edolphus Towns Cedric L. Richmond

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ten respondents reporting food hardship. The median congressional district had a rate of 18.2 percent. Of the 30 districts with the worst rates, eight were in California, four were in Texas, three were in Florida, and two each were in Alabama, Illinois, Michigan, and New York. The appendix includes two separate lists with the food hardship rate for every congressional district in the nation in 2010-2011. The first is designed to make it easy for readers to find rates in specific districts of interest to them: it is organized alphabetically by state and, within the state, by the congressional district number. That list gives the rate for each district and also shows where each district ranks nationally, with 1 being the highest (worst) food hardship rate and 436 being the lowest. The second list is organized by rank among the 436 districts, with 1 being the highest rate and 436 being the lowest. Ranking 300th or even 400th on this list, however, should not be a point of pride. After all, the “best” district in the country has one in 13 households suffering food hardship. What this list shows is that food hardship is a problem in every corner of America, and should be a concern for every member of Congress. In the end, the nation’s food insecurity problem doesn’t boil down to the 48 districts with rates over 25 percent or even to the half of all districts above the median of 18.2 percent. It boils down to the fact that in 436 congressional districts in this extraordinarily wealthy nation, somewhere between 7.6 percent and 33.3 percent of respondents – and in 422 districts, 10 percent or more of respondents – told Gallup that there were “times in the past twelve months when [they] did not have enough money to buy food that [they or their family] needed.” That is a national problem demanding aggressive steps toward a solution.

insurance, TANF, refundable tax credits) that help struggling workers and families; and strengthened – not reduced, as some in Congress are proposing – federal nutrition programs (SNAP/Food Stamps, school meals, WIC, summer, afterschool, and child care food) that reach more households – seniors, children, and working-age adults alike – in need and do so with more robust benefits. For FRAC’s seven-point strategy specifically aimed at reaching the President’s goal of ending childhood hunger by 2015, see www.frac.org/pdf/endingchildhunger_2015paper.pdf. As a nation, even in difficult times, we have the resources to eliminate hunger for everyone, regardless of age or family configuration. The cost of not doing so – in terms of damage to health, education, early childhood development and productivity – is just too high. The moral cost of not doing so is even higher.

Methodology
Results are based on telephone (landline or cellular) interviews in 2008 through 2011 with randomly sampled adults, age 18 or older in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Total sample sizes for 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011 were 355,334, 353,849, 352,840 and 353,492 respectively. Margins of error were calculated using 90% confidence intervals. Data are weighted to be nationally representative based on known census figures for age, race, sex, and education and to minimize nonresponse bias. In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of public opinion polls. Because differences within MSAs and congressional districts from year to year are often small and sample sizes for each year can be limiting, there is potential for overlap across the years. Therefore, readers are cautioned against comparing a 2010-2011 rate for a particular MSA or congressional district to our prior report data for 2009-2010 or 2010. At the national level for 2011 (n=352,789) the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 1 percentage point. At the regional level for 2011 (n=352,789; range: 35,688-67,632), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 1 percentage point. At the state level for 2011 (n=352,789; range: 728-33,060), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 2.2 percentage points.
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Conclusion
Food hardship rates are too high in every corner of the nation, and the national 2011 rate was higher than the 2010 rate, even though economic growth was picking up. It is crucial that the nation rebuild its economy, strengthen employment and wages, and develop public supports that will dramatically decrease these food hardship numbers and do so quickly. Essential steps include: a growing economy that provides full-time jobs at decent wages, shares prosperity and pulls households out of hunger and poverty; strengthened income supports (e.g., unemployment

At the MSA level for 2010-2011 (n=413,773; range: 1,14430,404), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 1.9 percentage points. At the congressional district level for 2010-2011 (n=692,674; range: 603-4,434), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 3.1 percentage points. At the national level for 2008-2011 by month (n=1,240,731; range: 13,242-31,375), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 1 percentage point. At the national level for 2008-2011 by quarter (n=1,240,731; range: 43,79491,634), the margin of error was less than or equal to ± 1 percentage point.

Acknowledgements
This report was prepared by Rachel Cooper and Michael Burke.

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National Food Hardship Rate by Month 2008-2011 Month Food Hardship Rate January 2008 16.5 February 2008 16.2 March 2008 16.1 April 2008 16.7 May 2008 17.4 June 2008 17.4 July 2008 17.0 August 2008 19.1 September 2008 18.5 October 2008 18.8 November 2008 20.3 December 2008 19.4 January 2009 18.8 February 2009 19.0 March 2009 18.6 April 2009 18.2 May 2009 18.4 June 2009 17.3 July 2009 17.7 August 2009 17.9 September 2009 18.1 October 2009 18.9 November 2009 18.3 December 2009 18.2 January 2010 18.1 February 2010 17.9 March 2010 18.0 April 2010 17.1 May 2010 17.9 June 2010 17.5 July 2010 17.6 August 2010 18.2 September 2010 18.0 October 2010 19.3 November 2010 18.2 December 2010 18.6 January 2011 18.4 February 2011 17.6 March 2011 17.6 April 2011 17.4 May 2011 18.4 June 2011 18.3 July 2011 19.1 August 2011 18.8 September 2011 19.8 October 2011 20.1 November 2011 19.0 December 2011 19.0

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State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

Food Hardship in 2011 by State Food Hardship Rate 23.4 18.2 20.5 21.1 19.3 16.0 14.0 21.0 16.3 21.6 21.7 11.8 18.9 17.5 20.3 15.5 14.9 22.3 21.3 16.7 16.3 14.5 18.1 12.6 24.5 19.5 15.4 14.4 20.0 15.2 15.8 18.1 17.6 21.1 10.0 19.8 21.3 18.0 15.0 18.1 21.9 15.2 21.7 21.6 17.7 16.0 16.6 16.4 22.5 13.7 14.7

Rank 2 22 15 12 20 35 47 14 33 8 6 50 21 29 16 38 43 4 10 30 33 45 23 49 1 19 39 46 17 40 37 23 28 12 51 18 10 26 42 23 5 40 6 8 27 35 31 32 3 48 44

