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Oling, Lane - GOV

From:
Sent:
Schutt, Eric - GOV
20117:57 AM
To: Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV;
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
Wow ...
From:
Sent: February 19, 2011 10:23 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I thought the NYTimes was good. Holy crap.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
19, 2011 09:51 PM
To:.__ Gilkes, Keith- GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Fw: Washington Post Profile
From: Chris Schrimpf
Sent: Saturday,
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Washington Post Profile
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011!02/19/ AR2011021904205 pf.html
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has history of going up against unions
By Brady Dennis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 19, 2011; 9:28PM
MADISON, WIS. - On a Tuesday afternoon in September 2003, during Scott Walker's first term as Milwaukee
County executive, scores of union workers gathered at the local courthouse to protest layoffs he had ordered as
part of an aggressive effort to balance the budget and avoid what he said would otherwise be necessary tax
mcreases.
They shouted anti-Walker chants, and union officials and Democratic officeholders took turns denouncing his
slash-and-bum approach.
The layoffs Walker had announced that summer decimated the county's public parks staff and also reduced the
number of county social workers, corrections officers and janitors. As a result, park bathrooms were shuttered
and pools were closed. Trash was piled up so high in the Milwaukee County Courthouse that visitors had to
sidestep apple cores and coffee cups, and some judges resorted to cleaning toilets, a local newspaper reported.
1
Despite the deep cuts and the union uproar, Walker cruised to reelection the following spring and remained in
his post six more years, until his successful gubernatorial run in the fall.
The 43-year-old governor has garnered national attention in the past week- challenging unions in a birthplace
of the progressive movement and joining other high-profile governors such as New Jersey's Chris Christie (R)
in pushing deep budget cuts and straight talk on fiscal restraint - but allies and opponents alike say they are
hardly surprised. While deficit reduction and spending cuts are in style these days in Washington and beyond,
they have been Walker's bread and butter for two decades.
"Anybody who said they didn't see this coming wasn't paying attention to the election," said Joe Sanfelippo, a
member of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and a Walker supporter. "He's true to his word ... he's
not going to back down."
Indeed, Walker showed little concern for the sea of protesters singing Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take
It" outside his window Friday evening. Dressed in a navy suit and red tie, he shrugged offthe chants for his
resignation and the signs portraying him as a dictator.
"My last couple budget addresses [in Milwaukee County], I literally had protesters from the unions in the
chambers standing up during my speech holding signs .... I had people catcalling and the whole bit; I'm used to
it," he said in an interview in his spacious Capitol office, with its dark wood furniture and tightly drawn
burgundy blinds.
"Obviously these guys have a right to be heard, but this is still a small fraction of the percentage of all state and
local government workers," he said. "I can't let these voices overpower the voices of the millions of other
taxpayers I represent."
Asked whether his experiences with unions as county executive had influenced his bill to curb state employee
benefits and put tight restrictions on their collective-bargaining rights - the same measure that brought the
chanting masses to his doorstep - he didn't hesitate.
"Absolutely," he said. "Totally."
During his eight-year tenure in Milwaukee County, Walker never raised property taxes. He cut the county
workforce by 20 percent, improved its bond rating and gave back hundreds of thousands of dollars of his own
salary as part of the effort to trim spending. But he also saw his relations with local unions deteriorate.
Union leaders say Walker never negotiated in good faith and had a singular solution to every budget problem:
cut. Under his watch, the county privatized public jobs, laid off workers and placed others on furlough.
"The guy's a one-trick pony. His playbook is very limited," said Rich Abelson, executive director of AFSCME
District Council48, Milwaukee's largest union. "The result of that is an absolute devastation of the programs
and services in Milwaukee County."
Abelson said the union filed multiple lawsuits against Walker over the years for unfair labor practices, and the
relationship continued to sour as Walker kept "cutting wages and benefits for working people."
Walker argued that collective bargaining was the biggest hurdle to balancing the budget and that unions had
little incentive to give ground because they almost always prevailed in arbitration. He said that the cuts he
proposed were intended to prevent layoffs and accused union leaders of being uninterested in compromise.
2
"If I could go after ... the pension and health-care contribution, I could have avoided layoffs; I could have
avoided other service cuts," he said. "But because of the way the law is, local governments just can't do that."
Walker, a native of Colorado Springs, spent his formative years in a small town 60 miles south of Madison,
called Delavan, where his father served as pastor at the Baptist church. He became an Eagle Scout and idolized
Ronald Reagan.
He attended Marquette University but left just shy of a degree to take a marketing job with the American Red
Cross, making him the first Wisconsin governor in more than half a century not to have a college degree.
At 25, he won election to the state Assembly and served for nine years. But in 2002, Milwaukee County
Executive Tom Ament, a Democrat, resigned in the wake of a county pension fund scandal, and Walker became
the rare Republican to win office in the area by vowing to clean up the mess.
Friends and foes alike describe Walker as hardworking and amiable, a devoted husband and father of two
teenage sons. They also call him a gifted and ambitious politician who has never strayed Jl'om his conservative
ideals.
"He was tea party before there was a tea party. He's always been ideologically pure," said Mordecai Lee, a
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political science professor who sparred with Walker on a weekly television
show during his Assembly days. "He would do whatever it took not to raise taxes. He never wavered, never
doubted."
Lee said Walker's repeated success at the polls, even in Democratic strongholds, came as no smprise. He
preached fiscal conservatism but also campaigned on his own frugality, noting that he packed ham-and-cheese
sandwiches for lunch and drove a weathered Saturn.
"Scott Walker is the Republican Obama- he's likable, he's nice, so voters saw that [side] rather than the very
ideological Republican," Lee said. "He's one ofthe most impressive politicians I've ever seen."
On Friday evening at the Capitol, Walker remained true to the portrait painted by supporters and detractors alike
- calm and composed even during the tensest moments but utterly unwavering and unapologetic in his views.
Guards stood outside every entrance to the governor's office. Walker talked about finding time to watch
"American Idol" with his wife the previous night. The crowds outside chanted, "Kill the bill!" Walker talked
about texting with his sons throughout the day. "They've been following this. They're intrigued," he said.
Outside, the sun was setting. The crowd sang "We Shall Overcome." The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson had arrived to
fire up the tens of thousands of protesters in their fifth day of demonstrations.
Inside, the governor prepared to slip quietly out of the Capitol and head 80 miles north to welcome home
members of aN ational Guard unit from Iraq, a brief and welcome respite from the budget battles.
He predicted that the legislative impasse would soon end and that he would have the votes to push through his
bill. As for the union backers who would surely return day after day to shower him with their discontent- well,
he wasn't looking for their affection.
"I sleep all right," he said.
3
Oling, Lane - GOV
From: Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 8:39 PM
To:
Subject:
Fadness, Joseph F - GOV; Matejov, Scott - GOV; Erwin, David - GOV
RE: Walker
They will be all by themselves.
Also -we have a leak over there.
From: Fadness, Joseph F- GOV
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 8:37PM
To: Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Matejov, Scott- GOV; Erwin, David - GOV
Subject: RE: Walker
Interesting. This is the event that we canceled on Sunday.
From: Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 8:36PM
To: Matejov, Scott - GOV; Fadness, Joseph F - GOV; Erwin, David - GOV
Subject: FW: Walker
Importance: High
FYI- See below on a media event that the AFL-CIO is protesting at.
From: Keith Gilkes -The Champion Group
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 8:34PM
To: Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Subject: Walker
Begin forwarded message:
From: Jenissee Volpintesta <jvolpintesta@wisaflcio.org>
Date: February 14, 2011 6:47:25 PM CST
Subject: Walker appearance
Scott Walker will be in Milwaukee on Tuesday February 15, 2011 at Grover Piston
Ring- 2759 S 28th street between 9:00 and 9:30am, he will have media with him.
Please join us in solidarity as we take action and demand our voices are heard!
Thank you,
Jenissee Volpintesta
1
Wisconsin State AFL-CIO
Greater Milwaukee Area Organizer
Milwaukee Area Labor Council
633 S. Hawley Rd.
Milwaukee, Wl53214
Cell: 262-364-6751
Office: 414-771-7070 x18
jvolpintesta@wisaflcio.org
Keith Gilkes, President
The Champion Group, LLC
E-mail: kgilkes@ChampLLC.com
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Sunday, February 20, 2011 7:35 AM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re: Washington Post Profile
Let me work on the wording a bit and send back.
Just want to adjust some wording. Be back with you in a bit.
Cullen J- GOV
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
07:28:53 2011
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I feel like we should tweet this:
By battles through! the years have prepared me to do what's right to balance the budget: (link)
From:
To: <;rhnmnf, Chris - Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Sat Feb 19 22:23:37 2011
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I thought the NYTimes was good. Holy crap.
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: 19, 2011 09:51 PM
Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
\Jiiashir1atcm Post Profile
From: Chris Schrimpf
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2011 09:47 PM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Washington Post Profile
http :1/www. washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/20 11/02/19/ AR20 11021904 205 pf.html
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has history of going up against unions
By Brady Dennis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 19, 2011; 9:28PM
MADISON, WIS. -On a Tuesday afternoon in September 2003, during Scott Walker's first term as Milwaukee
County executive, scores of union workers gathered at the local courthouse to protest layoffs he had ordered as
part of an aggressive effort to balance the budget and avoid what he said would otherwise be necessary tax
increases.
1
They shouted anti-Walker chants, and union officials and Democratic officeholders took turns denouncing his
slash-and-bum approach.
The layoffs Walker had announced that summer decimated the county's public parks staff and also reduced the
number of county social workers, corrections officers and janitors. As a result, park bathrooms were shuttered
and pools were closed. Trash was piled up so high in the Milwaukee County Courthouse that visitors had to
sidestep apple cores and coffee cups, and some judges resorted to cleaning toilets, a local newspaper reported.
Despite the deep cuts and the union uproar, Walker cruised to reelection the following spring and remained in
his post six more years, until his successful gubernatorial run in the fall.
The 43-year-old governor has garnered national attention in the past week- challenging unions in a birthplace
of the progressive movement and joining other high-profile governors such as New Jersey's Chris Christie (R)
in pushing deep budget cuts and straight talk on fiscal restraint - but allies and opponents alike say they are
hardly surprised. While deficit reduction and spending cuts are in style these days in Washington and beyond,
they have been Walker's bread and butter for two decades.
"Anybody who said they didn't see this coming wasn't paying attention to the election," said Joe Sanfelippo, a
member of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and a Walker supporter. "He's true to his word ... he's
not going to back down."
Indeed, Walker showed little concern for the sea of protesters singing Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take
It" outside his window Friday evening. Dressed in a navy suit and red tie, he shrugged off the chants for his
resignation and the signs portraying him as a dictator.
"My last couple budget addresses [in Milwaukee County], I literally had protesters from the unions in the
chambers standing up during my speech holding signs .... I had people catcalling and the whole bit; I'm used to
it," he said in an interview in his spacious Capitol office, with its dark wood furniture and tightly drawn
burgundy blinds.
"Obviously these guys have a right to be heard, but this is still a small fraction of the percentage of all state and
local government workers," he said. "I can't let these voices overpower the voices of the millions of other
taxpayers I represent."
Asked whether his experiences with unions as county executive had influenced his bill to curb state employee
benefits and put tight restrictions on their collective-bargaining rights- the same measure that brought the
chanting masses to his doorstep - he didn't hesitate.
"Absolutely," he said. "Totally."
During his eight-year tenure in Milwaukee County, Walker never raised property taxes. He cut the county
workforce by 20 percent, improved its bond rating and gave back hundreds of thousands of dollars of his own
salary as part of the effort to trim spending. But he also saw his relations with local unions deteriorate.
Union leaders say Walker never negotiated in good faith and had a singular solution to every budget problem:
cut. Under his watch, the county privatized public jobs, laid off workers and placed others on furlough.
"The guy's a one-trick pony. His playbook is very limited," said Rich Abelson, executive director of AFSCME
District Council 48, Milwaukee's largest union. "The result of that is an absolute devastation ofthe programs
and services in Milwaukee County."
2
Abelson said the union filed multiple lawsuits against Walker over the years for unfair labor practices, and the
relationship continued to sour as Walker kept "cutting wages and benefits for working people."
Walker argued that collective bargaining was the biggest hurdle to balancing the budget and that unions had
little incentive to give ground because they almost always prevailed in arbitration. He said that the cuts he
proposed were intended to prevent layoffs and accused union leaders of being uninterested in compromise.
"If I could go after ... the pension and health-care contribution, I could have avoided layoffs; I could have
avoided other service cuts," he said. "But because of the way the law is, local governments just can't do that."
Walker, a native of Colorado Springs, spent his formative years in a small town 60 miles south of Madison,
called Delavan, where his father served as pastor at the Baptist church. He became an Eagle Scout and idolized
Ronald Reagan.
He attended Marquette University but left just shy of a degree to take a marketing job with the American Red
Cross, making him the first Wisconsin governor in more than half a century not to have a college degree.
At 25, he won election to the state Assembly and served for nine years. But in 2002, Milwaukee County
Executive Tom Ament, a Democrat, resigned in the wake of a county pension fund scandal, and Walker became
the rare Republican to win office in the area by vowing to clean up the mess.
Friends and foes alike describe Walker as hardworking and amiable, a devoted husband and father of two
teenage sons. They also call him a gifted and ambitious politician who has never strayed from his conservative
ideals.
"He was tea party before there was a tea party. He's always been ideologically pure," said Mordecai Lee, a
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political science professor who sparred with Walker on a weekly television
show during his Assembly days. "He would do whatever it took not to raise taxes. He never wavered, never
doubted."
Lee said Walker's repeated success at the polls, even in Democratic strongholds, came as no surprise. He
preached fiscal conservatism but also campaigned on his own frugality, noting that he packed ham-and-cheese
sandwiches for lunch and drove a weathered Saturn.
"Scott Walker is the Republican Obama- he's likable, he's nice, so voters saw that [side] rather than the very
ideological Republican," Lee said. "He's one of the most impressive politicians I've ever seen."
On Friday evening at the Capitol, Walker remained true to the portrait painted by supporters and detractors alike
-calm and composed even during the tensest moments but utterly unwavering and unapologetic in his views.
Guards stood outside every entrance to the governor's office. Walker talked about finding time to watch
"American Idol" with his wife the previous night. The crowds outside chanted, "Kill the bill!" Walker talked
about texting with his sons throughout the day. "They've been following this. They're intrigued," he said.
Outside, the sun was setting. The crowd sang "We Shall Overcome." The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson had arrived to
fire up the tens of thousands of protesters in their fifth day of demonstrations.
Inside, the governor prepared to slip quietly out of the Capitol and head 80 miles north to welcome home
members of a National Guard unit from Iraq, a brief and welcome respite from the budget battles.
3
He predicted that the legislative impasse would soon end and that he would have the votes to push through his
bill. As for the union backers who would sm-ely return day after day to shower him with their discontent - well,
he wasn't looking for their affection.
"I sleep all right," he said.
4
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
I feel like we should tweet this:
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
~ 0 , 20117:29 AM
--Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV;
Schutt, Eric - GOV
Re: Washington Post Profile
By battles through! the years have prepared me to do what's right to balance the budget: (link)
To: 1 Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Sat Feb 19 22:23:37 2011
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I thought the NYTimes was good. Holy crap.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: 19, 2011 09:51PM
Gilkes, Keith- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Wi'l<hil1nt<1n Post Profile
From: Chris Schrimpf
Sent: Saturday, February
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Washington Post Profile
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/19/AR2011021904205 pf.html
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has history of going up against unions
By Brady Dennis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 19, 2011; 9:28PM
MADISON, WIS.- On a Tuesday afternoon in September 2003, during Scott Walker's first term as Milwaukee
County executive, scores of union workers gathered at the local courthouse to protest layoffs he had ordered as
part of an aggressive effort to balance the budget and avoid what he said would otherwise be necessary tax
increases.
They shouted anti-Walker chants, and union officials and Democratic officeholders took turns denouncing his
slash-and-bum approach.
The layoffs Walker had announced that summer decimated the county's public parks staff and also reduced the
number of county social workers, corrections officers and janitors. As a result, park bathrooms were shuttered
and pools were closed. Trash was piled up so high in the Milwaukee County Courthouse that visitors had to
sidestep apple cores and coffee cups, and some judges resorted to cleaning toilets, a local newspaper reported.
1
Despite the deep cuts and the union uproar, Walker cruised to reelection the following spring and remained in
his post six more years, until his successful gubernatorial run in the fall.
The 43-year-old governor has garnered national attention in the past week- challenging unions in a birthplace
of the progressive movement and joining other high-profile governors such as New Jersey's Chris C1uistie (R)
in pushing deep budget cuts and straight talk on fiscal restraint - but allies and opponents alike say they are
hardly surprised. While deficit reduction and spending cuts are in style these days in Washington and beyond,
they have been Walker's bread and butter for two decades.
"Anybody who said they didn't see this coming wasn't paying attention to the election," said Joe Sanfelippo, a
member ofthe Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and a Walker supporter. "He's true to his word ... he's
not going to back down."
Indeed, Walker showed little concern for the sea of protesters singing Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gouna Take
It" outside his window Friday evening. Dressed in a navy suit and red tie, he shrugged off the chants for his
resignation and the signs portraying him as a dictator.
"My last couple budget addresses [in Milwaukee County], I literally had protesters from the unions in the
chambers standing up during my speech holding signs .... I had people catcalling and the whole bit; I'm used to
it," he said in an interview in his spacious Capitol office, with its dark wood furniture and tightly drawn
burgundy blinds.
"Obviously these guys have a right to be heard, but this is still a small fraction of the percentage of all state and
local government workers," he said. "I can't let these voices overpower the voices of the millions of other
taxpayers I represent."
Asked whether his experiences with unions as county executive had influenced his bill to curb state employee
benefits and put tight restrictions on their collective-bargaining rights -the same measure that brought the
chanting masses to his doorstep - he didn't hesitate.
"Absolutely," he said. "Totally."
During his eight-year tenure in Milwaukee County, Walker never raised property taxes. He cut the county
workforce by 20 percent, improved its bond rating and gave back hundreds of thousands of dollars of his own
salary as part of the effort to trim spending. But he also saw his relations with local unions deteriorate.
Union leaders say Walker never negotiated in good faith and had a singular solution to every budget problem:
cut. Under his watch, the county privatized public jobs, laid off workers and placed others on furlough.
"The guy's a one-trick pony. His playbook is very limited," said Rich Abelson, executive director of AFSCME
District Council48, Milwaukee's largest union. "The result of that is an absolute devastation of the programs
and services in Milwaukee County."
Abelson said the union filed multiple lawsuits against Walker over the years for unfair labor practices, and the
relationship continued to sour as Walker kept "cutting wages and benefits for working people."
Walker argued that collective bargaining was the biggest hurdle to balancing the budget and that unions had
little incentive to give ground because they almost always prevailed in arbitration. He said that the cuts he
proposed were intended to prevent layoffs and accused union leaders of being uninterested in compromise.
2
"Ifl could go after ... the pension and health-care contribution, I could have avoided layoffs; I could have
avoided other service cuts," he said. "But because of the way the law is, local governments just can't do that."
Walker, a native of Colorado Springs, spent his formative years in a small town 60 miles south of Madison,
called Delavan, where his father served as pastor at the Baptist church. He became an Eagle Scout and idolized
Ronald Reagan.
He attended Marquette University but left just shy of a degree to take a marketing job with the American Red
Cross, making him the first Wisconsin governor in more than half a century not to have a college degree.
At 25, he won election to the state Assembly and served for nine years. But in 2002, Milwaukee County
Executive Tom Ament, a Democrat, resigned in the wake of a county pension fund scandal, and Walker became
the rare Republican to win office in the area by vowing to clean up the mess.
Friends and foes alike describe Walker as hardworking and amiable, a devoted husband and father oftwo
teenage sons. They also call him a gifted and ambitious politician who has never strayed from his conservative
ideals.
"He was tea party before there was a tea party. He's always been ideologically pure," said Mordecai Lee, a
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political science professor who sparred with Walker on a weekly television
show during his Assembly days. "He would do whatever it took not to raise taxes. He never wavered, never
doubted."
Lee said Walker's repeated success at the polls, even in Democratic strongholds, came as no surprise. He
preached fiscal conservatism but also campaigned on his own frugality, noting that he packed ham-and-cheese
sandwiches for lunch and drove a weathered Saturn.
"Scott Walker is the Republican Obama- he's likable, he's nice, so voters saw that [side] rather than the very
ideological Republican," Lee said. "He's one ofthe most impressive politicians I've ever seen."
On Friday evening at the Capitol, Walker remained true to the portrait painted by supporters and detractors alike
- calm and composed even during the tensest moments but utterly unwavering and unapologetic in his views.
Guards stood outside every entrance to the governor's office. Walker talked about finding time to watch
"American Idol" with his wife the previous night. The crowds outside chanted, "Kill the bill!" Walker talked
about texting with his sons throughout the day. "They've been following this. They're intrigued," he said.
Outside, the sun was setting. The crowd sang "We Shall Overcome." The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson had arrived to
fire up the tens of thousands of protesters in their fifth day of demonstrations.
Inside, the governor prepared to slip quietly out of the Capitol and head 80 miles north to welcome home
members of a National Guard unit from Iraq, a brief and welcome respite from the budget battles.
He predicted that the legislative impasse would soon end and that he would have the votes to push through his
bill. As for the union backers who would surely return day after day to shower him with their discontent - well,
he wasn't looking for their affection.
"I sleep all right," he said.
3
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
rday, February 19, 201110:24 PM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV;
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Re: Washington Post Profile
I thought the NYTimes was good. Holy crap.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
S e n ~ r y 19, 2011 09:51 PM ,
To:---Gilkes, Keith- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Fw: Washington Post Profile
From: Chris Schrimpf
Sent: Saturday, February 19,
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Washington Post Profile
http:/lwww.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/19/AR2011021904205 pf.html
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has history of going up against unions
By Brady Dennis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 19, 2011; 9:28PM
MADISON, WIS. -On a Tuesday afternoon in September 2003, during Scott Walker's first term as Milwaukee
County executive, scores of union workers gathered at the local courthouse to protest layoffs he had ordered as
part of an aggressive effort to balance the budget and avoid what he said would otherwise be necessary tax
increases.
They shouted anti-Walker chants, and union officials and Democratic officeholders took turns denouncing his
slash-and-bum approach.
The layoffs Walker had announced that sununer decimated the county's public parks staff and also reduced the
number of county social workers, corrections officers and janitors. As a result, park bathrooms were shuttered
and pools were closed. Trash was piled up so high in the Milwaukee County Courthouse that visitors had to
sidestep apple cores and coffee cups, and some judges resorted to cleaning toilets, a local newspaper reported.
Despite the deep cuts and the union uproar, Walker cruised to reelection the following spring and remained in
his post six more years, until his successful gubernatorial run in the fall.
The 43-year-old governor has garnered national attention in the past week- challenging unions in a birthplace
of the progressive movement and joining other high-profile governors such as New Jersey's Chris Christie (R)
in pushing deep budget cuts and straight talk on fiscal restraint - but allies and opponents alike say they are
1
hardly surprised. While deficit reduction and spending cuts are in style these days in Washington and beyond,
they have been Walker's bread and hutter for two decades.
