You are on page 1of 12

1ae ccoaomic imçact oI tae customer cxçerieace

aau caçaçemeat ia Jo key ccoaomies
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc
uovcmec· zoou
z
cxecutive summary
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
Snapshot of Key Findings by the Numbers:
usus!!s.s
sillioe
cosi oi (oo· casiomc· sc·vicc ie
¡c |cy ccoeomics
ususzo!
tvc·açc valac (ie oec yca·) oi cac|
casiomc· ·claiioes|i( losi io a
com(ciiio· o· aeaeooeco

c·caicsi saiisic· ac·oss all
coaei·ics ~as com(cicei (co(lc io
assisi ie aey c|aeecl
sc.ox
|c·ccei oi coesamc·s ~|o ~oalo
~clcomc (·oaciivc ceçaçcmcei io
im(·ovc i|ci· cx(c·icecc i|·oaç|
cxiceoco oiic·s o· |cl( oa·ieç
sclisc·vicc i·aesaciioes
One of the first global surveys of consumer attitudes
toward customer service uncovered some significant
findings in terms of consumer behavior, actionable
steps to improve customer service, and business results
from the customer experience. In addition, it provides
a snapshot of the key shifts in technologies that will
allow enterprises to improve customer service. The
survey — which covered 16 major economies in
North America, Latin America, Asia Pacific, and
Europe — seeks to capture the key factors that
influence consumer loyalty, satisfaction, and customer
service preferences. Nearly 9,000 consumers were
surveyed, with a minimum sampling of 500 per
country, to determine what companies should be
doing to improve the customer experience.
One common element among all countries: poor
customer service has a major impact on enterprises
worldwide, directly resulting in lost revenue. In
virtually every country, customers ended at least one
relationship per year due to poor service. Across all
countries surveyed, about 7 in 10 consumers have
ended a relationship.
The vast majority of lost revenue results in defections
to a competitor. Nearly two-thirds of consumers who
have ended relationships turn to a competitor, with the
remainder lost or abandoned completely as consumers
decide not to purchase from anyone. While consumers
cannot always abandon a purchase, even previously safe
industries — such as utilities — are starting to see
losses. For most enterprises, however, consumers are
free to choose substitute goods, such as movies instead
of cable TV.
a
W
hile many companies are keenly aware of the value of excellent customer service, few can
accurately quantify its direct impact on their bottom line. On the face of it, the problem is
simple. Most businesses understand that turning the customer experience into an emotional engagement
strengthens their brand and results in more loyal and satisfied consumers. However, most companies do
not measure their effectiveness in converting each opportunity into revenue, nor do they measure the
overall cost of poor customer service. For example, contact centers have consistently measured a wide
variety of key indicators, such as the time spent on each call, the speed-of-answer, and customer-
reported satisfaction rates. Yet research shows that less than one-third of companies worldwide measure
revenue per call.
Furthermore, the problem has become more complicated as customer interactions move beyond the
contact center. According to numerous industry researchers, more than 90% of all transactions initiated
over the Web are abandoned before any transaction is completed. And virtually no researchers have
accurately measured the value of customer service across communication channels.
How can we best measure the impact of lost business opportunities from customer service each year,
and identify the underlying causes?
To answer these questions, Genesys collaborated with leading industry analysts at Datamonitor/Ovum
to accurately measure the cost of poor customer service globally.
Genesys engaged an independent research firm, Greenfield Online, which conducted an online poll of
8,880 consumers, with a minimum sample of 500 per country. In addition to the consumer survey,
Datamonitor/Ovum used its proprietary country-level contact center models. Leveraging both data sets
along with Datamonitor/Ovum’s modeling expertise, we have produced the first large-scale attempt to
place an economic value on the lost revenue from customer service across all channels when businesses
do not measure up to the consumer’s expectations.
The 28-question online survey included diverse participants, with representatives from virtually every
age and income bracket.
The result of that effort is “The Cost of Poor Customer Service: The Economic Impact of the Customer
Experience and Engagement,” an in-depth look at the issue. Those results are included in this report.
Please note that this report presents the combined and comparative survey results from 16 selected
economies; additional regional results, as well as other individual country reports, are available
separately from Genesys.
At Genesys, we believe it is important to continually gain perspective on the changing nature of
customer service, as well as consumer perceptions of it. We are extremely aware of the challenges
enterprises face in today’s dynamic environments as they strive to deliver on their vision of a great
customer experience.
We hope this survey will be of use for customer service organizations, as well as others, to help them
understand the opportunities and the challenges ahead for all involved.
iatrouuctioa
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
iatrouuctioa
overaii. r usosaas.s biiiioa
çer year çrobiem
Behind the Numbers:
What is the value of excellent customer service?
While satisfaction is a critical measure of customer
service, ultimately companies respond to metrics
that translate into hard costs. And lost revenue is a
very stark reminder of those costs.
For each country surveyed, Datamonitor/Ovum
calculated country-level loss figures. The combined
total, while not a worldwide figure, provides an
in-depth snapshot of the impact to many of the
largest economies.
The cost of poor customer service is a significant
problem. Enterprises in the countries shown below
lose an estimated USD$338.5 billion each year
due to defections and abandoned purchases as a
direct result of a poor experience. Nearly 70% of
consumers said they had ended a relationship due
to poor customer service alone.
Chart 1: Global Losses
key |iauiaçs
couatries surveyeu
Genesys conducted surveys in each of the
following countries:
s Australia
s Brazil
s Canada
s China
s Czech Republic
s France
s Germany
s India
s Italy
s Mexico
s Netherlands
s New Zealand
s Poland
s Russia
s U.K.
s U.S.
c
a
a
a
u
a
k
u
s
s
i
a
o
«o
oo
so
Joo
u
s
ciobai Losses Irom |oor customer service by couatry
(ia uso biiiioas)
zsx
c
a
i
a
a
s
r
a
z
i
i
M
e
x
i
c
o
u
k
|
o
i
a
a
u
c
e
r
m
a
a
y
i
t
a
i
y
u
e
t
a
e
r
i
a
a
u
s
i
a
u
i
a
r
u
s
t
r
a
i
i
a
zo
c
z
e
c
a

