www.smdailyjournal.

com
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 249
ANCHORS AWEIGH
LOCAL PAGE 5
DEFYING
THE ODDS
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘PIRANHA 3DD’
LURING CROWD
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
PORT SAILS INTO PLATINUM ANNIVERSARY
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A number of Capuchino High
School teachers are asking for
Principal Shamar Shanks to step
down citing failed communication,
an escalating number of disputes
and concerns about tolerance. She
plans to stay put, however.
In a May 30
email to
Superintendent
Scott Laurence
and the San
Mateo Union
High School
District Board of
T r u s t e e s ,
Capuchino High
School union representatives Kathy
Fogle and Naomi Tuite outline a
variety of issues including: tension
and growing discord between
Shanks and the staff; a culture of
fear for employees; and a lack of
collaboration when it comes to deci-
sions. They also point to Shanks
making religious references that can
be found offensive by those with
differing views. As a result, most
teachers recently said they would
not like her to return as principal in
the fall, according to the letter.
Both the district and Shanks note
much change has occurred at the
school, which can be difficult.
However, they point to recent gains
in test scores as proof the discom-
fort is worthwhile.
“I am whole-heartedly committed
to Capuchino and I will remain to
see our collective vision through,”
Shanks wrote in an email response
to the letter.
Similarly, Laurence expressed
confidence in Shanks as the school
leader.
Teachers want Capuchino principal to leave
District superintendent expresses confidence in San Bruno school leader
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — The suddenly dis-
mal news on American jobs is a
blow to President Barack Obama’s
re-election argument that he has
been a steward of recovery. It’s
heightened White House anxiety
over global threats to U.S. econom-
ic growth — and the president’s
political prospects, too.
The economy, Obama conceded
Friday, “is not growing as fast as we
want it to.”
Taking a harsher tone, presumed
Republican rival Mitt Romney
declared that the country appeared
to be “moving backward.” He
sought to drive
home a political
point from the
nation’s first
increase in job-
lessness in
almost a year.
After a winter
when the job
trends were in
his favor,
Obama has been forced onto the
defensive by three months of lack-
luster to dismal growth. Confronted
by Friday’s report of a feeble 69,000
new jobs and an uptick in unem-
ployment to 8.2 percent in May,
Obama vigorously renewed his
Employment
report a blow
for president
See SHANKS, Page 24
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Just days before voters head to the
polls, proponents of three county
measures that will add taxes to
rental cars and parking and increase
the hotel tax in the unincorporated
area decried what they say are lies
and distortions perpetuated by deep-
pocketed companies on behalf of the
affected industries.
“They are deliberately distorting
the message, saying this is a car tax.
Nothing could be further from the
truth,” said San Mateo County
Supervisor Don Horsley, referring
to radio ads attacking the tax meas-
ures.
But Kathy Turner, vice president
of legislative/government affairs for
Enterprise Holdings, which is fund-
Pro-tax group decries opposition
Radio ads called distorted, which funders deny
May numbers weaken Barack
Obama’s election argument
See JOBS, Page 18
See TAX, Page 24
Barack Obama
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), MILLBRAE NURSERY SCHOOL (BELOW)
Above: Francesca Gravem, left to right, Jada Scott, Posy Princess and part of the court, pose with San Bruno Lion
Issac Mejia Friday. Below: Photo of the Posy Parade from 2010.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Dressed in princess dresses, Jada
Scott and Francesca Gravem prac-
ticed their princess waves Friday
afternoon.
The two little girls from different
schools — John Muir and Allen
respectively — had reason to be
practicing their skills. Scott was
chosen to be the Posy Princess and
Gravem is part of her court for the
72nd annual Posy Parade which will
take place in San Bruno Sunday
afternoon.
Both were excited to learn they
Parade of posies
San Bruno marks 72nd year for annual celebration of children
See PARADE, Page 24
Shamar Shanks
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Comedian Dana
Carvey is 57.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1953
Queen Elizabeth II was crowned in
Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the
death of her father, King George VI; it
was the first such ceremony to be tele-
vised.
“We are minor in
everything but our passions.”
— Elizabeth Bowen, Irish author (1899-1973)
Actor Stacy Keach
is 71.
Actor-comedian
Wayne Brady is 40.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Usain Bolt,left,of Jamaica competes in the men’s 100 meters event at the Golden Gala IAAF Diamond League at the Olympic
stadium in Rome, Italy.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s. Northwest winds 10
to 15 mph.
Sunday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers after midnight.
Lows in the upper 40s. West winds 15 to 20 mph...Becoming
northwest 5 to 10 mph after midnight. Chance of showers 20
percent.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3, in first place;Whirl Win, No. 6, in second place;
and California Classic, No. 5, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:43.69.
(Answers Monday)
FORGO MIGHT OUTAGE DOLLAR
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When he started his new plant nursery,
everyone — ROOTED FOR HIM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SLELP
CROUC
TRIEVD
MTOICM
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
A
Answer
here:
3 9 2
2 27 38 46 52 45
Mega number
June 1 Mega Millions
3 4 21 26 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 0 9 9
Daily Four
9 4 3
Daily three evening
In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances
Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date,
Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive man-
sion.)
In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal
as saying from London that “the report of my death was an
exaggeration.”
In 1924, Congress passed a measure that was then signed by
President Calvin Coolidge guaranteeing full American citizen-
ship for all Native Americans born within U.S. territorial lim-
its.
In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New
York of a degenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis;
he was 37. The chief justice of the United States, Charles
Evans Hughes, announced his retirement effective July 1,
1941.
In 1961, during a state visit to France, President John F.
Kennedy, noting the warm reception his wife was receiving,
jocularly described himself as “the man who accompanied
Jacqueline Kennedy to Paris, and I have enjoyed it.” Playwright
and director George S. Kaufman, 71, died in New York.
In 1962, Soviet forces opened fire on workers in the Russian
city of Novocherkassk who had gone on strike over food short-
ages; accounts of the death toll vary, although a retired gener-
al who said he opposed the action put the figure at 22 to 24 dur-
ing a 1989 interview.
In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon
and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar sur-
face.
In 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the
first visit by a pope to a Communist country.
Actor Milo O’Shea is 87. Actress-singer Sally Kellerman is 75.
Actor Ron Ely is 74. Rock musician Charlie Watts is 71. Singer
William Guest (Gladys Knight & The Pips) is 71. Actor Charles
Haid is 69. Composer Marvin Hamlisch is 68. Movie director
Lasse Hallstrom is 66. Actor Jerry Mathers is 64. Actress Joanna
Gleason is 62. Actor Dennis Haysbert is 58. Actor Gary Grimes
is 57. Pop musician Michael Steele is 57. Rock singer Tony
Hadley (Spandau Ballet) is 52. Singer Merril Bainbridge is 44.
Rapper B-Real (Cypress Hill) is 42. Actress Paula Cale is 42.
Actor Anthony Montgomery is 41. Actor Wentworth Miller is 40.
Rock musician Tim Rice-Oxley (Keane) is 36.
Some high-scoring two-letter words
that are acceptable in Scrabble are xu
(Vietnamese money), qi (a life-force)
and za (short for pizza).
***
MACK trucks have bulldogs as hood
ornaments. People who really love their
MACK bulldog can buy “Mack Duds,”
little clothes to put on the bulldog.
***
The famous Hollywood sign was
rebuilt in 1978. The original sign, built
in 1923, was damaged and falling apart.
Celebrities sponsored individual letters
of the sign for $27,500 each. Among
the people that paid to restore the sign
were singers Gene Autry (1907-1998)
and Andy Williams (born 1927).
***
The size of a football field is 120 yards
long and 53 1/3 yards wide.
***
The state of Arizona produces more
copper than all of the other states com-
bined, and has since 1910.
***
Americans first saw bananas at the
1876 Philadelphia Centennial
Exhibition. Sold as an “exotic treat,”
the bananas were wrapped in foil and
cost 10 cents each.
***
Can you name the sports in a triathlon
and the order in which they are compet-
ed? See answer at end.
***
Famous people who attended UCLA
include actors James Dean (1931-1955)
and Jayne Mansfield (1933-1967),
director Francis Ford Coppola (born
1939) and basketball star Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar (born 1947).
***
One hundred cups of coffee consumed
in four hours can kill you. It is equiva-
lent to 10 grams of caffeine, a lethal
amount.
***
Yankee Stadium outraged baseball fans
in 2004 when the stadium stopped sell-
ing Cracker Jacks and sold Crunch ‘n
Munch instead. In two short months,
due to the hue and cry, the stadium
brought back traditional Cracker Jacks.
***
The first gold record awarded to a
recording artist went to Glenn Miller
(1904-1944) in 1942. His song
‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ (1941) sold
more than 1 million records.
***
Novelist Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855)
wrote Jane Eyre in 1847. Her sister
Emily Brontë (1818-1848) wrote
Wuthering Heights in 1848.
***
To easily peel a sweet potato, take it
from boiling water and immerse it in a
bowl of ice cold water for 20 seconds,
then peel the skin off.
***
Koalas are not bears. They are marsupi-
als.
***
In 2009, Samsung built the largest
functioning cellphone. It measured 15
feet by 11.2 feet by 2.5 feet.
***
A “close encounter” with aliens is a
sighting of a UFO. A ‘close encounter
of the second kind’ is finding physical
evidence of a UFO. An encounter of the
third kind is physical contact with a
UFO.
***
Kampgrounds of America (KOA) had
its first campground in 1962 along the
Yellowstone River in Montana.
Montana businessman Dave Drum rec-
ognized the need for a nice, clean
campground for weary travelers. He
offered, hot showers, clean rest rooms
and a small store for $1.75 a night.
***
Answer: The three sports in a triathlon,
in order, are swimming, cycling and
running. The three sports are per-
formed consecutively with no breaks.
The standard distances in a triathlon
are 1,500 meter swim, 40 kilometer
bike ride and 10 kilometer run.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
7 14 23 26 31 5
Mega number
May 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
www.greenhillsretirement.com
1201 Broadway Millbrae, CA 94030
Lic. 4150600292
Along with our Assisted and Independent Living,
we now provide Memory Care Services.
“Mom was a fall risk.
Ever since we moved her to
Greenhills we have peace of
mind knowing she is cared for.”
CALL TODAY FOR A FREE TOUR
(650) 742-9150
REDWOOD CITY
Vandalism. All four tires on a vehicle were
flat on Madrone Street before 8:13 a.m. Friday,
May 25.
DUI. A white Cadillac was driving on the rail-
road tracks under the freeway and the driver
was arrested at Chestnut Street and Veterans
Boulevard before 11:48 p.m. Thursday, May
24.
