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PRESSBOOK
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Crew Director................................................................................................................Federico Fellini Writers.......................................................... Federico Fellini, Ennio Flaiano, and Tullio Pinelli Producers...........................................................Jacques Bar, Mario De Vecchi, Lorenzo Pegoraro Composer..........................................................................................................................Nino Rota Cinematographers..................................................Carlo Carlini, Otello Martelli, Luciano Trasatti Film Editor..........................................................................................................Rolando Benedetti Production Designer.....................................................................................................Mario Chiari Set Decorator...............................................................................................................Luigi Gervasi Costume Designers.............................................................Michele Bomarzi, Margherita Marinari Cast Franco Interlenghi Moraldo Alberto Sordi Alberto Franco Fabrizi Fausto Leopoldo Trieste Leopoldo Riccardo Fellini Riccardo Leonora Ruffo Sandra Lda Baarov Giulia, Michele's Wife Arlette Sauvage Woman in the Cinema Jean Brochard Fausto's Father Claude Farell Olga, Alberto's Sister Gigetta Morano Alberto's Mother Enrico Viarisio Sandra's Father Paola Borboni Sandra's Mother Carlo Romano Michele Achille Majeroni Natale Guido Martu Young Railroad Worker Vira Silenti Leopoldo's 'Chinese' Date Silvio Bagolini Giudizio

A Corinth Films and International Media Presentation A Kino International Release Federico Fellinis

Italy / 1953 / 105 Minutes Black & White / Italian with English subtitles

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THE TITLE VITELLONI literally means big calves" in Italian. Fellini uses the word to describe idle young men without occupations who refuse to grow up and are supported by parents, relatives and friends. The term could also be translated as the big loafers" or "the overgrown teenagers."

I VITELLONI SYNOPSIS

The ve vitelloni are rst seen marching through the streets. The intellectual Leopoldo is an amateur playwright. Alberto lives with his sister, who is involved with a married man. Riccardo is a talented tenor. Moraldo, the youngest of the group, is an amiable dreamer. His sister, Sandra, is romantically involved with outrageous womanizer Fausto, the groups leader. Sandra discovers she is pregnant. Fausto, the father-to-be, immediately tries to skip town. His father catches him and forces him to marry Sandra. While they are away honeymooning, the other vitelloni roam around town, shooting pool and chasing women. On the couples return, Faustos father-in-law gets him a job at a local shop. He soon returns to his womanizing ways and is red for making a move on the bosss wife. News of his behavior reaches Sandra but Moraldo saves his friends reputation by lying. Shortly after, Sandra gives birth. Fausto slips up again and this time Moraldo cant nd an excuse for it. Sandra leaves, taking the baby with her. Fausto eventually nds her and declares himself a changed man. In the closing scene, Moraldo leaves town in search of a better life in the middle of the night. One of the vitelloni nally leaves the nest.