k
e
ç
u
b
i
i
c
u
e
w

z
e
a
i
a
a
u
|
r
a
a
c
e
ciobai Losses Irom |oor
customer service
«
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
iatrouuctioa
The survey participants said that when they end
a relationship, most of the time they take their
business to a competitor.
Chart 2: Business lost to competitors, versus transactions
abandoned completely
When a consumer defects it is also costly for a rival
to gain that business, since a company must recoup
the marketing expense of gaining a customer,
depending on the industry, according to researchers
at Datamonitor/Ovum. Consumers were asked
specifically if, as a result of a poor customer experi-
ence, they awarded their business to a competitor or
decided not to purchase at all. While consumers
cannot abandon all industries — such as utilities in
countries where there is not open competition —
other industries indeed experience permanent
losses from withheld transactions.
Which industries have the biggest risk?
Consumers are far more likely grow impatient and
leave a few key industries than any other relationship.
Chart 3: Global losses by Industry
The hardest hit industries across all countries
surveyed are financial services, cable and satellite TV
providers, and a variety of telecommunications
companies. In the past year, financial services firms
saw over USD$44 billion in lost revenue. And cable
and satellite TV providers suffered more than
USD$37 billion of losses alone. Wireless carriers and
Internet service providers each saw more than
USD$36 billion in lost revenue. Landline carriers
also lost more than $33 billion.
Even industries that were previously safe from
competition, such as utilities in deregulated regions,
are also feeling the pain, with USD$13.6 billion in
lost revenue.
However, some industries that were hard hit, like
financial services, had some good news. Financial
services companies were seen more positively than
negatively, while others were not as fortunate, such
as telecommunications, where negative sentiment
outweighed positive by a two-to-one ratio.
key |iauiaçs
i
a
s
u
r
a
a
c
e
i
a
t
e
r
a
e
t

s
e
r
v
i
c
e

ç
r
o
v
i
u
e
r
so
szo
sao
s«o
|
i
a
a
a
c
i
a
i

s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
zsx
c
a
b
i
e
/
s
a
t
e
i
i
i
t
e