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Food Hardship Rate 2010-2011 for 100 Large Metropolitan Statistical Areas Food Hardship 2010-2011 Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Rate Rank Akron, OH 18.4 45 Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY 15.6 77 Albuquerque, NM 20.2 20 Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ 16.9 61 Anchorage, AK 19.5 30 Asheville, NC 23.8 3 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 19.7 27 Austin-Round Rock, TX 18.5 42 Bakersfield, CA 25.3 1 Baltimore-Towson, MD 16.7 64 20.0 25 Baton Rouge, LA 21.3 12 Birmingham-Hoover, AL Boise City-Nampa, ID 19.1 37 13.4 91 Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Bradenton-Sarasota-Venice, FL 16.1 70 11.1 98 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 13.6 88 Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY Cape Coral-Fort Myers, FL 18.9 39 Charleston-N Charleston-Summerville, SC 18.1 47 Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC 18.0 50 16.2 68 Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL-IN-WI Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 17.3 54 Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 17.0 58 15.7 74 Colorado Springs, CO Columbia, SC 21.2 13 Columbus, OH 18.0 50 18.9 39 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX Dayton, OH 22.4 8 Denver-Aurora, CO 17.2 55 Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA 13.7 87 Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI 18.0 50 Durham, NC 14.9 80 24.3 2 Fresno, CA 17.0 58 Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI 23.7 4 Greensboro-High Point, NC Greenville-Mauldin-Easley, SC 19.7 27 13.5 90 Harrisburg-Carlisle, PA Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT 13.4 91 Honolulu, HI 12.6 95 20.5 18 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 19.8 26 21.1 15 Jacksonville, FL Kansas City, MO-KS 15.6 77 Knoxville, TN 20.8 17 Lakeland-Winter Haven, FL 21.9 9 Lancaster, PA 10.7 99 20.1 23 Las Vegas-Paradise, NV Little Rock-N Little Rock-Conway, AR 18.1 47 19.5 30 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN 22.5 7 Madison, WI 9.5 100 20.2 20 Memphis, TN-MS-AR Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL 20.5 18 Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 14.3 84 11.7 97 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
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Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN New Haven-Milford, CT New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA New York-North New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA Ogden-Clearfield, UT Oklahoma City, OK Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA Orlando-Kissimmee, FL Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, FL Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ Pittsburgh, PA Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, ME Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, OR-WA Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown, NY Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, RI-MA Raleigh-Cary, NC Richmond, VA Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Rochester, NY Sacramento--Arden-Arcade--Roseville, CA Salt Lake City, UT San Antonio, TX San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Santa Rosa-Petaluma, CA Scranton--Wilkes-Barre, PA Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA Spokane, WA Springfield, MA St. Louis, MO-IL Syracuse, NY Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL Toledo, OH Tucson, AZ Tulsa, OK Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Wichita, KS Winston-Salem, NC Worcester, MA York-Hanover, PA Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 19.7 27 14.9 80 21.7 11 15.9 73 19.1 37 21.9 9 17.2 55 22.6 6 19.3 34 17.1 57 16.1 70 19.3 34 13.6 88 14.8 82 16.9 61 15.7 74 18.9 39 15.5 79 18.5 42 23.7 4 13.9 86 16.9 61 17.0 58 20.2 20 16.6 65 14.0 85 12.6 95 18.1 47 15.7 74 14.8 82 18.4 45 19.3 34 16.2 68 16.5 66 20.1 23 19.5 30 18.0 50 21.2 13 16.5 66 12.7 94 18.5 42 19.5 30 16.1 70 13.4 91 20.9 16

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Food Hardship 2010-2011 by Congressional District - Organized by State District Representative Alabama 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 At-Large 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Jo Bonner Martha Roby Mike Rogers Robert B. Aderholt Mo Brooks Spencer Bachus Terri A. Sewell Alaska Don Young Arizona Paul A. Gosar Trent Franks Benjamin Quayle Ed Pastor David Schweikert Jeff Flake Raul M. Grijalva Vacant Arkansas Eric A. "Rick" Crawford Tim Griffin Steve Womack Mike Ross California Mike Thompson Wally Herger Daniel E. Lungren Tom McClintock Doris O. Matsui Lynn C. Woolsey George Miller Nancy Pelosi Barbara Lee John Garamendi Jerry McNerney Jackie Speier Fortney Pete Stark Anna G. Eshoo Michael M. Honda Zoe Lofgren Sam Farr Dennis A. Cardoza Jeff Denham Jim Costa Devin Nunes Kevin McCarthy Lois Capps Elton Gallegly Howard P. "Buck" McKeon David Dreier Brad Sherman Howard L. Berman 21.1 16.7 20.0 31.8 12.7 15.6 22.7 15.7 24.0 18.0 20.1 24.7 18.3 20.6 17.8 14.4 21.0 14.7 19.9 14.0 17.5 15.8 14.3 9.2 13.4 9.7 9.9 16.0 19.7 29.2 22.4 29.7 23.1 20.0 20.5 14.5 21.1 14.8 17.0 23.9 120 266 161 5 378 302 88 297 57 223 159 49 215 136 228 338 125 330 163 349 238 295 341 431 364 426 423 289 167 12 97 10 73 161 142 333 120 327 257 60 18.1 221 26.4 23.2 25.6 26.0 19.4 16.3 27.2 28 71 42 33 177 276 23 Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank

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District 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 At-Large At-Large 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Representative Adam B. Schiff Henry A. Waxman Xavier Becerra Judy Chu Karen Bass Lucille Roybal-Allard Maxine Waters Janice Hahn Laura Richardson Grace F. Napolitano Linda T. Sánchez Edward R. Royce Jerry Lewis Gary G. Miller Joe Baca Ken Calvert Mary Bono Mack Dana Rohrabacher Loretta Sanchez John Campbell Darrell E. Issa Brian P. Bilbray Bob Filner Duncan Hunter Susan A. Davis Colorado Diana DeGette Jared Polis Scott R. Tipton Cory Gardner Doug Lamborn Mike Coffman Ed Perlmutter Connecticut John B. Larson Joe Courtney Rosa L. DeLauro James A. Himes Christopher S. Murphy Delaware John C. Carney Jr. District Of Columbia Eleanor Holmes Norton Florida Jeff Miller Steve Southerland II Corrine Brown Ander Crenshaw Richard B. Nugent Cliff Stearns John L. Mica Daniel Webster Gus M. Bilirakis C.W. Bill Young Kathy Castor