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FEDERICO FELLINI BIOGRAPHY

Fellini was born in 1920 in Rimini, an Adriatic port in North-central Italy. His upbringing was religious, middle class and provincial. His father, born in the region, was a well-to-do salesman of coffee and other grocery specialties; his mother was originally from Rome. The young Fellini attended religious boarding schools where his main talent was drawing. In 1985, at a gala tribute offered by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Fellini told a New York audience that his love of lm originated in Riminis primitive movie house, the Fulgor, where he saw American movies for the rst time. In 1938, he left high school and moved to Florence, then established himself in Rome. Inasmuch as his mother was Roman, he felt that going there was for him like coming home. His original ambition was to become a journalist. He published cartoons and short stories in a satirical magazine, joined a vaudeville troupe, travelling across Italy, and later wrote sketches for the radio. He entered the movies as a rewrite man, working for various directors. It was in 1943 that Fellini met and married Giulietta Masina, who had a profound inuence on his life and work. She would star in many of his lms, including LA STRADA, THE NIGHTS OF CABIRIA, and JULIET OF THE SPIRITS. In 1944, soon after the liberation of Rome, Fellini and some of his friends found a means of supporting themselves by opening a shop that provided Allied troops with caricatures and portraits for their families. Late in 1944, Roberto Rossellini visited the shop. Their encounter was to be a turning point in Fellinis career. Rossellini asked him to collaborate on a lm he was working on about the Nazi occupation of Romethe project became the landmark neo-realist lm OPEN CITY (1945) that ignited Italys post-war lm renaissance. Fellini joined the ranks of the most esteemed neo-realist scriptwriters, remaining in Rosselinis orbit for several years, also working with him on PAISAN, THE FLOWERS OF ST. FRANCIS, and THE MIRACLE. Fellini made his own directorial debut collaborating with Alberto Lattuada on VARIETY NIGHTS (1950), about the ups and down of a travelling vaudeville troupe. His rst solo directorial debut effort was the farcical THE WHITE SHEIK (1952). Then I VITELLONI (1953) proved an overwhelming success that established Fellini as a director of international standing. It was followed by LA STRADA (1954), starring Giulietta Masina in an unforgettable performance as the innocent vagabond clown Gelsomina and marked Fellinis command of atmosphere. It was chosen by the Motion Picture Academy as Best Foreign Film this was the rst of ve Oscars for its director. Next came IL BIDONE (1955), his starkest lm yet, a dark and powerful morality tale about a petty crook.

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FEDERICO FELLINI BIOGRAPHY (continued)

The directors next work was THE NIGHTS OF CABIRIA (1957), written for Masina, again memorable, this time as a resilient Roman prostitute. CABIRIA not only won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film, it was turned into a popular Broadway musical, SWEET CHARITY, later adapted into a big screen Hollywood musical starring Shirley MacLaine. LA DOLCE VITA (1960) was a triumphant follow-up to the directors international successes of the 50s, an instant box ofce smash. This autobiographical movie gave the world a sensational view of the decadent "sweet life" of Roman society as seen through the eyes of a journalist (Marcello Mastroianni), who left home to make his way in Rome. After this lm, the expression "la dolce vita" became a part of the international language. It was followed by 8 1/2 (1963), another runaway success, a masterpiece of self-reective cinema built on the fantasies and frustrations of a celebrated movie director who breaks down under pressure and refuses to face reality. The amboyant JULIET OF THE SPIRITS (1965), also an exercise in psychoanalysis, is an outrageous Jungian color vehicle for Masina, a sort of female companion piece to 8 1/2. Next came SATYRICON (1969), a loose adaptation of Petronius, a surrealist extravaganza centered on a couple of adolescent Roman youths. Two of the directors current preoccupations, hallucinogenic drugs and science ction, shaped the look and feel of the lm which was made at a time when experimentation, polysexuality and self-discovery were in vogue. With his next ction feature, the irresistible AMARCORD (1973), his fourth Best Foreign Language Oscar winner and a milestone in his career, Fellini returned to the top of his form in a nearly plotless nostalgic amalgam of childhood memories. It was followed by CASANOVA (1976), a vehicle for the directors thoughts on age, sex and death, in which the prolic lover is seen as a dissipated, mechanical man. Although its recreation of 18th century Venice is staggering, critical reaction to the lm was mixed, and while none of his subsequent works ranked with the directors greatest, they were all unmistakably Fellini creations. With the death of Luchino Visconti, Fellini was, in the eyes of most people, Italys undoubted king of cinema. In March 1993 came one nal trip to the United States to receive a Lifetime Achievement Oscar. In October of the same year, after a massive stroke, Fellini died in his beloved Rome. Many editorials and obituaries remarked that with his death, an era had ended.