Disturbance. A person was throwing garbage
cans and screaming at others on Stambaugh
Street before 10:07 p.m. Wednesday, May 23.
Accident. A vehicle crashed after driving on
the wrong side of El Camino Real before 8:57
p.m. Wednesday, May 23.
Burglary. A person in a wheelchair was tied
down while two people burglarized his house
on Hudson Street before 12:21 p.m.
Wednesday, May 23.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on Birch
Street before 11:04 a.m. Wednesday, May 23.
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. A man reported several juve-
niles tried to “attack” him while he was riding
his motorcycle and they pushed an elderly
woman down at the intersection of South San
Mateo Drive and Second Avenue before 2:15
p.m. Tuesday, May 29.
Armed robbery. An armed person robbed 7-
Eleven on the 600 block of Concar Drive
before 12:02 a.m. Tuesday, May 29.
Fraud. Identity fraud was reported on the 100
block of South Grant Street before 2:14 p.m.
Thursday, May 24.
Burglary. Cash and prescription medications
were reportedly taken from a house on the
1300 block of Palos Verdes Drive before 3:10
a.m. Wednesday, May 23.
Police reports
Oh dear!
A bicyclist ran into a deer at the inter-
section of 42nd and Bettina avenues in
San Mateo before 8:51 a.m. Tuesday,
May 29.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Alex Tabing has found her place by being
part of a team — both on the field and in stu-
dent government roles — but never lost her
curiosity for exploring the world of science.
The 17-year-old was always curious. In
fact, at 5, she asked for a microscope, which
she still has. Her tenure with sports started
earlier though. At 4, she started playing soc-
cer. Softball started a couple years later and
lasted through her freshman year. At one
point, basketball was also in the mix.
Tabing explained she enjoyed being part
of something bigger than her. That explana-
tion speaks to many of her choices in sup-
porting her larger Notre Dame High School
community over the last four years.
“Alexandra Tabing is our 2012 Great
Graduate because of her pursuit of excel-
lence in all areas without compromise, her
strength of purpose, her stellar integrity and
her consistent desire to understand and to
integrate her growing body of knowledge
with the goal of becoming a well-educated
leader and a woman for others,” said
Principal Rita Gleason.
Tabing attended Our Lady of Mr. Carmel
from preschool through eighth grade before
enrolling at Notre Dame. The choice to
attend the Belmont school came after Tabing
saw the wonderful experience her older sis-
ter was having. Once in high school, Tabing
remained active in her club soccer team,
Peninsula Blue Lightning. Once at Notre
Dame, Tabing decided to play basketball at
school since she didn’t have a club option
for the sport. She played for two years and
won the most inspirational player award her
freshman year.
Getting involved really took off when, at
the encouragement of her sister, Tabing ran
for class office as a freshman. As class pres-
ident, she jumped into the new school and
began meeting new people. Tabing had
wanted a challenge that required her to step
up and push herself. She found it in leader-
ship. She was also class president her soph-
omore and junior years. Most recently,
Tabing served as one of six girls on the asso-
ciated student body. The decision to stay that
involved was easy for Tabing.
“I attribute a lot of who I am today to the
Notre Dame community,” Tabing said,
adding she wanted to give back and serve the
community that had supported her.
One way Tabing supported the school was
by serving on the Ambassador Board and
helping to revamp the shadow program,
which allows potential new students to fol-
low a current student during the day to get a
feel for the school.
Her work supporting the school hasn’t
gone unnoticed. She was given the Karen
Judge Ring Award — an award passed down
by a graduating senior to a rising junior at
the school. At the time of the interview,
Tabing was still deciding who to pass the
ring on to before graduating.
Looking forward, Tabing plans to study
engineering although what kind is still up in
the air. She enjoys the practicality of engi-
neering and believes it can be the basis for a
variety of occupational options in the future.
Before starting work on her degree,
Tabing plans to make a summer bucket list
with friends and attempt to complete it.
Notre Dame High School’s graduation
will be held 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 5 at St.
Pius Catholic Church, 1100 Woodside Road,
Redwood City. Tickets are required.
Great Grads is in its seventh year profiling
one graduating senior from each of our local
schools. Schools have the option to partici-
pate. Those that choose to participate are
asked to nominate one student who deserves
recognition.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Supporting her community
Age: 17
City of residence:
Redwood City
College:
Northwestern
Major: Engineering
Favorite subject in
high school:
Advanced placement
chemistry but also enjoyed English
What she’ll miss about high school:
The community and sisterhood at Notre
Dame.
Biggest life lesson learned thus far:To
be confident and trust yourself to take
risks.
Alex Tabing
4
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Lic: 41560033
MILLS ESTATE VILLA
24 Hour Assisted Living Care
Vacation and Short Term Respite
Stays Always Welcome
650.692.0600
1733 California Drive, Burlingame
www.CiminoCare.com
¸Gmj^Yeadq
nY[YlagfoYk
[Yj]%^j]]o`ad]
EgeoYkaf
_gg\`Yf\kYl
Eaddk=klYl]NaddY
^gjYo]]c&¹
5
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Millbrae looking to
appoint school leaders
Two openings on the Millbrae
Elementary School District Board of
Trustees will be filled by appointment
next month.
An empty seat became available
with last month’s death of Caroline
Shea, who was in the middle of serv-
ing her fifth term on the board. A sec-
ond opening was created by the relo-
cation of Trustee Marjory Luxenberg.
The terms of both women are set to
expire in 2013.
The board recently decided on
appointments to fill the vacancies
through December 2013. Those
appointed will be able to run for office
in November 2013 to serve a full
four-year term, according to a press
release written by Superintendent
Linda Luna.
Applicants must be registered vot-
ers who live in the district’s atten-
dance area. Applications are available
at the district office, 555 Richmond
Drive in Millbrae, and on the district’s
website, www.millbraeschooldis-
trict.org. Applications are due by 4
p.m. Friday, June 15. Interviews will
be held at a June 25 board meeting.
$1M sought in alleged
Redwood City teacher abuse
A mom whose 5-year-old son was
allegedly kicked and deprived of food
by a Redwood City special education
teacher is seeking more than $1 mil-
lion in damages.
Nadia Cortez filed a legal claim on
Thursday that names the teacher, 44-
year-old Alexia Bogdis, and several
school district officials and aides.
Such claims generally precede law-
suits. Cortez says Bogdis, a teacher at
Roosevelt Elementary School, pulled
her autistic son’s hair, kicked him in
the stomach and prevented him from
eating and drinking water.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Port of Redwood City is cele-
brating its 75th year by inviting over
today another septuagenarian — the
USS Potomac, the presidential yacht
commonly considered the “Floating
White House” during its Roosevelt-
era heyday.
Together, the port and the yacht
will mark three-quarters of a century
of maritime history by throwing open
their doors to the public for a peek
into the past and — at least for the
Peninsula’s only active commercial
port — a look to the present and
future. “It’s a unique opportunity to
celebrate both birthdays together,”
said Port Executive Director Mike
Giari. “And it’s a great chance to
come down to the best waterfront of
any city on the Peninsula.”
Giari concedes some people don’t
know the port even exists and even
more can’t really say what it does. On
Saturday, though, visitors can learn
its story through historical photo-
graphs and displays by port tenants
like Sims Metal Management, which
is co-sponsoring the Potomac’s rare
visit.
The port actually started operating
in the 1860s to ship logs and lumber
to build San Francisco and Oakland.
In 1936, Redwood City voters passed
a ballot measure financing and revi-
talizing the deep-water port, making
if officially part of the city.
The same year, the U.S. Navy
crowned the USS Potomac as the
official ship of President Franklin
Delano Roosevelt who used it until
his death in 1945. Right off the state-
room sits a large teak deck used as a
sitting area for Roosevelt. He liked
greeting dignitaries and guests in the
rounded area because it was very
wide and long to accommodate his
wheelchair, said Adam Alberti,
speaking on behalf of sponsor Sims.
“It was certainly grand in its day.
Visitors will see it is still very stately
and also of that period,” Alberti said.
The 165-foot ship’s colorful past
didn’t end there. Singer Elvis Presley
was one of many owners before she
was seized in San Francisco after
being used by drug smugglers. The
ship was impounded, sank, raised
and abandoned on an East Bay estu-
ary. Rotting and a week away from
being sold for scrap, the ship was res-
cued by the Port of Oakland which
paid $15,000 and launched a $5 mil-
lion, 12-year renovation.
The last time the ship made the
voyage from Jack London Square to
Redwood City was 10 to 15 years
ago, Giari said.
Aside from the Potomac, visitors
today can also enjoy food and drink
at the Sequoia Yacht Club, listen to
live music at the waterfront stage and
learn more about the port, its tenants
and what they do.
“You know all those squished cars
you see transported on the highway?”
Giari asked.
They are headed to Sims which
recycles all sorts of metals.
How about the foundation of the
new San Francisco 49ers stadium in
the South Bay? All those materials
came through the Port of Redwood
City, Giari said.
About 50 to 60 vessels come
through the port with cargo yearly
and the uptick in need for construc-
tion materials — like that needed for
the stadium — helps keep the port
thriving even if flies under many peo-
ple’s radar, Giari said.
“We hope people will come down
and learn more about us,” Giari said.
“And, of course, visit the Potomac,
too.”
Port sails into platinum anniversary
The Potomac will be open for dockside tours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday,June 2 at the Port of Redwood City Marina,451 Seaport Court,
Redwood City. Tours are $5 for adults, free for children 12 and under.
Parking is free.There will be live music at the port’s outdoor waterfront
stage.The Sequoia Yacht Club will be open to the public for food and
beverages.
USS Potomac public viewing
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A teen who helped hold up a
San Mateo barbershop at gunpoint
was sentenced to a year in jail and
probation for making off with jew-
elry and money from both the cus-
tomers and employees.
Bernard Sims, 18, also received
a five-year suspended prison sen-
tence and was ordered to stay
away from his two co-defendants
and the San Mateo Zoo Barber
Shop. At the same hearing Friday,
Bryan Deonte Carter, 18, delayed
his sentencing in the same case
until July 22 and Dedrick Montre
Sevier, 23, reset his trial date to
July 23.
Carter and Sims each faced up
to five years in prison after plead-
ing no contest to two counts of
robbery and admitted using a
weapon and that the crime was a
violent felony. Sevier is still
charged with 10 counts of first-
degree robbery and one count of
second-degree burglary.