"Anybody who said they didn't see this coming wasn't paying attention to the election," said Joe Sanfelippo, a
member of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and a Walker supporter. "He's true to his word ... he's
not going to back down."
Indeed, Walker showed little concern for the sea of protesters singing Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take
It" outside his window Friday evening. Dressed in a navy suit and red tie, he shrugged off the chants for his
resignation and the signs portraying him as a dictator.
"My last couple budget addresses [in Milwaukee County], I literally had protesters from the unions in the
chambers standing up during my speech holding signs .... I had people catcalling and the whole bit; I'm used to
it," he said in an interview in his spacious Capitol office, with its dark wood furniture and tightly drawn
burgundy blinds.
"Obviously these guys have a right to be heard, but this is still a small fraction of the percentage of all state and
local government workers," he said. "I can't let these voices overpower the voices of the millions of other
taxpayers I represent."
Asked whether his experiences with unions as county executive had influenced his bill to curb state employee
benefits and put tight restrictions on their collective-bargaining rights - the same measure that brought the
chanting masses to his doorstep - he didn't hesitate.
"Absolutely," he said. "Totally."
During his eight-year tenure in Milwaukee County, Walker never raised property taxes. He cut the county
workforce by 20 percent, improved its bond rating and gave back hundreds of thousands of dollars of his own
salary as part of the effort to trim spending. But he also saw his relations with local unions deteriorate.
Union leaders say Walker never negotiated in good faith and had a singular solution to every budget problem:
cut. Under his watch, the county privatized public jobs, laid off workers and placed others on furlough.
"The guy's a one-trick pony. His playbook is very limited," said Rich Abelson, executive director of AFSCME
District Council 48, Milwaukee's largest union. "The result of that is an absolute devastation of the programs
and services in Milwaukee County."
Abelson said the union filed multiple lawsuits against Walker over the years for unfair labor practices, and the
relationship continued to sour as Walker kept "cutting wages and benefits for working people."
Walker argued that collective bargaining was the biggest hurdle to balancing the budget and that unions had
little incentive to give ground because they almost always prevailed in arbitration. He said that the cuts he
proposed were intended to prevent layoffs and accused union leaders of being uninterested in compromise.
"Ifi could go after ... the pension and health-care contribution, I could have avoided layoffs; I could have
avoided other service cuts," he said. "But because of the way the law is, local governments just can't do that."
Walker, a native of Colorado Springs, spent his formative years in a small town 60 miles south of Madison,
called Delavan, where his father served as pastor at the Baptist church. He became an Eagle Scout and idolized
Ronald Reagan.
2
He attended Marquette University but left just shy of a degree to take a marketing job with the American Red
Cross, making him the first Wisconsin governor in more than half a century not to have a college degree.
At 25, he won election to the state Assembly and served for nine years. But in 2002, Milwaukee County
Executive Tom Ament, a Democrat, resigned in the wake of a county pension fund scandal, and Walker became
the rare Republican to win office in the area by vowing to clean up the mess.
Friends and foes alike describe Walker as hardworking and amiable, a devoted husband and father of two
teenage sons. They also call him a gifted and ambitious politician who has never strayed from his conservative
ideals.
"He was tea party before there was a tea party. He's always been ideologically pure," said Mordecai Lee, a
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political science professor who sparred with Walker on a weekly television
show during his Assembly days: "He would do whatever it took not to raise taxes. He never wavered, never
doubted."
Lee said Walker's repeated success at the polls, even in Democratic strongholds, came as no surprise. He
preached fiscal conservatism but also campaigned on his own frugality, noting that he packed ham-and-cheese
sandwiches for lunch and drove a weathered Saturn.
"Scott Walker is the Republican Obama- he's likable, he's nice, so voters saw that [side] rather than the very
ideological Republican," Lee said. "He's one of the most impressive politicians I've ever seen."
On Friday evening at the Capitol, Walker remained true to the portrait painted by supporters and detractors alike
- calm and composed even during the tensest moments but utterly unwavering and unapologetic in his views.
Guards stood outside every entrance to the governor's office. Walker talked about finding time to watch
"American Idol" with his wife the previous night. The crowds outside chanted, "Kill the bill!" Walker talked
about texting with his sons throughout the day. "They've been following this. They're intrigued," he said.
Outside, the sun was setting. The crowd sang "We Shall Overcome." The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson had arrived to
fire up the tens of thousands of protesters in their fifth day of demonstrations.
Inside, the governor prepared to slip quietly out of the Capitol and head 80 miles north to welcome home
members of a National Guard unit from Iraq, a brief and welcome respite from the budget battles.
He predicted that the legislative impasse would soon end and that he would have the votes to push through his
bill. As for the union backers who would surely return day after day to shower him with their discontent - well,
he wasn't looking for their affection.
"I sleep all right," he said.
3
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent: February 20, 2011 8:30AM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M -
GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
Good.
From: Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
20, 2011 07:28AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I feel like we should tweet this:
By battles through! the years have prepared me to do what's right to balance the budget: (link)
From: ....
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Gilkes, Keith- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Sent: Sat Feb 19 22:23:37 2011
Subject: Re: Washington Post Profile
I thought the NYTimes was good. Holy crap.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
19, 2011 09:51PM
To:--Gilkes, Keith- GOV; Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Schutt, Eric- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J- GOV
Subject: Fw: Washington Post Profile
From: Chris SchrrimofW
Sent: Saturday, FPh,rr ri'lrv
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: Washington Post Profile
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/19/AR2011021904205 pf.html
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has history of going up against unions
By Brady Dennis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 19, 2011; 9:28PM
MADISON, WIS.- On a Tuesday afternoon in September 2003, during Scott Walker's first term as Milwaukee
County executive, scores of union workers gathered at the local courthouse to protest layoffs he had ordered as
part of an aggressive effort to balance the budget and avoid what he said would otherwise be necessary tax
increases.
1
They shouted anti-Walker chants, and union officials and Democratic officeholders took turns denouncing his
slash-and-bum approach.
The layoffs Walker had announced that summer decimated the county's public parks staff and also reduced the
number of county social workers, corrections officers and janitors. As a result, park bathrooms were shuttered
and pools were closed. Trash was piled up so high in the Milwaukee County Courthouse that visitors had to
sidestep apple cores and coffee cups, and some judges resorted to cleaning toilets, a local newspaper reported.
Despite the deep cuts and the union uproar, Walker cruised to reelection the following spring and remained in
his post six more years, until his successful gubernatorial run in the fall.
The 43-year-old governor has garnered national attention in the past week- challenging unions in a birthplace
ofthe progressive movement and joining other high-profile governors such as New Jersey's Chris Christie (R)
in pushing deep budget cuts and straight talk on fiscal restraint - but allies and opponents alike say they are
hardly surprised. While deficit reduction and spending cuts are in style these days in Washington and beyond,
they have been Walker's bread and butter for two decades.
"Anybody who said they didn't see this coming wasn't paying attention to the election," said Joe Sanfelippo, a
member of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors and a Walker supporter. "He's true to his word ... he's
not going to back down."
Indeed, Walker showed little concern for the sea of protesters singing Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take
It" outside his window Friday evening. Dressed in a navy suit and red tie, he shrugged off the chants for his
resignation and the signs portraying him as a dictator.
"My last couple budget addresses [in Milwaukee County], I literally had protesters from the unions in the
chambers standing up during my speech holding signs .... I had people catcalling and the whole bit; I'm used to
it," he said in an interview in his spacious Capitol office, with its dark wood furniture and tightly drawn
burgundy blinds.
"Obviously these guys have a right to be heard, but this is still a small fraction of the percentage of all state and
local government workers," he said. "I can't let these voices overpower the voices of the millions of other
taxpayers I represent."
Asked whether his experiences with unions as county executive had influenced his bill to curb state employee
benefits and put tight restrictions on their collective-bargaining rights - the same measure that brought the
chanting masses to his doorstep - he didn't hesitate.
"Absolutely," he said. "Totally."
During his eight-year tenure in Milwaukee County, Walker never raised property taxes. He cut the county
workforce by 20 percent, improved its bond rating and gave back hundreds of thousands of dollars of his own
salary as part of the effort to trim spending. But he also saw his relations with local unions deteriorate.
Union leaders say Walker never negotiated in good faith and had a singular solution to every budget problem:
cut. Under his watch, the county privatized public jobs, laid off workers and placed others on furlough.
"The guy's a one-trick pony. His playbook is very limited," said Rich Abelson, executive director of AFSCME
District Council48, Milwaukee's largest union. "The result of that is an absolute devastation of the programs
and services in Milwaukee County."
2
Abelson said the union filed multiple lawsuits against Walker over the years for unfair labor practices, and the
relationship continued to sour as Walker kept "cutting wages and benefits for working people."
Walker argued that collective bargaining was the biggest hurdle to balancing the budget and that unions had
little incentive to give ground because they almost always prevailed in arbitration. He said that the cuts he
proposed were intended to prevent layoffs and accused union leaders of being uninterested in compromise.
"Ifl could go after ... the pension and health-care contribution, I could have avoided layoffs; I could have
avoided other service cuts," he said. "But because of the way the law is, local governments just can't do that."
Walker, a native of Colorado Springs, spent his formative years in a small town 60 miles south of Madison,
called Delavan, where his father served as pastor at the Baptist church. He became an Eagle Scout and idolized
Ronald Reagan.
He attended Marquette University but left just shy of a degree to take a marketing job with the American Red
Cross, making him the first Wisconsin governor in more than half a century not to have a college degree.
At 25, he won election to the state Assembly and served for nine years. But in 2002, Milwaukee County
Executive Tom Ament, a Democrat, resigned in the wake of a county pension fund scandal, and Walker became
the rare Republican to win office in the area by vowing to clean up the mess.
Friends and foes alike describe Walker as hardworking and amiable, a devoted husband and father of two
teenage sons. They also call him a gifted and ambitious politician who has never strayed from his conservative
ideals.
"He was tea party before there was a tea party. He's always been ideologically pure," said Mordecai Lee, a
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee political science professor who sparred with Walker on a weekly television
show during his Assembly days. "He would do whatever it took not to raise taxes. He never wavered, never
doubted."
Lee said Walker's repeated success at the polls, even in Democratic strongholds, came as no surprise. He
preached fiscal conservatism but also campaigned on his own frugality, noting that he packed ham-and-cheese
sandwiches for lunch and drove a weathered Saturn.
"Scott Walker is the Republican Obama- he's likable, he's nice, so voters saw that [side] rather than the very
ideological Republican," Lee said. "He's one of the most impressive politicians I've ever seen."
On Friday evening at the Capitol, Walker remained true to the portrait painted by supporters and detractors alike
- calm and composed even during the tensest moments but utterly unwavering and unapologetic in his views.
Guards stood outside every entrance to the governor's office. Walker talked about finding time to watch
"American Idol" with his wife the previous night. The crowds outside chanted, "Kill the bill!" Walker talked
about texting with his sons throughout the day. "They've been following this. They're intrigued," he said.
Outside, the sun was setting. The crowd sang "We Shall Overcome." The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson had arrived to
fire up the tens of thousands of protesters in their fifth day of demonstrations.
Inside, the governor prepared to slip quietly out of the Capitol and head 80 miles north to welcome home
members of a National Guard unit from Iraq, a brief and welcome respite from the budget battles.
3
He predicted that the legislative impasse would soon end and that he would have the votes to push through his
bill. As for the union backers who would surely return day after day to shower him with their discontent - well,
he wasn't looking for their affection.
"I sleep all right," he said.
4
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Gilkes, Keith.- GOV
Friday, February 11, 201112:23 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris -
GOV
RE: WTA Response to Governor's Press Conference
Nothing further needs to be done with this- they have members who would not be covered under our exemptions. They
are advocating on behalf of those members to remain.
Refer any questions on this to the statement the Troopers put out to the media.
From: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 12:19 PM
To: Schutt, Eric- GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: FW: WTA Response to Governor's Press Conference
I don't know exactly if anything needs to be done with this, I just thought someone else should see it incase we need to
provide any sort of response.
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: {608} 267-7303
Email:
www. walker. wi.qov
From: Nathan Yahn
Sent: Friday, February 11,
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Fwd: WTA Response to Governor's Press Conference
Cullen,
Just wanted to make you aware of this email. Notice, the part in paragraph 1 about PCO's that is being said
from the WI Troopers Assoc. I don't know if you were aware of this, but in case some questions are asked.
Nate
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: WTA- Zukowski <rzukowski@wisconsintrooper.org>
Date: Fri, Feb 11, 2011 at 10:40 AM
Subject: WTA to Governor's Press Conference
To:
WTA Members,
1
Today, Governor Walker announced proposed changes to Wisconsin's collective bargaining statutes for all
government employees. Those changes will have considerable impact on the lives of employees around the
state, including members of the State Patrol. It is our understanding that the changes will not affect State Patrol
troopers and inspectors, but as introduced, the legislation will impact PCOs. The WTA has shared our concerns
with the administration and will continue to advocate for the inclusion of all currently represented members of
the State Patrol to retain their collective bargaining rights, as our PCOs are the lifeline for officers on the road.
In the meantime, we anticipate these changes will invoke strong emotions from many state and municipal
employees. Those emotions may result in job actions against government offices, institutions, and officials. No
one needs to remind us that we all took an oath to protect the citizens of Wisconsin. We are law enforcement
professionals, and as the largest, most visible statewide law enforcement agency, we may be called upon to
ensure stability and public security in the coming days. Please continue to be vigilant and conscientious as you
perform your duties.
Understand that this is a considerable amount of information to assimilate and it is our top priority. We will
share more information as it becomes available once we assess the full impact on our membership.
Sincerely,
Ryan Zukowski
Executive Director
Wisconsin Troopers' Association
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Keith and Ed -
Sunday, February 27, 2011 9:22 PM
Eberle, Ed - LTGOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Senate Democrats Moving the Goal Posts
Here is a pithy quote I wrote that might be helpful in describing how the Senate Democrats have
moved the goal posts:
"When the Democrats left the State, they said they were trying to slow down the process so that the
public could absorb the bill and have more time to speak out against it (see below quotes from Feb 17
and 18). By the Democrats own standard this has happened. Any further delay is simply moving the
goal posts and creating a moving target."
Hope that's helpful.
Scott
Senator: Wis. Dems to stay away for days, weeks
Feb 18 01 :30 PM US/Eastern
By MICHAEL TARM
Associated Press
http://www. breitbart.com/article. ph p?id=D9LFBLD02&show article= 1
Sen. Tim Cullen said he and other Democrats planned to stage their boycott until Saturday to give the public more
time to speak out against the bill.
"The plan is to try and slow this down because it's an extreme piece of legislation that's tearing this state apart," said
Sen. Jon Erpenbach, who was with Democratic senators in northern Illinois on Thursday before they dispersed
###
February 17th, 2011 Wisconsin Democratic State Sen. Jim Holperin spoke with CNN's Candy Crowley about
state budget cuts and public unions. This interview aired in the 5 p.m. ET hour of The Situation Room with
Wolf Blitzer
http:// cnnpressroom. blogs.cnn.corn/20 11/02/1 7/wi -state-sen-jim-holperin -d-told-candy -crowley-he-thinks-gov-
is-trying-to-destroy-public-unions/
JIMHOLPERIN (D-12th DISTRICT), WISCONSIN STATE ASSEMBLY (via telephone): Candy, the
Democrats want to debate the budget cuts, they want to vote, and we will vote, just not today. And the reason
not today is because we don't believe sufficient time has passed for the people of the state to absorb the far-
reaching and unprecedented changes to collective bargaining that the governor is recommending that have
nothing to do with budget cuts.
1
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Brian and Keith:
ODay, Tom <TOday@gklaw.com>
Friday, February 18, 2011 7:24AM
Hagedorn, Brian K- GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Senate
You have likely thought of this ... l apologize if it is obvious ....
From what I have heard, a fiscal bill needs 20 senators for there to be quorum. A non-fiscal bill only needs a majority.
The Gov/Leg could introduce non-fiscal items regarding the collective bargaining, pass those with the majority (maybe it
will force a Dem to come in state) and then move on to the fiscal items. I know that calls into question whether the
bargaining items are fiscal/nonfiscal, but drastic, untoward measures on the Dem side call for expedience on our side.
lfthere is anything I can do: archaic research, etc., let me know.
Keep up the good fight.
http://www.jsonline.com/polls/116392154. html?results=y&mr-1 &oid=1 &pid-116392154&cid=8500544
TomO'Day
Attorney
~
780 North Water Street
Milwaukee, WI 53202-3590
Phone:414-273-3500
Direct:-
F a x : 4 1 ~
Email: TOday@gklaw.com
http:l/www.gklaw.com
**Pursuant to Circular 230 promulgated by the Internal Revenue Service, ifthis email, or auy attachment hereto, contaius advice
concerning any federal tax issue or submission, please be advised that it was not intended or written to be used, and that it cannot be
used, for the purpose of avoiding federal tax penalties unless otherwise expressly iudicated.
This is a transmission from the Jaw firm of Godfrey & Kahn, S.C. and may contain iufonnation which is privileged, confidential, and
protected by the attorney-client or attorney work product privileges. If you are not the addressee, note that any disclosure, copyiug,
distribution, or use of the contents of this message is prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please destroy it and
notify us immediately at our telephone number ( 414) 273-3500. **
1
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
NancyGmail
Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:29 PM
sen.cowles@legis.wi.gov; sen.ellis@legis.wi.gov; sen.olsen@legis.wi.gov;
sen.wanggaard@legis.wi.gov; sen.zipperer@legis.wi.gov; Sen.Darling - LEGIS
Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Separate the bill: pass collective bargaining piece NOW
Senators, A friend just heard Charles Krauthammer on TV supporting Governor Walker and indicating he believes that
we are winning. He also said that layoffs would be a strategic mistake.
However, he mentioned your ability to pass non-monetary bill. if you have the ability to pass these bills without having the
democrats return, why not simply separate the budget repair bill, leave the fiscal part alone for the moment and pass the
part of the bill that will eliminate collective bargaining only at this time? I'd pretty much guess that if you were to separate
this bill into 2 parts and move to pass this part now, those cowards hiding across the border would be forced to return!
Thanks for your consideration. If there's something that would disallow you from doing this with the bill, please let me
know.
Nancy Mistele
"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be." Thomas Jefferson
1
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Monday, February 07, 2011 9:19AM
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
State Journal: Big cuts in blue states, too
Below is an Editorial that ran in the Wisconsin State Journal over the weekend that recognizes the reality of state budgets
and the opportunity for frugality
Big cuts in blue states, too
State Journal editorial! Posted: Sunday, February 6, 2011 6:00am
Cuts to public schools, state universities and health programs.
A 10 percent reduction in take-home pay for state employees.
As many as 10,000 layoffs.
Those aren't the actions ofWisconsin Gov. Scott Walker- at least not yet.
Those are the budget proposals from Democratic governors in states such as New York and California.
It shows how dire the finances of so many states have become, and how bipartisan the mood is to control
spending. Gone are the federal stimulus dollars that propped up pre-recession state spending. Gone is the public
appetite for tax hikes and new borrowing.
"There's no Democratic or Republican philosophical dispute here. The numbers have to balance, and the
numbers now don't balance .... It's painful, but it is also undeniable."
Those are the words of Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. He just proposed a $1 billion cut to state
education aid, a 10 percent reduction to state agencies and as many as 10,000 layoffs if state worker unions
don't agree to concessions.
Even California's liberal Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed slashing welfare spending in half, cutting aid to
universities by almost 20 percent and reducing take-home pay for state workers by 8 percent to 10 percent.
It's not mean-spiritedness that's driving such proposals. It's financial and political reality.
Walker highlighted Cuomo's words during Walker's State of the State speech Tuesday night in Madison.
Cuomo is right, Walker said. What's needed is "swift, corrective action" to fix Wisconsin's $3 billion budget
gap. That will surely include reductions in most if not all major state programs.
In addition, Walker gave specific targets for state employee concessions. He wants to increase pension
contributions from "next to nothing" to just over 5 percent, which is about the national average. Walker also
1
wants state employees to double, from 6 percent to 12 percent, what they pay toward their health care
premiums. Twelve percent is about half the national average, he said.
Walker isn't singling out state workers. He's including them as patt of a much broader budget solution. And he
was wise last week to tone down his campaign rhetoric, praising state workers for their efforts and ability to do
more with less.
It won't be easy or painless. But an honest and frugal budget fix is needed to move Wisconsin forward toward
better days and greater investment.
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
......... 0, 20117:02 PM
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schutt, Eric - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV
State Journal: Walker will propose stripping collective bargaining rights from state
workers
Walker will propose stripping collective bargaining
rights from state workers
MARY SPICUZZA and CLAY BARBOUR I Wisconsin State Journal madison.com I (30) Comments I Posted:
Thursday, February 10, 2011 5:45pm
Gov. Scott Walker will seek to eliminate almost all collective bargaining rights of state and local public workers
as part of his plan for fixing Wisconsin's budget deficit, a move one Democratic leader called an "assault on
workers in the state."
In comments to the Associated Press, Walker said no one should be surprised by the move, aimed at closing the
state's more than $130 million budget hole for this fiscal year and a projected $3.6 billion deficit over the next
two years.
"This is not a shock," said Walker, a Republican who took office in January. "The shock would be if we didn't
go forward with this."
The governor will propose limiting labor negotiations for state and local public workers to salaries only,
eliminating collective bargaining rights for other areas like benefits and pensions.
Walker shared details of the plan with Republican lawmakers in a closed caucus Thursday.
"The state's broke, and it's going to be ugly," Sen. Luther Olsen, R-Ripon, said Thursday evening after the
meeting with the governor.
Republican lawmakers mostly remained silent about Walker's plans, but labor unions and Democrats decried
the move.
"This is a shocking development," AFT-Wisconsin President Bryan Kennedy said. "It ends collective
bargaining for public employees in our state, after 50 years of management and workers solving problems
together."
Kennedy, whose union represents about 17,000 public employees, said he was surprised that after little more
than a month in office Walker is calling the system broken when "he has yet to sit down with workers" at the
bargaining table. He predicted rampant job losses throughout the state as a result.
Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca, D-Kenosha, said the move was "unprecedented" and called on Walker
to sit across the table from workers and "look them in the eye" in labor negotiations.
1
But Brian Fraley, spokesman for the conservative John K. Maciver Institute for Public Policy, said the
governor's plan was expected.
"You can't balance the budget without dealing with labor costs," Fraley said. "We are in a financial crisis, so
this only makes sense."
The Maciver Institute has long argued that Wisconsin should become a right-to-work state. Currently there are
22 right-to-work states, in which it is illegal to force a person to join a union as a requirement of employment.
A law professor said the move would be "hugely unpopular." Unlike private unions, which are governed by
federal labor laws, public employee unions derive their authority from state law, which the Legislature can
change at any time.