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FEDERICO FELLINIS FILMOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

Voice of the Moon, The (1990) Intervista (1987) Ginger and Fred (1986) And the Ship Sails On (1983) City of Women (1980) Orchestra Rehearsal (1979) Casanova (1976) Amarcord (1974) Fellini's Roma (1972) Clowns, The (1970) Fellini Satyricon (1969) Fellini A Directors Notebook TV Documentary (1969) Toby Dammit -Episode from Spirits of the Dead- (1968) Juliet of the Spirits (1965) Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 (1963) Temptation of Dr. Antonio, The -Episode from Boccaccio 70- (1962) Dolce Vita, La (1960) Nights of Cabiria (1957) Il Bidone (1955) Strada, La (1954) A Matrimonial Agency - Episode from Love in the City- (1953) I Vitelloni (1953) White Sheik, The (1952) Variety Lights -with Alberto Lattuada-(1950)

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PRODUCTION NOTES The script for LA STRADA was actually written before I VITELLONI, but when Fellini showed it to his producer of contract, he was told "this wont make a lira," and was advised to drop it. He nally found a sympathetic producer in Lorenzo Pegoraro, who had admired THE WHITE SHEIK. Fellini turned to exploring new ideas with Ennio Flaiano and Tullio Pinelli, his co-scenarists on THE WHITE SHEIK. They decided on the theme of the pleasures and frustrations of growing up in a small town. The three men regaled each other with tales about their youth until they decided they had a viable lm subject. "In spite of our different backgrounds, the spirit of the script we wrote was Fellinis," Pinelli emphasized. The story they developed concerned ve young middle-class men who had grown up together in a town on the Adriatic coast, quite similar to Rimini, Fellini's home-town. When the lm was casting, producer Pegoraro was dismayed by Fellinis insistence on using Alberto Sordi for the role of the somewhat effeminate Alberto who lives with his sister. "Theres not a single big name in this lm," the producer complained. "Youll make a commercial disaster. Sordi makes people run away." (Years later when I VITELLONI was revived, Sordi had become Italys number one superstar comic actor, and the posters were redone to put his name above the title.) Pegoraro asked Fellini to meet him half way and bring in a name. He suggested that Fellini might talk to Vittorio De Sica about accepting the role of Natali, the aging gay ham actor who attempts to seduce Leopoldo. De Sica expressed some interest but on the condition that his part would be rewritten to conform to his image of the character. Fellini rightly felt that doing so would force the story out of balance, and the role was nally given to the veteran Achille Majeroni, who turned in an unforgettable performance. As Fellini had delineated the characters in the script, he had already had in mind not only Sordi and Leopoldo Trieste, both of whom he had directed in THE WHITE SHEIK, but also his brother Riccardo who, better than anyone he knew, could enter into the "vitelloni" mentality, since he had been one himself. They were joined by Franco Interlenghi, who with his fresh, serious, boyish face had rst attracted attention in De Sicas SHOESHINE and would play Moraldo, the directors alter ego, the only member of the group to leave town for the big cityand Franco Fabrizi, at that time practically unknown, whom Fellini had rst noticed when he was just one of revue queen Wanda Osiris chorus boys in a successful variety show. A starting date was set for December 1952, with Pegoraro backed by a group of Florentine businessmen and a French-based production company. On the date lming was to begin, Pinelli recounts that the temperamental producer, still obsessed with the unpromising nature of the cast, locked himself in a bathroom and refused to come out and sign checks for equipment.