The three were arrested Dec. 17,
2010 on suspicion of robbing
employees and customers of the
San Mateo Zoo Barber Shop at
1226 El Camino Real. Sevier, who
is on parole for a 2008 Menlo Park
robbery, allegedly brandished a
Ruger 9 mm handgun while order-
ing everyone to the ground. The
group allegedly fled with jewelry,
wallets and cash.
Police responding to the inci-
dent chased the getaway car south
on Highway 101 and off the
Ralston Avenue exit where the
suspects allegedly tossed the gun
onto the freeway and ran. Police
apprehended the three along with
a woman reportedly driving the
car. They recovered the gun and
stolen property.
Sevier remains in custody in
lieu of $100,000 bail.
Teen gets jail, probation in barbershop holdup
6
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
]ust be age 62+ and own your own home:
ϑ Turn home equIty Into cash
ϑ Pay oII bIIIs & credIt cards
ϑ No more mortgage payments
ϑ RemaIn In your home as Iong as you IIve
ϑ You retaIn ownershIp (tItIe) to your home
ϑ FHA Insured program
Call today for a free, easy to read quote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
Carol ßertocchini, CPA
NMLS ÌD #455078
Reverse Mortgage
SpecIaIIst and a CPA
wIth over 25 years
experIence as a
IInancIaI proIessIonaI
S1L NMLS ÌD 98161
CA DRE #01820779
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
CITY GOVERNMENT
• A proposal to build a series of
large office buildings, possibly the
home to biotech companies, at the
now-vacant former Burlingame
Drive-in, will be reviewed by the
City Council Monday.
Millennium Partners, New York-
based developers of mixed-used properties, applied in April
2010 to develop the 18.13-acre site — a project now known
as Burlingame Point, located at 300 Airport Blvd. (also
known as 350 Beach Road). Plans call for 689,810 square
feet of office space in two five-story buildings, one seven-
story building and one eight-story building. In December
2010, the City Council approved an agreement to conduct an
environmental review of the project, which became available
for review late last year. In May, the Planning Commission
gave unanimous support for the proposal.
As proposed, the project will provide space for either
office or biotech use. When last changed, the zoning for the
Bayfront was altered to be open for biotech. There would
also be a two-story, 33,400-square-foot amenities building
that would include a child-care facility, exercise facility and
a cafe/break room. Parking would be offered in a five-story
parking structure and a podium-level parking area below the
four office buildings and in smaller lots scattered around the
site.
At the same meeting, the council will hold a public hear-
ing about its 2012-13 proposed budget and capital improve-
ment program.
In other business, the council will consider introducing an
ordinance to allow up to three more restaurants in certain
areas of the Burlingame Avenue Commercial District.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, June 4 at City Hall, 501
Primrose Road, Burlingame.
T
he Black Parents Association
of the San Mateo Union High
School District will hold its
27th Baccalaureate Ceremony 3 p.m.
June 3 at Pilgrim Baptist Church in
San Mateo. This year’s program is enti-
tled “Navigate your life with Faith,
Focus and Fortitude” and is dedicated
to honor students of color who attend
school in the San Mateo Union High
School District for their community
involvement, extracurricular, civic and
cultural activities, as well as their
scholastic and leadership achievements.
Each graduate will receive a
“Certificate of Congratulations” and
an honorary “Kente Cloth Scarf,”
which represents cultural diversity,
African-American heritage and success
in academic studies.
Qualified graduating students within
the school district who have met a grade
point average of 2.5 or higher; shown
community involvement; possess leader-
ship qualities, positive attitude and com-
mitment are selected for scholarship
awards. If you would like to make a
donation to the Black Parents
Association of the SMUHSD please
email smubpa@gmail.com for more
information or send checks payable to
Black Parents Association SMUHSD,
P.O. Box 101, San Mateo, CA 94401.
***
In February, students in the Hillsdale
Effect, a club from Hillsdale High
School that fundraises to provide
microloans for impoverished women in
Guatemala, lived on $2 a day to raise
awareness of world poverty.
To date, the teens have raised about
$22,000, enough to offer loans to 44
women. This year, the group had raised
$5,000 by the end of February.
***
Sacred Heart Preparatory student
Catherine Mullings won the NCWIT
Award for
Aspirations in
Computing. The
award, sponsored by
Bank of America
and the National
Center for Women
& Information
Technology, recog-
nizes young high
school women for
their computing-
related achievements and interests as part
of an effort to encourage more young
women to choose careers in technology.
A total of 35 award-winners were
selected from high schools across the
country for their outstanding aptitude
and interest in information technology
and computing, solid leadership ability,
good academic history and plans for
post-secondary education.
Each award-winner receives: $500 in
cash, a laptop computer, a trip to the
Bank of America Technology
Showcase and Awards Ceremony held
in Charlotte, N.C. and an engraved award
for both the student and the school.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
Two singers from Notre Dame
Elementary School were the only
Catholic school representatives selected
for the annual California Music Education
Association’s Bay Area Honor Choir Jan.
13 and Jan.14.Eighth grader Meg Tillman
and seventh grader Ellie Duebner were
nominated by their music teacher/choral
director, Barbara Varian Barrett, for their
vocal quality and music proficiency to
join a choir of 120 seventh to ninth grade
singers for this two-day event at San Jose
State University. The event was in
conjunction with the annual CMEA
Winter Conference for music educators
in the Bay Area.
Catherine
Mullings
7
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE – I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a “red-fag”. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the “Archdiocese of Los
Angeles” has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
“Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California” the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with “Stewart Enterprises”
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. “Stewart Enterprises” runs a
website called “Catholic Mortuaries.com”
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I don’t see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point I’m trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesn’t mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
Kids Across
1. A fying lady in a storybook
who can make magic
happen with the touch of
her wand
3. A group of geese all fying
together
5. When the letters in the word
"low" are unscrambled, they
spell out this high fyer
8. You can fnd this little bird in
middle of the name of a man
named "Lawrence"
9. What you need to build your
very own airplane
11. Although it usually jumps
around like its cricket cousin,
when a ______ is in a hurry,
it can fy
15. The pros on the plane who
help the passengers
16. If you have ever seen a silver
dollar, you know that this
bird is on the money
18. A dragonfy has two sets of
_______ which it can use to
fy forward and backward
19. I have a long tail and soar
through the skies, but
actually I'm not alive? What
am I?
20. Famous bird tale: "The ____
Duckling"
21. God's helpers who fy around
heaven
22. When a baby bird is old
enough to leave home, its
mother nudges him out of
the ____
23. A mammal that can fy (or
what a baseball player uses
to hit a fy ball)
Parents Down
1. What a butterfy does with
its 18A as it futters by
2. Air passenger's mugshot
card, for short (without it,
she's grounded)
4. Europe's upersonic shuttle
6. Broom zoomer
7. Flying saucer Rover thinks of
as a good catch
8. Narrow-waisted frequent
fyer
10. Ejects, pulls the cord and
foats to down to earth (or
apparatus used to do it)
12. Look up, look down: Where
fying fsh are, most of the
time
13. Mythical horse that really
took of
14. Aerodynamically challenged
farm residents
17. Ancient place where the
Phoenix is said to have risen
from the ashes
18. Take a fying leap: Although
he can steer by shifting his
weight, its currents are really
a hang glider's guider
This Week’s Solution
© 2012 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Creators
Syndicate, Inc.
6/03/12 kris@kapd.com Visit www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family!

The Original Crossword Puzzle for Kids and Their Favorite Adults

The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for grown-ups!
Fly Away!
By Jan Buckner Walker
LOCAL 8
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Edward J. Leahy
Edward J. Leahy, born May 4, 1925 to Helen and Joseph
William Leahy, Cohoes, NY, passed away suddenly on Friday,
May 25, 2012at his homeintheCity of SanMateowherehehad
resided since 1955. Ed graduated from Vincentian Institute
High School in Albany, NY in 1943. Upon graduation he joined
the U.S. Navy under the V-5(Naval Aviation Cadet)/V-12 (Navy
College Training) programs attending school in Virginia at
Emory & Henry College, the University of Richmond and the
U.S. Navy Midshipman School at the University of Notre Dame
earning his commission as Ensign. During World War II he
served on the USS Sepulga and the amphibious transport USS Henrico achieving the rank of
Lieutenant Commander over his active naval career.
Subsequent to his military service Ed returned to New York where he graduated from
Siena College. On June 14, 1948 he married Stella McKay of Salem, Ore at St. Mary’s
church in Cohoes with his sister Helen and her husband Edward F. “Ted” Morris (both of
whom preceded him in death in April 2007) serving as maid of honor and best man.
In the early 1950’s the couple moved to California where Ed joined the U.S. Naval
Radiological Defense Laboratory in San Francisco. At NRDL, Ed became the head of
the Fleet Support Branch of the Military Evaluations Division where he directed staff in
operations research analysis, nuclear physics and mathematics with the chief emphasis
on the analysis of operations and systems in support of fleet operations. Over his career
at NRDL Ed participated in numerous nuclear weapons field tests in the Pacific, was a
member of the Navy’s Radiological Control Team winning Superior Accomplishment
awards and authoring a number of technical publications.
Upon the closure of NRDL in 1969, Ed went to work for the U.S. Army Engineer
Waterways Experiment Station Explosive Excavation Research Laboratory at the
Lawrence Livermore Laboratory where he participated in various programs including
those at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station at Fort Polk, Louisiana,
Dredged Sediment Movement Tracing in San Francisco Bay and the Nevada Test Site
with the mission to make contributions in excavation research with explosives for
both military and civil works construction.
Having devoted his professional career to the study of nuclear physics, he continued
his career with the University of California, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory where he
became Group Leader within the Health Physics Group until his retirement in 1990.
At home Ed and Stella raised five children, Constance, Edward, Scott, Cynthia, and
Martin. Early on, Ed was active with the Boy Scouts of America and St. Gregory’s
parish. Later he became involved with St. Bartholomew’s parish serving as an usher
for many years while also volunteering at the Second Harvest Food Bank/St. Vincent
de Paul until his passing. Ed was a devoted husband throughout their nearly 64
years of marriage as well as loving father to his children and grandfather to Damien,
Jessica, Travis, Nicole, Rushton, Malcolm, Alexandra (Sashka), Tom, Sam and Allison.
Ed’s disciplined approach to life combined with his dry humor will be greatly missed
by his family and friends, including friends of the Irish Mafia. The family would also
like to sincerely thank those that have assisted Ed and Stella over the last couple of
years for their patience, love and kindness.
A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11:00am Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at St.
Bartholomew Catholic Church, 600 Columbia Dr., San Mateo, Ca. 94402 with a
reception immediately following.