1
v
L
a
a
u
i
i
a
e

c
a
r
r
i
e
r
w
i
r
e
i
e
s
s

c
a
r
r
i
e
r
r
i
r
i
i
a
e
c
o
a
s
u
m
e
r

ç
r
o
u
u
c
t
s
c
o
v
e
r
a
m
e
a
t

a
ç
e
a
c
i
e
s
u
o
t
e
i
u
t
i
i
i
t
i
e
s
o
t
a
e
r
sJo
u
e
a
i
t
a
c
a
r
e
sso
i
a
u
u
s
t
r
y

i
o
s
s
e
s
(
b
i
i
i
i
o
a
s
)
s
u
b
s
c
r
i
ç
t
i
o
a
s
s
Customer churn and
defections within industry,
$212.2 billion
Business abandoned and
lost to entire industry,
$126.3 billion
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
cauiaç a susiaess keiatioasaiç
Some countries have much more actively engaged
consumers. Companies in these countries have far
more opportunities to interact. Consumers in Poland,
China, and Mexico have by far the largest number of
interactions per year with customer service.
However, in Australia, France, New Zealand, and the
U.S. companies have far fewer interactions, and
therefore the enterprise must make the most of each
opportunity.
How many relationships does the average consumer
abandon per year due to customer service? Some
regions are far more likely to have consumers end
relationships.
oa averaçe, coasumers ia virtuaiiy every couatry
waik away Irom a reiatioasaiç uue to çoor
service. overaii, coasumers eau more taaa J.«
reiatioasaiçs eaca year oa averaçe uue to a çoor
customer service exçerieace. 1ae coasumers
most wiiiiaç to waik away Irom a reiatioasaiç are
Irom srazii, Ioiioweu by |oiaau, caiaa, aau iauia.
Chart 5: Relationships ended
Customer expectations – and risk to abandon – vary
widely by country
Consumers were asked to select the industries that
did the best and worst job of customer service. The
consumer’s choice of best industry is shown in blue,
and worst industry is shown in red.
The most positive ratings are for consumer products,
travel/hospitality, and financial services. The most
heavily negative ratings are for telecommunications
and government.
Chart 4: Positive and negative ratings
key |iauiaçs
o
u
k
i
a
u
i
a
o.oo
J.so
z.oo
z.so
r
v
ç
uumber oI keiatioasaiçs caueu sy couatry
zsx
s
r
a
z
i
i
|
o
i
a
a
u
c
a
i
a
a
M
e
x
i
c
o
c
e
r
m
a
a
y
r
u
s
t
r
a
i
i
a
i
t
a
i
y
u
s
u
e
w

z
e
a
i
a
a
u
J.oo
k
u
s
s
i
a
a.oo
u
e
t
a
e
r
i
a
a
u
s
o.so
c
a
a
a
u
a
|
r
a
a
c
e
c
z
e
c
a
-zox
-Jox
ox
Jox
zox
aox
-«ox
-aox
s
a
t
i
s
I
a
c
t
i
o
a

w
i
t
a

i
a
u
u
s
t
r
y

x çositive x aeçative
|
i
a
a
a
c
i
a
i

s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
1
e
i
e
c
o
m
1
r
a
v
e
i
/
u
o
s
ç
i
t
a
i
i
t
y
c
o
v
'
t