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 15.4 309 10.5 414 28.0 16 17.8 228 24.0 57 32.4 4 29.9 8 10.9 406 28.0 16 27.6 22 20.1 159 13.6 358 25.1 47 9.4 429 28.3 14 21.3 117 19.6 173 13.9 352 26.0 33 11.0 405 20.5 142 10.4 416 22.1 101 18.2 218 17.5 238 19.8 12.9 18.4 15.4 16.9 13.4 18.9 14.5 13.2 14.1 11.8 14.0 18.4 15.8 21.0 22.8 32.6 22.9 19.7 21.8 20.5 22.6 17.9 17.3 25.4 166 377 212 309 262 364 195 333 371 347 393 349 212 295 125 85 3 81 167 110 142 90 225 247 45

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District 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 18

Representative Dennis A. Ross Vern Buchanan Connie Mack Bill Posey Thomas J. Rooney Frederica S. Wilson Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Theodore E. Deutch Debbie Wasserman Schultz Mario Diaz-Balart Allen B. West Alcee L. Hastings Sandy Adams David Rivera Georgia Jack Kingston Sanford D. Bishop Jr. Lynn A. Westmoreland Henry C. "Hank" Johnson Jr. John Lewis Tom Price Rob Woodall Austin Scott Tom Graves Paul C. Broun Phil Gingrey John Barrow David Scott Hawaii Colleen W. Hanabusa Mazie K. Hirono Idaho Raul R. Labrador Michael K. Simpson Illinois Bobby L. Rush Jesse L. Jackson Jr. Daniel Lipinski Luis Gutierrez Mike Quigley Peter J. Roskam Danny K. Davis Joe Walsh Janice D. Schakowsky Robert J. Dold Adam Kinzinger Jerry F. Costello Judy Biggert Randy Hultgren Timothy V. Johnson Donald A. Manzullo Robert T. Schilling Aaron Schock John Shimkus Indiana

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 22.2 99 16.8 265 17.6 237 19.1 185 20.9 129 30.4 7 15.1 315 15.7 297 19.3 179 21.4 115 14.5 333 31.5 6 19.6 173 22.5 92 22.3 25.5 22.9 23.4 21.8 10.0 17.3 22.5 18.7 20.4 19.7 25.9 22.5 11.4 15.7 17.5 18.2 26.1 27.1 20.7 26.8 18.4 12.2 16.2 14.4 11.3 10.5 16.0 17.5 10.3 14.9 18.6 16.2 16.2 15.5 17.0 98 44 81 68 110 419 247 92 204 148 167 38 92 396 297 238 218 31 25 132 26 212 388 278 338 398 414 289 238 417 324 209 278 278 306 257

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 14

District 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Representative Peter J. Visclosky Joe Donnelly Marlin A. Stutzman Todd Rokita Dan Burton Mike Pence André Carson Larry Bucshon Todd C. Young Iowa Bruce L. Braley David Loebsack Loenard Boswell Tom Latham Steve King Kansas Tim Huelskamp Lynn Jenkins Kevin Yoder Mike Pompeo Kentucky Ed Whitfield Brett Guthrie John A. Yarmuth Geoff Davis Harold Rogers Ben Chandler Louisiana Steve Scalise Cedric L. Richmond Jeffrey M. Landry John Fleming Rodney Alexander Bill Cassidy Charles W. Boustany Jr. Maine Chellie Pingree Michael Michaud Maryland Andy Harris C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger John P. Sarbanes Donna F. Edwards Steny H. Hoyer Roscoe G. Bartlett Elijah E. Cummings Chris Van Hollen Massachusetts John W. Oliver Richard E. Neal James P. McGovern Barney Frank Niki Tsongas John F. Tierney Edward J. Markey

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 19.1 185 23.2 71 18.3 215 16.4 274 13.6 358 22.1 101 26.0 33 20.2 156 20.3 152 13.0 13.3 14.5 11.5 17.5 16.1 15.0 13.8 18.8 20.5 23.0 21.2 19.0 27.7 22.0 19.3 26.2 22.5 21.1 25.1 19.3 21.9 14.8 19.3 17.0 18.7 16.0 16.6 13.8 13.5 20.5 9.5 15.9 18.7 14.2 14.1 13.4 12.6 10.0 374 369 333 395 238 286 319 355 199 142 76 118 190 19 103 179 30 92 120 47 179 106 327 179 257 204 289 270 355 361 142 428 293 204 344 347 364 381 419

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 15

District 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 At-Large 1 2 3 1 2 3 1

Representative Michael E. Capuano Stephen F. Lynch William R. Keating Michigan Dan Benishek Bill Huizenga Justin Amash Dave Camp Dale E. Kildee Fred Upton Tim Walberg Mike Rogers Gary C. Peters Candice S. Miller Thaddeus G. McCotter Sander M. Levin Hansen Clarke John Coyners Jr. John D. Dingell Minnesota Timothy J. Walz John Kline Erik Paulsen Betty McCollum Keith Ellison Michele Bachmann Colin C. Peterson Chip Cravaack Mississippi Alan Nunnelee Bennie G. Thompson Gregg Harper Steven M. Palazzo Missouri Wm. Lacy Clay W. Todd Akin Russ Carnahan Vicky Hartzler Emanuel Cleaver Sam Graves Billy Long Jo Ann Emerson Blaine Luetkemeyer Montana Denny Rehberg Nebraska Jeff Fortenberry Lee Terry Adrian Smith Nevada Shelley Berkley Mark E. Amodei Joseph J. Heck New Hampshire Frank C. Guinta