"He can do that, technically speaking," Paul Secunda, an associate professor of law at Marquette University
Law School, said of Walker's plan to strip the unions of most of their collective bargaining power. "Is it a
popular move? No. Is it in step with labor rights around the world? No."
Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, said Republicans are still reviewing the details of the plans.
"The one thing I'm waiting for is the (Legislative) Fiscal Bureau to actually show us the numbers and work
through it," Fitzgerald said. "Because what we are working off of now is the governor speaking off the top of
his head."
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimp.f@Jwisconsin.gov
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Importance:
Gilkes, Keith - GOV
........ 01110:13 AM
Trooper statement ...
High
Statement by Ryan Zukowski, Executive Director of Wisconsin Troopers' Association on Governor Scott Walker's
proposed changes to the budget repair bill
"The Wisconsin Troopers' Association recognizes the significant contributions and hard work provided by all state
employees."
"As sworn officers of the statewide police force, we have the unique role of ensuring the safety of the public and
providing support to local and federal law enforcement agencies, while facing threats to our lives daily."
"While the collective bargaining changes announced today will have considerable impact on the lives of employees
around the state, we commend Governor Walker for being consistent in distinguishing police and fire services as
we must be able to continue to ensure the safety of all those who live, work and travel in the state. "
###
1
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
http:// dailyreporter .com
The Daily Reporter
Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Thursday, February 24, 2011 8:04 PM
Schutt, Eric - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris -
GOV
Union Members won't Pay Dues Voluntarily
Union fights may land in court
by Jack Zemlicka
Published: February 23rd, 2011
Courtrooms could be the next battlefields if unions lose their collective bargaining rights and struggle to collect dues
under existing contracts.
"We get questions from membership as to, 'Why would I continue to pay voluntarily?"' said Lyle Balistreri, president of
the Milwaukee Building and Construction Trades Council. "How many people pay voluntarily to do anything?"
The collective bargaining bill stalled in the Wisconsin Legislature can modify state statutes, said Madison attorney
Lester A. Pines, but lawsuits could pop up over whether abolition of bargaining rights supersedes the ability of union
employers to withhold dues under existing contracts.
"I think there is serious question as to whether the Legislature can impair a contract like that," said Pines, of Cullen
Weston Pines & Bach LLP, and counsel for Madison Teachers Inc. "Will school districts or municipalities legally be able
to withhold union dues?"
They will, said Lance M. Nelson, staff representative for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal
Employees Council 40 in Chippewa Falls, but unions will struggle to enforce the fair dues structure because of the
increased health insurance and pension contributions employees would make under the proposed legislation.
"Would the contract remain valid? Sure," Nelson said. "But with people paying so much more, after you get done
taking a big hit, nobody is going to have the money to afford to pay dues."
Gov. Scott Walker's proposal would force public workers to contribute about 5 percent to their pensions and at least
12.6 percent to their health care coverage.
The governor's plan would let unions representing most public employees to negotiate only for wage increases, and
any increase above the Consumer Price Index would have to be approved in a statewide referendum.
Unions also would face a membership vote every year to stay organized, and workers could opt out of paying dues.
All of these factors could greatly diminish unions' power, Balistreri said. Without collective bargaining rights, he said,
unions likely would be tied up fighting grievances related to the enforceability of existing contracts.
Unions are trying to work with Walker to retain their collective bargaining rights in some form, but no progress has
been made.
Under one proposal, union leaders said they would accept paying more for benefits as Walker wants but still retain
their collective bargaining rights. Another compromise offered by Republican Sen. Dale Schultz would remove
collective bargaining rights for just two years.
Walker has repeatedly rejected both offers, saying local governments and school districts can't be hamstrung by the
often lengthy collective bargaining process and need to have more flexibility to deal with as much as $1 billion in cuts
he will propose in his budget and into the future.
If the legislation does pass, Nelson said, he expects there will be legal challenges to the constitutionality of the law,
among other things.
1
"But we have no ideas," he said, "as to where it will focus at this point."
The Associated Press also contributed to this story.
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Check this out
Cullen Werwie
Press Secretary
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Press Office: (608} 267-7303
Email: Cullen. Werwie@WI.Gov
www. walker. wi. qov
From: Taylor, Cynthia
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Tuesday, February 01, 201112:27 PM
Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Union president apologizing for AFSCME behavior (below)
To: Huebsch, Mike - DOA; GOV General; Sen.Kapanke - LEGIS
Subject: Possible savings for State
Governor Walker, Secretary Huebsch, and Senator Kapanke:
This comes to you from a WSEU Local Union President but someone the believes more along your lines. I
worked at the University of Florida for over 10 years and thought our benefits were extremely good. When I
moved back to my home near La Crosse, WI and got a job at UW-L I was SHOCKED to learn how good the
benefits here were. The one draw back is that I took an almost 50% cut in pay coming back here. But my
husbands increase offset my decrease for the most part.
Recently I quickly through some numbers together and I have attached the spreadsheet. At UF I worked in the
Fringe Benefit Office and was included in negotiations on health insurance. Some ways to decrease premiums
included co-pays and decreased utilization. I have used the current WSEU workforce at UW-L to make some
calculations using some simple assumptions. Now I know nothing is that simple, but I also know that often the
simple solution gets overlooked.
I would also like to apologize for the rude and crude behavior and language used by AFSCME leadership. It is
very unprofessional and certainly does NOT represent all the members opinions and behavior.
Sincerely,
Cyndi Taylor
Cynthia A. Taylor
President WSEU Local 1449
and
Dean's Assistant
1
2
Oling, Lane - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2011 5:30 PM
To: Schutt, Eric - GOV; Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Gilkes, Keith - GOV
Republicans control both houses, but the plan could still be tough to pass through the Legislature. Senate Majority
Leader Scott Fitzgerald said it was too early to say whether the plan could pass his house. He said Republican
senators had a "lot of good questions" for Walker's team.
"The concept is pretty radical," said Sen. Luther Olsen (R-Ripon). "It affects a lot of good working people."
Olsen said he could support the changes on pensions and health care, but had reservations about taking away other
bargaining rights.
Sen. Glenn Grothman (R-West Bend) said he would have like to see an even bolder plan.
"It's about time. It's not as far I'd go, but it's about time," he said.
Sen. Randy Hopper (R-Fond du Lac) and Sen. Dale Schultz (R-Richland Center) both declined to say whether they
supported the proposal. "Concepts are one thing. I like to see the (bill) language," Schultz said.
Walker and his staff met with Republicans behind closed doors Thursday to discuss the budget plan. The proposal has
not yet been formally introduced and could undergo changes as lawmakers weigh in with Walker.
One issue still being worked out is whether the bill will be introduced in a special session, which is called by the
governor, or an extraordinary session, which is called by lawmakers. That element could be significant because
legislative leaders would have to sign off on details before introducing a bill in an extraordinary session.
The state faces an even larger $3.6 billion deficit in the next 2011-'13 budget that begins on July 1. Democrats have
criticized Walker for adding to that problem in recent weeks by passing $117 million in tax cuts aimed at boosting the
economy and holding down the price of health care. The tax cuts received support from Republicans and some
Democrats.
Walker's proposal on unions would affect state workers in both the districts of both Democratic and Republican
lawmakers.
Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald (R-Horicon) and brother Scott Fitzgerald, for instance, have three prisons in or near
their districts- Dodge Correctional Institution, Fox Lake Correctional Institution and Waupun Correctional Institution.
Those institutions have large numbers of union guards and other workers.
Chris Schrimpf
Communications Director
Office of the Governor
Press Office: 608-267-7303
Email: chris.schrimpj@wisconsin.gov
1
Oling, Lane - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Evenson, Tom - GOV
~ : 2 4 A M
Governor Walker's Prepared Testimony
Sergeant Zeeh asked me if I could send this to you. I hope all is well.
Have a great weekend!
-Tom
Governor Walker's Testimony to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform- April14,
2011
Chairman lssa and Distinguished Committee Members, I appreciate this opportunity to testify before you
today and look forward to our discussion regarding the budget challenges faced by states across this nation,
Wisconsin's current state budget deficit and our committed approach to putting our state back on the path to
prosperity.
In nearly every state across America, Governors are facing major budget deficits. In fact, according to the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 44 states and the District of Columbia face shortfalls in Fiscal year 2012
totaling more than$111 billion and ranging from 2 to 45% of their total state budgets. In Wisconsin, we are
currently facing a biennial budget deficit of $3.6 billion.
Many Governors, Democrat and Republican alike, are cutting state aid to schools and other local governments
-which forces massive layoffs, massive property tax increases or both.
In Wisconsin, we are doing something truly progressive. In addition to holding the line on spending and
finding efficiencies in state government, we are implementing long term budget reforms focused on
protecting middle class jobs and middle class taxpayers.
While our idea may be a bold political move it is a very modest request of our employees. We are reforming
the collective bargaining system so our state and local governments can ask employees to contribute 5.8% for
pension and 12.6% for health insurance premiums. These reforms will help them balance their budgets. In
total, our collective bargaining reforms save local governments more than $700 million each year.
Most workers outside of government would love our proposal. For example, my brother David works as a
banquet manager and as a part-time bartender. His wife works at a local department store. They have two
beautiful children. They are a typical middle class family.
He told me that he pays about $800 a month for his health insurance and the little he can set aside in his
401(k). Like many other workers in our state, he would love a deal like the one I offered government workers.
Over the past several months, I have visited numerous factories and small businesses across Wisconsin. On
these tours, workers tell me that they pay anywhere from 15% to 50% oftheir health insurance premium
1
costs. The average middle class worker is paying more than 20% of his or her premium. Like my brother, they
would love a plan like the one we are offering.
Even federal employees pay more than twice what we are asking state and local government workers to pay
and most ofthem don't have collective bargaining for wages or benefits. These facts beg the question as to
why the protesters are in Wisconsin and not in Washington, D.C. By nearly any measure, our requests are
quite reasonable.
Beyond helping to balance current and future budgets, our reforms will also make our government work
better.
In 2010, Megan Sampson was named an Outstanding First Year Teacher in Wisconsin. A week later, she
received a layoff notice from the Milwaukee Public Schools. So why would one of the best new teachers be
one of the first let go? Because her collective bargaining contract requires staffing decisions to be made based
on seniority.
Ms. Sampson received a layoff notice because the union leadership would not accept reasonable changes to
their contract. Instead, they hid behind a collective bargaining agreement that costs the taxpayers more than
$101,000 per year for each teacher; a contract which protects a 0% contribution for health insurance
premiums; and a contract that forces schools to staff based on seniority and union rules.
Our budget reforms allow school districts to assign staff based on merit and performance. That keeps great
teachers like Ms. Sampson in the classroom.
And it works at the state level too. In 2005, Governor Mitch Daniels reformed collective bargaining in
Indiana. In turn, the government became more efficient, more effective and more accountable to the
public. Governor Daniels even encouraged employees to come forward with ways to save taxpayer dollars
and they responded. Eventually, the state was able to reward top performing employees. This is true reform
- making government work for the people.
Since January 3rd, we passed some ofthe most aggressive economic development legislation in the
country. And on nearly every measure, many Democrats joined with all of the Republicans and an
-.-...,
Independent to vote in favor ofthe various pieces of legislation. The Wisconsin legislature recognized that we
are growing, not Republican or Democratic jobs, but Wisconsin jobs. Together, we worked to show that
Wisconsin is open for business.
But sometimes, bi-partisanship is not so good. During several of the past budgets, members of both political
parties raided segregated funds, used questionable accounting principles and deferred tough decisions. This,
along with the use of billions of dollars worth of one-time federal stimulus money for the budget two years
ago, left Wisconsin with the current $3.6 billion deficit.
Our reforms allow us to take a new and better approach. Instead of avoiding the hard decisions and searching
for short-term solutions, we make a commitment to the future. The choices we are making now in Wisconsin
will make sure our children are not left picking up the pieces of the broken state budget others left
behind. Our reforms create the lowest structural deficit in recent history ensuring our budget is stable for
decades to come. Moody's called our budget proposal "credit positive" because of our dynamic efforts to
reduce the structural deficit.
2
These changes do more than just balance the budget; they give small businesses the confidence they need to
grow and invest in our state. Investors want stability and our budget provides long-term fiscal certainty for
our state and local governments.
We live in the greatest nation on earth. For more than 200 years we've had leaders who cared more about
their children and grandchildren than themselves -leaders who have demonstrated the courage to make
decisions in the best interest of the next generation- and not just the next election. This is truly a concept
that America has always admired, but many have now forgotten as we face our greatest challenge- balancing
our budgets.
My hope is that our actions in Wisconsin will remind the rest ofthe nation what makes our country great, but
more importantly my sincere hope is that by reforming our state budget for the long haul we will be sending a
strong signal to job creators from around the world that Wisconsin is Open for Business.
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Tel: {608} 267-7303
E-Mail: tom.evenson@wisconsin.gov
http:Uwalker.wi.gov
3
Page 1 of4
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Friday, March 25, 2011 6:27 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Daily Policy and Legislative Update
Legislative Affairs Team
-
Legislative Contacts:
Senator Lasee's office inquired about information regarding how collective bargaining is a fiscal issue.
Representative Bies' Office called letting us know about a ship building company in Door County that was
given a new contract and will be creating jobs.
Representative Larson's Office called asking for info on inmates granted early release reoffending.
Representative Nygren's Office called asking about if the Block Grant given to Catalyst Exhibits was a
product of Special Session AB 4- economic development funds and information on the elimination of the
indigent civil legal services funding in the budget.
Representative Petryk's Office emailed asking if municipalities and school districts can go to referenda to
increase public employees' wages over CPl.
-
Economic Development and Regulatorv Reform Team
Commerce
Sub-Zero Plant Visit Planned
Bio Science Authority Proposal
o Ron Kuehn and Jordan Lamb asked the Governor to consider their Kansas-style proposal to create
25,000 bioscience jobs in the next 5 years
Transfer of Safety and Buildings to DSPS
o Nate spoke with David Seager of the Milwaukee Professional Fire Fighters Association and
discussed the transfer
Oneida Seven Generations project
o Commerce has been asked to attend a presentation on Environmental Assessment of this project on
April12
1
h
Venture Capital
DNR
o Draft not released
o Spoke with Charlie Goff of NEW Capital in Appleton about the proposal and other ways to improve
access to capital
US Department of Interior
o Patrick spoke with DOl, which would like to discuss policy items with the Governor's office
PSG
E911
o PSG would like direction from the Governor's office on a FCC E911 response that needs to be filed.
WHEDA
Reform Initiatives /i'
o WHEDA has s h a ~ e d some items with the Legislature
Human Services and Education Team
8/2/2011
Page2 of4
-
Education:
Children At Risk will not be part of the budget errata and will have to be amended by JFC
-
Education News:
Schools intending to Rarticipate in voucher program drops slightly (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/
The number of schools registered to accept students through the city's voucher program this coming school year
has dropped from the number of schools on the list at this time last year, according to information from the
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
Wausau docks pay for 25.4 teachers in sickout (WaUS<!!J Dailv Herald)
The Wausau School District has released the names of 254 teachers who have admitted that they missed a day's
worth of work for illegitimate reasons on Feb. 18.
That's the day when many teachers and other public workers -from Wausau and districts across the state -
congregated in Madison to protest Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill, which is meant to strip most collective
bargaining rights from public union contracts.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Waste, Fraud and Abuse:
We are sending out templates to WFA agency task forces and contacts to begin filling out suggestions for
the Commission to review. Also, to ensure we highlight WFA in agencies and how the new administration
is fixing it.
Local Governments:
Wisconsin State Journal. Editorial: Residency rule hurts schools
It will help Wisconsin's largest and most troubled school district hire the best teachers, who are key to raising
student achievement.
It's supported by both the Republicans who run the state Capitol as well as the state's largest teachers union.
So let's move Senate Bill 34 to the governor's desk this spring so Milwaukee school principals can hire new
teachers from a larger talent pool over the summer.
Oshkosh Northwestern. New teachers optimistic about finding jobs despite cuts to public education
But Robers, a 22-year-old certified to teach middle and high school science, sees an upside: Her chances of
finding a job appear as good as ever.
Many school districts across Wisconsin are passing collective bargaining agreements that include wage and
benefit concessions that will absorb most or all of the proposed funding cuts in Gov. Scott Walker's biennial
budget. That means districts won't have to reduce staff to balance their budgets, at least for one more year.
At the same lime, droves of older teachers are retiring for fear of losing benefits or because of frustration with
political changes affecting the profession.
"That means jobs mighl be opening. We're not aware of what level, but they will be opening and that's a positive for
teachers who will be graduating or gelling their licenses in the next year or two," said Suzanne Doe mel, a teacher
education program coordinator at UWO and UW-Sheboygan.
Oshkosh Northwestern. Green Lake negotiating school contract extension
The GLEA's proposal asked for step and lane salary increases based on the previous year's consumer price index.
It offers to have teachers pay half of their contributions to the Wisconsin Retirement System, or 5.8 percent of their
salaries, effective Sept. 1, 2011.
The proposals from both sides would have the teachers pay 10 percent toward their health insurance premiums for
8/2/2011
Page 3 of4
the duration of the contract extension. The board reserves the right to seek bids for insurance coverage, according
to its initial proposal.
The Chippewa Herald . School board approves modified employee contracts
The Chippewa Falls School Board approved modified contracts for employees represented by the district's two
unions- the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) and the Chippewa Falls
Federation of Teachers (CFFT). AFSCME represents the school support staff, including secretaries, custodial and
food service workers.
Beloit Daily News. Teacher contract adopted
For most of the bargaining units including teachers, the concessions include a 5. 8 percent contribution to the
Wisconsin Retirement System effective July 1, a two-year salary freeze for all units, longevity pay changes, new
evaluation systems for all employees and up to a 12.8 percent premium share contribution to the district's health
plan, officials said.
Sheboygan Press. City transit union may get new contract
The city's Transit Commission reached a tentative agreement Thursday evening with its transit employee union on
a contract extension that would freeze wages through 2013 and gain other concessions that would exceed those
the city would realize through Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill.
Green Bay Press Gazette. Green Bay union employees' contract extended
The Green Bay City Council on Thursday approved a contract extension with union employees that city officials
say will save $600,000 this year.
The council voted 11-0 to approve the contract, which formalizes cost-saving health insurance and pension
contributions from Gov. Scott Walker's bill, which would strip public employees of collective bargaining powers.
The contract does not include any pay increases and eliminates mandatory furlough days.
Oshkosh Northwestern. Council, city manager to discuss contract extensions for city un
The Oshkosh Common Council will meet in closed session tonight to discuss whether it wants to consider
negotiating contract extensions with at least two of the unions representing Oshkosh municipal employees.
La Crosse Tribune. Council OKs new worker contracts, by mayor has questions before he'll sign ions in
special meeting
Employees will provide half of their state pension contribution, starting in 2012. They also will pay 10 percent of
monthly medical insurance premiums in 2012 if participating in a health risk assessment, 12.6 percent if not. That
share rises in 2013 to 12.6 percent for those in health risk assessment and 16 percent for nonparticipants.
"It was a hard agreement to swallow," Smith said, "but the alternative was not that great."
The new pact includes a 1 percent salary increase in 2012, with the SEIU having the option to reopen the contract
for wages in 2013.
Stevens Point Journal. Proposed cuts to state aid stall plans in Hull, New Hope
Voters recently rejected plans to renovate the existing building and build an addition for about $195,000.
Zaborowski said the town now is looking at plans to build a new building and abandon the old one, which could
save about $50,000 on the total cost. The Town Hall, it is hoped, would be preserved as a historic building.
Voter ID:
Wisconsin Reporter. Expert: Include student badges to irnprove voter ID bill
Speaking for himself and three University of Wisconsin colleagues, UW-Madison political scientist David Canon
told the Assembly Committee on Election and Campaign Reform that he's not taking a stance on whether the
Legislature should require that voters present a valid photo identification card- just making suggestions on how
to write a law that protects the integrity of elections, limits legal challenges and keeps the costs down.
8/2/2011
Page 4 of4
Corrections:
The CaJ)ital Times. Corrections Dept. not embracing plan to scale back meals
"Generally, there would be some concerns about the climate that might create within the institutions," says DOC
spokesman Tim LeMonds, "and any health risks that might be involved."
Sen. Fitzgerald/Rep. Fitzgerald. Help protect Fox Lake water quality
8/2/2011
Page 1 of3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 7:21 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
Legislative Affairs Team
Legislative Contacts
Contacted by Senators Harsdorf, Wanggaard, and Kedzie regarding what federal employees can
collectively bargain over.
Contacted by Senator Harsdorf's Office about the deletion of their Byrn Grant funded ADA position and the
deletion of their Justice Information Fee ADA position.
Contacted by many Senators' Offices requesting a copy of the presentation given to the caucus on
Tuesday.
Assembly Committee on Elections held an information hearing on election reform.
Economic Development and Regulatory Reform Team
DOT
Information provided on change in statutory language for Eminent Domain
Update regarding the Raw Forest Products Permit and Frozen Road Declaration.
Update on details on the Zoo Interchange ramps.
Expressed desire for the Transportation Policy Committee to meet two times in 2011.
Twitter updates for accidents statewide are now available
Jobs Hotline
2 calls received
Call from Laurie Spencer from Baraboo Ambulance who is seeking grant assistance for expansion of their
"Community Paramedic" program.
Commerce
Transfer of Housing
o WHEDA and Commerce continue meeting to plan the transition of housing functions
Venture Capital
o Ryan and Jason met with Jeff Craver of Advantage Capital
Human Services and Education Team
Health Care
Met with WI FamilyCare Association: Wondered what the state's intentions are for FamilyCare; highlighted how
FamilyCare allows for a streamlined, more cost-effective, consumer driven system rather than a provider-driven
one.
Met with Kara Slaughter {WI Farm Union): Discussed farm families' concerns with BadgerCare; concerned with
the power that DHS will gain in the budget and the budget repair
Today, there were picketers outside the State Office Building in Milwaukee protesting a specific case in the
Wisconsin Shares program that DCF lost.
Education
Met with Katy Venskus from Democrats for Education Reform to review their agenda. She and her group are
very supportive of much of our agenda but worry about legislative support from Democrats in the current political
8/2/2011
Page 2 of3
environment. Katy brought our attention to the development by Howard Fuller, MMAC, and others of a "Common
Report Card" for all schools in Milwaukee.
Met with Steve Lyons and Mike Rogowski from WEA Trust who assured us that WEAC does not benefit
financially from their insurance company and that the company wishes to compete with other carriers.
Education News
Madison teachers given until Apri115 to rescind fake doctors' notes (Wisconsin State Journal)
Madison teachers who missed school last month to attend protests and turned in fraudulent doctor's notes have
been given until April 15 to rescind those notes, officials said Thursday.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Waste, Fraud and Abuse:
I met with Craig and Ara today to talk about suggestions and for them to meet Fay Simonini from DCF.
She has suggestions for millions in savings if we put some money into pursuing fraud claims. Craig and
Ara were very excited.
Local Governments:
La Crosse Tribune. Editorial: Recycling changes make little sense
According to the State Journal, Sens. Michael Ellis, R-Neenah, and Rob Cowles, R-Green Bay, wrote a letter to
constituents last week stating: "We have long opposed unfunded mandates on local governments by the state.