r
ç
e
a
c
i
e
s
u
e
a
i
t
a
c
a
r
e
c
o
a
s
u
m
e
r

ç
r
o
u
u
c
t
s
u
t
i
i
i
t
i
e
s
i
a
s
u
r
a
a
c
e
o
t
a
e
r
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
iatrouuctioa
One of the interesting aspects of this cross-national
survey is the evidence of varying service expecta-
tions and operational performance. Looking at a
cross-tabulation of the number of customer service
interactions per year (by country) and the percent
of business transactions abandoned, expressed as a
percentage of customer service interactions, shows
four primary groupings of customer expectations.
The groupings fall into the following quadrants
where the average across all geographies is the
center point of the quadrant.
Chart 6: Countries with greatest percent of risk for
abandons
The groupings indicate four models of customer
service operation — and consumer response to
that operation — in these dimensions.
Risk: The higher the percentage of abandons per
given volume of interactions, the greater the risk
within a single service interaction. In other words
— service organizations have to “get it right” on
the first try because there are few chances to
recover from an error.
Efficiency of operation: It appears that the lower
the number of interactions per year, the more
efficient customer service organizations within that
country are at completing business in the fewest
number of steps. This reflects to some degree the
maturity of customer service operational practices
as well as technology support.
Chart 7: Customer Risk and Efficiency
uiça risk, aiça
eIncieacy.
rustraiia
caaaua
|raace
uetaeriaaus
uew zeaiaau
uk
us
uiça risk, iow
eIncieacy.
srazii
iauia
Low risk, aiça
eIncieacy.
czeca keçubiic
cermaay
Low risk, iow
eIncieacy.
caiaa
Mexico
|oiaau
kussia
Country too close to statistical average to character-
ize in this grid: Italy
In this quadrant, the “ideal” placement would be the
lower-left corner, where organizations are efficient
and consumers indicate little risk of abandoning
business if a customer service transaction is unsatis-
factory. On the other hand, there is substantial risk
in the upper-left quadrant, where consumers in a
mature market, such as Australia, will abandon a
service provider nearly 19% of the time if there is an
unsatisfactory transaction.
key |iauiaçs
z
i
o
w
ĺ
k
i
s
k
ĺ
a
i
ç
a
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
aiça c||icicucY iow
key |iauiaçs
s
commoa 1areaus rcross couatries
Not surprisingly, there were some broad areas of
agreement among consumers from many regions.
Three common threads emerged among all countries.
First, consumers are demanding better integration
between self-service and assisted service, including
voice self-service and eServices. The most requested
improvements in all countries were to be able to start
in voice self-service or the Web and get live assistance
from an agent, and to start in e-mail and have better
integration with agent-assisted service. In other
words, “Don’t ask me twice.”
Second, consumers said that the ability to
communicate across multiple channels is critical to
loyalty. When asked what they would most like to
see companies deploy to improve service, 40% chose
human service, but more than half of consumers
chose at least one new communication channel
among their top choices. In other words, “Treat my
interactions as a conversation.”
Chart 8: Most sought improvements
Finally, overwhelmingly, an average of 86% of
consumers per country said they would find proactive
engagement either a “strong benefit” or would
“welcome proactive assistance” when they were stuck
on the Web or in self-service. In other words, “It’s ok
to give me a call or ask me if I need help.”
Chart 9: Consumer Preferences for Proactive Contact
s
u
ç
ç
o
r
t

s
o
c
i
a
i

c
o
m
m
u
a
i
t
i
e
s
ox
zox
aox
s
e
t
t
e
r

a
u
m
a
a

s
e
r
v
i
c
e
Most rskeu Ior imçrovemeats
i
a
t
e
ç
r
a
t
e

m
o
r
e

c
a
a
a
a
e
i
s
c
a
r
i
c
a
e
u

c
o
a
t
e
a
t
w
e
b

a
s
s
i
s
t
a
a
t
s

o
r

r
v
a
t
a
r
s
o
t
a
e
r
Jox
«ox
N
e
w

Z
e
a
l
a
n
d
B
r
a
z
i
l
0%
40%
60%
80%
A
v
g
Consumer Perferences for
Proactive Contact
25%
M
e
x
i
c
o
C
h
i
n
a
I
t
a
l
y
U
S
P
o
l
a
n
d
C
a
n
a
d
a
F
r
a
n
c
e
I
n
d
i
a
U
K
20%
C
z
e
c
h
100%
G
e
r
m
a
n
y
A
u
s
t
r
a
l
i
a
R
u
s
s
i
a
N
e
t
h
e
r
l
a
n
d
s
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
iatrouuctioa
key |iauiaçs
s
C
z
e
c
h
U
S
$0
$100
$200
$300
A
v
g
Value of Relationships Ended
25%
U
K
A
u
s
t
r
a
l
i
a
C
a
n
a
d
a
F
r
a
n
c
e
I
t
a
l
y
N
e
w

Z
e
a
l
a
n
d
M
e
x
i
c
o
G
e
r
m
a
n
y
P
o
l
a
n
d
N
e
t
h
e
r
l
a
n
d
s
$400
B
r
a
z
i
l
C
h
i
n
a
I
n
d
i
a
R
u
s
s
i
a
I
n
d
u
s
t
r
y