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 16.2 278 12.1 390 13.3 369 17.7 16.5 16.2 18.1 20.3 18.8 17.8 16.0 11.4 15.6 14.3 19.7 29.8 29.4 17.8 10.6 10.7 10.7 11.9 17.7 11.2 11.9 15.6 26.0 28.0 22.6 23.9 18.8 10.0 17.9 20.6 20.2 18.0 19.9 24.1 17.4 15.5 12.5 17.0 15.0 23.5 19.6 17.3 15.4 235 272 278 221 152 199 228 289 396 302 341 167 9 11 228 413 409 409 391 235 402 391 302 33 16 90 60 199 419 225 136 156 223 163 55 245 306 383 257 319 66 173 247 309

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 16

District 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5

Representative Charles F. Bass New Jersey Robert E. Andrews Frank A. LoBiondo Jon Runyan Christopher H. Smith Scott Garrett Frank Pallone Jr. Leonard Lance Bill Pascrell Jr. Steven R. Rothman Donald M. Payne Rodney P. Frelinghuysen Rush D. Holt Albio Sires New Mexico Martin Heinrich Stevan Pearce Ben Ray Luján New York Timothy H. Bishop Steve Israel Peter T. King Carolyn McCarthy Gary L. Ackerman Gregory W. Meeks Joseph Crowley Jerrold Nadler Robert L. Turner Edolphus Towns Yvette D. Clarke Nydia M. Velázquez Michael G. Grimm Carolyn B. Maloney Charles B. Rangel José E. Serrano Eliot L. Engel Nita M. Lowey Nan A. S. Hayworth Christopher P. Gibson Paul Tonko Maurice D. Hinchey William L. Owens Richard L. Hanna Anne Marie Buerkle Kathleen C. Hochul Brian Higgins Louise McIntosh Slaughter Tom Reed North Carolina G.K. Butterfield Renee L. Ellmers Walter B. Jones David E. Price Virginia Foxx

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 14.2 344 20.7 20.6 12.7 14.4 9.7 14.6 7.9 19.3 13.4 25.8 7.8 10.0 25.2 19.7 18.7 20.2 13.0 17.8 12.6 15.5 14.2 23.0 23.0 10.1 14.3 26.3 23.8 20.6 17.8 9.1 24.0 32.7 21.1 11.3 12.4 13.4 17.5 17.2 16.4 16.9 14.5 12.3 16.6 15.7 14.9 27.7 22.8 19.0 11.6 20.7 132 136 378 338 426 331 434 179 364 40 435 419 46 167 204 156 374 228 381 306 344 76 76 418 341 29 63 136 228 432 57 2 120 398 385 364 238 254 274 262 333 386 270 297 324 19 85 190 394 132

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 17

District 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 At-Large 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Representative Howard Coble Mike McIntyre Larry Kissell Sue Wilkins Myrick Patrick T. McHenry Heath Shuler Melvin L. Watt Brad Miller North Dakota Rick Berg Ohio Steve Chabot Jean Schmidt Michael R. Turner Jim Jordan Robert E. Latta Bill Johnson Steve Austria John A. Boehner Marcy Kaptur Dennis J. Kucinich Marcia L. Fudge Patrick J. Tiberi Betty Sutton Steven C. LaTourette Steve Stivers James B. Renacci Tim Ryan Bob Gibbs Oklahoma John Sullivan Dan Boren Frank D. Lucas Tom Cole James Lankford Oregon Suzanne Bonamici Greg Walden Earl Blumenauer Peter DeFazio Kurt Schrader Pennsylvania Robert A. Brady Chaka Fattah Mike Kelly Jason Altmire Glenn Thompson Jim Gerlach Patrick Meehan Michael G. Fitzpatrick Bill Shuster Tom Marino Lou Barletta Mark S. Critz Allyson Y. Schwartz

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 22.0 103 23.3 70 21.9 106 15.0 319 24.6 51 23.6 64 25.7 41 19.1 185 9.8 20.6 16.7 21.7 18.9 16.2 19.6 20.4 21.1 19.0 18.7 22.2 15.0 16.7 14.9 21.4 13.7 21.0 20.7 20.3 23.1 18.9 19.7 24.1 15.9 20.5 18.2 20.8 17.1 26.5 21.0 17.3 11.3 15.1 12.2 13.5 11.2 16.7 16.1 16.5 16.2 13.0 424 136 266 112 195 278 173 148 120 190 204 99 319 266 324 115 357 125 132 152 73 195 167 55 293 142 218 131 255 27 125 247 398 315 388 361 402 266 286 272 278 374

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 18

District 14 15 16 17 18 19 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 At-Large 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Representative Michael F. Doyle Charles W. Dent Joseph R. Pitts Tim Holden Tim Murphy Todd Russell Platts Rhode Island David N. Cicilline James R. Langevin South Carolina Tim Scott Joe Wilson Jeff Duncan Trey Gowdy Mick Mulvaney James E. Clyburn South Dakota Kristi L. Noem Tennessee David P. Roe John J. Duncan Jr. Charles J. "Chuck" Fleischmann Scott DesJarlais Jim Cooper Diane Black Marsha Blackburn Stephen Lee Fincher Steve Cohen Texas Louie Gohmert Ted Poe Sam Johnson Ralph M. Hall Jeb Hensarling Joe Barton John Abney Culberson Kevin Brady Al Green Michael T. McCaul K. Michael Conaway Kay Granger Mac Thornberry Ron Paul Rubén Hinojosa Silvestre Reyes Bill Flores Sheila Jackson Lee Randy Neugebauer Charles A. Gonzalez Lamar Smith Pete Olsen Francisco "Quico" Canseco Kenny Marchant Lloyd Doggett Michael C. Burgess

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 18.5 210 16.1 286 10.7 409 13.2 371 9.8 424 13.9 352 17.3 17.5 19.9 19.1 21.7 21.7 22.9 27.2 15.3 23.0 21.2 23.1 22.9 18.8 22.0 15.6 22.8 21.9 23.9 22.7 13.6 20.9 25.9 18.9 12.5 24.7 27.7 14.8 17.4 19.0 20.4 19.4 24.4 26.1 19.1 25.6 20.3 26.0 15.1 13.2 20.4 17.3 22.5 17.9 247 238 163 185 112 112 81 23 314 76 118 73 81 199 103 302 85 106 60 88 358 129 38 195 383 49 19 327 245 190 148 177 52 31 185 42 152 33 315 371 148 247 92 225