The elimination of recycling grants while still prohibiting certain materials from landfills effectivelv constitutes an
unfunded mandate."
They argued that the Walker plan 'just doesn't make sense and should be taken out of the budget."
They're absolutely right.
Our environment and its future would be better served if the governor would listen.
Wisconsin State Journal. Natural Resources Board urges Walker to reconsider rollback of phosphorus
rules
Moroney said Walker's goal is to ease any financial burden on local governments and on businesses faced with
paying more for increased water treatment.
"I think the governor is sensitive to municipalities and is looking for a way not to force additional expenses on
them," Moroney said.
Oshkosh Northwestern. School board approves teacher, staff contract extensions
The average teacher- who earns $50,426- will see their take-home pay reduced by as much as 8 percent due
to the concessions. That amounts to $3,9851ess take-home pay annually or $332 less per month. Most of that
monev. while felt as a loss ofincome. 1 ~ being invested in their pensions.
Key provisions in new Oshkosh school labor union contracts
-Total wage freeze, saving $1.2 million
-Employees pay 12 percent of health insurance instead of 5 percent, saving $1 million.
-Employees pay 5. 8 percent of salary toward pension, saving $2.9 million.
-District administration allowed to seek cheaper health insurance providers without negotiating.
-Teacher no longer receive 90 sick davs per vear. Instead, they receive 10 sick days per year that can
accumulate up to 90 days.
-Seniority rules no longer apply to paraprofessionals and non-teaching employees when filling vacancies or giving
promotions.
8/2/2011
Page 3 of3
La Crosse Tribune. City officials set to meet on workers' contracts
They will pay 10 percent of monthly medical insurance premiums in 2012 if participating in a health risk
assessment, 12.6 percent if not. That share rises in 2013 to 12.6 percent for those in health risk assessment and
16 percent for nonparticipants.
This article is riddled with inaccuracies which I underlined. It is interesting to note that the mayor thinks
she will save less because people retired. No mayor, you will save more because you don't have those
salaries or fringe benefits anymore, not just the pension savings.
The Cl!IQpewa Herald. City official: Walker's figures don't add up for Chippewa Falls
"The reason the $154,920 number is wrong is because the state calculated what we could potentiallv capture in
retirement contributions from employees." Bauer said.
'The $230.000 they have used is overestimated."
Instead of gaining savings, she figures the city will lose $124,656 in shared revenue, $101,471 in general
transportation aids, and potentially another $60,000 in recycling funding.
Plus the city has to consider what will happen if it loses $347,000 in library funding and another $212,000 in what
the state calls expenditure restraints.
"The city is going to be preparing for a worst-case scenario," she said.
She said Walker office's savings estimate is wrong because it takes the city's 2009 year-end total payroll and
uses that amount in its calculations. Pan of that was money for eight city workers who took early retirement.
"As we have not filled those positions, by using that payroll figure, they have used an inflated number and
therefore overestimated what we could capture," she said.
Then the governor's office assumes the city will save $166.000 for insurance. Only, the city is not on the state
health plan.
What the city is looking at saving on health insurance under its contract with AFSCME for 2011 is $18,000. Bauer
said the savings figure for 2012 isn't known yet.
Other savings expected by the city this year include:
-- The workers increasing their pension contribution to 5. 8 aercent. saving $24.000 for 2011 and $48,000 for
2012.
--Reducing the longevity payout will save $30,000 for 2011.
--Reducing the sick leave annual payout will save $22,000 for 2011. The total annual budget for this item for all
employees is $62,000.
--Saving about $16,000 in dental insurance in 2012.
--And saving $16,000 in pension contributions for management workers this year.
8/2/2011
Page 1 of5
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Sent: Monday, March 28, 2011 7:04 PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
Legislative Affairs Team
Legislative Contacts:
Representative Weininger and Representative Mmsau's Office both contacted us regarding pier
regulation legislation.
Representative Kapenga' s Office contacted us regarding charter school provisions in the budget.
Committee Actions Tomonow:
Committee
A. Urban and Local Affairs
Hearing
S. Judiciary, Ethics, and
Date
3/29/2011
Government Operations Hearing 3/29/2011
Joint Committee on Finance
Hearing
S. Agriculture, Forestry and
Higher Education Hearing
A. Jobs, Economy, and Small
Business Exec
Joint Committee on Review of
Administrative Rules (JCRAR)
Exec
8/2/2011
3/29/2011
3/29/2011
3/29/2011
3/29/2011
Time Room
10:00 300 NE
10:00 300 SE
10:00 412 E
10:30 201 SE
11:00 328 NW
11:00 330 SW
Bill
AB 60- individuals and officers who may
covered by a county blanket bond
SB 19- disinfection of municipal water
supplies
Agency briefings for DOA, DOR, Tourisrr
and the Supreme Court
Confirmation of Alberta Darling as a
member of the College Savings Program
Board
SB 28- Composition of the UW Board of
Regents
AB 53- creation of 3 additional enterprise
zones
AB 13- Development opportunity zone fo
Beloit
NR 411- Construction and operation
permits for indirect sources
NR 404.04 (3)- Particulate matter,
secondary standard
LRB 1483/1 (Senate), LRB 1756/1
(Assembly)- wind energy system rules
CR 10-098- Payday lending
Page 2 of5
Economic Development and Regulatory Reform Team
Commerce
State Fire Marshall Office
o Interest in creating this office with one high level person who would act as key leader in the
state for fire service
Cascade Tissue Group
o DNR Deputy Sec. Moroney and Jason met with executives in Eau Claire today
o Company will add a new paper machine and keep plant in Eau Claire
New Companies to WI
o 2 companies (1 from IL and 1 from MI) will start conducting business in WI in Pewaukee
and Madison respectively
Venture Capital
o Draft sill yet to be released from Budget Office
Tourism
LFB Budget Analysis
o Reviewed analysis in advance of Tuesday's testimony by Secretmy Klett
DOT
Motor Carrier Permits
o DOT resolved an issue a business had with hying to receive permits for its vehicles
Definition of Major Highways Program
DATCP
o Reggie Newson communicated to Rep. Petrowski's office the changes to the definition of the
Major Highways Program under the Govemor's Budget proposal
ATCP 110, 111, 114, 125, 134
o Spoke with Ross Kinzler about the rules.
DNR
Recycling
o DNR has proposed two modified recycling aid programs for review.
Army Corps of Engineers
o Asked to set up a meeting with the Govemor' s Office regarding DNR regulation changes.
Panick will meet with a representative April 5
PSC
Chair of Public Service Commission
o Governor announced today that former Rep. Phil Montgomery will act as Chair
JOBS Hotline
2 calls received
o Call from Glenn Hetzer of Powder Booth Restoration
o Hetzer is currently located in Illinois and wants to move to Wisconsin
Human Services and Education Team
DHS Update
1. Discussed tobacco contJol money being utilized for cessation instead of prevention
2. Road Show Update:
8/2/2011
Page 3 of5
a. Wed.: Eau Claire; Aprilsth: Fennimore; April 14th: Milwaukee potentially moved to
Waukesha; April21 st: Kimberly; and April 26th: Wausau
3. Transfer ofFoodShare & SSI from DRS to DCF
a. Options need to be discussed on the transfer
4. Discussion on potential number of retirements within DRS. There are a significant number of
highly skilled workers who will be retiring. A nationwide search will be needed for some of them
in order to fill these specialty positions.
NGA Medicaid Taskforce
1. There will be 3 more conference calls to discuss the list of desired Medicaid flexibilities.
2. Governors will have a conference call in 3 weeks on the Medicaid flexibilities
3. New date: May 16th will be the potential DC meeting with the Governors to discuss a potential
white paper on flexibilities by states and/or letter to the Administration and to Congress
a. The visit may include a meeting with Secretary Sebelius
Education
Superintendent Evers agreed to be vice chair of Read to Learn Taskforce to make recommendations on
third grade reading initiatives. DPI reiterated its preference that the $600,000 in the budget is housed in
DPI rather than DOA.
Education News
Milwaukee could become first American city to use universal vouchers for education (Milwauke[i
Journal Sentinel)
Milwaukee's private school voucher program has broken new and controversial ground often in its 21-
year history. Now, it is headed toward what might well be another amazing national first.
If Gov. Scott Walker and leading voucher advocates prevail, Milwaukee will become the first city in
American histoty where any child, regardless of income, can go to a private school, including a religious
school, using public money to pay the bill.
State-union battles revive hope for school-choice 1eforms (Washington Times)
By DickArmey
After a major loss in their battle with Wisconsin taxpayers over collective bargaining powers, teachers
unions are reeling. States are caught in a vicious cycle in which the private sector is shrinking while
public liabilities grow and politicians have finally realized they must rein in spending and restore
economic sanity to their budgets - even if that means pushing back against union influence.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Waste. Fraud and Abuse:
The WFA Commission meeting notice for Friday has been released.
Local Governments:
Wisconsin State Journal. Madison school budget has smaller property tax levy
"This is certainly positive from the perspective of property taxpayers, however it is incorrect to assume that this tax
decrease is a result of our budget reductions," Nerad said in a statement.
"The property tax decrease is being imposed on us by the slate through the governor's budget proposal."
The biggest factor in closing the remaining gap is requiring employees to pay half of their annual pension
contribution, saving the district $11.5 million.
8/2/2011
Page 4 ofS
The agreement allowed the district to require employees to pay up to 5 percent of their health insurance premium
next year, but Nerad is proposing other cuts to avoid that option. Other districts are requiring employees to pay up
to 12 percent of their premium, which Walker is requiring of state employees.
"One of our budget goals was to delay for at least one year any increase in employee contributions for health
insurance premiums," Nerad said.
Wisconsin Rapids Tribune. Two Wisconsin Rapids school unions reach deals on contracts
Following a closed-session discussion, which included an evaluation of Dickmann's first school year on the job as
superintendent, the School Board extended her deal by a year. It's now set to expire June 30, 2013.
Dickmann's extension also included a wage freeze. The district's administrator contract stipulates an annual salary
of $125,000.
The Chigpewa Herald. School board approves modified employee contracts
Union workers have agreed to increased benefit pay-ins- 5.8 percent toward the state pension fund and an
additional12. 6 percent toward the district's insurance costs.
With that, the district's estimated budget shortfall of $2.8 to $4 million will drop to $550,000 to $1.25 million, District
Business Manager Chad Trowbridge told the board earlier this month.
Oshkosh Northwestern. Walker's proposal to reduce state rules regulating phosphorus content in runoff may
not reduce city's costs
Oshkosh Wastewater Utility Superintendent Steve Brand said complying with the phosphorus regulations Gov.
Scott Walker wants to eliminate are expected to cost the city an estimated $30 million. The money, currently
included in the city's 2015 capital improvement program would pay for a wastewater plant upgrade to filter out
phosphorus.
The budget bill also proposes to eliminate pollution control regulations that require storm water utilities to reduce
the volume of temporary suspended solids in storm runoff. Current law requires the city to reduce the volume of
temporary suspended solids by 40 percent by 2013. Oshkosh met a requirement to reduce pollution by 20 percent
by 2008 through construction of detention basins, street sweeping and other measures.
Oshkosh Public Works Director David Patek said the city is unlikely to meet the 40 percent reduction level by 2013,
but continues to work toward it. He said the value of pollution reduction to a community that prides itself on its
waterways means he plans to continue to design pollution controls into storm water management projects even if
Walker's proposal passes.
Veterans:
I am working with the various VSO's to organize a press conference to talk about the Governor's budget
and the wins in it for veterans. The goal is 3pm on Friday either at a New Berlin VFW or a Brookfield
Legion Hall.
I am meeting with four applicants to serve on the veterans board this Thursday. I should have
recommendations for Keith by Friday.
I Met with Brittany Zimmerman's parents about passage of Katie's law. They believe it will help find
Brittany's killer. Senator Harsdorf will be authoring it with an expected introduction in the summer. It would
require DNA at every felony arrest.
Fond. du Lac Rlgorter. Walker's budget denies funding for police network
La Crosse County Sheriff Steve Helgeson's agency was one of the first to join, but stopped using it in 2009.
The concept looked promising, the sheriff said, but the network hasn't gained momentum. Too few agencies,
8/2/2011
Page 5 of5
especially his neighboring departments in western Wisconsin, whose information is the most valuable to his
agency, have joined, he said. And agencies that participate don't share enough data, he said. His county has a
common record management software system many of the smaller jurisdictions use, he added.
"It just hasn't seemed to be as valuable as it sounded like it would be in the beginning," he said. "I was pretty
excited, but after it rolled out, it seemed to sputter."
8/2/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page I of4
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Saturday, April30, 201110:55 AM
To: Evenson, Tom- GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty- Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Thanks for heading in
From: Evenson, Tom- GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:54 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
I'll send you a draft before I blast it
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office of Governor Scott Walker
E-Mail: tom.evenson@wisconsin.gov
http://walker.wi.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 201110:54 AM
To: Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Ok.
From: Evenson, Tom - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 201110:53 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
I'm here at the office now. I'll take care of it!
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office of Governor Scott Walker
Tel:
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page 2 of4
E-Mail: tom.evenson@wisconsin.gov
http://walker.wi.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:47 AM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Nevermind, I'm going to swing by the office
From: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 09:23AM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Evenson, Tom- GOV
Subject: Fw: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Is there any chance that either of you can get this out today? If not I can do it.
From:
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 09:20AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Cc: Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
It is fine.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
2011 07:56AM
Cc: , Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Our hearts go out to the family and friends of Sgt. Hermanson, especially to his wife and parents. We're
enormously grateful for his service. His family is in our prayers during this time of grief.
From: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI [mailto:jacqueline.guthrie@us.army.mil]
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 06:57AM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A- DMA; Dunbar, Donald P Brig Gen NGWI <donald.p.dunbar@us.army.mil>; Anderson,
Mark E- DMA; McCoy, John E- DMA; Stopper, George E CSM NGWI <george.stopper@us.army.mil>; Legwold,
Scott- DMA; ; Bair, Margaret BrigGen USAF ANG WIHQ/ZSECl
<margaret.bair@ang.af.mil>; Cariello, Dominic A BG NGWI <dominic.a.cariello@us.army.mil>;
DominicCariello@RacineFed.com <DominicCariello@RacineFed.com>; Ladue, Jon M TSgt NGWI
<jon.ladue@us.army.mil>; Staab, Joy A CPT NGWI <joy.a.staab@us.army.mil>; Krenz, Craig- DMA; Hagedorn,
Brian K- GOV; Moore, Dorothy J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Rasmussen, Lynn - DMA
(1st); NGWI JOC- DMA; Lt. Governor; Chisholm, James CMSgt USAF ANG JFHQ-WI/CCC
<james.chisholm@ang.af.mil>; Hedman, Douglas V MAJ NGWI <douglas.hedman@us.army.mil>; Bruns, Mark-
DMA; Gross, Tammy- DMA; nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com <nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com>; Hitt, Andrew A-
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page 3 of4
GOV; Koon, Kenneth - DMA; Erwin, David - GOV; Hutter, Shelly - GOV; McMahon, Jack- GOV; Fitzgerald, Richard
- GOV (Rick); Barron, Julio - DMA; Walters, Jason - DMA; Mills, Jamie - DMA; Miles, Stephanie M MSgt USAF ANG
115 FW/CC <stephanie.miles@ang.af.mil>; Olson, Larry- DMA (1st); Sweet, Russell - DMA; Watkins, Steve-
DMA; Zarm, Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <tara.zarm@us.army.mil>; Williams, Kori R CTR NGWI
<kori.williams@us.army.mil>; NGWI TAG PAO <int-WING-PAO@ng.army.mil>; Fuller, Patrick- LEGIS;
Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov <Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov>; Inabnet, Kay - LEGIS;
robert.marchant@legis.state. wi .us <robert. march ant@ legis.state. wi. us>; Jeff.Renk@legis.state. wi. us
<Jeff.Renk@legis.state.wi.us>; Mathews, Ric F- DVA; Senator Kohl
<Ryan_Knocke@kohl.senate.gov>;
Zarm, Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <ta
Subject: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton (UNCLASSIFIED)
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
Ladies and Gentlemen I regret to inform you that DoD has just announced that Sgt. Matthew
D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died April 28, from wounds suffered when enemy forces
attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
Funeral arrangements are pending. We will keep you updated as information becomes
available.
Jackie Guthrie
LTC, Wisconsin National Guard
Director of Public Affairs
Tel: 608.242.3050 MIJ'
Fax:
Cell:
From: DoD News [mailto:dodnews@subscriptions.dod.mil]
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2011 11:21 PM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI
Subject: DOD Identifies Army Casualty
DOD AI!I!}' Casualty
Sat, 30Apr2011 00:07:00-0500
IMMEDIATE RELEASE
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
No. 362-11
April 30, 2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page4 of4
The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring
Freedom.
Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died Apri128, in Wardak province, Afghanistan of wounds
suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1oth Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
For more information, media should contact the Fort Drum public affairs office at, 315-772-8286.
U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)
On the Web: http://www.defense.gov/re!eases/
Media Contact: +1 (703) 697-5131/697-5132
Public Contact: http://www.defense.gov/landing/guestions.aspx or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1
Update your subscriptions, modify your password or e-mail address, or stop subscriptions at any time on your User Profile
Page. You will need to use your e-mail address to log in. If you have questions or problems with the subscription service,
please e-mail support@govdelivery.c
0
m.
L__ __ _ ]
GovDelivery, Inc. sending on behalf of the U.S. Department of Defense 408 St. Peter Street Suite 600 St. Paul, MN 55102 1-800-439-1420
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page 1 of4
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Evenson, Tom - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 11:03 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Subject: RE: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty -Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
No problem happy to do it.
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office
E-Mail: tom.evenson@wisconsin.gov
http://walker.wi.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:55 AM
To: Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Thanks for heading in
From: Evenson, Tom- GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:54 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
I'll send you a draft before I blast it
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office
E-Mail: tom.evenson@wisconsin.gov
http://walker.wi.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:54 AM
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page2 of4
To: Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
01<.
From: Evenson, Tom- GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 201110:53 AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Subject: RE: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
I'm here at the office now. I'll take care of it!
Tom Evenson
Press Aide
Office of Governor Scott Walker
E-Mail:
http ://walker. wi.gov
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 10:47 AM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Nevermind, I'm going to swing by the office
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 09:23AM
To: Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Evenson, Tom - GOV
Subject: Fw: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty- Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Is there any chance that either of you can get this out today? If not I can do it.
From:
Sent: Satu 09:20AM
To: Schrimpf,
Cc: Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty- Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
It is fine.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
201107:56 AM
To:---
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Cc: Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty -Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Page 3 of4
Our hearts go out to the family and friends of Sgt. Hermanson, especially to his wife and parents. We're
enormously grateful for his service. His family is in our prayers during this time of grief.
From: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI [mailto:jacqueline.guthrie@us.army.mil]
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 06:57AM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A- DMA; Dunbar, Donald P Brig Gen NGWI <donald.p.dunbar@us.army.mil>; Anderson,
Mark E- John E- E CSM NGWI <george.stopper@us.army.mil>; Legwold,
Bair, Margaret BrigGen USAF ANG WIHQ/ZSEC1
<margaret. .mil>; 1 <dominic.a.cariello@us.army.mil>;
DominicCariello@RacineFed.com <DominicCariello@RacineFed.com>; Ladue, Jon M TSgt NGWI
<jon.ladue@us.army.mil>; Staab, Joy A CPT NGWI <joy.a.staab@us.army.mil>; Krenz, Craig- DMA; Hagedorn,
Brian K- GOV; Moore, Dorothy J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Rasmussen, Lynn - DMA
(1st); NGWI JOC - DMA; Lt. Governor; Chisholm, James CMSgt USAF ANG JFHQ-WI/CCC
<james.chisholm@ang.af.mil>; Hedman, Douglas V MAJ NGWI <douglas.hedman@us.army.mil>; Bruns, Mark-
DMA; Gross, Tammy- DMA; nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com <nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com>; Hitt, Andrew A-
GOV; Koon, Kenneth - DMA; Erwin, David - GOV; Hutter, Shelly - GOV; McMahon, Jack- GOV; Fitzgerald, Richard
- GOV (Rick); Barron, Julio - DMA; Walters, Jason - DMA; Mills, Jamie - DMA; Miles, Stephanie M MSgt USAF ANG
115 FW/CC <stephanie.miles@ang.af.mil>; Olson, Larry- DMA (1st); Sweet, Russell- DMA; Watkins, Steve-
DMA; Zarm, Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <tara.zarm@us.army.mil>; Williams, Kori R CTR NGWI
<kori.williams@us.army.mil>; NGWI TAG PAO <int-WING-PAO@ng.army.mil>; Fuller, Patrick- LEGIS;
Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov <Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov>; Inabnet, Kay- LEGIS;
robert.marchant@legis.state.wi.us <robert.marchant@legis.state.wi.us>; Jeff.Renk@legis.state.wi.us
<Jeff.Renk@legis.state.wi.us>; Mathews, Ric F- DVA; Senator Kohl (Luoma)- DMA;
<Ryan_Knocke@kohl.senate.gov> ;.41
"'ii ; Zarm, Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <tara.zarm@us.army.mil>; Tim Lau
Subject: DOD Identifies Army Casualty- Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton (UNCLASSIFIED)
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
Ladies and Gentlemen I regret to inform you that DoD has just announced that Sgt. Matthew
D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died April 28, from wounds suffered when enemy forces
attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
Funeral arrangements are pending. We will keep you updated as information becomes
available.
Jackie Guthrie
LTC, Wisconsin National Guard
Director of Public Affairs
Tel: 608. 242.3050
Fax:
Cell:
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
From: DoD News [mailto:dodnews@subscriptions.dod.mil]
Sent: Friday, April 29, 201111:21 PM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI
Subject: DOD Identifies Army Casualty
DOD Identifies Army Casual!y
Sat, 30Apr2011 00:07:00-0500
IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Page 4of4
No. 362-11
April 30, 2011
The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring
Freedom.
Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died April 28, in Wardak province, Afghanistan of wounds
suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1oth Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
For more information, media should contact the Fort Drum public affairs office at, 315-772-8286.
U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)
On the Web: b!)R://www.defense.gov/releases/
Media Contact: +1 (703) 697"5131/697-5132
Public Contact: httpJ/www.defense.gov/landing/questions.aspx or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1
Update your subscriptions, modify your password or e-mail address, or stop subscriptions at any time on your User Profile
Page. You will need to use your e-mail address to log in. If you have questions or problems with the subscription service,
please e-mail support@govdeliverv.com.
GovDelivery, Inc. sending on behalf of the U.S. Department of Defense 408 St. Peter Street Suite 600 St. Paul, MN 55102
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Atmy Casualty Page 1 of3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent: Saturday, April30, 2011 9:20AM
To: Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Cc: Gilkes, Keith - GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Re: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty- Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
It is fine.