l
o
s
s
e
s
(
b
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
)
keçioaai oiIIereaces
Value of Customer Interactions:
1ae averaçe vaiue oI iost reiatioasaiçs varieu
substaatiaiiy Irom reçioa to reçioa, aau was
aot uirectiy tieu to çurcaasiaç çower ia eaca
couatry. |or examçie, waiie tae averaçe vaiue
oI iost reiatioasaiçs across aii couatries
surveyeu was usosz«a çer year, by Iar tae
most vaiuabie reiatioasaiçs eaueu are ia tae
uk, waere taey averaçe usosaso, Ioiioweu
cioseiy by rustraiia at usosaas aau caaaua
at usosaao. 1ae ieast vaiuabie reiatioasaiçs
eaueu are ia caiaa at usoszz.
Chart 10: Value of each relationship ended
koot causes oI Lost keiatioasaiçs
Why do customers leave? Consumers are
remarkably consistent in citing key reasons that
they leave. Assisted service is well developed,
with the overwhelming majority of consumers
saying their most satisfying experience occurred
because of a capable and competent customer
service representative. But self-service that is not
intelligently integrated with assisted service is a key
area of concern. Consumers feel the most significant
root causes of poor service are:
s Being trapped in automated self-service
s Being forced to wait too long for service
s Repeating themselves
s Representatives that lack the skills to answer their
inquiry
Some interesting differences occur regionally. For
example, in many European countries, including
Germany, the Netherlands, France, the UK, and the
Czech Republic, a significant portion of consumers
said one of their greatest sources of frustration was
being unable to reach customer service without
paying a charge for the call. In Germany, 29% said
so, and in the Netherlands 25% mentioned this.
Nearly 10% of Chinese consumers also cited this as
a source of frustration.
One result: in each of those countries, Web Chat
and Web self-service were much more popular
forms of service.
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
|avorite commuaicatioa caaaaeis
The favorite channel of communication is still the
phone, but e-mail and the Web were surprisingly
strong choices.
Chart 11: Preferred Channels of Customer Service
In seven of 15 countries, e-mail was the first or
second choice, and it nearly overtook traditional
voice as the top overall communication channel.
key |iauiaçs
waere are tae siççest caçs ia
commuaicatioa caaaaeisz
Consumer satisfaction with each channel varies
dramatically. The chart below shows in blue the
percent of consumers in each communication
channel who were satisfied with that channel. The
portions in red display the percent who were
dissatisfied with that channel. The channels with
the greatest disparity between positive and negative
experiences show trouble spots. For example, most
people are happy with live agents, and e-mail, but
would like improvements to voice self-service and
paper mail.
Chart 12: Satisfaction with Channel
-zox
ox
zox
«ox
-«ox
s
a
t
i
s
I
a
c
t
i
o
a