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 19

District 27 28 29 30 31 32 1 2 3 At-Large 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 At-Large

Representative Blake Farenthold Henry Cuellar Gene Green Eddie Bernice Johnson John R. Carter Pete Sessions Utah Rob Bishop Jim Matheson Jason Chaffetz Vermont Peter Welch Virginia Robert J. Wittman E. Scott Rigell Robert C. "Bobby" Scott J. Randy Forbes Robert Hurt Bob Goodlatte Eric Cantor James P. Moran H. Morgan Griffith Frank R. Wolf Gerald E. Connolly Washington Jay Inslee Rick Larsen Jaime Herrera Beutler Doc Hastings Cathy McMorris Rodgers Norman D. Dicks Jim McDermott David G. Reichert Adam Smith West Virginia David B. McKinley Shelley Moore Capito Nick J. Rahall II Wisconsin Paul Ryan Tammy Baldwin Ron Kind Gwen Moore F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. Thomas E. Petri Sean P. Duffy Reid J. Ribble Wyoming Cynthia M. Lummis

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 24.2 54 28.2 15 33.3 1 28.8 13 16.2 278 23.4 68 17.1 15.1 18.5 15.4 14.0 16.3 23.6 18.3 19.0 17.0 15.0 7.6 23.5 10.9 9.3 10.9 17.3 15.7 16.9 19.3 20.6 11.1 10.7 17.8 18.8 21.9 24.3 14.6 12.3 11.3 23.0 8.5 12.7 15.4 13.9 13.5 255 315 210 309 349 276 64 215 190 257 319 436 66 406 430 406 247 297 262 179 136 404 409 228 199 106 53 331 386 398 76 433 378 309 352 361

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 20

State Texas New York Florida California Arizona Florida Florida California Michigan California Michigan California Texas California Texas California California Mississippi Kentucky North Carolina Texas California Alabama South Carolina Illinois Illinois Pennsylvania Alabama New York Louisiana Illinois Texas Alabama California Indiana Mississippi Texas Georgia Texas New Jersey North Carolina Alabama Texas Georgia Florida New Jersey California Louisiana Arkansas Texas North Carolina Texas West Virginia Texas Missouri

Food Hardship 2010-2011 by Congressional District Food Hardship 2010-2011 District Representative Rate Rank 29 Gene Green 33.3 1 16 José E. Serrano 32.7 2 3 Corrine Brown 32.6 3 34 Lucille Roybal-Allard 32.4 4 4 Ed Pastor 31.8 5 Alcee L. Hastings 31.5 6 23 17 Frederica S. Wilson 30.4 7 35 Maxine Waters 29.9 8 13 Hansen Clarke 29.8 9 20 Jim Costa 29.7 10 14 John Coyners Jr. 29.4 11 18 Dennis A. Cardoza 29.2 12 30 Eddie Bernice Johnson 28.8 13 43 Joe Baca 28.3 14 28 Henry Cuellar 28.2 15 31 Xavier Becerra 28.0 16 37 Laura Richardson 28.0 16 2 Bennie G. Thompson 28.0 16 5 Harold Rogers 27.7 19 1 G.K. Butterfield 27.7 19 Al Green 27.7 19 9 38 Grace F. Napolitano 27.6 22 7 Terri A. Sewell 27.2 23 6 James E. Clyburn 27.2 23 2 Jesse L. Jackson Jr. 27.1 25 4 Luis Gutierrez 26.8 26 1 Robert A. Brady 26.5 27 1 Jo Bonner 26.4 28 10 Edolphus Towns 26.3 29 2 Cedric L. Richmond 26.2 30 1 Bobby L. Rush 26.1 31 16 Silvestre Reyes 26.1 31 4 Robert B. Aderholt 26.0 33 47 Loretta Sanchez 26.0 33 André Carson 26.0 33 7 1 Alan Nunnelee 26.0 33 20 Charles A. Gonzalez 26.0 33 12 John Barrow 25.9 38 25.9 38 5 Jeb Hensarling 10 Donald M. Payne 25.8 40 12 Melvin L. Watt 25.7 41 3 Mike Rogers 25.6 42 18 Sheila Jackson Lee 25.6 42 2 Sanford D. Bishop Jr. 25.5 44 11 Kathy Castor 25.4 45 Albio Sires 25.2 46 13 41 Jerry Lewis 25.1 47 5 Rodney Alexander 25.1 47 4 Mike Ross 24.7 49 8 Kevin Brady 24.7 49 24.6 51 10 Patrick T. McHenry 24.4 52 15 Rubén Hinojosa 3 Nick J. Rahall II 24.3 53 27 Blake Farenthold 24.2 54 8 Jo Ann Emerson 24.1 55
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 21

State Oklahoma Arkansas California New York California Mississippi Texas New York North Carolina Virginia Nevada Virginia Georgia Texas North Carolina Alabama Indiana California Oklahoma Tennessee Kentucky New York New York Tennessee Wisconsin Florida Georgia South Carolina Tennessee Florida North Carolina Tennessee Arizona Texas Florida Mississippi Florida Georgia Georgia Louisiana Texas California Georgia Florida Ohio California Indiana Kentucky North Carolina Tennessee Louisiana North Carolina Tennessee West Virginia Florida Georgia

District 5 1 33 15 28 4 1 11 11 3 1 9 4 32 7 2 2 21 2 3 2 6 7 1 4 4 3 5 4 2 2 8 7 2 8 3 25 8 13 3 25 19 1 12 11 51 6 6 6 6 7 8 9 2 6 5