From: Schrimpf, Chris - GOV
2.011 07:56AM
Cc: , Werwie, Cullen J - GOV
Subject: Draft statement Fw: DOD Identifies Army Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton
(UNCLASSIFIED)
Our hearts go out to the family and friends of Sgt. Hermanson, especially to his wife and parents. We're
enormously grateful for his service. His family is in our prayers during this time of grief.
From: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI [mailto:jacqueline.guthrie@us.army.mil]
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2.011 06:57AM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A- DMA; Dunbar, Donald P Brig Gen NGWI <donald.p.dunbar@us.army.mil>; Anderson,
Mark E- DMA; McCoy, John E- DMA; Stopper, George E CSM NGWI <george.stopper@us.army.mil>; Legwold,
Scott - DMA; p ) Bair, Margaret BrigGen USAF ANG WIHQ/ZSEC1
<margaret.bair@ang.af.mil>; Cariello, Dominic A BG NGWI <dominic.a.cariello@us.army.mil>;
DominicCariello@RacineFed.com <DominicCariello@RacineFed.com>; Ladue, Jon M TSgt NGWI
<jon.ladue@us.army.mil>; Staab, Joy A CPT NGWI <joy.a.staab@us.army.mil>; Krenz, Craig- DMA; Hagedorn,
Brian K- GOV; Moore, Dorothy J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV; Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Rasmussen, Lynn - DMA
(1st); NGWI JOC- DMA; Lt. Governor; Chisholm, James CMSgt USAF ANG JFHQ-WI/CCC
<james.chisholm@ang.af.mil>; Hedman, Douglas V MAJ NGWI <douglas.hedman@us.army.mil>; Bruns, Mark-
DMA; Gross, Tammy - DMA; nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com <nan.m.gardner@healthnet.com>; Hitt, Andrew A -
GOV; Koon, Kenneth - DMA; Erwin, David - GOV; Hutter, Shelly - GOV; McMahon, Jack- GOV; Fitzgerald, Richard
- GOV (Rick); Barron, Julio - DMA; Walters, Jason - DMA; Mills, Jamie - DMA; Miles, Stephanie M MSgt USAF ANG
115 FW/CC <stephanie.miles@ang.af.mil>; Olson, Larry- DMA (1st); Sweet, Russell - DMA; Watkins, Steve -
DMA; Zarm, Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <tara.zarm@us.army.mil>; Williams, Kori R CTR NGWI
<kori.williams@us.army.mil>; NGWI TAG PAO <int-WING-PAO@ng.army.mil>; Fuller, Patrick- LEGIS;
Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov <Laura.Jones@legis.wisconsin.gov>; Inabnet, Kay- LEGIS;
robert. marchant@legis.state. wi. us <robert. marchant@ legis.state. wi. us>; Jeff. Renk@legis.state. wi. us
<Jeff.Renk@legis.state.wi.us>; Mathews, Ric F- OVA; Senator
<Ryan_Knocke@kohl.senate.gov>
Tara M Mrs CTR NGWI <tara.zarm@us.army.mil>; Tim Lau
Casualty - Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, Appleton (UNCLASSIFIED)
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
Ladies and Gentlemen I regret to inform you that DoD has just announced that Sgt. Matthew
D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died April 28, from wounds suffered when enemy forces
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Army Casualty Page 2 of3
attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
Funeral arrangements are pending. We will keep you updated as information becomes
available.
Jackie Guthrie
LTC, Wisconsin National Guard
Director of Public Affairs
Tel: 608.242.3050
Fax:
Cell:
From: DoD News [mailto:dodnews@subscriptions.dod.mil]
Sent: Friday, April 29, 201111:21 PM
To: Guthrie, Jacqueline A LTC NGWI
Subject: DOD Identifies Army Casualty
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Sat. 30 Apr 2011 00:07:00-0500
IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
No. 362-11
April 30, 2011
The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring
Freedom.
Sgt. Matthew D. Hermanson, 22, of Appleton, Wis., died April 28, in Wardak province, Afghanistan of wounds
suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry
Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.
For more information, media should contact the Fort Drum public affairs office at, 315-772-8286.
U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs)
On the Web: http://www.defense.gov/releases/
Media Contact: +1 (703) 697-5131/697-5132
Public Contact: http://www.defense.gov/landing/guestions.aspx or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1
Update your subscriptions, modify your password or e-mail address, or stop subscriptions at any time on your User Profile
Page. You will need to use your e-mail address to log in. If you have questions or problems with the subscription service,
please e-mail support@govdelivery.com.
[
GovDelivery, Inc. sending on behalf of the U.S. Department of Defense 408 St. Peter Street Suite 600 St. Paul, MN 55102 1-800-439-1420
10/12/2011
DOD Identifies Atmy Casualty
Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: FOUO
10/12/2011
Page 3 of3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Cc:
Subject:
Tweet

Evenson, Tom - GOV
Werwie, Cullen J - GOV; Schrimpf, Chris- GOV
Kaukauna board OKs budget moves I Appleton Post Crescent I postcrescent.com
Kaukauna: "teachers will be called back if the state
1
s collective bargaining legislation
that is on hold pending a legal challenge takes effect":
http://www.postcrescent.corn/article/20110503/APC0101/105030432/Kaukauna-board-0Ks-budget-
moves?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CAPC-News%7Cs
1
Page 1 of2
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Ristow, Nate - GOV
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2011 5:24PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA; Roetker, Patrick- GOV
Subject: RE: Open Records Request
Thanks again for the quick action with Pat on this. Looking over the Schoepke records alerted me to another
request that you guys may have records for. On February 16, 2011 the Sierra Club, through legal counsel,
requested the following:
All records related to meetings or discussions with agents or representatives of Koch Industries, its
subsidiaries, or affiliates regarding a best available retrofit (BART) determination for Georgia-
pacific Consumer Products LP in Green Bay, Wisconsin.
Thanks guys.
NOTICE TO RECIPIENT: The information in this e-mail is confidential and may be protected by the
attomey/client privilege or the attorney's work product doctrine. It is intended solely for the addressee
(s); access to anyone else is unauthorized. Ifthis message has been sent to you in enor, do not review,
disseminate, distribute, or copy it. Please reply to the sender that you have received the message in error,
then delete it. Thank you for your cooperation.
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2011 4:13 PM
To: Ristow, Nate- GOV
Subject: RE: Open Records Request
Nate,
I met one time with Jeff Schoepke on Jan. 28th I believe he left me with a letter of some type. Let me track it
down for you.
--Jason
From: Ristow, Nate - GOV
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2011 4:12PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: Open Records Request
One WI Now has made the following open records request:
Copy of all written or email communications sent to or received by these offices from
Jeffrey Schoepke or Jeff Schoepke.
Any records related to any meetings during the same time period between Mr.
Schoepke and Governor Walker or anyone on his behalf, including but not limited to
calendar entries and schedules.
The request applies to both Transition Office and Govemor's Office communications through
Febmary 22nd.
8/2/2011
Please advise whether or not any connnunications or meetings occurred between you and Mr.
Schoepke. Let me !mow if you have any questions. Thank you.
Nate Ristow
Assistant Legal Counsel
Office of Governor Scott Walker
115E State Capitol
Page2 of2
NOTICE TO RECIPIENT: The inf01mation in this e-mail is confidential and may be protected by the
attorney/client privilege or the attorney's work product doctrine. It is intended solely for the addressee
(s); access to anyone else is unauthorized. If this message has been sent to you in error, do not review,
disseminate, distribute, or copy it. Please reply to the sender that you have received the message in error,
then delete it. Thank you for your cooperation.
8/2/2011
Page 1 of3
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 4:23 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Cc: Powers, Renee M - DOA
Subject: FW: Kelly Smith Questions
Jason,
Below are responses that I sent to Kelly Smith, the reporter from Lake Country News, regarding the Lisbon
petition. His questions are below.
Carla, Cari Anne and Mark Herman helped Renee and I craft these responses.
Thanks,
Erich
From: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 3:11 PM
To: 'Smith, Kelly'
Subject: Kelly Smith Questions
Kelly,
Here are responses to your two questions:
When the Incorporation Review Board was created by the Legislature in 2004, the Legislature gave decision-
making authority in one Board member, while allowing that person to benefit from the expertise of other
members who serve in an advisory capacity. As a Board, the body is subject to Wisconsin's Open Meetings Law
and holds public meetings, whereas one person acting alone would not be.
The Board has developed a drafting process which it believes fully complies with the Open Meetings Law. In
your e-mail you referred specifically to the portion of the Attorney General's Open Meetings Law Compliance
Guide concerning "walking quorums." A "walking quorum" is "where a majority of members of a body sign a
document that expressly commits them to a future course of action." When Board members submit written
comments to staff they are not committing to any particular course of action. Nor are the comments shared
between multiple Board members, which would be another sign of a "walking quorum." In fact, all deliberations,
including the exchange of ideas between multiple Board members, occur at public meetings. There have been
occasions in the past where Board members have changed their views during public deliberations.
Erich
From: Smith, Kelly [mailto:ksmith@jcpgroup.com]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 201112:22 PM
To: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Subject: RE: Responses to your questions
Erich:
This email follows up our conversation on Friday, April 2 regarding who and how incorporation decisions are
being made.
As I understand what we discussed on Friday, a decision whether to affirm or deny a petition of incorporation is
made solely by the secretary of the agency or his or her designee who serves on the Incorporation Review
8/2/2011
Page 2 of3
Board, rather than the other members of the board. based on Section 15.105 (23) which states is part, "All
members of the board, other than the secretary of the administration or his or her designee, serve only in an
advisory capacity"
As you have indicated, it would appear based on that sentence that the only member of the board with decision
making powers is the secretary of the administration or his or her designee. Before going any further, I do not
recall at any point during either the Richfield or Lisbon incorporation hearings were members of the public
attending the hearings told that the only member of the board with a decision making power was the secretary
of the administration or his or her designee. This does not only appear to be disingenuous but also raises the
question of what is the practical function of the remainder of the board members.
However, this interpretation also appears to be in conflict with other sections of the statue. Section 9 of
66.0203, Function of the Board, states "the board shall make any necessary investigation to apply the standards
un 66.0207. Further, it says the board shall schedule a hearing at a place or time convenient to the territory
sought to be incorporated. The statue continues "Unless the court sets a different time limit, the board shall
prepare its findings and determination, citing supporting evidence, within 180 days after receipt of the referral
from the court and payment of any fee imposed."
"The findings and determination shall be forwarded by the board to the circuit court," according to 66.0203 (9)
(d).
Section 66.0203 (9) (e) adds, "The determination of the board made in accordance with the standards
66.0205,66.0207, and 676.0217 shall be one of the following: if the board determines that the petition shall be
dismissed, the circuit court shall issue an order dismissing the petition. If the board grants the petition, the
circuit court shall order an incorporation referendum as provided in 66.0211."
Furthermore 66.0207, Standards to be applied by the board, says the board may approve a referendum only if
it determines the standards further described in that section are met.
It would appear there is a substantial conflict between what Seeton 15.105 (3) says and what is described in
numerous section of 66.0203. I would like to know how the Department of Administration resolved that conflict
and upon what administrative ruling or document the department has based its conclusion on that the only
member of the board with decision making authority is the secretary of the administration or his or her
designee.
In view ofthis apparent conflict, and my previous questions about the Open Meetings Law, I would like to hear
you and or the agency respond to the suggestion that you are making decisions regarding the governance of
tens of thousands of people virtually in a telephone booth and in violation of state laws intended to allow and
provide public review of this decision making process.
Thanks. Hope to hear from you soon
Kelly Smith
Lake Country Publications
From: Smith, Kelly [mailto:ksmith@jcpgroup.com]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2011 8:50AM
To: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Cc: Peterson, Scott; Mukwonago Chief, Eimer
Subject: RE: Responses to your questions
8/2/2011
Page 3 of3
Erich;
Following up on our conversation of last week, Robert Dreps, a lawyer whose law firm, Godfrey and Kahn,
represents both the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and Journal Communications, has advised me that it
appears that the Incorporation Review Board's deliberation process may be in violation of the state's Open
Meetings Law.
I would refer you to the Wisconsin Attorney General's Open Meeting Compliance guide, Page 9, Section 3
"Walking quorums." The last paragraph of the section reads "where a majority of members of a body sign a
document that expressly commits them to a future course of action, a comt could find a walking quorum violation. Huff
Correspondence, January 15,2008; see also 1-01-10, January 25,2010 (use of email voting to decide matters fits
the definition of a "walking quorum" violation of the open meetings law). I would refer you to the informal opinion
issued by the Wisconsin Attorney General on January 25,2010.
It is Mr. Dreps' opinion that the circumstances described in the AG's informal opinion of Jan. 25,2010 are somewhat
similar to the circumstances involving the Incorporation Review Board's issuance of its findings after individual board
members review the recommendations prepared by the DOA staff. I would be interested in you or your attomey's
opinion on this matter.
8/2/2011
Page 1 of 1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - GOV
Sent: Monday, June 06,2011 5:15PM
To: Kitzman, Nick- GOV
Subject: daily update
Economic Development and Regulatory Reform Team
Commerce
-
WEDC Board Meeting
o Confirmed next board meeting for Monday, June 13
1
h, at the Capitol
Burger Boat
o Pete Bilski, VP of HR for Burger Boat, called; supports collective bargaining changes in the budget
repair bill
o Wants to thank the Governor for funds distributed to the North Coast Marine Manufacturing
Association from the Workforce Development Board
BIO Conference
o Working with Commerce, Bryan Renk of BioForward, and the WI Tech Council on specifics of visit
and itinerary
o Shared "Wisconsin is Open for Business" logo with Tech Council for use at the state's pavilion
DNR
Department of Interior Deputy Secretary Visit
o Met with DNR staff for background on the federal America's Great Outdoors initiative.
-
DOT
-
Eminent Domain (budget)
o Contact from Wisconsin Realtors Association and Wisconsin Builders Association with questions
about the eminent domain language inserted by JFC
Motor Carrier Liability
o Contact from Rep. Nygren regarding a potential amendment to AB50 (about this issue)
DRL
-
Surety Bond Agents (budget)
o DRL staff is evaluating a JFC motion that allows sureties to be compensated.
o The department has a number of concerns about how the motion was written and suggests we get
clarity.
WHEDA
-
Wisconsin Eye Funding (budget)
o There is concern about a JFC motion requiring a $5 million loan from WHEDA to cover Wisconsin
Eye's operating costs
JOBS Hotline
2 calls received
8/2/2011
Page 1 of4
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - GOV
Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 5:50PM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Daily Policy and Legislative Update
l-egislative Affairs Team
Legislative Contacts:
Cindy met with Representative Kooyenga regarding AB 30- delegation of child by parent.
Assembly Session
o The Assembly is scheduled to begin debate on the budget tomorrow
Senate Session
o SB 93- concealed carry (as amended)
AB 148- bill to pay the bills (final passage)
o SB 107- landlord CCAP usage preemption
SB 1 09- penalties for soft tissue injuries to Jaw enforcement officers
Economic Development and Regulatorv Reform
Commerce
-
o Marinette Marine names new General Manager
o Former Congressman Beau Boulter called to report that Admiral Chuck Goddard (Ret.) has been
named as the general manager of the Marinette Marine shipyard.
o Adm. Goddard was in charge of shipbuilding at the Navy prior to retiring in 2009.
o OECD
o Confirming details and participation of WI parties for June meeting
o Working with Volz and Steve Baas
BID International Convention
o Working with Commerce and WI Tech Council on details and scheduling
o WTC recommended restaurant venue for Monday night meeting with companies and VIP's
Checking with Commerce to see if this would work
o Letter from the governor approved for the BIO Directory-- working with WTC on details
DNR
-
Mining
o Met with a member of the Lake Superior Binational Forum.
The group that works to protect Lake Superior, per the Boundary Waters Treaty.
EPA has a Binational Task Force that works on these matters, the Forum acts as a consultant
to the Task Force.
o They saw the initial ferrous mining legislation proposal and were concerned that it would break
certain provisions of our treaty with Canada.
DOT
Opposition to JFC Motion on Bidding Requirements for Public Works Projects
o Joint Letter from Counties of Marathon, Brown, Colombia, Adams, Dunn, Kenosha, Waupaca,
Manitowoc, Outagamie, Cities of Milwaukee and La Crosse and Villages of Brown Deer and Fox Point
o Wisconsin Chapter of American Public Works Association
o Letter from Door County
8/2/2011
Page 2 of4
JOBS Hotline
2 calls received
Education and Human Services Team
DCF:
DCF was notified today by NGA that they will receive a $10,000 grant. The selection and grant is in part of the
Three Branch Institute on Adolescents in FosterCare.
DWD:
Interim Secretary Scott Baumbach will be confirmed by the Senate tomorrow to become Secretary of Department
of Workforce Development.
DHS Newsworthy:
FamilyC_<J.re enrollment cap in budget starts June 3Q (The Racine Journi;ll Times)
When the program started, the purpose was to serve seniors and people with disabilities. The idea was that it
would save money because elderly people would use in-home care instead of going to the nursing homes. But it
has ended up costing the slate more, said Burlington's Rep. Samantha Kerkman, R-Powers Lake. She co-chairs
the state's Joint Legislative Audit Committee, which recently conducted an audit of the program.
State official defends freeze on FamilyCare (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
Kitty Rhoades, deputy secretary for health services, said a state audit and other data on the program have not
provided answers to how much it would cost if a scheduled unfettered enrollment expansion were allowed. That
means costs of allowing more enrollments in FamilyCare remain unknown, she said Friday. "As it expands, (costs)
are a relative unknown quantity," said Rhodes.
Proposed Medicaid cuts__put NJ in National Debate (Associated P r e s ~ < )
In New Jersey's case, changes would mean a parent of two earning more than $103 per week would be ineligible.
At issue in New Jersey is a $540 million cut to stale Medicaid funding that Gov. Chris Christie proposed for next
year's budget. About $240 million comes from specific program cuts, such as $140 million dropped from nursing
home coverage.
On Political Expediency and Health Care Reform Guest Opinion (Kaiser Family Health News) Author. James
C. Capretta
DWD Newsworthy:
Finding skilled workers a struggle for Bucyrus (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
As chairman of the Governor's Council on Workforce Investment, a state advisory panel, Sullivan wants Gov. Scott
Walker to change how the state spends hundreds of millions of dollars each year in federal job training funds- and
in the process, link the funds to reforms of local education programs. The proposals would change how workforce
investment boards- regional training entities- apply for funds. They would need to justify each allocation with
commitments to reform the curricula of each region's kindergarten- through-12
1
h public schools as well as each
region's technical colleges.
Education:
The U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Education and Workforce will markup H.R. 2117- The
bill would repeal the federal regulation related to state authorization of higher education programs. That
regulation specified that colleges that enroll students through online and distance-education programs must
seek state approval to operate in all states in which they operate. Colleges that fail to do so may lose their
eligibility to award federal student aid to that states' students.
The School Report Card OpEd is going through an redraft to address some of Tony Evers's concerns as
well as the recent announcement on NCLB by Arne Duncan (see below).
Education News:
Opinion: Revamp No Child Left Behind now (Politico)
By Arne Duncan
Everyone responsible for educating children for the knowledge economy of the 21st century agrees that America's
federal education law is in dire need of reform. Teachers, parents, school leaders, governors, members of
8/2/2011
Page 3 of4
Congress and the Education Department have all called for an overhaul of the No Child Left Behind Act.
Education Secretary Mav Agree to Waivers on 'No Child' Law Requirements (New York Times/
Unless Congress acts by this fall to overhaul No Child Left Behind, the main federal law on public education,
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan signaled that he would use his executive authority to free states from the
law's centerpiece requirement that all students be proficient in reading and math by 2014.
5 reasons to believe progress is being made to address reading crisis (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel!
I attended the second meeting of Gov. Scott Walker's Read to Lead Task Force recently. Unlike most anything else
going on in the Capitol, this was a civil, constructive discussion involving people of diverse opinions. The focus of
the afternoon-long session was how to improve the way teachers are trained to teach reading.
finding skilled workers a struggle for Bucyrus (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
A delegation of senior Texas government authorities met Sullivan at the airport, including the mayor of the town of
Kilgore. In a one-hour lunch, they matched Bucyrus with a ready-to-occupy factory with every possible amenity.
More important, they asked Sullivan exactly what sort of workers he needed. Sullivan said 80 with specific skill.
The state gave Sullivan a guarantee that the workers would be waiting when the doors opened at the expansion
site in Kilgore. State officials customized a recruitment, training and certification program. One year later, when the
expansion site in Kilgore opened its doors, the 80 welders were waiting.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Local Governments and Propertv Taxes:
Sheboygan Press. Editorial: State lawmakers should stop dictating to local government
Isn't it enough that Gov. Walker and the Legislature is limiting local government's ability to raise money to provide
services to local taxpayers through limits on lax levies?
The state budget provision on road work further restricts local governmenls'.abi/ily to make up for reductions in
state aid or shared revenue by prohibiting them from fully utilizing their highway and public works departments.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Editorial: Steps in the right direction but quite a few missteps, too
Whatever problems exist in the state budget proposed by Gov. Scott Walker and being worked on by the
Legislature - and there are problems - Wisconsin should see its first honest budget in a long time.
It requires more prudent spending by local governments. There are some problems with that, and with the changes
the stale is making generally on collective bargaining, but labor costs do have to be reined in.
Other states face.similar problems; many of them will see massive layoffs and cuts in services. Wisconsin's budget
seeks to avoid that kind of outcome bv making necessarv cuts in labor costs without lavoffs.
Education funding: Milwaukee Public Schools will be working with $182 million less than last year, most of that
from an expected loss of $82 million in state revenue and $95.5 million in grant funding. Tough decisions will have
to be made. The School Board should have made tough decisions earlier to prepare for this day. The district must
find continued cost savings.
Last week, the School Board made the right call to ask the teachers union for concessions to save jobs. If the
teachers union agrees to a 5. 8% pension contribution, which potentially could be done under legislation by the
Legislature's budget committee, 198 teacher positions could be saved.
Juvenile corrections: Legislators have voted to shut down youth correctional institutions Ethan Allen School in the
Town of Delafield and Southern Oaks Girls School in Union Grove. Juvenile offenders would be transferred from
those institutions to the Lincoln Hills correctional facility in Irma in Lincoln County, about four hours from
Milwaukee. The proposal saves $23 million but will be a hardship for Milwaukee families. Let's rethink that one.
Appleton Post Crescent. Menasha officials say service reductions are inevitable as city struggles to balance
budget
8/2/2011
Page 4 of4
"The most equitable way now would be for those employees who did not participate in furloughs to start paying that
5.8 percent," Englebert said. "It's unfortunate the city police union would not help us and take a reduction in pay,"
Markes said.
Officer Jeff Jorgenson, a police union bargaining committee member, said all bargaining units were told if they
accepted a 1 percent pay increase in 2010 there would be no layoffs. He said the city has enacted staffing
reductions in the police department, never hiring another officer as discussed in late 2008 and then did not replace
a lieutenant who retired in early 2010.
-
Legislative Meetings:
I met with Senator Zipperer's staff, Chris Reader to discuss SB 104 with Corrections staff. Corrections had
ideas to reduce the fiscal cost. Zipperer agreed and is drafting a substitute amendment.