w
i
t
a

i
a
u
u
s
t
r
y

x çositive x aeçative
|
a
o
a
e

t
o

i
i
v
e

a
ç
e
a
t
v
o
i
c
e

s
e
i
I
-
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
w
e
b

s
e
i
I
-
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
w
e
b

c
a
a
t
c
-
m
a
i
i
M
o
b
i
i
e

a
a
u

s
M
s
|
a
ç
e
r

m
a
i
i
o
t
a
e
r
oox
sox
|aoae
web seiI-service
web wita caat
caçabiiities
c-maii
Mobiie çaoae aau sMs
|açer maii
Jst caoice zau caoice
rutomateu seiI-service
|ax
otaer
ox zox «ox oox sox
Jo
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
createst sources oI customer
satisIactioa
Consumers were also asked the factors that made
the biggest difference in satisfaction. Their satisfac-
tion is increased when four key needs are met:
s Competency
s Convenience
s Proactivity
s Personalization
Consumers felt that companies had done much
more to improve in the area of competency than
any of the others. When thinking of their most
satisfying experience, consumers said competent
service representatives played the largest role.
Proactivity makes a significant difference.
Chart 13: What were the most significant factors in your
most satisfying customer experiences?
iatrouuctioa
key |iauiaçs
imçroviaç tae customer cxçerieace
Consumers want consistency and continuity.
The biggest opportunities for improving the
customer experience are in:
s Greater proactivity
s Improved personalization
s Better cross-channel integration
Consumers overwhelmingly said they would like more
proactive outreach. More than 86% of consumers said
they would find proactive engagement either a “strong
benefit” or would “welcome proactive assistance” when
they were stuck on the Web or in self-service.
Consumers overwhelmingly said they would like more
proactive outreach. More than 83% of consumers said
they would find proactive engagement either a “strong
benefit” or would “welcome proactive assistance” when
they were stuck on the Web or in self-service.
Chart 14: Consumer Views of Proactive Contact
Consumers prioritized the following as most important
when asked how they want companies to improve their
cross-channel conversations. They want companies to
enable them to:
s Start in voice self-service and get assistance from an
agent
s Start on the Web and get voice assistance or chat from
an agent
s Receive an e-mail and then get assistance from a
contact center
s Schedule callbacks to avoid wait times
s Add chat or instant messaging to Web interactions
0%
20%
40%
60%
Convenient
communication
channels
Competent
customer service
representatives
Proactive in
reaching out to me
Personalized
transactions
47%
69%
37%
37%
80%
“No
Thanks”
13.6%
Strong plus
44.2%
Welcome
42.2%
JJ
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics
Jz
ccecsys aeo i|c ccecsys loço a·c ·cçisic·co
i·aocma·|s oi ccecsys 1clccommaeicaiioes
|aeo·aio·ics, lec. tll oi|c· com(aey eamcs
aeo loços may ec ·cçisic·co i·aocma·|s o·
i·aocma·|s oi i|ci· ·cs(cciivc com(aeics aeo
a·c |c·cey ·ccoçeizco.
zoou ccecsys 1clccommaeicaiioes
|aeo·aio·ics, lec. tll ·iç|is ·csc·vco.
ceaesys woriuwiue
ccecsys, ae tlcaicl|accei com(aey, is i|c
~o·los lcaoieç (·ovioc· oi coeiaci cceic·
aeo casiomc· sc·vicc maeaçcmcei soii~a·c
— ~ii| mo·c i|ae o,ooo casiomc·s ie
so coaei·ics. ccecsys soii~a·c oi·ccis
mo·c i|ae ¡oo millioe ieic·aciioes cvc·y
oay, oyeamically coeecciieç casiomc·s
~ii| i|c ·iç|i ·csoa·ccs — sclisc·vicc
o· assisicosc·vicc — io ialiill casiomc·
·ccacsis, o(iimizc casiomc· ca·c çoals, aeo
ciiiciceily asc açcei ·csoa·ccs. ccecsys
|cl(s o·çaeizaiioes o·ivc coeiaci cceic·
ciiicicecy, sio( casiomc· i·asi·aiioe, aeo
accclc·aic easiecss ieeovaiioe.
|o· mo·c ieio·maiioe visii.
www.çeaesysiab.com, o· call
-J sss ccucsYs o· J-oso-«oo-JJoo.
rmericas
corçorate ueauuuarters
ccecsys
zoo¡ 1aei(c·o sc··a slvo.
ualy ciiy, ct uoo¡o ust
1cl. -¡ cso occ ¡¡oo
|ax. -¡ cso occ ¡zco
|mail. ieio@çcecsyslae.com
~~~.çcecsyslae.com
curoçe, Miuuie cast, rIrica
cMcr ueauuuarters
ccecsys +oasc
¡oo |·imlcy sasiecss |a·|
|·imlcy
camec·lcy
sa··cy, cu¡c ¯sc ueiico |ieçoom
1cl. -oo ¡z¯c oo ¯ooo
|ax. -oo ¡z¯c oo ¯oo¡
rsia |acinc
r|rc ueauuuarters
ccecsys |aeo·aio·ics
tasi·alasia |iy |io
|cvcl ¡¯, ¡zo Wal|c· si·cci
uo·i| syoecy usW zoco tasi·alia
1cl. -c¡ z uoc! ssoo
aJao v.J - JJ/os-ciobai.
coaciusioa
Poor customer service has a clear and immediate impact on a company.
These responses suggest the steps companies can take to make improvements.
The first step should be to understand and measure the direct business impact
of customer service, and identify the gaps between the customer experience
and expectations.
To do so, companies need to assess their existing communication channels, and
make interactions more convenient across multiple channels. It is imperative that
an enterprise engage consumers on the customer’s terms or risk losing them.
Consumers will welcome companies who are more proactive, such as offering
to move a customer out of automated systems like the Web or voice activated
self-service.
And finally, companies need to become more personalized in their overall
treatment of consumers by integrating customer data, and developing processes
that recognize the value and history of each customer.
his is part of a series conducted by Genesys in partnership with key industr
y thought leaders, such as Datamonitor/Ovum. As other results are available,
we will gladly share them. For more information, please visit:
www.çeaesysiab.com
*The value of business lost due to poor customer service was calculated based on information
survey respondents provided, including how many times they had ended a business relationship
and the specific value of that relationship. In addition, consumer responses were compared
against proprietary Datamonitor/Ovum data on the volume of customer service interactions,
and transaction values. The country-level data was calculated based on population levels, per
country using people aged 18 years or older as the purchasing population.
1|c cosi oi |oo· casiomc· sc·vicc. 1|c |coeomic lm(aci oi i|c casiomc· |x(c·icecc aeo |eçaçcmcei ie ¡c |cy |coeomics