Representative James Lankford Eric A. "Rick" Crawford Karen Bass Charles B. Rangel Howard L. Berman Steven M. Palazzo Louie Gohmert Yvette D. Clarke Heath Shuler Robert C. "Bobby" Scott Shelley Berkley H. Morgan Griffith Henry C. "Hank" Johnson Jr. Pete Sessions Mike McIntyre Martha Roby Joe Donnelly Devin Nunes Dan Boren Charles J. "Chuck" Fleischmann Brett Guthrie Gregory W. Meeks Joseph Crowley David P. Roe Gwen Moore Ander Crenshaw Lynn A. Westmoreland Mick Mulvaney Scott DesJarlais Steve Southerland II Renee L. Ellmers Stephen Lee Fincher Raul M. Grijalva Ted Poe Daniel Webster Gregg Harper David Rivera Austin Scott David Scott Jeffrey M. Landry Lloyd Doggett Jeff Denham Jack Kingston Dennis A. Ross Marcia L. Fudge Bob Filner Mike Pence Ben Chandler Howard Coble Diane Black Charles W. Boustany Jr. Larry Kissell Steve Cohen Shelley Moore Capito Cliff Stearns John Lewis

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 24.1 55 24.0 57 24.0 57 24.0 57 23.9 60 23.9 60 23.9 60 23.8 63 23.6 64 23.6 64 23.5 66 23.5 66 23.4 68 23.4 68 23.3 70 23.2 71 23.2 71 23.1 73 23.1 73 23.1 73 23.0 76 23.0 76 23.0 76 23.0 76 23.0 76 22.9 81 22.9 81 22.9 81 22.9 81 22.8 85 22.8 85 22.8 85 22.7 88 22.7 88 22.6 90 22.6 90 22.5 92 22.5 92 22.5 92 22.5 92 22.5 92 22.4 97 22.3 98 22.2 99 22.2 99 22.1 101 22.1 101 22.0 103 22.0 103 22.0 103 21.9 106 21.9 106 21.9 106 21.9 106 21.8 110 21.8 110
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 22

State Ohio South Carolina South Carolina Florida Ohio California Kentucky Tennessee Arizona California Louisiana New York Ohio California Florida Ohio Pennsylvania Florida Texas Oregon Illinois New Jersey North Carolina Ohio California Missouri New Jersey New York Ohio Washington California California Florida Kentucky Maryland Oregon Georgia Ohio Texas Texas Indiana Michigan Oklahoma Texas Indiana Missouri New Mexico Arkansas California Arizona California California Missouri South Carolina Colorado California

District 3 3 4 21 15 44 3 2 1 25 4 17 8 5 1 17 2 16 4 4 3 1 5 18 2 4 2 12 1 6 23 49 7 1 7 2 10 7 13 23 9 5 1 19 8 5 3 3 39 3 22 7 7 1 1 17

Representative Michael R. Turner Jeff Duncan Trey Gowdy Mario Diaz-Balart Steve Stivers Ken Calvert John A. Yarmuth John J. Duncan Jr. Paul A. Gosar Howard P. "Buck" McKeon John Fleming Eliot L. Engel John A. Boehner Doris O. Matsui Jeff Miller Tim Ryan Chaka Fattah Thomas J. Rooney Ralph M. Hall Peter DeFazio Daniel Lipinski Robert E. Andrews Virginia Foxx Bob Gibbs Wally Herger Vicky Hartzler Frank A. LoBiondo Nydia M. Velázquez Steve Chabot Norman D. Dicks Lois Capps Darrell E. Issa John L. Mica Ed Whitfield Elijah E. Cummings Greg Walden Paul C. Broun Steve Austria Mac Thornberry Francisco "Quico" Canseco Todd C. Young Dale E. Kildee John Sullivan Randy Neugebauer Larry Bucshon Emanuel Cleaver Ben Ray Luján Steve Womack Linda T. Sánchez Benjamin Quayle Kevin McCarthy George Miller Billy Long Tim Scott Diana DeGette Sam Farr

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 21.7 112 21.7 112 21.7 112 21.4 115 21.4 115 21.3 117 21.2 118 21.2 118 21.1 120 21.1 120 21.1 120 21.1 120 21.1 120 21.0 125 21.0 125 21.0 125 21.0 125 20.9 129 20.9 129 20.8 131 20.7 132 20.7 132 20.7 132 20.7 132 20.6 136 20.6 136 20.6 136 20.6 136 20.6 136 20.6 136 20.5 142 20.5 142 20.5 142 20.5 142 20.5 142 20.5 142 20.4 148 20.4 148 20.4 148 20.4 148 20.3 152 20.3 152 20.3 152 20.3 152 20.2 156 20.2 156 20.2 156 20.1 159 20.1 159 20.0 161 20.0 161 19.9 163 19.9 163 19.9 163 19.8 166 19.7 167
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 23

State Florida Georgia Michigan New Mexico Oklahoma California Florida Nevada Ohio Alabama Texas Florida Louisiana Louisiana Maine New Jersey Washington Florida Indiana North Carolina South Carolina Texas Kentucky North Carolina Ohio Texas Virginia Colorado Ohio Oklahoma Texas Kansas Michigan Missouri Tennessee West Virginia Georgia Maryland Massachusetts New Mexico Ohio Illinois Pennsylvania Utah Colorado Delware Illinois California Indiana Virginia California Idaho Oregon Alaska Michigan Arkansas

District 5 11 12 1 4 45 24 2 6 5 14 20 1 6 2 8 5 15 1 13 2 17 4 3 9 12 5 7 4 3 6 4 6 1 5 1 9 2 2 2 10 15 14 3 3 At-Large 5 1 3 4 52 2 3 At-Large 4 2