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PRODUCTION NOTES (continued) The company and crew were waiting in Viterbo, a town near Rome with an atmosphere similar to Fellinis hometown, Rimini. Finally, after a long wait, Pegoraro came out of the bathroom and the rst scenes were shot. Shooting continued off and on until the following spring, the going somewhat stormy and interrupted on several occasions; consequently I VITELLONI had three different directors of photography, for each one of them, corresponding to the breaks in the lm, found that he was no longer free, due to previous commitments. The interiors were nearly all shot in Florence. Pegoraros backers were Tuscan cloth manufacturers and they liked to be able to look in on the shooting from time to time, for they wanted to keep the lm within controlling distance, although Florence was not particularly suited to winter lming. The Goldoni theatre was rented for two important sequencesthe carnival and Natalis performance. Exteriors were shot at Ostia near Rome (the beach and Kursaal) and Viterbo and Ostia. Fellini tried to reconstruct the Rimini of his youth from memory. He never considered shooting at Rimininow that he had become a fairly well known gure in the Italian world, he didnt want to appear a patronizing gure in the eyes of his former friends, who had for the most part become mediocre professional men in their provincial town. I VITELLONI was barely nished when the Venice selection committee accepted it for the festival. It was warmly received with a standing ovation and awarded the Silver Lion. In spite of all the doubts about its commercial appeal, the lm was a success in Italy, a triumph with critics and public in France and it established Fellini as a director of international stature. The success of I VITELLONI made it possible for Fellini to reactivate a project he felt deeply about, LA STRADA. He thought that Anthony Quinn, who was then making a lm at Cinecitta, would be perfect for the role of Zampano. He approached Quinn who had never heard of Fellini and didnt show much interest. Shortly afterward, Quinn received an invitation to dinner with Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman. After dinner, they screened I VITELLONI for himit was Bergman, who adored the picture, who had set it up. "I was thunderstruck by it," Quinn said. "I told them the lm was a masterpiece and that the same director was the man who had been chasing me for weeks." The next day Quinn phoned Fellini and let him know he would love to do LA STRADA. The rest is lm history. LA STRADA, starring Quinn and Fellinis wife, Giulietta Masina, was a worldwide smash hit in country after countryand earned Fellini the rst of his ve Oscars. He was the recipient of Best Foreign Language Film Awards for LA STRADA in 1956, THE NIGHTS OF CABIRIA in 1957, 8 1/2 in 1953 and AMARCORD in 1974.

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CREW - BIOGRAPHIES OTELLO MARTELLI (DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY)

The doyen of Italian cinematographers gained an international reputation for his sensitive work on key lms of the nonrealist period and in the 1950s became Fellinis favorite cameraman. One of Italys last surviving masters of black-and-white cinematography, he was also a pioneer in the eld. He shot PAISAN and STROMBOLI for Rossellini, Jules Dassins WHERE THE HOT WIND BLOWS, but is best remembered for his work with FelliniVARIETY LIGHTS, I VITELLONI, LA STRADA, IL BIDONE. His images from LA DOLCE VITA of Roman high life or Anita Ekberg splashing in the Trevi fountain have become an indelible part of lm history. In addition to his feature work, Martelli, who lived to be nearly 100, is remembered as the cameraman sent by the Italian government to accompany Nobiles historic 1928 expedition to the North Pole.

NINO ROTA (COMPOSER)

The greatest Italian composer of the post-war era, Rota was a child prodigy who at the age of 11 composed his rst oratorio. He studied with Ildebrando Pizzetti and in 1943 began writing lm scores. His best known opera is The Italian Straw Hat. He composed the scores for most of Fellinis lms, creating an evocative world inseparable from the directors by capturing Fellinis style in musicthe sense of surreal reverie, frequent carnival imagery, a playful mix of sentiment and irreverence. Because of this celebrated partnership, there is a danger of overlooking Rotas work with other major directors, notably ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS and THE LEOPARD for Visconti and THE GODFATHER and THE GODFATHER II, which earned him an Academy Award.

MARIO CHIARI (PRODUCTION DESIGNER)

The noted art director of I VITELLONI also worked on lms of De Sica, Jean Renoir, King Vidor and John Huston. Chiari trained to be an architect. Hr entered lms in 1941 and designed the sets for Dieterles VULCANO, Renoirs THE GOLDEN COACH, Vidors WAR AND PEACE, Viscontis WHITE NIGHTS and LUDWIG, Fleischers DR. DOOLITTLE and the KING KONG remake.