Private family interment will follow the reception. In lieu of flowers the family
would like donations sent to the Second Harvest Food Bank, 1051 Bing Street, San
Carlos, CA. 94070.
Obituary
Lois Marie Watson
Former Burlingame Elementary School
District administrator Lois Marie Watson died
May 25, 2012 at the age of
82.
She was a resident of
Hillsborough.
Her distinguished career
as an educator spanned 40
years, beginning in San
Francisco in 1951, where
she was a teacher and
principal. She moved to
Burlingame in 1968 as primary consultant and
principal of Coolidge School, and served as
director of Curriculum, Instruction and
Personnel and chief negotiator until her retire-
ment in 1991. After she retired, she served
several more years as director of Student
Teaching at Notre Dame de Namur University,
continuing to share her expertise with young
educators entering the profession. She
achieved the notable status of “Golden Sister”
in Alpha Delta Kappa, an international sorori-
ty of women educators.
In addition to her career, Mrs. Watson was
involved in her community. She served as
commodore of the Coyote Point Yacht Club
and president of the following organizations:
Broadway by the Bay, Peninsula Civic Light
Opera, Burlingame University Club, Dancing
Partners, Soroptomists and Futures Unlimited.
Lois was a remarkable lady who loved to
water ski, snow ski, scuba dive, sail, dance,
sing and swim. She will be greatly missed.
She is survived by her beloved husband of
62 years John Watson, her daughter Kimberly
Stertzer, son-in-law Dr. Simon Stertzer and
granddaughters Jessica and Allison.
A memorial service will be held 2 p.m.
Thursday, June 14 at the First Presbyterian
Church of Burlingame.
Friends may sign the guestbook at
www.crippenflynn.com.
Constance Elizabeth ‘Connie’ Del Visco
Constance Elizabeth “Connie” Del Visco,
born Aug. 20, 1931, died May 27, 2012 peace-
fully after a short illness in Hayden, Idaho at
the age of 80.
She was a longtime resident of Redwood
City before moving to Rathdrum, Idaho with
her daughter and family in
2009. She was the mother
of nine children, grand-
mother of 19, great-grand-
mother of four, aunt to
may nieces and nephews,
and good friend to many.
She is survived by her sis-
ters Esther Capulli of
North Carolina, Gail
Patalliot of California, and Elaine Edwards of
Massachusetts, her children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by
her parents, sister Maureen Pepi, and brothers
Robert “Bob” Templeton and Donald
Templeton. She was a beloved daycare
provider and foster mother to many in San
Mateo County. She was an avid baseball fan of
the San Francisco Giants and her original
hometown team, the Boston Red Sox. She was
also a 49er faithful. She will be greatly missed
by all who knew and loved her. At Connie's
request, there will be no memorial services
held.
Edward Michael Magyar
Edward Michael Magyar, former resident of
Redwood City, died peacefully in his Fremont
residence May 28, 2012 at
the age of 86.
Born on Dec. 6, 1925 in
Cleveland, Ohio, he was
preceded in death by his
parents Michael and
Marie Magyar, his step-
mother Julia Magyar, his
wife Doris Magyar and his
sister Mary Jane Lazor.
He is survived by his sis-
ter Evelyn Kilbourn, his daughters Cathy
Dutton and Cindy Vanderpan, grandsons
Chris and Michael Dutton and several nieces,
grand-nieces and grand-nephews. All will
miss him very much. Having served a long
and faithful career in the U.S. Air Force,
Edward will be laid to rest alongside his
beloved wife in Golden Gate National
Cemetery on June 4, 2012. Donations may be
made in his memory to The Carter Center
(www.cartercenter.org).
Obituaries
Man charged with
stalking female students
A 23-year-old man pleaded not guilty Friday
to allegations he stalked female high school
students in South San
Francisco.
South San Francisco
police say Diego Equihua-
Torres allegedly stalked
two students as they
walked from their school
into downtown South San
Francisco between May 22
and May 25. Equihua-
Torres never threatened or
spoke to the students, but
made it obvious he was following them, police
said. Then at about 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, one
of the girls called police when she noticed
Equihua-Torres following her again.
He was found near Grand and Maple
avenues and arrested on suspicion of stalking
and annoying/harassing someone under 18
years old, police said.
On Friday, Equihua-Torres pleaded not
guilty and asked for a court-appointed attor-
ney. A judge dropped his bail to $10,000 and
ordered him back to court June 7 for a pretrial
conference followed by a June 25 jury trial.
Weekend construction to
close arrival runway, cause delays
Travelers arriving at San Francisco
International Airport this weekend should
expect delays because of the closure of one of
two main arrival runways, airport officials said
Friday.
Runway 28L will be closed from 8 p.m.
today through 8 a.m. Monday to allow con-
struction crews to modify lighting and signs
and install infrastructure for new runway sta-
tus lights, according to airport spokesman
Mike McCarron.
The closure will cut the arrival rate in half at
the airport, from 60 aircrafts per hour to 30,
McCarron said in a statement.
Travelers should expect delays during peak
arrival times, especially for flights originating
within two hours of SFO.
Travelers expecting to fly in or out of SFO
this weekend should contact their airline
regarding possible delays.
The runway closure and construction are the
first part of a federally mandated runway safe-
ty project. The project is expected to be com-
pleted by the fall of 2014.
Former mayor drops appointment bid
Former San Carlos mayor Brad Lewis, who
temporarily rejoined the City Council last year
after the mayor unexpectedly died, withdrew
his name from consideration for an 18-month
appointment to fill the latest mid-term vacancy.
Lewis’ withdrawal follows on the heels of
Cameron Johnson, a member of the city’s
Economic Development Advisory
Commission, doing the same because of the
City Council request applicants agree not to
run for election in 2013.
Lewis cited the time and energy needed to
adequately fill the open seat in his withdrawal
request to City Clerk Christine Boland and
City Manager Jeff Maltbie.
Seven applicants still remain in the running
for the seat: Farrokh Albuyeh, Karen Clapper,
Ricardo Garcia-Pacheco, John Hoffmann,
Sally Mitchell, Steven San Filippo and Inge
Tiegel-Doherty. The City Council will hold
interviews and an appointment next
Wednesday night.
The current vacancy was created in April
when former mayor Andy Klein resigned for
personal reasons. After three meetings, the
council agreed to appoint a replacement until
the regular November 2013 election and ask
applicants for a promise not to run. The request
is not legally enforceable but the City Council
has used it before, most recently when Lewis
was named to fill the vacancy left by the May
2011 death of former mayor Omar Ahmad.
The interviews will be 5 p.m. Wednesday,
June 6 at the San Carlos Library, Second Floor,
610 Elm St.
Local briefs
Diego
Equihua-Torres
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The motorist arrested for evading police after
driving the wrong way through the presidential
motorcade during Barack Obama’s Redwood
City visit last month told authorities he loved
the president, agrees with everything he stands
for and meant him no harm, according to pros-
ecutors.
However, the District Attorney’s Office did
charge Eddie Darrell Boyce Jr., 49, with one
felony count of fleeing a peace officer and a
misdemeanor charge of hit and run after crash-
ing his vehicle at the intersection of El Camino
Real and Carlos Avenue.
Boyce, of Mountain View, pleaded not guilty
Friday and was ordered back to court June 25
for a preliminary hearing.
Redwood City police arrested Boyce May 23
after he reportedly drove around a barricade and
down a street sealed off for the motorcade’s trip
from an Atherton campaign event to the Fox
Theatre on Broadway. The
president was not yet in the
area around 9 p.m. when
Boyce reportedly drove his
sedan around a police car
near Manzanita Street that
was serving as part of the
barricade. The officers tried
cutting him off but Boyce
allegedly drove the wrong
way down El Camino Real
and crashed into a curb and
SamTrans sign in the 2600 block.
After being taken into custody, Boyce told
police he knew Obama was going to be at the
Fox Theatre but wasn’t attempting to harm him,
said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Boyce reportedly said he didn’t hear the
police siren and was on his way to visit a friend.
If convicted, Boyce faces six years in prison
as a second-striker. His prior convictions con-
tributed to his bail being set at $500,000,
Wagstaffe said.
Boyce remains in custody.
Aragon water polo coach arrested
A 25-year-old water polo coach at Aragon
High School in San Mateo was arrested
Friday for sexual assault on a minor and lewd
acts with a minor after a female student
reported he had touched her inappropriately,
according to police.
The coach, Joshua David Tatro, of El
Granada, was taken into custody without inci-
dent. The girl said the inappropriate behavior
took place this past year and police began
their investigation May 14 after school offi-
cials notified them. Tatro had worked at the
school for one year, according to police.
Driver pleads not guiltyto crashing
presidential motorcade barriers
Eddie Boyce
OPINION 9
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S
an Mateo County voters will
head to the polls June 5. The
Daily Journal is making the
following recommendations for
candidates, propositions and
measures.
National offices
U.S. Senate
Dianne Feinstein (D)
U.S. representative, District 14
Jackie Speier (D)
U.S. representative, District 18
Anna Eshoo (D)
State offices
State Senate, District 13
Jerry Hill (D)
State Assembly, District 22
Kevin Mullin (D)
State Assembly, District 24
Rich Gordon (D)
County offices
(nonpartisan)
Supervisor, District One
Dave Pine
Supervisor, District Four
Warren Slocum
Supervisor, District Five
Adrienne Tissier
State propositions
Proposition 28-YES
Proposition 28 would extend the
amount of time a legislator can
hold office in either the state
Senate or Assembly to 12 years
but reduce the amount of time a
legislator can hold office in both
houses of the state Legislature
from 14 to 12. A yes vote means
state legislators can be more effec-
tive in one house, while not think-
ing about making the jump to
another house. Term limits means
legislators often spend too much
time running for office rather than
conducting the business of the
state. This proposition would
allow a constant tenure in one of
the state’s legislative bodies.
***
Proposition 29-NO
Proposition 29 imposes an addi-
tional $1 per pack tax on ciga-
rettes and an equivalent tax
increase on other tobacco prod-
ucts. Revenue produced from this
tax would fund research for cancer
and tobacco-related illnesses.
While this proposition is a step up
from other similar proposals that
seek to fund unrelated programs
from cigarette taxes in that the
revenue produced will go toward
disease research, but now is not
the time to create a new govern-
ment program funded with tax
money. In addition, the majority
of cigarette smokers are low-
income and a new tax on that pop-
ulation is an unfair burden.