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Culotta, Jason - GOV
Thursday, May 05, 2011 10:29 AM
Eberle, Ed - L TGOV
Subject: FW: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
Attachments: Venture Capital MEDIA handout.ppt; Wisconsin Jobs Act- Talking Points. doc
Ed,
I can give you a full briefing this afternoon, but here are some basics on it.
--Jason
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2011 9:04AM
To: Eberle, Ed- LTGOV; Culotta, Jason- GOV
Subject: Re: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
It's actually happening right now. Jason can get you all the details.
From: Eberle, Ed - L TGOV
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2011 08:58AM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Re: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
I realize announcement is tomorrow but any info on venture capitol you could provide? Talking points ect
From: Murray, Ryan M- GOV
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2011 07:44AM
To: Murray, Ryan M - GOV
Subject: Daily Policy and Legislative Briefing
Legislative Contacts:
Legislative Affairs Team
Page 1 of4
Talked to Representative LeMahieu's Office about a technical change to a bill that would increase the penalties for
daycare providers who sexually assault children.
Representative Suder will be holding a press conference tomorrow regarding his bill to repeal early release.
A bill that would permit concealed carry (includes licensing system) was circulated for co-sponsorship by Representative
Mursau. A bill that that would permit constitutional carry (individual does not need a license) was circulated for co-
sponsorship by Senator Galloway.
Representative Jorgensen called about a letter he sent last week. Department of Corrections has sent a response.
Thursday's Committees Date Time Room Bill Author
225
A. Utilities Exec 5/5/2011 9:30 NW
SS AB 14- telecommunications Honadel
JFC Bill Exec 5/5/2011 10:00 412E
AB 92- eliminate the cap on Choice Honadel
AB 94- technical changes to Choice Marklein
A. Veterans Exec 5/5/2011 10:00 330SW
AB 96- composition ofthe Vets Board Petersen
S. Natural Resources Hearing
and Exec 5/5/2011 10:00 300SE
(Exec) SB 59- piers Kedzie
(Exec) SB 52- fish culling Moulton
(Exec) SB 72- bear hunting Harsdorf
(Hearing) SB 75- deer hunt Kedzie
Jt. Public Safety and
Corrections Hearing 5/4/2011 11:00 411 s
AB 86/ SB 57- early release Suder
8/2/2011
Economic Development
Commerce
International Trade
o International trade directors from around the world will be visiting Wisconsin from May 9-13
o Each day will be in a d i f f e ~ e n t area in the state
Venture Capital
o Announcement set for tomorrow morning
Page 2 of4
o Put together talking points for the announcement for the participants included and also put together a brief
PowerPoint, briefly describing the bill, which will be handed out to the Media.
DFI
o Met with Senator Wanggaard and Rep. Stone and Rep. Petryk today on the proposal in advance oftomorrow's
announcement.
National Mortgage License System (NMLS)
o Call repmts for mmtgage licensees are now going to be required on a quarterly basis
o Sec. Bildsten met with the WMBA to discuss the implementation
PSC
New and Emerging Technologies Improvement Act of2008
o Information collection mandated by the FCC from the PSC
o PSC sent letter in April complying with FCC request
Manitoba Hydro expressed concerns on the WPS Hydrocap Bill.
Tourism
National Tourism Week
o Updated schedule for visits by the Governor and the Lt. Governor
a Dept. of Tourism publically announced today the secretary's and dep. secretary's visits around the state
JOBS Hotline
1 call received
DNR
Spoke with the Council of Great Lakes Governor's executive Committee and approved their Great Lakes Budget.
DOT
Stillwater Bridge
o Congressman Ron Kind testified in support ofH.R. 850, Congresswoman Bachman's bill that would deem
construction of a four-lane highway bridge consistent with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.
Zoo Interchange
o Contact with WisDOT regarding the preferred alternative and potential announcement.
Co11tact with Sen. Moulton to update him on concerns expressed fi:om local officials and businesses in Chippewa County
regarding weight limits on local roads.
NGA HHS Committee
HHS Weeldy Meeting:
Health Care and Education Team
I. HealthCare Exchanges Topic: Speaker ideas will be collected from committee members and sent to leadership for
consideration. The topic and speaker must be decided by the end of May to be in the pre-agenda draft released to all
governors and stakeholders the first week of June.
2. Oregon Global Waiver: Oregon and Washington are teaming up to ask CMS for flexibilities relating to managed care
populations. They hope to have federal permission by the fall with implementation between Feb. and April of2012.
3. Update on Medicaid Task Force: HHS Committee members were briefed by NGA on the task force and what they see in
the future. NGA staff has come to the conclusion that this will be a lost cause and it will end with no letters being sent to
HHS/CMS or Congress.
NGA Center for Best Practices:
I. Held a conference call with other governors' health care staff and the NGA Center for Best Practices on health care
challenges each state is facing. discussed the upcoming summer policy institute for all governors' human services advisors.
Discussed topic choices.
8/2/2011
Page 3 of4
Meeting with Rep. Marldein: Medicaid Director Brett Davis presented a Medicaid I 01 discussion with Rep. Marklein.
Discussed health care funding, IJ\If centralization, health care benefits for illegal immigrants.
OCI
Meeting with Rep. Strachota and OCI: OCI discussed the possible Assembly Insurance Committee bill relating to technical
corrections. Rep. Strachota asked about health care exchanges and whether a model was being created. Constituents have
contacted her with concerns about the current DHS exchange website. Strachota indicated that it should be taken down and
replaced with an "under-construction" notice.
Meeting with Rep. Kestell and OCI: Kestell has concerns regarding personal financial literacy. He believes that high school
students should not just be taught about checking and savings accounts, but that they should be taught about health, life, and auto
insurance as well. He also has concerns with health insurance policy changes and stated that senior citizens need to be educated
about their choices. Many senior citizens have had the same agent for many years and do not realize the potential savings they
may be missing.
Education:
SB 28 (composition of the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System) was passed out of the Senate Higher
Ed Committee by a vote of6-1 (Halperin only no vote)
Continued talks with stakeholders on school report cards. All groups have shown interest so far.
Education News:
On Cam nus: Lovell will earn $330.203 as next UW-Milwaukee chancellor (Wisconsin State Journal)
Michael Lovell will earn an annual salary of$330,203 as the next chancellor ofUW-Milwaukee.
The UW Board of Regents confirmed his appointment at a special meeting Tuesday and set his salary.
Justice and Local Governments Team
Local Government:
Appleton Post Crescent. Kaukauna teachers union leader dismayed with layoffs
The measure requires most public employees at all levels of government to contribute 5.8 percent of their salaries toward
retirement and pay at least 12.6 percent of their health iilsurance premiums.
Board president Todd Arnoldussen said the layoffi could be reversed if the legislation withstands the legal dispute and takes
effect, saving the district hundreds of thousands of dollars.
"The Board of Education wants to make it ve1y clear that if the (col/ech've bargaining legislation) becomes lml
1
, there will be
many staff recalls, as well as a significant reduction in the proposed (maximum) tax levy,
11
Arnoldussen wrote in a statement.
Racine Journal Times. RUSD has plan to avoid $478,000 cost for sick-out
RACINE- A new Racine Unified plan announced Tuesday aims to reduce the cost of making up school time lost during a one-
day teacher sick-out from an estimated $478,000 to zero.
The new proposal would make up time by extending school days, instead of adding an extra day at the end of the year. The plan
will go before the School Board for approval Wednesday.
The dishict's previous plan, approved by the School Board in April, made up the sick-out time by extending the school year by
one day, from June 10 to June 13. The extension was slated to cost an extra $478,000 in staffing costs because employees would
be paid to work the additional day and were already paid for work during the sick-out.
Justice:
Marinette County DA Brey: Letter to DOA Sec. Huebsch
Veterans:
The Assembly plans to exec. Petersen's veterans board reorganization next week. There is expected one omnibus
amendment to make technical tweaks to ensure the secretary has control of the agency and the board terms are 4 years, not
3. It is also expected to be on the floor of the Assembly the week of May 9.
Concealed Carrv:
8/2/2011
Page 4 of4
Senator Galloway and Representative Mursau have introduced two versions of concealed carry. One requires licensure
and the other does not.
o Rep. Mursau/Sen. Galloway Propose concealed carry legislation. LRB 2033 LRB 2007
Voter ID:
o Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Photo lD bill advances in Capitol
Republicans who control the Legislature plan to pass the measure as early as next week GOP Gov. Scott Walker supports
requiring photo ID to vote.
To make its IDs compliant with the requli'ements of the Assembly bill, the University of Wisconsin-Madison would have to put
addresses on them. UW officials are reluctant to do that because the IDs include magnetic strips that open doors to dorm rooms,
and students would be at risk of break-ins if they lost them.
Racine Journal Times. Editorial: Let
1
s make voters think
Straight-party voting has spawned a kind of laziness that needs to be addressed.
While the pros and cons of Wisconsin's newest voter identification bill will once again stir up forceful debate, one provision so
far has seemed to unite people. An amendment to Assembly Bill 7 would wipe out the shortcut of filling in a party's name and
skipping the individual races in the fall general election.
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 5:32 PM
To: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Subject: RE: Kelly Smith Questions
Good!
Thanks for sharing, Erich.
--Jason
From: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 4:23 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Cc: Powers, Renee M - DOA
Subject: FW: Kelly Smith Questions
Jason,
Page 1 of3
Below are responses that I sent to Kelly Smith, the reporter from Lake Country News, regarding the Lisbon
petition. His questions are below.
Carla, Cari Anne and Mark Herman helped Renee and I craft these responses.
Thanks,
Erich
From: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2011 3:11 PM
To: 'Smith, Kelly'
Subject: Kelly Smith Questions
Kelly,
Here are responses to your two questions:
When the Incorporation Review Board was created by the Legislatnre in 2004, the Legislature gave decision-
making authority in one Board member, while allowing that person to benefit fiom the expertise of other
members who serve in an advisory capacity. As a Board, the body is subject to Wisconsin's Open Meetings Law
and holds public meetings, whereas one person acting alone would not be.
The Board has developed a drafting process which it believes fully complies with the Open Meetings Law. In
your e-mail you referred specifically to the portion of the Attorney General's Open Meetings Law Compliance
Guide concerning "walking quorums." A "walking quorum" is "where a majority of members of a body sign a
document that expressly commits them to a futnre course of action." When Board members submit written
comments to staff they are not committing to any particular course of action. Nor are the comments shared
between multiple Board members, which would be another sign of a "walking quorum." In fact, all deliberations,
including the exchange of ideas between multiple Board members, occur at public meetings. There have been
occasions in the past where Board members have changed their views during public deliberations.
Erich
From: Smith, Kelly [mailto:ksmith@jcpgroup.com]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 201112:22 PM
To: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
8/2/2011
Page2 of3
Subject: RE: Responses to your questions
Erich:
This email follows up our conversation on Friday, April 2 regarding who and how incorporation decisions are
being made.
As I understand what we discussed on Friday, a decision whether to affirm or deny a petition of incorporation is
made solely by the secretary of the agency or his or her designee who serves on the Incorporation Review
Board, rather than the other members of the board. based on Section 15.105 (23) which states is part, "All
members of the board, other than the secretary of the administration or his or her designee, serve only in an
advisory capacity"
As you have indicated, it would appear based on that sentence that the only member of the board with decision
making powers is the secretary of the administration or his or her designee. Before going any further, I do not
recall at any point during either the Richfield or Lisbon incorporation hearings were members of the public
attending the hearings told that the only member of the board with a decision making power was the secretary
of the administration or his or her designee. This does not only appear to be disingenuous but also raises the
question of what is the practical function of the remainder of the board members.
However, this interpretation also appears to be in conflict with other sections of the statue. Section 9 of
66.0203, Function of the Board, states "the board shall make any necessary investigation to apply the standards
un 66.0207. Further, it says the board shall schedule a hearing at a place or time convenient to the territory
sought to be incorporated. The statue continues "Unless the court sets a different time limit, the board shall
prepare its findings and determination, citing supporting evidence, within 180 days after receipt of the referral
from the court and payment of any fee imposed."
"The findings and determination shall be forwarded by the board to the circuit court," according to 66.0203 (9)
(d).
Section 66.0203 (9) (e) adds, "The determination of the board made in accordance with the standards
66.0205,66.0207, and 676.0217 shall be one of the following: if the board determines that the petition shall be
dismissed, the circuit court shall issue an order dismissing the petition. If the board grants the petition, the
circuit court shall order an incorporation referendum as provided in 66.0211."
Furthermore 66.0207, Standards to be applied by the board, says the board may approve a referendum only if
it determines the standards further described in that section are met.
It would appear there is a substantial conflict between what Seeton 15.105 (3) says and what is described in
numerous section of 66.0203. I would like to know how the Department of Administration resolved that conflict
and upon what administrative ruling or document the department has based its conclusion on that the only
member of the board with decision making authority is the secretary of the administration or his or her
designee.
In view of this apparent conflict, and my previous questions about the Open Meetings Law, I would like to hear
you and or the agency respond to the suggestion that you are making decisions regarding the governance of
tens of thousands of people virtually in a telephone booth and in violation of state laws intended to allow and
provide public review of this decision making process.
Thanks. Hope to hear from you soon
8/2/2011
Kelly Smith
Lake Country Publications
From: Smith, Kelly [mailto:ksmith@jcpgroup.com]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2011 8:50AM
To: Schmidtke, Erich J - DOA
Cc: Peterson, Scott; Mukwonago Chief, Eimer
Subject: RE: Responses to your questions
Erich;
Page 3 of3
Following up on our conversation of last week, Robert Dreps, a lawyer whose law firm, Godfrey and Kahn,
represents both the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and Journal Communications, has advised me that it
appears that the Incorporation Review Board's deliberation process may be in violation of the state's Open
Meetings Law.
I would refer you to the Wisconsin Attorney General's Open Meeting Compliance guide, Page 9, Section 3
"Walking quorums." The last paragraph of the section reads "where a majority of members of a body sign a
document that expressly commits them to a futme course of action, a com! could find a walking quorum violation. Huff
Correspondence, January 15,2008; see also 1-01-10, January 25,20 I 0 (use of email voting to decide matters fits
the definition of a "walking quorum" violation of the open meetings law). I would refer you to the informal opinion
issued by the Wisconsin Attorney General on January 25, 2010.
It is Mr. Dreps' opinion that the circumstances described in the AG's informal opinion of Jan. 25, 2010 are somewhat
similar to the circumstances involving the Incorporation Review Board's issuance of its findings after individual board
members review the recommendations prepared by the DOA staff. I would be interested in you or your attorney's
opinion on this matter.
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From:
Sent:
To:
Subject:
Culotta, Jason - DOA
Friday, March 25, 2011 3:22 PM
Murray, Ryan M- GOV; Jensen, Jodi - DOA
eminent domain follow up
Attachments: Examples wo names.docx
Jodi and Ryan,
This is what ATC sent me when I asked for a fiscal estimate.
DOT is trying to get us a number, but it will likely be Monday before they have one.
--Jason
From: Garvin, John [mallto:jgarvin@atcllc.com]
Sent: Friday, March 25, 201110:47 AM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA; Newson, Reggie - DOT
Cc: Tony Langenohl; Garvin, John
Subject: FW: Examples wo names
Jason and Reggie-
Here are some redacted numbers for your review. If you need case names/numbers, please let me know.
Thanks,
John
From: Andersen, Katherine L.
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:28 PM
To: Garvin, John
Cc: Kochaver, Teresa
Subject: Examples wo names
John,
Page 1 of 1
Use this version for public disclosure of examples. I've removed the landowner names and ATC's name. If we need
to prove these are real cases we can do so at a different time. Does this work for you?
Katherine L. Andersen - Managing Attorney
ATC Management Inc., corporate manager for
American Transmission Company LLC
New Street Address effective August 17, 2009
W234 N2000 Ridgeview Parkway Court
Waukesha, WI 53188-1022
262/506-6936
ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATION: The information contained in this message is privileged and
confidential. It is intended only to be read by the individual or entity named above or their designee. If the reader of this
message is not the intended recipient, you are on notice that any distribution of this message, in any form, is strictly
prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify the sender and delete or destroy any
copy of this message.
8/2/2011
I. Trials-
Case No 1.
o 89 out of9llandowners settled with Condemnor. This landowner (LO)
refused to negotiate.
o Initial offer in 2006 was $7,543.
o The condemnation commission awarded $4,800 one year later.
o Offered of$10,000 prior to trial.
o Jury awarded the $6,134.
o Because the jurisdictional offer was lower than the initial written offer, the
Condenmor was required to pay attorney's fees pursuant to the reasoning in
LaCrosse v. Benson.
o The LO submitted a demand for litigation expenses in the amount of
$116,609. The trial comi reduced the demand to $70,857, but was still
distressed that the total just compensation claimed by the landowners was
$35,000 and the attorney's fees far exceeded the maximum amount the
landowners sought to recover.
Case No.2
o Highest written offer/jurisdictional offer = $6,206
o The condenmation commission awarded $6,800.00
o The jury awarded $40,900, which award was reversed on appeal.
o Litigation expenses claimed after trial were$ 114,591.67
o After reversal on appeal, the LO's settled for the $6,800 condenmation
commission award plus $3,200 new money, for total compensation of
$10,000.
Case No.3
o ATC highest written offer/jurisdictional offer= $19,125
o Condemnation Commission Award= $15,300
o Jury Award= $35,500
o Additional compensation to the LO = $16,375 after trial
o Litigation expenses demanded= $105,507, reduced by the Court to
$99,299.39. The court commented that the case was tenibly "overtried," and
that the LO's expert "overcharged and underperformed."
Case No. 4/Two LO's
o Jurisdictional offer #1 = $29,575; Jurisdictional offer No.2= $10,950.
o Condemnation Commission Awards= $25,600 and $11,550 respectively.
o Jury awards= $82,125 and $34,470 respectively.
o Increases= $52,550 and $22,920, for total increase after trial of $75,470.
o Litigation expenses demanded= $50,357.05 + $47,916.24 for total of
$98,293.29.
II. Condemnation Commission Hearings -
Case No.5
o Highest written offer/jurisdictional offer= $4,575
o Condemnation Connnission award= $9,500
o Increase to LO = $4,925
o Litigation Expenses demanded= $19,586.24
o Reduced to $18,419.10 by the Court. The Court expressed further doubt that
the time billed for was actually used, but stated that "suspicion is not a lawful
ground for reducing a monetary claim."
Case No.6
o Highest written offer/jurisdictional offer= $10,500
o Condemnation Connnission award= $13,100
o Net increase to LO = $2,600
o Litigation Expenses claimed $13,518.47, of which $6,184.77 was for the
attomey and $7,333.70 for LO appraiser.
Case No.7
o LO appraisal = $46,650
o Condemnor appraisal= $4,500
o Highest written offer/jurisdictional offer = $6,525
o Condemnation Connnission Award= $8,625
o Increase to LO = $2,100
o Litigation expenses demanded= $18,257.79 (and rising)
o Atty proposes to recover fees billed to this LO for work that was performed in
other clients' cases (where litigation expenses not recovered), presumably on
the theory that all work atty does for one client benefits all other clients. Atty
did not meet the 15% threshold in the "other" cases.
Case No.8
o Highest written offer/jurisdictional offer= $22,200
o Condemnation Commission award= $21,200
o Litigation expenses demanded: Appraiser= $2,549.90 for first appraisal and
$6,218.40 after Condemnation Commission hearing; Atty = $19,200 for total
of $27,968.30.
o This LO was asked to surrender his entire just compensation award to "cover
legal fees." The LO stated that he held off discussing his case with other LO's
out of concern that "the attomey may 'adjust' or increase the fee amount."
The LO further offered that "if someone seems uncertain about who to trust or
how the challenge process occurs in practical terms, please consider sharing
my name and number as a resource to them. It may only be a five minute
conversation, but by sharing my experience about the process, I could
potentially save a landowner substantial time and
III. Jurisdictional Offer "too high" cases:
Attomey has argued in three cases that the condemnor's jurisdictional offer was not
"based on" its appraisal as required in 32.06(2)(b ), i.e., the jurisdictional offer was too
high. In all cases the condemnor offered more than the amount of just compensation
indicated in the appraisals. These higher offers benefited all parties by attempting to
avoid litigation. However, they resulted in the atty not winning attomey's fees in any of
the three cases.
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent:
To:
Wednesday, March 16, 2011 11:13 AM
Jacque, Andre- LEGIS
Subject: RE: Draft Response
Too long.
From: Jacque, Andre [mailto:Andre.Jacque@legis.wisconsin.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:44AM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: FW: Draft Response
Jason,
Any thoughts/suggestions on this (going to those in opposition)?
Thanks!
Andre
From: Jacque, Andre
Sent: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 4:42AM
To: Murphy, Michael
Subject: Draft Response
Subject: Thank you for contacting me regarding Special Session Senate Bill 11 - the Budget Correction Bill
Thank you for contacting me to share your thoughts on Special Session Senate Bill11, otherwise known as Governor
Walker's Budget Repair Bill. Thousands of district residents have called, e-mailed, or visited with me personally to discuss
the bill, ask questions, and share their thoughts both in support and opposition. While I have tried my hardest to return
calls, meet with people personally, and respond to e-mails, the sheer volume has been a challenge to manage. I
appreciate everyone's patience as I work to respond by calling as many individuals as possible each day while managing
all of my legislative responsibilities. I also want to share with you some general thoughts and information on many of the
questions that have been asked. As the legislative process on these issues continues within the regular budget
deliberations, I hope the information below is helpful.
I do not take the issue before us lightly. I have served as a public employee for the past five years prior to my election to
the State Assembly. My father is a public employee union member, and my mother is a former public school teacher. The
recently enacted changes will require most state and local government employees, including myself and my parents, to
pay the same greater portion of health care premium costs and higher contribution toward pensions, and will have a
substantial effect on my family's budget. In addition, the retirement formula for elected officials has rightly been reduced to
the same 1.6 factor as most public employees.
Having been criticized during both the primary and general elections for my public; sector experience, I am not been one to
vilify public employees of any profession, or forget their outstanding contributions to our community. However,
Wisconsin's budget problems require very difficult decisions, with no easy options. The private sector as a whole has
experienced the economic downturn to a greater depth than many of its counterparts in public service. This is not to
blame public employees for their benefits or job stability, but to present the reality that comes from a private sector that
relies on profit for survival, and a public sector which does not.
Unfortunately, due to past mismanagement by both political parties, Wisconsin's budget has become unsustainable.
Whether it was Gov. McCallum's use of tobacco settlement funds or Gov. Doyle's utilization of stimulus dollars (and 10%
increase in state spending), the application of one-time funding for ongoing state operating expenses, along with
segregated fund raids, has left Wisconsin with a structural deficit ($137 Million for the current biennium through the end of
June, and $3.6 Billion for the following two years) that has been further exacerbated by a lagging national economy.