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CAST BIOGRAPHIES FRANCO INTERLENGHI MORALDO Born in Rome, 1931. He began his lm career auspiciously as a juvenile in De Sicas classic SHOESHINE and appeared in a number of Viscontis stage productions. He came to incarnate the typical post-war Italian youth who may occasionally get into bad company, but is basically decent. He is clearly the directors alter ego in I VITELLONI. Fellini said: "Moraldo is more or less me." For a while he rivaled Marcello Mastroianni as a top romantic star in Italy, but he never developed a name internationally, although he did appear in a few English language pictures shot in Europe: TERESA, THE BAREFOOT COUNTESSA, A FAREWELL TO ARMS. FRANCO FABRIZI FAUSTO He worked in theatre and played small roles in lms until Fellini gave him his rst important role in I VITELLONI as the egotistical good-for-nothing womanizer. He also appears in Fellinis IL BIDONE, SATYRICON and GINGER AND FRED, in Antonionis LE AMICHE and Viscontis DEATH IN VENICE. ALBERTO SORDI ALBERTO One of Italys most famous and beloved actors, whose roles, both comic and tragic, are a kin of catalogue of the national character. He came to embody Italys everymanmore than any other actor, he touched the most important events of contemporary Italian history with his lms. For many years he was the top box-ofce attraction on the screen in Italy, a master of bittersweet satire and caricature. He began his career in lm by dubbing the voice of Oliver Hardy for Italian versions of Laurel and Hardy comedies. He also wrote and directed lms. Quite often he was seen as an "anti-hero" or average man caught up in forces beyond his control or comprehension. Aided by an elastic face that complemented his chameleonic nature, he appeared in nearly 200 movies. LIDA BAAROVA GIULIA (MICHELES WIFE) An astonishing career. After seeing her gentle and restrained performance in Fellinis lm, it is difcult to believe that as a young sexpot she precipitated a crisis in the upper echelons of the Third Reich. At the age of 20, the lovely almond-eyed Czech actress signed an Ufa contract that brought her to Berlin. Her popularity soared as she appeared in a number of lavish German productions of the mid-1930s. She had been living with top star Gustav Frolich (METROPOLIS) when she began an affair with married propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels. The affair blew up when Hitler became aware of it and ordered Goebbels to choose between the lady and his job. Baarova returned to Prague, where after the war she was arrested with charges of treason and espionage. When released, she made a few last lms in Italy.

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QUOTES I VITELLONI "I Vitelloni was a major inspiration for my picture Mean Streets back in 1973. For me, it captures the bittersweet emotions of a moment that eventually comes for everyone: the moment you realize you can either grow up, or stay forever a child." Martin Scorsese "In Italy, as the so-called realistic cinema has decayed, a vital new talent has emerged: Federico Fellini Vitteloni, completed in 1953, a year before La Strada, secured Fellinis fame in Europe. It is a ner piece of work than La Strada in every way. Technically, it is an elegant exercise in cinematic direction. Literally, it is a murderous satire curiously infused with tenderness for the thing it destroys. The title means "the big calves" in Italian, but it is perhaps most idiomatically translated as "the slobs." The slobs in question are the sons of some middle-class families in a small city in Italy. In body they are full-grown males, but at heart they are just big bambini. Though nished with school, they cannot quite bring themselves to take jobs The nimbleness, the knowningness, the irony, the sharp observation of small-town life in all this has hardly been surpassed on the screen. Moreover, there is a sense of the unpredictable ow of life...that gives to everything Fellini dies a kind of tidal vitality. He sees his people straight and whole, most warmly and naturally loves them and hates them, and takes them as they are And in Fellinis hands, people sometimes seem more important than the screen has made them appear for year; they seem larger, somehow, even the lowliest and most hopelessly lost among them." TIME, Nov 5th, 1996. "I Vitteloni continues today to be one of Fellinis most popular works in Italy precisely because it has revealed after ve decades its authenticity as a wonderfully accurate portrait of daily life in the countrys small towns just before the impact of the "economic miracle" and the transition of the peninsula to a modern industrial nation." Peter Bondanella in THE FILMS OF FEDERICO FELLINI, Cambridge University Press "The distinction of Vitelloni lies in Fellinis understanding of his characters, his unusual sympathy for their problems and the rich comedy of the lm is intensied for its entire cast, with performances of particular brilliance by Franco Fabrizi and Alberto Sordi. In its association of music to mood, and its application of camera and editing principles, Vitelloni stands as a model of progressive lm technique. As in all truly creative works, however, the signicance of Fellinis achievement goes beyond the area of form. In its nal impression, Vitelloni distinctly evokes the image not of art, but of life." Eugene Archer in Film Culture.