Representative Richard B. Nugent Phil Gingrey Sander M. Levin Martin Heinrich Tom Cole Mary Bono Mack Sandy Adams Mark E. Amodei Bill Johnson Mo Brooks Ron Paul Debbie Wasserman Schultz Steve Scalise Bill Cassidy Michael Michaud Bill Pascrell Jr. Cathy McMorris Rodgers Bill Posey Peter J. Visclosky Brad Miller Joe Wilson Bill Flores Geoff Davis Walter B. Jones Marcy Kaptur Kay Granger Robert Hurt Ed Perlmutter Jim Jordan Frank D. Lucas Joe Barton Mike Pompeo Fred Upton Wm. Lacy Clay Jim Cooper David B. McKinley Tom Graves C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger Richard E. Neal Stevan Pearce Dennis J. Kucinich Timothy V. Johnson Michael F. Doyle Jason Chaffetz Scott R. Tipton John C. Carney Jr. Mike Quigley Mike Thompson Marlin A. Stutzman J. Randy Forbes Duncan Hunter Michael K. Simpson Earl Blumenauer Don Young Dave Camp Tim Griffin

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 19.7 167 19.7 167 19.7 167 19.7 167 19.7 167 19.6 173 19.6 173 19.6 173 19.6 173 19.4 177 19.4 177 19.3 179 19.3 179 19.3 179 19.3 179 19.3 179 19.3 179 19.1 185 19.1 185 19.1 185 19.1 185 19.1 185 19.0 190 19.0 190 19.0 190 19.0 190 19.0 190 18.9 195 18.9 195 18.9 195 18.9 195 18.8 199 18.8 199 18.8 199 18.8 199 18.8 199 18.7 204 18.7 204 18.7 204 18.7 204 18.7 204 18.6 209 18.5 210 18.5 210 18.4 212 18.4 212 18.4 212 18.3 215 18.3 215 18.3 215 18.2 218 18.2 218 18.2 218 18.1 221 18.1 221 18.0 223
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 24

State Missouri Florida Missouri Texas California California Michigan Michigan New York New York Washington Michigan Minnesota Florida California California Idaho Illinois Iowa New York Rhode Island Missouri Texas Florida Georgia Nevada Pennsylvania Rhode Island Texas Washington New York Oregon Utah California Illinois Maryland Nebraska Virginia Colorado New York Washington Florida Arizona Ohio Ohio Pennsylvania Maryland New York Michigan Pennsylvania Indiana New York Alabama Virginia Illinois Illinois

District 6 9 3 26 3 32 7 15 2 13 9 1 5 14 9 53 1 12 5 21 2 9 11 10 7 3 3 1 24 2 22 5 1 27 18 1 2 6 5 24 4 13 2 2 13 9 4 27 2 11 4 23 6 2 7 16

Representative Sam Graves Gus M. Bilirakis Russ Carnahan Michael C. Burgess Daniel E. Lungren Judy Chu Tim Walberg John D. Dingell Steve Israel Michael G. Grimm Adam Smith Dan Benishek Keith Ellison Connie Mack Barbara Lee Susan A. Davis Raul R. Labrador Jerry F. Costello Steve King Paul Tonko James R. Langevin Blaine Luetkemeyer K. Michael Conaway C.W. Bill Young Rob Woodall Joseph J. Heck Mike Kelly David N. Cicilline Kenny Marchant Rick Larsen Maurice D. Hinchey Kurt Schrader Rob Bishop Brad Sherman John Shimkus Andy Harris Lee Terry Bob Goodlatte Doug Lamborn Richard L. Hanna Doc Hastings Vern Buchanan Trent Franks Jean Schmidt Betty Sutton Bill Shuster Donna F. Edwards Brian Higgins Bill Huizenga Lou Barletta Todd Rokita William L. Owens Spencer Bachus E. Scott Rigell Danny K. Davis Donald A. Manzullo

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 18.0 223 17.9 225 17.9 225 17.9 225 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.8 228 17.7 235 17.7 235 17.6 237 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.5 238 17.4 245 17.4 245 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.3 247 17.2 254 17.1 255 17.1 255 17.0 257 17.0 257 17.0 257 17.0 257 17.0 257 16.9 262 16.9 262 16.9 262 16.8 265 16.7 266 16.7 266 16.7 266 16.7 266 16.6 270 16.6 270 16.5 272 16.5 272 16.4 274 16.4 274 16.3 276 16.3 276 16.2 278 16.2 278
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 25

State Illinois Massachusetts Michigan Ohio Pennsylvania Texas Kansas Pennsylvania Pennsylvania California Illinois Maryland Michigan Massachusetts Oregon California District Of Columbia Arizona Florida Hawaii New York Washington Arizona Michigan Minnesota Tennessee Illinois Montana New York California Colorado New Hampshire Vermont Wisconsin South Dakota Florida Pennsylvania Texas Utah Kansas Nebraska North Carolina Ohio Virginia Illinois New York Ohio California Maine Texas California New Jersey Wisconsin California Connecticut Florida

District 17 8 3 5 12 31 1 10 15 16 11 3 8 1 1 10 At-Large 8 19 2 28 3 6 10 8 7 18 At-Large 4 29 4 1 At-Large 7 At-Large 18 5 21 2 2 3 9 12 7 14 29 14 26 1 10 6 6 1 24 1 22

Representative Robert T. Schilling Michael E. Capuano Justin Amash Robert E. Latta Mark S. Critz John R. Carter Tim Huelskamp Tom Marino Charles W. Dent Zoe Lofgren Adam Kinzinger John P. Sarbanes Mike Rogers John W. Oliver Suzanne Bonamici John Garamendi Eleanor Holmes Norton Vacant Theodore E. Deutch Mazie K. Hirono Louise McIntosh Slaughter Jaime Herrera Beutler Jeff Flake Candice S. Miller Chip Cravaack Marsha Blackburn Aaron Schock Denny Rehberg Carolyn McCarthy Adam B. Schiff Cory Gardner Frank C. Guinta Peter Welch Sean P. Duffy Kristi L. Noem Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Glenn Thompson Lamar Smith Jim Matheson Lynn Jenkins Adrian Smith Sue Wilkins Myrick Patrick J. Tiberi Eric Cantor Randy Hultgren Tom Reed Steven C. LaTourette David Dreier Chellie Pingree Michael T. McCaul Lynn C. Woolsey Frank Pallone Jr. Paul Ryan Elton Gallegly John B. Larson Allen B. West