County measures
Measure T-NO
Measure T imposes a 2.5 percent
business license tax on vehicle
rental businesses operating in
unincorporated areas of the coun-
ty. It requires a majority vote to
pass. This measure is aimed at the
San Francisco International
Airport and seeks $7.75 million a
year for the county government.
Ostensibly, it will tax out-of-town
visitors but could make large
meeting and convention planners
consider taking their business
elsewhere. In addition, air
travel at SFO is
rebounding, but it has
been a long road
since the downturn
after the terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11,
2001. It is too tenuous
a time to create any
disincentive for air travel
to the area and add risk to local
business owners who depend on
tourist revenue.
***
Measure U-YES
Measure U increases the existing
transient occupancy tax from 10
percent to 12 percent in the unin-
corporated areas of the county and
brings it in line with similar taxes
imposed by local cities. It requires
a majority vote to pass. This meas-
ure would mean a modest increase
to the hotel tax in the unincorpo-
rated areas of the county —
approximately $1.50 for a $75 a
night visit. It aims to raise approx-
imately $200,000 a year for the
county government.
***
Measure W-YES
Measure W is a $67 parcel tax to
improve education at elementary
and middle schools in the
Redwood City Elementary School
District. It requires
two-thirds vote to pass. In the last
five years, the district has had to
make due with $13 million in cuts
in the last five years and no one
has had a raise. The current stu-
dent to teacher ratio is 30 to 1 —
a number which most people
agree is too high for effective edu-
cation. The parcel tax will not
cure the district’s ills but it
is a modest measure to
assist it in a tight fiduci-
ary time and is certainly
warranted this year.
***
Measure X-NO
Measure X imposes an 8
percent business license tax
on commercial parking facility
operators in unincorporated areas
of the county. It requires majority
vote to pass. This measure would
likely be passed on to customers,
many who live in this county and
use these facilities when taking
flights from SFO elsewhere.
***
Measure Z-YES
Measure Z will mean the continu-
ation of a parcel tax of no higher
than $65 for four more years
County Fire Service Area 1, also
known as the Highlands. It
requires two-thirds vote to pass.
The county currently contracts
with the California Department of
Forestry and Fire Protection for
coverage of its unincorporated
areas like the Highlands but voters
there also pay an additional
amount of $65 per parcel to
increase the level of service. The
tax was set at $65 in 1996 and
generates approximately $92,000
annually.
To find your polling location or read other
nonpartisan election information prepared
by the League of Women Voters visit
http://www.smartvoter.org/.
Recommendations for the June election
Other
voices
Facebook’s initial
public offering
— The Daily Gazette,
Schenectady, N.Y.
W
hen investors, be they
large institutions or
small individuals, put
money into a stock, they have to
accept the possibility that their
investment won’t pan out. That’s
probably truer of an initial public
offering for a stock than of one that’s
already been trading, because not
only is there more known about the
latter company, its stock has some
kind of track record.
Still, investment bankers that
underwrite IPOs provide their insti-
tutional clients — who usually get
first dibs — with information about
the company’s performance, so these
preferred clients can make educated
guesses as to the IPO’s prospects.
When the IPOs are winners, the
stocks take off like rockets on the
first day of trading, and the institu-
tions can flip them for handsome
profits, or hang on for bigger long-
term gains.
By now, everyone knows that’s not
what happened with the much-antici-
pated, heavily hyped Facebook IPO
May 18. And while many institution-
al investors bought less of the stock
beforehand or unloaded immediately
that day, apparently because they’d
been tipped off by underwriters that
the company’s prospects had
dimmed since the initial prospectus
was issued, many retail investors
who didn’t get that information
bought more than they should have
and got stuck holding the bag, which
is now worth anywhere from one-
fifth to one-third less than they paid
for it. Understandably, they’re
demanding to know what happened,
and have found sympathetic ears in
Washington.
Corporate
tax reform
— The Plain Dealer, Cleveland
O
n April 1, when Japan low-
ered its corporate tax rate,
this country’s 35 percent tax
rate became the highest in the indus-
trialized world. Because the U.S. tax
code has so many loopholes or
breaks, the effective rate for corpora-
tions averaged 27.7 percent between
2006 and 2009, according to a
PricewaterhouseCoopers report, but
even that is well above the average for
comparable nations. ...
There actually are glimmers of
bipartisan agreement in Washington
that the United States needs to lower
corporate tax rates and simplify a tax
code that has grown so complex that
American business spends billions of
dollars trying to comply with its pro-
visions — or to capitalize on the myr-
iad breaks it contains.
Undoing this labyrinth and over-
coming the objections of its many
defenders will require cooperation
and discipline across party lines, on
both sides of Capitol Hill and at both
ends of Pennsylvania Avenue — traits
that are in short supply these days. It
will also require a huge investment of
time. But it is an exercise that
Congress and the White House can no
longer avoid.
The sooner the heavy lifting begins
— even if it probably won’t bear fruit
until after this fall’s elections — the
sooner American firms can shore up
their competitive position in the world
economy and create more jobs and
wealth in this country.
Letters to the editor
Leaf-blowing
ordinance … health or tax
Editor,
It seems the Burlingame City
Council has no idea of what they
just created. One day a week hun-
dreds of homes, with gardeners,
will be using leaf blowers. They
claim it is for noise and health rea-
sons. However, I wonder if they
even gave a thought to how much
dust and debris will be blown into
the air on the one day a week. This
looks to me like they didn’t think
at all about what they were going
create, only the ability to charge $5
per leaf blower and a $25 noise
test. The result of this new ordi-
nance, only going to create more
health problems in the areas being
blown on the same day. This is
dumb ordinance, and one that caus-
es more problems than it solves.
Get real council, and cancel this
ordinance before it starts.
Dan Andersen
Burlingame
Event center upgrades
Editor,
For decades, it has been obvious
that the San Mateo County Event
Center is a valuable treasure situat-
ed within the city of San Mateo.
Though owned by the county, when
Chris Carpenter took charge several
years ago, he has managed to dress
up and improve the old facilities,
and attract new events (The Maker
Faire), even surviving the disas-
trous economy that crashed back in
2007 and 2008.
The city has never shown much
interest in coordinating with the
event center. First class business
hotels next door to the event center
should have been included in the
plans for Bay Meadows II. Upscale
restaurants and shops next to the
event center would have appealed
to event planners, conference atten-
dees and residents of Bay
Meadows II, as well as patrons of
the mandatory annual county fair.
Silicon Valley industries
(Salesforce.com, Twitter, etc.) are
learning that their young employ-
ees prefer life in San Francisco, or
at least quick and easy access to
and from the city. Full development
around a contemporary, exciting
San Mateo County Event Center
would help to keep that young
demographic group, their employ-
ers and their paychecks, right here
in San Mateo for their meetings,
conferences and entertainment.
It may be too late, but upgrading
the event center should be a priori-
ty, encouraged and supported
enthusiastically by both the city
and by the county.
Tom Elliott
San Mateo
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who
live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and
insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and
world news, we seek to provide our readers with the highest
quality information resource in San Mateo County. Our
pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to reflect
the diverse character of this dynamic and ever-changing
community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Jeff Palter
Kris Skarston Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Carly Bertolozzi Caitlin Alyce Buckley
Jenna Chambers Kore Chan
Elizabeth Cortes JD Crayne
Darold Fredricks Brian Grabianowski
Drake Herrador Andrew Lyu
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Chloee Weiner
Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not be
accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where we
can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments please.
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are those
of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the views of
the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the accuracy of
any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,118.57 -2.22% 10-Yr Bond 1.467 -7.21%
Nasdaq2,747.48 -2.82% Oil (per barrel) 83.90
S&P 500 1,278.04 -2.46% Gold 1,626.00
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alarmed by an ominously weak U.S.
jobs report, investors ran for safety
Friday from new worries about a global
slowdown, sending the Dow Jones
industrial average to its biggest loss
since November.
The nearly 275-point dive wiped out
the last of the index’s gains for the year.
Across Wall Street, fearful investors
snapped up safer investments such as
bonds, dragging the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note to a record
low. Gold spiked $50 an ounce, and oil
fell to its lowest since October.
“The big worry now is that this eco-
nomic slowdown is widening and accel-
erating,” said Sam Stovall, chief equity
strategist at S&P Capital IQ, a market
research firm.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index and
Nasdaq composite index both fell more
than 2 percent. The Nasdaq has dropped
more than 10 percent since its peak —
what traders call a market correction.
And the S&P 500 is just a point above
correction territory.
American employers added just
69,000 jobs in May, the fewest in a year,
and the unemployment rate increased to
8.2 percent from 8.1 percent.
Economists had forecast a gain of
158,000 jobs.
The report, considered the most
important economic indicator each
month, also said that hiring in March and
April was considerably weaker than
originally thought.
Earlier data showed weak economic
conditions in Europe and Asia, too.
Unemployment in the 17 countries that
use the euro currency stayed at a record-
high 11 percent in April, and unemploy-
ment spiked to almost 25 percent in
Spain.
There were signs that growth in China,
which helped sustain the global econo-
my through the recession, is slowing sig-
nificantly. China’s manufacturing sector
weakened in May, according to surveys
released Friday.
The Dow closed down 274.88 points,
or 2.2 percent, at 12,118.57. The Dow is
off 0.8 percent for the year; two months
ago, it was up more than 8 percent for
the year.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
32.29 points, or 2.5 percent, to 1,278.04.
The Nasdaq dropped 79.86, or 2.8 per-
cent, to 2,747.48. Both indexes are still
up for the year — 1.6 percent for the
S&P 500 and 5.5 percent for the Nasdaq.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year
U.S. Treasury note briefly fell to 1.44
percent, the lowest on record.
Dow takes 275-point dive
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Hewlett-Packard Co., down $1.43 at $21.25
A Jefferies analyst downgraded shares of the
computer maker saying that tablet computers
and smartphones could hurt its business.
Modine Manufacturing Co., down 54 cents at
$5.94
The heating and cooling products maker said
fourth-quarter net income rose, buts its 2013
outlook disappointed investors.
Iamgold Corp., up 98 cents at $11.65
A weaker than expected May U.S. job report
pushed investors to buy gold, sending shares
of gold miners like Iamgold up.
Smith & Nephew PLC, down $1.53 at $45.13
The medical device maker is withdrawing a
metal liner used in hip replacements because
it is “not satisfied”with its clinical results.
DR Horton Inc., down $1.39 at $15.21
Shares of home builders, including DR Horton,
fell after the government released a weaker
than expected May U.S. jobs report.