Substantial cuts in many areas will be needed to restore a firm financial footing, and the five largest areas of state funding
are K-12 Education (38%), Shared Revenue and Tax Levy Credits (13%), Medical Assistance (9%), Adult and Juvenile
Corrections (9%), and the UW System (7%). Since employee salary and fringe benefits currently comprise more than
60% of state government's general purpose revenue operation costs and more than 75% of total school district
1
expenditures statewide, I support increased public employee benefits contributions as a way to avoid several thousand
layoffs at the state and local levels in both the short and long term that would otherwise occur.
Many who have contacted me in both support and opposition to the Governor's proposal have rightly pointed to the
exemption of public employees in protective service (police, fire, county sheriff, state patrol) as a glaring inconsistency in
treatment. While it may not be in my best political interest to do so, I agree, and have stated from the beginning (and in
the Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter) that from a fairness standpoint all public employees should make the same shared
sacrifice. I appreciate their service and trust in their professionalism. However I do not see this as partisan political
payback: there are 314 fire and police unions in Wisconsin, and only four of them endorsed Governor Walker last fall.
To answer a frequent question, the tax bills enacted by bi-partisan majorities of the legislature and Governor Walker earlier
this year have a $0 impact on the current fiscal year, which is what the budget repair bill was proposed to address. When
read in isolation, the Legislative Fiscal Bureau memo does show a projected $121.4 million general fund gross balance for
June 30, 2011 and a net balance of $56.4 million. However, the rest of the memo spells out at least $315.7 million in
unpaid bills or expected shortfalls in programs such as Medicaid services for the needy (153.2 million alone), corrections,
and the public defender's office. The State of Wisconsin was facing a $137 million budget shortfall through the end of June
2011 before passage of the bills, and it is facing a $137 million budget shortfall after enactment of the legislation. The
economic growth bills cited do not apply to this fiscal year. Among these initiatives are conforming Healthcare Savings
Accounts to federal tax deductibility (we were the last state in the union to do so), providing a two-year state income tax
exclusion for companies relocating to Wisconsin (i.e. we would likely not have received significant additional state tax
income without providing the incentive), and providing a small per-employee tax credit for companies hiring additional
positions. Gov. Walker's current proposal also leaves intact the state imposed tax increases from Gov. Doyle's previous
budget on both businesses and higher income individuals. Contrary to what has been said in some emails, it is the federal
government and not state funds that have been used to bail out Wall Street investment firms or mortgage speculators.
I do believe that some collectively-bargained provisions do have a fiscal effect on state agencies and local governments
that can impede their ability to manage their budgets.
*You may have heard that the highest paid employee in the City of Madison in 2009 was a bus driver who earned
$159,258 including $109,892 in overtime pay. Or that WI Department of Corrections employees have a contract provision
that allows them to call in sick, then report to work and collect two and half times their hourly rate in overtime (the cost to
taxpayers of this provision alone is $4.8 Million).
*Currently, many school districts participate in the (state teacher's union-run) WEA Trust because it is stipulated in their
contracts and is virtually impossible to bargain out. If school districts enrolled in the state employee health plan with
comparable benefits, it would save school districts tens of millions of dollars each year.
*Due to a 1982 provision of their collective bargaining agreement, Milwaukee Public School teachers (who average more
than $100,000 a year in total compensation) actually receive two pensions upon retirement instead of one. The
contribution to the second pension is equal to 4.2% of a teacher's salary, with the school district making 100% of the
contribution, just like they do for the first pension. This extra benefit costs taxpayers more than $16 million per year.
*Collective bargaining in the public sector has also allowed a number of union grievances to proceed, at considerable
taxpayer expense, arguing against the dismissal of newly convicted felons and sex offenders, the use of contracting for
supplemental municipal plowing following during a more than 2-foot snowfall during a two day blizzard earlier this year, and
the use of prison labor for mowing traffic medians.
That being said, there is common sense and purpose to many provisions that can be enshrined in state statute and local
ordinances or otherwise continued, and I am very supportive of continuing to examine the possibilities for doing so. I was
pleased to receive confirmation that existing provisions of the state collective bargaining agreements that have been in
place, excepting contributions for pensions, health care and union dues, are being maintained and that similar efforts are
taking place with many local units of government. Government exists for the effective and efficient provision of services to
its citizens, and while it must reflect its constituency's ability to pay, I have trust that it will also fairly consider employees'
workplace conditions. And since collective bargaining under the bill that was passed will continue for wages, at least up to
inflation, it would not be difficult for there to be at least some expansion to that through changes to the regular budget and
upcoming legislation. I am soliciting and personally examining existing collective bargaining language as the discussion of
changes to the upcoming biennial budget move forward. As major legislation is frequently modified even after passage,
and the regular budget has the same force of law and corrective ability as the budget repair proposal, this ongoing scrutiny
and dialogue will still continue, as had always been expected, despite whatever hurt feelings there may be by legislators on
either side of the aisle.
Current retirees and existing employee contracts cannot and will not be impacted by the recently-passed legislation. The
provisions included in the bill will only go into effect after an existing contract comes to an end, however, over the last
decade the average state employee contract has been signed 15 months late. These typical delays are actually part of the
2
roots of the current conflict. After state employee contracts were quickly ratified after the November elections (following
months of inaction) and attempts to push them through a still Democrat-controlled legislature in a lame duck session in
December failed, I and others hope that AFSCME Wisconsin leader Marty Beil would rescind his public statements of
unwillingness to negotiate and that both management and labor could work together to hammer out an agreement, or, at
the very least prepare a "last best offer" for consideration by the legislature, something which never happened. And once
Wisconsin became a proxy war for similar issues at the national level, lines of communication for good faith negotiation
were severely damaged within the particular context that emerged: Senate Republicans could not compromise
substantially without setting a precedent for future "rewards" for a minority party to leave, or threaten to leave, the state;
Senate Democrats could not return politically without receiving concessions that they knew could not really be offered until
a later date.
State politics remains an imperfect process, and while it would be nice if budget repair bills did not frequently take place in
speedy special sessions (the 2009 budget repair bill, which enacted several major tax increases, went from introduction to
Governor Doyle's signature within 72 hours without a hearing), this has yet to be the case. I am happy that the Joint
Finance Committee, following its 17 hour hearing on this year's budget repair proposal, decided to make a number of
improvements to the bill that I had requested, including increased legislative oversight of state agencies and the extension
of civil service protections to all public sector employees. Wisconsin's civil service protections are among the strongest
and most comprehensive in the nation, and afford strong due process protections and the ability to seek redress on
matters of discipline, termination (including a rigorous "just cause" standard), and workplace safety.
Thank you for reading my thoughts on these issues, and for the valuable input you and other constituents have provided
me from a very broad spectrum of viewpoints. Whether you agree with me on all, some, or none of the points I have
presented, I welcome your thoughts and will do my best to help move Wisconsin in the right direction for all of its citizens,
at this truly interesting and challenging time in our state's history.
Sincerely,
Andre Jacque
State Representative
2nd District
3
Page I of2
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2011 3:43 PM
To: Kloiber, Bill- DOA
Subject: RE: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
Me.
From: Kloiber, Bill - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 201112:12 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: FW: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
who does Housing?
Bill Kloiber
Deputy Director
State of Wisconsin
Office of State - Federal Relations
(202) 624- 5870
Hall of States
444 N. Capitol St., NW
Suite 613
Washington, DC 20001-1581
From: Szubrowski, Jennifer L [mailto:Jennifer.L.Szubrowski@hud.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2011 11:05 AM
Subject: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
Dear Senior Staff,
On behalf of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Deputy Secretary Ron
Sims, I am inviting you and the Governor to join a conference call on Wednesday, March 30th from 4-5
PM EST for a briefing on Choice Neighborhoods with Deputy Secretary Sims and senior HUD staff. As
you may know, HUD made funding award announcements for Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grants
this past Friday, March 18th. Choice Neighborhoods is a central element of the Administration's inter-
agency's Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative.
Participant Dial-in:
8/2/2011
Page2 of2
Conference ID Number:--
Please RSVP to me at Jennifer.L.Szubrowski@Hud.go\1 and let me know if you have any questions. I hope that
you will be able to join.
Thank You,
Leigh Szubrowski
LEIGH SZUBROWSKI
Office ofthe Secretary I Office of Intergovernmental Affairs & Public Engagement
US Department of Housing and Urban Development
451 7th Street, SW
Room 10148
Washington, D.C. 20410
8/2/2011
Page 1 of2
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 4:44 PM
To: Kitzman, Nick- GOV
Subject: daily update
Economic Development and Regulatorv Reform Team
-
DATCP
Met with the Farmers Union today
DNR
They have a number of concerns about the Budget and the Budget Repair Bills, all of which they
see as harmful to farmers
BadgerCare cuts (needed for family farmers)
elimination of PACE and conversion fees (because they oppose development)
reduction in rural school funds (fear the collapse of rural school districts)
T h ~ health care team will get in touch with Kara Slaughter, the gov't relation person at Farmers
Union
They:would like to see an end to direct payments, a provision of the federal Farm Bill (up for renewal
in 2012)
Sulfur Dioxide air quality standard
New standards were formulated for S02 by EPA on June 2, 2010.
The Governor is required to make a recommendation by June 2, 2011 demonstrating what parts of the
state in compliance, out of compliance, or that we just don't known enough about
To make the June 2nd timeline, a technical document must be submitted to the Legislature for their
review and a public hearing must be held on that document and public comment received.
This technical document is ready now for submission to the Legislature.
EPA will issue final designations for the S02 standards based on the states' recommendations on June
2, 2012.
The Great Lakes Commission held a meeting last week
DOT
o No Wisconsin appointees have been made, so there was no state representation
o Todd Ambs attended the conference as a citizen
o This is one of the vehicles through which DNR would like to challenge EPA policy along with other
Midwestern states.
Federal Transit Funding
o Received a letter from the Amalgamated Transit Union to John Lund, Office of Labor-Management
Standards, U.S. Dept. of Labor
o Regarding concerns on the collective bargaining provision in the Budget Repair Bill
o Cites court decision in 1982 between Jackson Transit Authority and local union
o ATU is claiming that the local union (in this case, in Wausau) reserves the right seek any
"appropriate remedy" or relief, to withdrawal from certification and the denial of any further funding to
Wausau
Hwy 23 Detour in Princeton
8/2/2011
o DOT changed detour route, as a result of a business and community effort making the case that a
particular business and its community residents would be extremely affected by the previously
planned detour
Page2 of2
ReaiiD
o Federal compliance certification date has been changed to January 2013
-
Commerce
Centergy - Central Wisconsin Alliance for Economic Development
8/2/2011
o Group came to the Capitol to hear remarks from Ryan Murray on the budget repair bill, the budget,
and overall economic development issues in WI
Page 1 of2
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2011 3:44 PM
To: Yahn, Nate- GOV
Cc: Darren Easton
Subject: FW: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
Nate and Darren,
Just wanted to make you aware of this call.
--Jason
From: Kloiber, Bill - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 20111:01 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
From: Szubrowski, Jennifer L [mailto:Jennifer.L.Szubrowski@hud.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:04 AM
Subject: Choice Neighborhoods Briefing Conference Call with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development Deputy Secretary Ron Sims - 3/30 at 4 PM EST
Dear Senior Staff,
On behalf of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Deputy Secretary Ron
Sims, I am inviting you and the Governor to join a conference call on Wednesday, March 3oth from 4-5
PM EST for a briefing on Choice Neighborhoods with Deputy Secretary Sims and senior HUD staff. As
you may know, HUD made funding award announcements for Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grants
this past Friday, March 18
1
h. Choice Neighborhoods is a central element of the Administration's inter-
agency's Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative.
Participant Dial-in:
Conference ID Numbe
Please RSVP to me at Jennifer.L.Szubrowski@Hud.gov and let me know if you have any questions. I hope that
you will be able to join.
Thank You,
Leigh Szubrowski
LEIGH SZUBROWSKI
Office of the Secretary I Office of Intergovernmental Affairs & Public Engagement
US Department of Housing and Urban Development
451 7th Street, SW
8/2/2011
Room 10148
Washington, D.C. 20410
8/2/2011
Page2 of2
Page 1 of 1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2011 2:59 PM
To: O'Donnell, Jessica L-OSER
Subject: FW: OSER question and answer document
Jessica,
I'm sorry to bother you again, but one of my employees would like to get an official response to the question
below.
Thanks,
--Jason
267-1824
From: Herreid, Peter E - DOA
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2011 9:57AM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA; DOA DL All DIR Division
Subject: RE: OSER question and answer document
Jason,
First, I appreciate that you are sharing the burden of compensation cuts.
I could not find an answer in the OSER FAQ sheet to this question I posed last week:
Given the cap on wages and loss of collective bargaining rights for benefits in the budget repair bill, should state
workers expect further cuts to their compensation in the future?
Thanks for taking questions,
Peter
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 4:27 PM
To: DOA DL All DIR Division
Subject: OSER question and answer document
DIR Team:
Today, the Office of State Employment Relations issued a Frequently Asked Questions Bulletin regarding
implications of the 2009-2011 Budget Repair Bill.
It is available at: http://oser.state.wi.us/docview.asp?docid=7209
Please feel free to follow up with me with any additional questions.
Thanks,
--Jason
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 5:24PM
To: Liedl, Kimberly - GOV
Subject: FW: UW
From: Cosh, William A. [mailto:coshwa@doj.state.wi.us]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:07 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: FW: UW
Jason-
FYI.
I just got the following from Todd.
Bill
-------------
From: Richmond, Todd [mailto:TRichmond@ap.org]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 4:04 PM
To: Cosh, William A.
Subject: UW
Page 1 of2
MILWAUKEE (AP) University of Wisconsin leaders have asked Gov.
Scott Walker not to spin off the flagship UW-Madison campus from the
rest of the system, saying the potential move would create
unnecessary competition that would hurt all the Wisconsin colleges.
'!! Three UW leaders wrote to Walker on Tuesday saying it had "come
to our attention" that Walker would propose removing the Madison
university from the larger system as part of his budget proposal next
week.
'!! "We want to express strong concerns about this significant
restructuring, especially without broad consultation and careful
deliberation," said the letter signed by Board of Regents President
Charles Pruitt and Vice President Mike Spector and UW System
President Kevin Reilly, a copy of which was obtained Wednesday by The
Associated Press.
'!! Walker spokesman Cullen Werwie told AP on Wednesday he couldn't
confirm anything about the budget.
'!! "Lots of the details of the UW System including funding and
flexibility will be released in the governor's budget, which will be
introduced on Tuesday," he said.
'!! Spinning off UW-Madison likely would mean it would be run by a
separate board whose members could be handpicked by Walker, which
8/2/2011
could give the Republican governor more control over how the
university is run.
Page 2 of2
Walker has been aggressive in his first six weeks in office.
Thousands of people have come to the Capitol this week to protest a
bill that would strip most public employees of their collective
bargaining rights. He signed a bill earlier this month that gives
Wisconsin companies a nominal tax break for every new job they add.
He signed two other tax cut bills in January, one that wipes out
corporate and personal income taxes for companies that relocate to
Wisconsin and another that eliminated state income taxes on
contributions to health savings accounts.
The University of Wisconsin system has 13 four-year universities
and 13 two-year universities, along with a stateside UW Extension
program. The system has almost 182,000 students, of which about 23
percent are at UW-Madison.

Todd Richmond
P.O. Box 962
Madison, WI 53701-0962
608-255-3679 (ofc)
The information contained in this communication is intended for the
use
of the designated recipients named above. If the reader of this
communication is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
that you have received this communication in error, and that any
review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is
strictly
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please
notify The Associated Press immediately by telephone at +1-212-621-
1898
and delete this e-mail. Thank you.
[IP_US DISC]msk dccc60c6d2c3a6438f0cf467d9a4938
8/2/2011
Page 1 of 1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 5:36PM
To: Kitzman, Nick- GOV
Subject: daily report
Economic Development and Regulatory Reform Team
Commerce
Centergy - Central Wisconsin Alliance for Economic Development
o Spoke to Barb Fleisner- Executive Director about her group wanting to set up a meeting with the
governor and business leaders
o Dorothy and scheduling is aware and has received the group's request
Spoke with Jeff Lyon on the three WHEDA ag lending proposals
DOT
1. Sec. Brance\ will verify with us tomorrow whether they're ready to share with legislators or need
modification
Met with a representative of the State Engineers Assn.
o They have a study showing at least $5 million Trans Fund SEG could be saved by using fewer
consultants
o Will pursue the matter with Reggie Newson
Former (D) Senator Goyke is working with Sen. Erpenbach on the State potentially losing FED
transit funding as a result of the of eliminating collective bargaining rights
o We have the opinion that the Fed is wrong on this issue and the Budget Repair Bill is compliant with
federal code
SB 15 and AB 18: Data Collection
o State Patrol to testify on informational basis only during Friday's committee hearing
o DOT and State Patrol will not pub/ical/y or privately oppose a potential amendment that would
eliminate the primary seatbelt enforcement provision
Hwy 23 reconstruction detour in Princeton, WI
o Business owner from Princeton working towards a "Citizens Preferred" detour, instead of the original
proposed by DOT
o Sent information to Reggie Newson to make him aware of situation
JOBS Hotline
First Name Last Name
Paul Craig
Ken Pierson
8/2/2011
Description of Call
says he is losing his job as a teacher
because of the budget repair bill; as a result
he is also closing his business because he
needs to find a new job
called JH earlier; has not heard from
Commerce
Comments
Contacted by
GOV; \efta
message
Contacted by
GOV; forwarded to
Nate Yahn for
Commerce action
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2011 12:05 PM
To: Herreid, Peter E - DOA
Subject: RE: OSER question and answer document
Peter,
I track a response down for you.
--Jason
From: Herreid, Peter E - DOA
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2011 9:57 AM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA; DOA DL All DIR Division
Subject: RE: OSER question and answer document
Jason,
First, I appreciate that you are sharing the burden of compensation cuts.
I could not find an answer in the OSER FAQ sheet to this question I posed last week:
Page 1 of 1
Given the cap on wages and loss of collective bargaining rights for benefits in the budget repair bill, should state
workers expect further cuts to their compensation in the future?
Thanks for taking questions,
Peter
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 4:27 PM
To: DOA DL All DIR Division
Subject: OSER question and answer document
DIR Team:
Today, the Office of State Employment Relations issued a Frequently Asked Questions Bulletin regarding
implications of the 2009-2011 Budget Repair Bill.
It is available at: bllp://oser.state.wi.us/docview.asp?docid=7209
Please feel free to follow up with me with any additional questions.
Thanks,
--Jason
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason- DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 2:28PM
To: Isaacson, Lee A- DOA
Subject: FW: questions
Lee,
I'm sorry, but I just found out I was supposed to forward these questions to you!
We had an all-division meeting yesterday and these questions were posed to me by employees.
Again, I apologize for not having sent them to you first.
--Jason
From: O'Donnell, Jessica L - OSER
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 5:12 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: RE: questions
I will forward these employee questions to OSER stafffor inclusion in a Q/A document
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:10 PM
To: O'Donnell, Jessica L - OSER
Subject: questions
Jessica,
Page 1 ofl
I just left a message for you, but I had a meeting of my DOA division today and was asked a number of questions
regarding the proposed benefit and collective bargaining changing in the budget repair bill.
Could you help walk me through the answers to these questions?
Thanks,
--Jason
267-1824
L Is the health insurance contribution tied to a health risk assessment?
Is the health risk assessment taken with blood lipid or blood pressure?
Is the health risk assessment assessing an individual's health, or how an individual health plan is
structured?
2. Does the health risk assessment apply to pre-existing conditions?
3. Without collective bargaining rights, what's to stop further loss of health insurance coverage?
4. Does the CPI index apply to non-represented employees?
5. Do the benefit changes for health Insurance and pension contributions apply to legislators now, or must they
stand for re-election before those changes are made?
6. Will the budget repair bill undue the rules regarding seniority status during layoffs? For instance, if someone with
more seniority gets laid off, will they still be able to "bump" someone with less seniority doing a different job?
7. Will similar workplace rules negotiated into statute by the unions still apply?
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 2:36PM
To: Isaacson, Lee A- DOA
Subject: FW: Questions about Budget Repair Bill
And a few more questions to add to my earlier list.
From: Herreid, Peter E - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 2:33 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: Questions about Budget Repair Bill
Jason,
Page 1 of 1
I think writing my questions down might help clarify what I was/am asking and make it easier for you to answer.
Assuming the budget repair bill passes,
How long will the new healthcare premium rates and employee pension contribution rates remain locked in
place?
If the public employee union is not re-certified, will individual employees (theoretically) be able to negotiate
a salary above the rise in CPI without a referendum?
Should a public employee assume that his/her total compensation will continually decrease in the future,
because salary increases may not exceed CPI and there will be no collective bargaining protections for the
benefits? If not, how so?
Thanks for fielding questions.
Peter
Peter Herreid
Grant Administrator
608.267.3369
Comprehensive Planning Grant Program
Wisconsin Land l.nformation Program
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley- GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 1:56PM
To: Kraus, Jennifer- DOA
Subject: RE: benefit and bargaining questions
Jenny,
Thank you! OSER is working on a Q & A response packet, but I appreciate your quick response.
May I send you one more question I received from a county lobbyist on this?
--Jason
From: Kraus, Jennifer- DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 20111:51 PM
To: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Subject: RE: benefit and bargaining questions
Page 1 of2
Jason - I'm assuming that these are from staff - here's the answers but you may want to check in with Cindy
Archer about how employees are getting answers so that the message is consistent.
#1 and #2 -05ER and ETF have to work out the design of the HRAs
#3 - health insurance coverage will be under management control - significant erosion of coverage will impact
the ability to attract and retain needed staff.
#4 CPI does not apply to non-reps -they would be covered as they are now under the comp plan
#5 increase in contributions apply now but change in forumla multiplier apply with new terms
#6 - civil service provisions are untouched
#7 not sure about this one -workplace rules in the statute are not changing (see #6) but they may be referring
to workplace rules that are in collective bargaining agreements --the plan there is to at least temporarily keep all
of the existing provisions from the collective bargaining agreements (except health and pension contributions, of
course) until OSER can sort through them all and create a totally new comp plan.
Hope that helps -Jenny
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 20111:31 PM
To: Kraus, Jennifer- DOA
Subject: benefit and bargaining questions
Jenny,
Hear the Madison schools left you with no choice but to stay home today!
I'm told you are THE expert on the questions about the proposed state employee benefit and collective bargaining
changes.
Could you help me address the following questions?
Thanks,
--Jason
7-1824
1. Is the health insurance contribution tied to a health risk assessment?
Is the health risk assessment taken with blood lipid or blood pressure?
8/2/2011
Page2 of2
Is the health risk assessment assessing an individual's health, or how an individual health plan is
structured?
2. Does the health risk assessment apply to pre-existing conditions?
3. Without collective bargaining rights, what's to stop further loss of health insurance coverage?
4. Does the CPI index apply to non-represented employees?
5. Do the benefit changes for health insurance and pension contributions apply to legislators now, or must
they stand for re-election before those changes are made?
6. Will the budget repair bill undue the rules regarding seniority status during layoffs? For instance, if
someone with more seniority gets laid off, will they still be able to "bump" someone with less seniority doing
a different job?