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 16.2 278 16.2 278 16.2 278 16.2 278 16.2 278 16.2 278 16.1 286 16.1 286 16.1 286 16.0 289 16.0 289 16.0 289 16.0 289 15.9 293 15.9 293 15.8 295 15.8 295 15.7 297 15.7 297 15.7 297 15.7 297 15.7 297 15.6 302 15.6 302 15.6 302 15.6 302 15.5 306 15.5 306 15.5 306 15.4 309 15.4 309 15.4 309 15.4 309 15.4 309 15.3 314 15.1 315 15.1 315 15.1 315 15.1 315 15.0 319 15.0 319 15.0 319 15.0 319 15.0 319 14.9 324 14.9 324 14.9 324 14.8 327 14.8 327 14.8 327 14.7 330 14.6 331 14.6 331 14.5 333 14.5 333 14.5 333
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 26

State Iowa New York California Illinois New Jersey California Michigan New York Massachusetts New Hampshire New York Connecticut Massachusetts California Connecticut Virginia California Pennsylvania Wisconsin Kansas Maryland Ohio California Indiana Texas Maryland Pennsylvania Wyoming California Colorado Massachusetts New Jersey New York Iowa Massachusetts Connecticut Pennsylvania Texas Iowa New York Pennsylvania Colorado Arizona New Jersey Wisconsin Massachusetts New York Nebraska Texas New York New York Wisconsin Illinois Pennsylvania Massachusetts Minnesota

District 3 25 4 8 4 11 11 9 3 2 5 3 4 8 5 1 46 19 8 3 5 16 40 5 3 6 7 At-Large 13 6 5 9 20 2 10 2 17 22 1 1 13 2 5 3 6 6 3 1 7 19 26 2 6 6 9 4

Representative Loenard Boswell Anne Marie Buerkle Tom McClintock Joe Walsh Christopher H. Smith Jerry McNerney Thaddeus G. McCotter Robert L. Turner James P. McGovern Charles F. Bass Gary L. Ackerman Rosa L. DeLauro Barney Frank Nancy Pelosi Christopher S. Murphy Robert J. Wittman Dana Rohrabacher Todd Russell Platts Reid J. Ribble Kevin Yoder Steny H. Hoyer James B. Renacci Edward R. Royce Dan Burton Sam Johnson Roscoe G. Bartlett Patrick Meehan Cynthia M. Lummis Fortney Pete Stark Mike Coffman Niki Tsongas Steven R. Rothman Christopher P. Gibson David Loebsack William R. Keating Joe Courtney Tim Holden Pete Olsen Bruce L. Braley Timothy H. Bishop Allyson Y. Schwartz Jared Polis David Schweikert Jon Runyan Thomas E. Petri John F. Tierney Peter T. King Jeff Fortenberry John Abney Culberson Nan A. S. Hayworth Kathleen C. Hochul Tammy Baldwin Peter J. Roskam Jim Gerlach Stephen F. Lynch Betty McCollum

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 14.5 333 14.5 333 14.4 338 14.4 338 14.4 338 14.3 341 14.3 341 14.3 341 14.2 344 14.2 344 14.2 344 14.1 347 14.1 347 14.0 349 14.0 349 14.0 349 13.9 352 13.9 352 13.9 352 13.8 355 13.8 355 13.7 357 13.6 358 13.6 358 13.6 358 13.5 361 13.5 361 13.5 361 13.4 364 13.4 364 13.4 364 13.4 364 13.4 364 13.3 369 13.3 369 13.2 371 13.2 371 13.2 371 13.0 374 13.0 374 13.0 374 12.9 377 12.7 378 12.7 378 12.7 378 12.6 381 12.6 381 12.5 383 12.5 383 12.4 385 12.3 386 12.3 386 12.2 388 12.2 388 12.1 390 11.9 391
FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 27

State Minnesota Connecticut North Carolina Iowa Hawaii Michigan Illinois New York Pennsylvania Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Washington California California Virginia Washington Minnesota Minnesota Pennsylvania Washington Minnesota California Illinois California Illinois New York Georgia Massachusetts Missouri New Jersey California North Dakota Pennsylvania California New Jersey Maryland California Virginia California New York Wisconsin New Jersey New Jersey Virginia

District 7 4 4 4 1 9 9 18 4 3 6 8 7 48 36 10 1 2 3 16 8 1 30 10 50 13 8 6 7 2 12 15 At-Large 18 14 5 8 42 11 12 14 5 7 11 8

Representative Colin C. Peterson James A. Himes David E. Price Tom Latham Colleen W. Hanabusa Gary C. Peters Janice D. Schakowsky Nita M. Lowey Jason Altmire Ron Kind Michele Bachmann Michael G. Fitzpatrick Jim McDermott John Campbell Janice Hahn Frank R. Wolf Jay Inslee John Kline Erik Paulsen Joseph R. Pitts David G. Reichert Timothy J. Walz Henry A. Waxman Robert J. Dold Brian P. Bilbray Judy Biggert Jerrold Nadler Tom Price Edward J. Markey W. Todd Akin Rush D. Holt Michael M. Honda Rick Berg Tim Murphy Anna G. Eshoo Scott Garrett Chris Van Hollen Gary G. Miller Gerald E. Connolly Jackie Speier Carolyn B. Maloney F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. Leonard Lance Rodney P. Frelinghuysen James P. Moran

Food Hardship 2010-2011 Rate Rank 11.9 391 11.8 393 11.6 394 11.5 395 11.4 396 11.4 396 11.3 398 11.3 398 11.3 398 11.3 398 11.2 402 11.2 402 11.1 404 11.0 405 10.9 406 10.9 406 10.9 406 10.7 409 10.7 409 10.7 409 10.7 409 10.6 413 10.5 414 10.5 414 10.4 416 10.3 417 10.1 418 10.0 419 10.0 419 10.0 419 10.0 419 9.9 423 9.8 424 9.8 424 9.7 426 9.7 426 9.5 428 9.4 429 9.3 430 9.2 431 9.1 432 8.5 433 7.9 434 7.8 435 7.6 436

FRAC | Food Hardship in America 2011 | Page 28

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