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QUOTES I VITELLONI (Continued) "I Vitelloni is the story of adolescents who cannot see anything more in life than satisfying their animal desiressleeping, eating, fornicating. I was trying to say there is something more, there is always more. Life must have a meaning beyond the animal. In I Vitelloni I was portraying, not, as people have claimed, the death throes of a decadent social class, but a certain torpor of the soul." Federico Fellini "With good reason, I Vitelloni remains one of Fellinis most highly regarded lms: it has a cast of unforgettable characters, a rhythmic structure, an expressive visual approach, symbolic richness, and a profound theme." Edward Murray in FELLINI THE ARTIST. "Vitelloni, a fascinating lm. As in La Strada, Fellini displays an uncanny and incomparable gift for selecting the perfect incident, the perfect setting to convey a mood or heighten an emotion. Fellini has this rare feeling for an imagery that reaches through to the spectator without words." Arthur King, Saturday Review, Nov 10th, 1956.

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Originally published on November 5th, 1956. A dying art, like rotting fruit, may hold the seed of a new birth. In Italy, as the so-called realistic cinema has decayed, a vital new talent has emerged: Federico Fellini. Last summer La Strada (Te Road) revealed him to U.S. audiences as an artist of uncertain means but of startling sensibility. I Vitelloni, completed in 1953, a year before La Strada, secured Fellinis fame in Europe. It is a ner piece of work than La Strada in every way. Technically, it is an elegant exercise in cinematic diction. Literally, it is a murderous satire curiously infused with tenderness for the thing it destroys. The title means "the big calves" in Italian, but it perhaps most idiomatically translated as "the slobs." The slobs in question are the sons of some middle-class families in a small city in Italy. In body they are full-grown males, but at heart they are just big bambini. Though nished with school, they cannot quite bring themselves to take jobs. Supported by indulgent families, they sleep till noon, spend the rest of the day at the poolroom or on the beach, talking about girls they seldom get or wishing they were somewhere far away. Sometimes, there is nothing to do but mambo along the sidewalk, or just grow sideburns. At night they get drunk on money cadged from their working sisters, and tiptoe delicately to bed in the wee hours. They are terried of their fathers, but pathetically sentimental about their doting mothers. Fausto (Franco Fabrizi), the biggest of the slobs, is a charming young chump who spends most of his life salting the local quail. When a beauty contest winner gets pregnant, he tries to leave town, but his father catches him on the wing and makes him marry the girl (Leonora Ruffo). His father-in-law then forces him to take a job in a shop that sells religious objects. Fausto tries to relieve his misery by irting with the bosss wife and eventually gets red for his pains. Not long after, he spends the night with a showgirl (Maja Nipora), comes home smeared with lipstick, wakes up to nd wife and baby gone. After a desperate search, Fausto discovers them both at his fathers house, but unfortunately he nds his father too, who gives him a good, old fashioned spanking. The nimbleness, the knowingness, the irony, the sharp observation of small-town life in all this has hardly been surpassed on the screen. Moreover, there is a sense of the unpredictable ow of life, even though in I Vitelloni it is only the sloshing of stale water in very small pot, that gives to everything Fellini does a kind of vitality. Fellini sees his people straight and whole, most warmly and naturally loves them and hates them, and takes them as they are. It is one measure of Fellinis superiority to most of his neorealist colleagues in the Italian lm industry that he does not trouble his head, or his audience, with social problems as such: on the reactionary assumption (which horries his Commuist critics) that societies are made up of people, Fellini simply makes pictures about peoples problems. And in Fellinis hands, people sometimes seem more important than the screen has made them appear for years; they seem larger, somehow, even the lowliest and most hopelessly lost among them.

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