Nasdaq
Leap Wireless International Inc.,down 71 cents
at $5.06
A BMO Capital Markets analyst downgraded
the phone company’s shares, saying its deal to
sell a prepaid iPhone could hurt margins.
Vera Bradley Inc., down $2.06 at $19.81
A Citi analyst downgraded shares of the bag
and accessories maker saying that he doesn’t
think the stock will move much higher.
OmniVision Technologies Inc., down $2.79 at
$13.40
The maker of image sensors used in mobile
phones said that its profit fell 92 percent in the
fiscal fourth quarter as sales dropped.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Groupon’s stock tum-
bled Friday as insiders sold their shares
after a post-IPO prohibition was lifted.
Employees and other insiders are
required to wait before selling their
stock following a company’s initial pub-
lic offering. Groupon’s lock-up period
expired on Friday. The company went
public on Nov. 4.
Shares of Groupon Inc. fell 95 cents,
or 8.9 percent, to close at $9.69 Friday.
Earlier, the stock was trading as low as
$9.53. That’s the lowest since its IPO,
which priced at $20.
Groupon makes money by selling
online deals for spas, restaurants and
weekend getaways. Though it recently
reported a good quarter, its stock has
been battered due to a series of missteps
with its finances.
In March, the Chicago-based company
restated its quarterly financial results,
explaining that it lost more than it ini-
tially reported because it had to pay out
more refunds than expected. In May, it
replaced two of its board members to
add executives with more accounting
experience.
Friday was a bad day for the overall
stock market, too. A closely watched
report showed that the U.S. economy
added far fewer jobs than expected last
month.
Other social media company stocks
declined as well.
Shares of Facebook Inc. dropped
$1.88, or 6.4 percent, to close at $27.72.
That’s down 27 percent from its IPO
price of $38.
Shares of online game maker Zynga
Inc. slid 25 cents, or 4 percent, to $6.01.
LinkedIn Corp., the online social net-
work for professionals, fell $4.59, or 4.8
percent, to $91.51.
Online reviews site Yelp Inc., mean-
while, fell $1.02, or 6.1 percent, to
$15.69.
Groupon stock tumbles
By Tom Krisher
and Dee-Ann Durbin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Easier credit, hot new
cars and falling gas prices kept
Americans buying vehicles at a strong
pace in May despite bad economic news.
May sales totaled 1.3 million cars and
trucks, up 26 percent from the same
month a year earlier. It was the best May
for the industry since 2008.
The good results surprised some ana-
lysts, since car sales usually hew closely to
the performance of the stock market and to
consumer confidence numbers. In May,
confidence was wobbly and the stock mar-
ket had its worst month in two years.
“We should have had a disastrous new
vehicle sales month, but consumers are
still interested in the new products,” said
Jesse Toprak, vice president of market
intelligence for the car buying site
TrueCar.com. “This was an anomaly.”
Toprak thinks June sales will stumble
as people weigh troubling headlines, like
Friday’s report that U.S. unemployment
rose for the first time in 11 months. He
expects sales to pick up at the end of the
year as the economy improves and the
presidential election ends political
uncertainty.
But others don’t think the disap-
pointing news will derail the indus-
try’s recovery.
“I don’t believe that the employment
data in and of itself will have an impact,”
said Ken Czubay, Ford’s U.S. sales
chief. Czubay said dealer traffic was
strong in May, particularly over
Memorial Day weekend.
Toyota led sales increases with an 87
percent rise from a year earlier, while
Honda saw a 48-percent jump. In May
2011, both companies ran short of cars
and trucks after the earthquake in Japan
crippled their factories. But their show-
rooms are full again, and they’re rapidly
gaining back the market share that they
lost to competitors such as Hyundai and
GM.
New models keep U.S. auto sales solid
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Facebook is letting its
nearly 1 billion users vote on changes to
its privacy policy.
The previously announced changes
include new sections explaining how it
uses people’s information. The updates
also reflect recently added features such as
a new profile format called Timeline.
The new policy also opens up the possi-
bility for Facebook to start showing peo-
ple ads on outside websites, targeting the
pitches to interests and hobbies that users
express on Facebook.
The voting period starts Friday and runs
through next week. The company had
announced the changes in May, a week
before its initial public offering of stock.
Facebook’s highly anticipated IPO landed
with a thud, closing just 23 cents above its
$38 offering price on its first trading day.
The stock has declined another 26 percent
in the two weeks since then.
This is the second time Facebook Inc. is
letting users vote on policy changes. The
first time was in 2009 when Facebook was
a much smaller, privately held company
with fewer than 200 million users.
It may be the last time, though.
Thirty percent of Facebook’s 900 mil-
lion users, or 270 million people, have to
vote on the changes — for or against — to
have the process be binding. Otherwise,
Facebook considers the vote “advisory.”
That will most likely be the case.
Facebook’s experiment in democracy
hasn’t panned out as expected. While
thousands of people have left comments
on Facebook’s proposed changes, “our
original intent was to get high-quality,”
and not high-quantity comments, said
Erin Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy offi-
cer of policy.
Facebook to let users vote on privacy changes
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If anyone if looking for a 2003 Chrysler
Minivan in great condition, Tony Cooper Sr.
isn’t selling.
With his son Tony Jr. playing ball at
Pepperdine this season, Tony Sr. needed a
mode of transportation. After renting cars
every other weekend to make the trip last year,
Cooper invested in a used minivan with
12,500 miles on it prior to the 2012 season.
He has since added nearly 25,000 miles to the
speedometer.
All the miles were accrued commuting
between Malibu and his San Carlos home,
with the exception of the Town & Country’s
maiden voyage to Las Vegas.
“That wasn’t a big surprise to me by any
means,” Tony Jr. said. “Whether or not he got
the van, I knew he was going to make it down
to watch my games.”
Pepperdine has made the mileage worth
while. The Waves are amid a memorable sea-
son, posting their best regular-season record
since 2008. Last week, they went down to the
wire to win the West Coast Conference title –
Pepperdine’s first since 2006 – and in doing
so advanced to regional postseason play this
weekend at Stanford’s Sunken Diamond.
With a 6-2 win Friday over Michigan State,
Pepperdine advances through the winner’s
bracket of the round-robin tourney to play
Stanford Saturday at 6 p.m.
Tony Sr. was of course in one of the best
seat in the house Friday. After carefully doing
the math, he estimated he’s missed just six
midweek games this season. That’s a relative-
ly high number, considering he has missed
hardly any of Tony Jr.’s games dating back to
little league.
Since Tony Jr. started playing for the
Central Middle School Tee Ball League when
he was 4, Tony Sr. coached his teams every
step of the way, with outstanding results.
They won their first championship with the
San Carlos Farm League Pirates when Tony
Jr. was 8. Soon thereafter, Tony Sr. headed up
the San Carlos District 52 All-Stars for three
seasons, before moving up to Pony League
13-14 year-olds for two summers. Tony Sr.
then took over the San Carlos Joe DiMaggio
team for legendary coach Bud Papadakis, cul-
<< Celtics beat Heat 101-91, page 13
• Federer to face ‘lucky loser’, page 13
Weekend•June 2-3, 2012
S.F. HOLDS OFF METS: GIANTS HAVE FOURTH WIN IN FIVE GAMES >>> PAGE 12
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Off the football field, former College of San
Mateo superstar Eddie Elder has never met an
obstacle he couldn’t overcome.
Local sports fans remember Elder for his
All-American 2009 campaign where he was a
key cog in CSM’s march to the Northern
California title.
Following a successful run at Arizona State
University, Elder finds himself in a familiar
state as he strives toward his goal of one day
becoming an NFL player.
“I don’t mind not being drafted,” Elder said
as he currently partakes with the Arizona
Cardinals in off-season Organized Team
Activities or, OTAs in a try-out kind of role.
“There are plenty of players out there that
have been successful that weren’t drafted. I’ve
always been an underdog, so it’s really noth-
ing new. So, I’m just going to do my best to
achieve those things.”
When the NFL draft rolled around, Elder
was left without a team and instead accepted
an invitation to Arizona’s mini-camp where
he’s fighting day to day for a spot on the train-
ing camp roster and hopefully on an NFL
sideline come the 2012-2013 season.
“The pressure is on every day, but I don’t
think about it,” Elder said. “My family drives
me. They support me, no matter what.
“Really, it’s a dream come true. It’s some-
thing I’ve always wanted since I was a little
kid. Of course, I would have liked to have
gone a different direction and got drafted. But,
I just have to deal with my situation and go
from there.”
Elder played in all 25 games with 20 starts
in two seasons at Arizona State and totaled
130 tackles, three interceptions, seven passes
defended, one sack and a forced fumble.
Before then, his career and story as a
Bulldog was legendary. From not having the
academics to attend Oregon, to stepping onto
a football field at CSM and playing over 20
games at safety, to being one of the most heav-
ily recruited players in the nation. Elder left
CSM in 2010 with the school record for inter-
ceptions (13) and the winner of the NorCal
Defensive Player of the Year in 2009, and a
NorCal championship in the same year.
Now, after receiving his bachelors degree in
Interdisciplinary Studies with an emphasis on
Sociology and Communications, Elder, who
admitted to a bit of adjustment period on and
off the field once he got to ASU, looks to tack-
le his biggest dream yet.
“They were just happy for me,” Elder said
of his support team, “because I’ve accom-
plished things that family hadn’t — I was the
first in my family to graduate.
“Not only family, but friends, people at my
old high school and at my old JUCO. I’m just
trying to set the bar and let people know that
Defying odds
Eddie Elder keeps proving people wrong
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS
After helping lead CSM to the 2009 Nor Cal championship,cornerback Eddie Elder put in two
solid years at Arizona State. He is currently participating in mini-camp with the Arizona
Cardinals as undrafted free agent.
Follow in his son’s footsteps
TERRY BERNAL
Tony Cooper Sr. invested in a used minivan to journey between Malibu and his San Carlos
home every other weekend to watch his son Tony Jr. play ball at Pepperdine.
See ELDER, Page 14
“I don’t mind not
being drafted. …
I’ve always been
an underdog,
so it’s really
nothing new.”
Eddie Elder
See COOPER, Page 15
By Mike Fitzpatrick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — For more than 50 years, the
New York Mets chased that elusive no-hitter.
Johan Santana finally finished the job.
Santana pitched the first
no-hitter in team history,
helped by an umpire’s
missed call and an out-
standing catch in left field
in an 8-0 victory over the
St. Louis Cardinals on
Friday night.
After a string of close
calls over the last five
decades, Santana went all
the way in the Mets’
8,020th game.
“Finally, the first one,” he said. “That is the
greatest feeling ever.”