7. Will similar workplace rules negotiated into statute by the unions still apply?
8/2/2011
Page 1 of 1
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Culotta, Jason - DOA
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 1:31 PM
To: Kraus, Jennifer- DOA
Subject: benefit and bargaining questions
Jenny,
Hear the Madison schools left you with no choice but to stay home today! .
I'm told you are THE expert on the questions about the proposed state employee benefit and collective bargaining
changes.
Could you help me address the following questions?
Thanks,
--Jason
7-1824
1. Is the health insurance contribution tied to a health risk assessment?
Is the health risk assessment taken with blood lipid or blood pressure?
Is the health risk assessment assessing an individual's health, or how an individual health plan is
structured?
2. Does the health risk assessment apply to pre-existing conditions?
3. Without collective bargaining rights, what's to stop further loss of health insurance coverage?
4. Does the CPI index apply to non-represented employees?
5. Do the benefit changes for health insurance and pension contributions apply to legislators now, or must
they stand for re-election before those changes are made?
6. Will the budget repair bill undue the rules regarding seniority status during layoffs? For instance, if
someone with more seniority gets laid off, will they still be able to "bump" someone with less seniority doing
a different job?
7. Will similar workplace rules negotiated into statute by the unions still apply?
8/2/2011
Downing, Karley- GOV
From:
Sent:
Newson, Reggie- DOT
Monday, April 11, 2011 4:33 PM
To:
Subject:
Murray, Ryan M - GOV; Culotta, Jason - DOA; Himebauch, Casey- GOV
FW: Communities impacted by potential loss of federal transit funding
Attachments: summary of labor agreements.xlsx
FYI.
Best,
Reggie
From: Currie, Monique - DOT
Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011 4:31 PM
To: Newson, Reggie - DOT; Berg, Michael - DOT; Gottlieb, Mark - DOT
Cc: Meier, Joan - DOT; Alley, John - DOT; Trombino, Paul - DOT; Wolfgram, Mark - DOT
Subject: Communities impacted by potential loss of federal transit funding
Dear Reggie,
As requested, please here are the 4 communities which we believe will be impacted by Wisconsin Act 10 and the
potential for lost federal operating assistance for their transit systems in 2011:
Maximum federal dollars
lost
Transit System
City of Kenosha Bus System $ 2,900,000
City of Manitowoc Bus System $ 1,100,000
Ozaukee County Shared Ride Taxi $ 630,000
Grant County Shared Ride Taxi $ 41,000
Total $ 4,671,000
By 2014 when all of the existing collective bargaining agreements expire, it is estimated that 18 transit
systems will no longer be eligible for up to $32.7 million in federal transit aid. A list of these is available in the
attached excel spreadsheet.
~
summqry of labor
agreements.xl ...
Please note that since our meeting in your office on April4, the City of Manitowoc's attorney has contacted us. She
believes that through a resolution by the city council, the city could incorporate terms and conditions acceptable to the
local labor union which would preserve rights. She has asked for further guidance from US DOL, but her calls have not
been returned. We do not believe this is a strategy on which to "hang your hat." Even if the city and the local transit
union {Teamsters) can come to an agreement via a city council resolution, the national union can still file an objection.
Further, none of the dollar amounts include the impact on federal transit capital assistance. If transit systems are
1
ineligible to receive operating transit assistance, they will also not be eligible to receive federal transit capital
assistance.
Please contact me with questions.
Sincerely,
Monique Currie
Program Manager
Bureau of Transit, Local Roads, Railroads & Harbors
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
4802 Sheboygan Ave, Room 951
Madison WI 53707
608-267-7345
FAX: 608-266-0658
monique.currie@dot.wi.gov
2
List of Tier A and B Transit Systems potentially impacted by end of municipal collective bargaining in Wisconsin Act 10
Maximum An ,unt Qualify for (ie. 50% of deficit)
Federal Funding
Municipal Municipal
Potentially
Transit System
Collective Collective
Impacted by
Bargaining Bargaining Privately
End of Muncipal CY2010 Federal funding
Agreement for Agreement for Contracted Who is subject to municipal-collective Collective Federal up to 50% of
2011? 2012? services bargaining? Bargaining Beginning? Notes Funding deficit 2011
Appleton y, y, ADA ?aratransit
Transit operations and maintenance
and Demand
employees, and municipal non-
Response (JARC)
management employees whose salaries
are funded with federal transit
asssistance. Yes 2013 $ 2,549,529 $ 3,310,526
Beloit
10nsanu malt'l enanc ..
employees, and municipal non-
management employees whose salaries
Yes expires are funded with federal transit
12/31/2011 No None asssistance. Yes 2012 $ 636,473 $ 847,613
Ch.ippewa Falls
City employee who oversees operations
and funded with federal transit$ is
represented by a municipal cotlective Funds distributed by Eau
2011 2012 Transit Operations bargaining agreement. Yes 2012 claire/Chippewa Falls UZA $ 145,362 $ 143,517
Eau Claire
rans1 opera 1ons an malt'l enance
employees, and municipal non-
management employees whose salaries
Yes through ADA Paratransit are funded with federal transit
y,
6/2012 Only asssistance. Yes 2012 $ 1,686,625 $ 2,210,940
Fond duLac Yes No None
rans1 operations ano ma1m:enance
employees, and municipal non-
Yes 2012
management employees whose salaries
are funded with federal transit
asssistance. $ 526,562 $ 680,508
Green Bay
rans1 operations anu malt'l,enance
employees, and municipal non-
management employees whose salaries
Transit are funded with federal transit
y., y., Management asssistance. Yes 2013 $ 2,677,473 $ 3,484,139
Janesville
Transit operations and maintenance .
y., y., None employees Yes 2013 $ 918,981 $ 1,266,242
Kenosha
ADA Paratransit Transit and maintenance $2.3 million in federal transit
No No bnly employees Yes 2011 funding for 2010 $ 2,314,318 $ 2,922,081 $ 2,922,081
La crosse
ADA Paratransit Transit Operations and maintenance
y., y., Only employees Yes. 2012 $ 1,934,091 $ 2,545,603
Madison
rans1 opera 1ons anc malt'l,enance
employees, and municipal non-
management employees whose salaries
Yes extended Some ADA are funded with federal
"'
until3/2014 Paratransit asssistance. Yes. 2014 $ 7,065,939 $ 7,065,939
Milwaukee
Transit
County
Operations, ADA Transit operations and maintenance
No No Paratranstt employees No. NA $ -
Monona
Laio1aw contract, transit mgr"' dnance
State money may/may not be subject to collective
State money only only Transit Operations bargaining No NA $ $ -
Oshkosh
ADA Paratransit Transit Operations and maintenance
"'
No. Only employees Yes 2012 $ 1,576,066 $ 1,748,146
onalaska
y.,
No Transit Operations None
Ozaukee
County No No Transit Operations Shared-Ride-Tax! Mechanics
Racine
Commuter NA NA Transit Operations None
Racine Belle
Urban
Transit Operations
y., y., and Management None
Sheboygan
Yes- expires Transit Operations and maintenance
12/31/2011 No. None employees
Stoughton
Transit
state funding state funding Management and
only only Operations
sun Prairie
Transit
state funding state funding Management and
only only Operations operations all contracted out
Superior
Transit
Management and
NA NA Operations
Verona
state funding state funding
only only Transit Operations Contract with Madison Metro for seNice
Waukesha
Transit
Operations,
Maintenance, and
No. No. Supervision None
Wausau
Yes extended ADA Paratransit Operations and maintenance are
y., until 6/30/2013 only covered.
Washington
(Quntv
y.,
? Transit Operations None
No
y.,
2011
No NA
No NA
Yes 2012
No NA
No NA
No NA
No
No NA
Yes 2013
No NA
Grand
Funds distributed by La
Crosse UZA
Rejected contract extension
thru 2013 in April 2010
Effects will be the same as
Madison Metro
$ 630,177
$ -
$ 1,409,263
$ -
$
$ -
$ -
$ 1,395,147
0
$ 25,466,005
Tier A/B
Tier C
Total
nerA/B
nerC
New Total if ManitoWoc not impacted
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
~
$
$
~
$
630,177 $ 630,177
1,858,665
-
-
1,846,408
by_2014
.. f O ~ r ~ i O i i
$ 3,552,258
2,154,714 $ 1,145,818
32,715,214 $ 4,698,075
30,560,500 $ 3,552,258
1,050,218 $ 41,322
31,610,718 $ 3,593,579
List ofTier C (rural) systems currently receiving federal Section 5311 & potentially impacted by Wisconsin Act 10
Transit system
Municipal Collective Municipal Collective
Bargaining Bargaining Privately Contracted Who is subject to municipal
Federal Funding
Potentially Impacted
by End of Muncipal Max federal amt
Agreement for 2011? Agreement for 2012? Services collective bargaining? Collective Bargaining Beginning at SO% of deficit 2011
operations and
maintenance employees, a.nd
municipal nob-management
employees whose salaries are
Wisconsin I
clerical unit.
not sure if they are
by Act 10. Staff
assurances from
union rep that the
in place until
:heir collective I
$ 41,322 $ 41,322
$ 1,104,496 $ 1,104,496
$ 100,834
Unsure
I I
$ 117,729
2012 2013
$ 100,834
$117,729
Stevens Point Yes Yes None ''""" u""'""u"' ""u
maintenance employees, and
municipal
employees whose salaries are
funded with federal transit
asssistance.
* not all Tier C systems are shown, only those with potential labor issues
Yes
2013
Total
if Manitowoc not impacted Total
$
$
790,334
2,154,714 $ 1,145,818
$ 1,050,218 $ 41,322
$790,334
Page 1 of6
Downing, Karley - GOV
From: Adam Raschka [adam@raschka.usl
Sent: Tuesday, April12, 2011 3:12PM
To: WCCA
Subject: E-Channels- Apri112, 2011
Welcome toE-Channels, a periodic e-newsletter designed to provide links to selected
miicles of interest to WCCA members.
Wisconsin Finds the National Spotlight
Just six short months ago, Wisconsin was at the epicenter of the most dramatic shift of state power
during the 2010-midterm elections. Both the state Assembly and state Senate switched from democrat
to republican control and Scott Walker became the first republican elected governor of Wisconsin since
1998.
Governor Walker took this dramatic victory as a mandate. He began by immediately calling the
legislature into special session to pass a series of reforms aimed at jumpstarting the economy. In just six
shmi weeks, the legislature passed nearly a dozen pieces of legislation at an unprecedented pace;
however, the Governor's boldest move was yet to come.
A little more than a week before he was set to introduce his $60 billion 2011-13 biennial budget,
Governor Walker introduced a budget repair bill designed to set the table for his biennial budget. This
bill, which he had planned to introduce and sign into law in the week leading up to his address,
includedcontroversial provisions requiring state employees to increase both their pension and heath care
contributions as well as relinquishing many oftheircollective bargaining rights.
As anyone could imagine, Walker's proposal was highly controversial and public employees from
across the state descended upon the capitol to voice their disapproval. Despite very vocal opposition
and thousands of protestors literally camped out in the Capitol, the legislation was proceeding as
planned until all 14 Senate democrats senate fled to Illinois to prevent a vote on the measure.
Following weeks of delay and political posturing, the legislation eventually passed and is cmrently
being litigated on procedural matters. So why does all of thismatter to the cable industry? Political
uncertainty is never good thing.
The legislature, which was moving at in incredible pace, has since crawled to ahalt. The very political
malce-up of the state Senate is also in question where republicans cmrently hold a 19-14 majority, but
that could change shortly.
8/2/2011
Page2 of6
Alll6 state senators, both republican and democrats, who are eligible to be subject of a recall election
are currently facing recall effmis. To put this in context, in om nation's history, only 13 state legislators
have ever been successfully recalled.
The first tangible gauge of public sentiment on these collective bargaining changes came last week as
12-year incumbent Supreme Comt Justice David Prosser nanowly won re-election against a union
backed political novice.
Both sides went all in a Supreme Court race with the potential of shifting the balance of power on the
state's high court. Millions were spent and turnout reached 1.5 million voters, nearly double the
previous high court election. When the dust settled, Justice Prosser held on by less than 7,000 votes.
While uncertainty abounds in Madison, one thing is certain. The Green Bay PackersSuper Bowl XLV
victory, which unified Wisconsin just two months ago, seems ages ago.
Click here to see pictmes eve11ts as they unfolded in Madison
Telecommunications Reform Update
In the last edition of E-Channels we presented a brief overview of the telecommunications reform
package.
The political impasse at the capitol has given the authors of the legislation time to push for compromise
among the major voice providers operating in Wisconsin, including cable voice providers represented
by the WCCA.
The elements of a bill include:
Broad regulatory reform for ILECs, consistent with what was agreed to last session and in the
AT&T and Wisconsin State Telecommunications Association (WSTA) bill drafts to which we
have previously agreed;
Deregulation ofVoiP services (with limited exceptions)
State-wide CLEC ce11ification;
Limits to small ILEC ability to challenge competitive entry by CLECs in their market;
Language giving the PSC authority to over pole rates charged by municipalities for attachments
by video service providers; and
Access charge reform.
This legislation is currently in drafting by the Legislative Reference Bmeau and is expected to be
introduced quickly. Despite opposition from one or two voice providers, we anticipate the bill will
have broad, bi-pmiisan support and move through the legislatme this spring.
As a result, the WCCA will join AT&T, TDS companies represented by the WSTA in supporting the
first major rewrite of Wisconsin telecommunications statutes since 1994.
We will keep you posted on the progress of this legislation, but please contact the WCCA if you have
any questions about this telecommunications reform legislation.
Montgomery named Chairman of the Public Service Commission
8/2/2011
Page 3 of6
Govemor Scott Walker recently appointed former state Representative Phil Montgomery to fill his first
vacancy at the Wisconsin the Public Service Commission by making him Chairman of the Commission.
Dming his 12-year tenure in the state Assembly, Chairman Montgomery served as Chairman of the
Energy and Utilities Committee, providing him with a broad base of knowledge on utility issues.
Perhaps Chairman Montgome1y's most notable achievement in the legislature was as the author of2007
Act 42, the Video Competition Act which modemized Wisconsin's antiquated video franchising law.
Once confirmed by the state Senate, Chairman Montgome1y's term will expire on April 1, 2017.
Save the Date: Brewers vs. Cubs 27th
Join the WCCA this smmner on July 27th & 28th in downtown Milwaukee for the 2011 WCCA Aruma!
Convention at the Hilton Milwaukee City Center.
In lieu of a golf outing this year the WCCA will be tailgating and attending the Brewers vs. Cubs game
on Wednesday evening, July 27th at Miller Park!
Look for details in future editions of E-Channels.
Cable in the News
Gordon_Smith: Free TV Doesn't Mean For Cable- 4/12/11
FCC Approves Pole-Attachment Reforms - 4/7/11
Glenn Beck Leaving Fox News Show - 4/6/11
FCC Launches Beta Version of New Site - 4/5/11
Survey: 7% Of Pay-TV Subs Pondering Pulling The Plug - 4/5/11
Report: Time Warner Unveils "Home Premiere" - 4/1/11
Video Everywhere: Advances in Video Technology Changing TV Business -
3/31/11
Catering to Kids: Cable Networks Divide to Conquer - 3/21/11
Comcast's Cohen Named_NAMIC Breakfast Honorary Chair- 3/18/11
Ratings Up 24% for Thursday NCAA Tourney On Four Nets - 3/18/11
Former FCC Chairman Michael Powell not such an unlikely NCTA leader
as he might seem - 3/16/11
Research: Multichannel Subs Grew in 2010 - 3/15/11
'Wonder Women' Share Life Lessons At Packed Event - 3/15/11
March Madness: A Virtual Advertising Sellout - 3/15/11
Powell Reaction Pours In - 3/15/11
Michael Powell Named NCTA President - 3/15/11
Cable Ops Most - 3/14/11
Cable, Network News See Audience Declines In 2010: PEJ - 3/14/11
Cord-Cutting Greatly Exaggerated: ESPN Study - 3/14/11
Trying to Keep the Customer Satisfied - 3/14/11
Genachowski Intends To Stay Put At FCC: Top Aide - 3/10/11
McSlarrow Named President Comcast/NBCU Washington - 3/9/11
Cable Economic Impact Up In Down Economy- 3/7/11
Britt: Video Losses Unacceptable - 3/7/11
8/2/2011
Cable Operators Applaud FCC Retrans Move - 3/3/11
CAB Says Cable Ad Revenue Grew 12% - 3/3/11
Comcast Beats Analyst Q4 Estimates - 2/16/11
Competition in the News
With Blockbuster Win, Big Questions Remain for Dish - 4/6/11
Dish Wins Blockbuster Auction - 4/6/11
Page 4 of6
Time Warner Cable To Sell Ads For AT&.T U-verse TV - 4/5/11
Verizon pays $93.5M to settle whistleblower suit - 4/5/11
CenturyLink completes $12.2B acquisition of Qwest - 4/1/11
Google To Launch 1Gbps Fiber Broadband Service in Kansas CitY -
3/30/11
Best Buy Stocks Roku - 3/30/11
ACT Calls For PEG Commitments In AT&T/T-Mobile - 3/29/11
Sprint Opposes Merger of AT&T and T-Mobile - 3/28/11
Fans, Foes Weigh In On Proposed 'AT&T-Mobile' - 3/20/11
AT&T S t r ~ k e s $39B Deal for T-Mobile - 3/20/11
DirecTV Chairman Reaps $32.9M in 2010 - 3/18/11
Netflix Acquires Streaming Rights To 'House of Cards' TV Series -
3/18/11
Dish Raises DBSD Offer - 3/15/11
Newly Introduced Bill To Put Halt On Wireless Taxes - 3/10/11
Facebook Rents Warner Bros.'s 'Dark Knight' - 3/8/11
Redbox's Streaming Service To Rival Netflix Still In The Works-
2/18/11
Comcast Spotlight Will Sell Local Ads For AT&T U-verse TV - 2/15/11
Broadband and Telecom in the News
Time Warner Cable launches online backup service for businesses -
4/12/11
Kerry, McCain Introduce Privacy Bill - 4/12/11
Broadband Speeds Checked By FCC - 4/11/11
House Approves Net Neutrality-Blocking Resolution - 4/8/11
Time Warner Cable, Viacom take iPad app feud to NY court - 4/8/11
FCC passes data roaming mandate in 3-2 vote - 4/7/11
TIME WARNER CABLE ANNOUNCES SECOND ANNUAL CONNECT A MILLION MINDS
WEEK - 4/4/11
Time Warner Cable Extends Tablet Campaign: '300,000 People Can't Be
Wrong' - 4/4/11
MTV, History Are Top Cable Networks On Facebook - 3/31/11
TWC's Witmer: We Didn't Anticipate iPad App Backlash- 3/30/11
Time Warner Cable In Talks With Hybrid Wireless Net: Report - 3/24/11
Extreme Reach Launches Cross-Platform Ad Delivery Product - 3/16/11
TWC iPad App To Stream 30 Channels Inside Subs' Homes - 3/14/11
PEJ: Google, Facebook Are Future of News Delivery - 3/14/11
DTV Pioneer Goodmon Pitches FCC On Alternative Broadband Plan -
3/13/11
Comcast Sees Bucks In Premium Tech Support - 3/9/11
8/2/2011
Page 5 of6
NCTA's McSlarrow Explains Backing for Net-Neutrality Order - 3/8/11
PWC Study: More TV Now Viewed On Computer Than TV- 3/7/11
FCC moves to reform low-income Universal Service programs - 3/4/11
Report: Cable beats telcos for broadband subscriber adds Report:
Cable beats telcos for broadband subscriber adds - 3/3/11
NCTA: Broadband Map Is 1.0 - 3/17/11
Cable, Broadcast Leverage Alternative Platforms for Success - 2/15/11
Baker: Net Neutrality Rule Costs Could Be Dramatic - 2/15/11
Wisconsin in the News
Election turnout magnified divide in Wisconsin - 4/10/11
Shilling announces candidacy against Kapanke- 4/9/11
New count gives Prosser lead after Waukesha County iQPutting error -
4/8/11
Democrats confirm it: Signatures to recall Hopper will be filed
Thursday - 4/7/11
Wisconsin Judge Race Heads for Recount - 4/7/11
__ ji\l_i_sconsin divided bej:_1fieen Madison, rest of state - 4/6/11
Big Labor's Wisconsin Revenge- 4/6/11
Recall campaigns turn out in force at polling places - 4/5/11
Recall ad to target Harsdorf on Twin Cities cable TV - 4/4/11
City hires public access coordinator_- 4/4/11
Montgomery begins role leading Public Commission - 4/1/11
Kapanke recall campaign to deliver signatures Friday - 4/1/11
Google still bullish on Madison - 4/1/11
Judge rules that Wisconsin's union law isn't in effect- 3/31/11
Cross Plains woman charged with sending death threats to lawmakers -
3/31/11
Union threatens boycott of any business that doesn't show support -
3/31/11
As Supreme Court race nears, TV ad spending soars - 3/30/11
Capitol security costs: $3.2 million and counting - 3/28/11
Walker picks Montgomery to head PSC - 3/28/11
Can the smell of brats reunite Wisconsin? - 3/26/11
Walker right on emails, analysis finds - 3/21/11
Judge temporarily blocks implementation of public union law - 3/19/11
WMC urges opposition to boycott effort - 3/17/11
State Senate recall petitions on both sides pick up speed- 3/17/11
Budget fight TV ads top $3 million - 3/15/11
La Follette draws ire over delay on bill - 3/15/11
AT&T sets monthly limits on broadband use - 3/14/11
State recall movement stands alone in U.S. History - 3/12/11
Walker signs budget bill, legal challenges mount - 3/11/11
Budget repair bill passes Senate, Thursday vote set in Assembly -
3/10/11
Frontier pumps $14 million into its Wisconsin broadband network -
3/4/11
A political cost-benefit analysis of Gov. Walker's battle with
8/2/2011
unions - 3/2/11
Budget-repair bill approved in early-morning vote - 2/25/11
Stewart, Colbert crack jokes about Madison - 2/22/11
Page 6 of6
Cable, Broadcast Talent Lends Support To _Protesting State Workers -
2/20/11
Capitol drama will reverber?te for both sides in 2012 rac(Os - 2/19/11
MSNBC's Ed Schultz pumps up the protesters and himself -- with a
live_ broadcast from the Capitol - 2/18/11
Senators' run to Illinois gets cheers from supRorters, a blast from
Walker - 2/18/11
State returns broadband grant money - 2/16/11
More on noise: Capitol like a Packers game - 2/16/11
Committee passes Walker's budget bill; now moves to Senate- 2/17/11
Walker takes broad swipe at public employee unions - 2/12/11
~ S C I
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-Channels is an e-mail publication of the Wisconsin Cable Communications Association, 22 East
Mifflin, Suite 1010, Madison, Wisconsin53703, 608-256-1683
http: //www.wicable.tv I
Adam Raschka
Wisconsin Cable Communications Association
Director, Regulatory & External Affairs
608.256.1683
adam@raschka.us
(please note the new e-mail address]
8/2/2011