He needed a couple of key assists to pull it
off.
Carlos Beltran, back at Citi Field for the
first time since the Mets traded him last July,
hit a line drive over third base in the sixth
inning that hit the foul line and should have
been called fair. But third base umpire Adrian
Johnson ruled it foul and the no-hitter was
intact — even though a replay clearly showed
a mark where the ball landed on the chalk line.
“I saw the ball hitting outside the line, just
foul,” Johnson told a pool reporter.
Santana pitches
fi rst no-hitter in
N.Y.Mets’ history
Johan Santana
SPORTS 12
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Felipe
Paulino kept the scuffling Athletics at
bay for six innings Friday night, and the
Kansas City Royals’ bullpen handled the
rest in a 2-0 victory that gave Oakland its
season-worst ninth straight loss.
Yuniesky Betancourt came off the dis-
abled list to provide an RBI double in
the first, and Mike Moustakas added an
RBI blooper to left later in the inning,
helping Kansas City win for only the
sixth time in 23 games at Kauffman
Stadium this season.
Paulino (3-1) has emerged as the ace
of the Royals’ haphazard starting rota-
tion, holding the opposition off the
scoreboard through six innings for the
fourth time in six starts.
He allowed three hits against Oakland
while striking out five and walking three.
Both of the Royals’ runs were charged
to Bartolo Colon (4-6), who recovered
from a sloppy start to last seven innings
— an encouraging outing after going 1-
3 with a 7.92 ERA in May.
Jonathan Broxton worked a perfect
ninth for his 12th save.
The A’s have been shut out six times in
their last 16 games, and have been
outscored 39-12 during their current los-
ing streak. They came into the night
ranked last in the majors in batting aver-
age (.210) and slugging percentage
(.338), and second-to-last in on-base
percentage and runs.
The Royals nearly added to their first-
inning cushion, but Alcides Escobar
grounded out to leave two runners
aboard in the first. Kansas City also left
a runner in scoring position in the sec-
ond inning before failing twice to plate a
run with the bases loaded in the third.
Colon was brilliant over the next four
innings, allowing only a two-out single
by Escobar in the sixth and a leadoff sin-
gle by Humberto Quintero in the sev-
enth.
The problem for Oakland was that
Paulino was just as good.
The right-hander wasn’t particularly
efficient, burning through 94 pitches in
six innings, yet he managed to keep a
struggling Oakland lineup off balance all
night.
Paulino shuts down A’s
Celtics beat Heat 101-91
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Kevin Garnett had 24 points and 11 rebounds
and Rajon Rondo scored 21 points with 10 assists to lead the
Boston Celtics to a 101-91 victory over the Heat in Game 3 of
the Eastern Conference finals on Friday night, cutting Miami’s
lead in the series to 2-1.
Game 4 is Sunday night in Boston.
Paul Pierce scored 23 points for Boston.
LeBron James scored 34 points, but the NBA MVP and the
rest of the Heat went cold during a 7-minute stretch at the end
of the first quarter and the beginning of the second, when
Boston outscored them 15-0 to turn a six-point deficit into a
nine-point lead.
James scored 16 points in the first quarter but had just four
points with one rebound and one assist in the fourth, when
Miami cut a 24-point deficit to eight. Mike Miller hit consecu-
tive 3-pointers during an 11-0 run that cut the deficit to 95-87.
Miami still trailed by eight points, with the ball, when
Dwyane Wade missed and Ray Allen grabbed the rebound,
sending Rondo on a fast break that made it a 99-89 with 99
seconds to play. James threw the ball away underneath, then
missed a 3-point attempt the next time down — one of only
four shots he took in the fourth quarter.
Royals 2, Athletics 0
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Melky
Cabrera remained the hottest hitter in
the National League, Madison
Bumgarner picked up his first win in
nearly four weeks and the San Francisco
Giants beat the Chicago Cubs 4-3 on
Friday night.
Cabrera had two hits to raise his aver-
age to .376, tying him with Paul
Konerko of the Chicago White Sox for
the highest mark in the majors. That
comes on the heels of his outstanding
May when he tied a San Francisco fran-
chise record with 51 hits.
Ryan Theriot added three hits and
scored twice while Buster Posey had two
RBIs to give the Giants their fourth win
in five games on the current homestand.
Alfonso Soriano hit a three-run home
run in the ninth for Chicago, but the
Cubs fell short and lost for the 15th time
in their last 20 games.
Coming off one of his worst starts of
the season, Bumgarner looked strong
after overcoming some early struggles.
He retired 17 of 20 batters during one
stretch and carried a shutout into the
ninth before tiring.
Closer Santiago Casilla nearly let it
slip away.
After Bumgarner gave up back-to-
back singles to Starlin Castro and Joe
Mather to open the inning, Casilla gave
up Soriano’s home run that cut San
Francisco’s lead to 4-3.
Casilla retired Reed Johnson on a
comebacker but allowed a double to Jeff
Baker and an infield single to Darwin
Barney. Casilla then left the game after
appearing to get hurt while pitching to
Barney.
Javier Lopez relieved Casilla and
recorded the final two outs for his first
save of the season.
San Francisco holds off Chicago
Giants 4, Cubs 3
REUTERS
Boston Celtics’Kevin Garnett drives to the net on Miami Heat’s
James Jones.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COMMUTE
TO THE CITY?
Need car service?
Drop off your car on
the way to work!
Domestic • Foreign
Excellent, High Quality Service
SCHWERIN AUTO SERVICE
1430 Bush Street, SF
415-673-9333
Quality Servic
WERIN AUTO SERVIC
COMMUTER
SPECIAL
Oil Change
$19.99
Most Cars • Bring This Ad
Collision Repair, Refinishing, Restorations, Metalwork,
Fiberglass • www.qualitycoachworks.com
650-280-3119
Mention this ad for 10% off Bodywork Labor
411 Woodsi de Road Redwood Ci t y
Quality Coachworks
AUTOBODY & PAINT
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUBLIN, Ohio — That other
Rory — Rory Sabbatini — played
his best golf in the worst weather
Friday at the Memorial and made a
surprising appearance atop the
leaderboard. Right behind him was
a Tiger Woods that looked all too
familiar.
Sabbatini played bogey-free over
his final 12 holes, and despite miss-
ing a 5-foot birdie putt on the 18th
hole, put together a 3-under 69 in
the cool, blustery conditions at
Muirfield Village to take a one-shot
lead going into the weekend.
Woods looked strong for the sec-
ond straight day, though he also had
another double bogey that slowed
his progress. What pleased him was
controlling his ball in the wind for
plenty of birdie chances that led to a
69.
“I hit the ball well all day, and it
was a day that I needed to,” Woods
said. “The wind
was blowing out
there, swirling in
those trees, and
it was just a
tough day.”
It was plenty
tough for Rory
McIlroy.
The U.S.
Open champion,
who returned to No. 1 in the world
only four weeks ago, missed the cut
in his third straight tournament.
McIlroy was in good shape until a
shot just outside a creek hit the bank
and went backward into the water,
leading to the first of two double
bogeys on the back nine. He shot 79
and missed the cut by three shots.
“I’m definitely hitting the ball
better than I did last week, so I can
see an improvement there,” he said.
“But I’ve still got a long way to go.”
It was tough for everyone on a
day that began with a two-hour rain
delay in the morning. That softened
the course, but the wind featured
gusts strong enough that it was dif-
ficult to attack the pins. It showed in
the scores.
Sabbatini was at 6-under 138, the
highest score to lead the Memorial
in 22 years.
“We basically just kept the ball in
play all day, and that’s the challenge
out there,” Sabbatini said. “And we
did that very well, and I’m very,
very excited, very content with the
way that things went.”
Woods has 72 wins on the PGA
Tour, one away from tying Jack
Nicklaus for second on the career
list. What better place to catch him
than on the course Jack built, though
Woods wasn’t ready to entertain
such thoughts only halfway through
the tournament.
And while he commands attention
at Muirfield Village — a four-time
champion who has shot par or better
in 22 of his last 23 rounds on this
course — there were plenty of pos-
sibilities going into the weekend.
Sabbatini leads Memorial as Tiger lurks
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — If it seems Roger
Federer breaks one record or anoth-
er every time he wins a match, that’s
because he does these days.
Then again, good as Federer is, he
can’t top this: His next opponent at
the French Open, Belgium’s David
Goffin, is unbeaten in Grand Slam
main-draw matches. (OK, so the
kid’s only 3-0, but still.)
Yes, before Federer can take on
Novak Djokovic or Rafael Nadal at
Roland Garros this year, he’ll need
to defeat Goffin, the first “lucky
loser” — a player beaten in qualify-
ing who sneaks into the field via
someone’s withdrawal — to reach
the fourth round at any Grand Slam
tournament in
17 years, and
only the seventh
to make it that
far.
“Now I’m
playing against
Roger,” the
109t h- r anked
Goffin said after
beating Lukasz
Kubot of Poland 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-1 on
Friday, “and I can’t believe it.”
A fresh-faced 21-year-old whose
voice was barely a whisper and
whose hands fidgeted during an
extended interview session with
reporters, the slender, 5-foot-11
Goffin matter-of-factly discussed
displaying photos and posters of 16-
time Grand Slam champion Federer
in his bedroom as a child.
“Since I was little, I’ve watched
Roger play on TV. To me, he plays
almost perfect tennis. His technique
is perfect. I also like him at the
human level; he’s a very good per-
son on and off the court,” said
Goffin, who was able to make his
Grand Slam debut because France’s
Gael Monfils pulled out with a knee
injury. “I expect a very tough match
on Sunday, of course. I don’t really
know how I’ll prepare for it, but I’ll
try to have fun.”
Informed that his next opponent is
an unabashed fan, Federer grinned
and replied, “Not the first time it
happens.”
Probably so. After all, the 30-year-
old Federer has been winning major
titles since 2003, when Goffin was
12. He’s been winning Grand Slam
matches since 2000, and Friday’s 6-
3, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5 victory over Nicolas
Mahut was Federer’s 235th, adding
to his Open era record.
Federer happened to catch a bit of
Goffin’s second-round matchup
against Arnaud Clement, the 2001
Australian Open runner-up who said
this would be his final French Open.
The condensed scouting report?
“Nice game. Smooth ball-striker.
And talented, obviously,” Federer
said. “Otherwise, he wouldn’t be
coming that far in this tournament.”
That match against Clement went
five sets, as did Goffin’s first-round
victory over 23rd-seeded Radek
Stepanek — the only five-setters of
his career. Against Kubot at inti-
mate, 1,559-seat Court 7, Goffin was
raucously cheered by flag-waving,
chorus-singing supporters who
made the short trip from Belgium.
“It gave me wings,” Goffin said. “I
felt as if I was playing at home.”
Coincidentally, the last “lucky
loser” to make it this far at a major
tournament was also Belgian, Dick
Norman, who did it at Wimbledon in
1995.
Now comes by far the toughest
test of Goffin’s young career.
Or, looked at another way, a
“bonus,” as he put it: the thrill of
standing across the net from his
favorite player and seeing how he
stacks up.
Asked whether he believes he can
defeat Federer, Goffin said, “If I say
yes, it might sound pretentious. And
if I say no, it will look like a lack of
ambition. We’ll see. I’ll prepare like
I do for other matches. I’ll try to go
for my shots and have fun on a big
court.”
Federer to face ‘lucky loser’ who keeps winning
Tiger Woods
REUTERS
Rory Sabbatini of South Africa watches his tee shot on the eighth hole
during the first round of the Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village
Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio.
Roger Federer
SPORTS 14
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
702 Marshall St., Ste. 400, Redwood City
650.369.8900
Fighting for victims
and their families
FREE CONSULTATION
(800) 308-0870
Motor Vehicle
Accidents

Wrongful Death

Traumatic Brain
Injuries

Spinal Cord Injuries

Survivors of
Domestic Violence
and Rape

Uninsured Motorist
Claims

Insurance Bad Faith
Led by former prosecutor
Todd Emanuel, Emanuel
Law Group fghts for
victims and their families.
RECENT RESULTS
$6.35 million: Settlement
afer Motor Vehicle Accident
$1.00 million: Judgment for
rape victim
$1.00 million: Settlement for
Uninsured Motorist Claim
$405,000: Judgment for
Domestic Violence Survivor
they can do whatever they put their mind to.”
As always when the game progresses up the
levels of play, players must do their best to
keep up in a sink-or-swim world of the NFL.
“Not only the speed of the game, but the
speed of the calls, the play calls,” Elder said of
some of the challenges. “You have to see a
formation, identify it and make the checks
right away because they’re going to snap the
ball whether you’re ready or not.
“Scouts fall in love with size, but at the
same time, this is football. We play the sport
for a reason and I’ve made it this far and I’ve
proved people wrong. The Cardinals gave me
a chance and I’m going to take advantage of
it.”
As is the norm with the growing Bulldog
Nation, which is sending top talent across the
county, Elder counts on the support of the
school and team that put him in a position to
live out his dream.
“Honestly, there’s nothing like the Bulldog
Nation,” Elder said. “There are a lot of good
things going on over there, it’s a dynasty.
We’re just trying push forward for the future
and for anyone who wants to be a Bulldog.
It’s family over there. Everyone is close. It’s a
great place and the coaches, they’re happy
[for me] because they knew my situation and
I do have hard time trying to adjust but they
got me through it. We made it happen.”
Continued from page 11
ELDER
By Ira Podell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWARK, N.J. — Neither the New Jersey
Devils nor the Los Angeles Kings seem to be
too concerned about who is on the ice against
high-powered Devils forward Ilya
Kovalchuk.
Kovalchuk was held to one fruitless shot in
New Jersey’s 2-1 overtime loss to Los
Angeles on Wednesday night in the opener of
the Stanley Cup finals.
Early on in the game, Kovalchuk was
matched up against Kings defensemen Willie
Mitchell and Slava Voynov. As the game pro-
gressed, the tandem Kovalchuk faced was
Drew Doughty and Rob Scuderi.
Devils coach Peter DeBoer said he isn’t
going into Game 2 looking to avoid either of
those pairs.
“We played (Dan) Girardi and (Ryan)
McDonagh against the Rangers. Same thing,”
DeBoer said Friday of the Eastern Conference
finals. “If they’re going to match those guys
up in order to get him away, we’re going to
have to get away from a four-line game, which
has been another strength. If they’re matching
up against Kovalchuk, then they’re not match-
ing up against (Zach) Parise or other guys.
“The matchup game isn’t something that
I’m interested in or worried about. For me, it
isn’t relevant.”
Kings coach Darryl Sutter echoed that sen-
timent. The Devils will have the advantage in
Game 2 as they have the last change as the
home team. That will shift to the Kings when
the series moves to Los Angeles for Games 3
and 4 next week.
“Doesn’t really matter,” Sutter said. “I think
it’s based on ice time, not so much ours. He’s
out there a lot. If you start chasing a matchup
during the game, that’s kind of a dinosaur. You
start chasing it, pretty soon you’re just chasing
the puck.
“You get guys tired or out of position. Rob
Scuderi can handle that just as well as Willie
Mitchell can. Slava and Drew, they’re right-
handed guys that can skate and make plays.
There’s not a big difference.”
The ultimate goal is to find a way to keep
Kovalchuk in check.
“He’s got a lot of skill and he’s able to just
hold the puck for that extra second to get him
into position to take a shot, which is probably
his best asset,” Scuderi said. “It’s something
we’ve tried to focus on. You just don’t want to
let a guy like that off the leash because he can
really hurt you.
Forget the matches: Kovalchuk faces different D
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
New Jersey Devils Ilya Kovalchuk, left, scores on New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist
as Rangers’ Michael Del Zotto follows the play during the first period in Game 6 of their NHL
Eastern Conference Final hockey playoff game.
16
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Find out why we’re one of the fastest growing construction companies in the Bay Area!
t: 650.274.4484
dom@risecon.com
P.O. Box 117414
Burlingame CA 94011
www.risecon.com
L#926933
t 650 274 4484 P O Bo 117414 risecon com
Fin Findd o d o t ut ut h why why we we’’re re on one o e o e of t f t f the he he ffas fasttes test g t grow rowiing ing co co t nst nstruc ructio tio tion c n c n com omp omp i ani anies es iin in th the the BBa Ba A y A y Area rea!!!
t 650 274 4484 P O B 117414 i
Call us today for a FREE design consultation
652-7810
Vacuum
MI ELE • ORECK • KI RBY • DYSON
HOOVER • BISSEL • KENMORE
ALL BRANDS
Vacuum
Specializing in Service & Sales
Hoover Self Propelled
UH50000
ON SALE NOW
$229
3 year warranty
1803-A El Camino Real
Burlingame
26609
Rebarts Interiors
247 California Dr Burlingame CA
650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106 San Carlos, CA
650-508-8518
FREE Measuring & Installation
Evening Appointments Available www.rebarts.com
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
SPORTS 17
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
UCLA: Football scholarship
won’t affect need-based awards
LOS ANGELES — Justin Combs, the 18-year-old son of
hip-hop mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs, will attend UCLA on a
$54,000 football scholarship.
It is one of 285 athletic scholarships the university hands out
every year.
It comes at a time when student fees are rising and a year
after the university had to use more than $2 million in student
fees to cover an athletic department funding gap.
Money for Combs’ scholarship will not affect need-based
scholarships awarded by the university, UCLA spokesman
Ricardo Vazquez told the Los Angeles Times.
“There is a big separation between financial aid based on
need and how that’s funded and how athletic scholarships are
funded and awarded to students,” he said, noting that athletic
scholarships come from athletic department ticket sales, cor-
porate partnerships, media contracts and private donations.
The newspaper said Justin Combs defended taking the schol-
arship on Twitter: “Regardless what the circumstances are, I
put that work in!!!! ... PERIOD.”
The senior Combs is worth an estimated $475 million and
gave his son a $360,000 Maybach car for his 16th birthday, the
Times said.
Justin Combs, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound defensive back, gradu-
ated from New Rochelle Iona Prep in New York with a 3.75
grade point average. He also had scholarship offers from
Illinois, Virginia and Wyoming.
If needy students are unaffected, there is no problem, said
Emily Resnick, outgoing president of UCLA’s Undergraduate
Students Association. “If his athletic abilities deserve it, then
more power to him.”
Joelle Gamble, who will graduate from the university in a
few weeks, said the scholarship could be considered an invest-
ment since UCLA would probably benefit by the celebrity
Combs could bring to the school.
“It’s how college athletics works. This is how we’re going to
get money,” she said.
Sports brief
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 29 21 .580 —
Miami 29 23 .558 1
New York 29 23 .558 1
Atlanta 28 24 .538 2
Philadelphia 28 25 .528 2 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 29 22 .569 —
St. Louis 27 25 .519 2 1/2
Pittsburgh 26 25 .510 3
Milwaukee 23 29 .442 6 1/2
Houston 22 30 .423 7 1/2
Chicago 18 32 .360 10 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 32 20 .615 —
San Francisco 27 24 .529 4 1/2
Arizona 23 29 .442 9
Colorado 22 29 .431 9 1/2
San Diego 18 35 .340 14 1/2
———
Saturday’sGames
Atlanta (Beachy 5-3) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 7-
1), 1:05 p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 8-1),
1:05 p.m.
L.A.Dodgers (Harang 3-3) at Colorado (Nicasio 2-2),
1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 8-1) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 7-1), 1:10
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Bedard 3-5) at Milwaukee (Marcum 3-
3), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 1-1) at San Diego (Volquez 2-
5), 4:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-3) at San Francisco (M.Cain
5-2), 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 4-2) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 4-
4), 4:15 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Atlanta at Washington, 10:35 a.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 11:05 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 12:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 3:35 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 30 22 .577 —
Baltimore 29 23 .558 1
New York 28 23 .549 1 1/2
Boston 27 25 .519 3
Toronto 27 25 .519 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 30 22 .577 —
Cleveland 28 23 .549 1 1/2
Detroit 24 28 .462 6
Kansas City 22 28 .440 7
Minnesota 18 33 .353 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 31 21 .596 —
Los Angeles 27 26 .509 4 1/2
Seattle 23 31 .426 9
Oakland 22 30 .423 9
———
Saturday’sGames
Boston (Doubront 5-2) at Toronto (Drabek 4-5),
10:07 a.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 3-3) at Kansas City (Hochevar
3-5), 11:10 a.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 4-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson
4-1), 1:10 p.m.
Seattle (Noesi 2-6) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-
5), 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Walters 2-1) at Cleveland (Tomlin 2-2),
4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 4-6) at Detroit (Porcello 3-4),
4:15 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 7-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-4),
7:05 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
N.Y.Yankees at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
Boston at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, 11:10 a.m.
AL STANDINGS
@Padres
12:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/7
@Royals
5:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
6/1
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Rapids
6:30p.m.
CSN+
6/20
@RSL
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
@Padres
3:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/6
vs.Cubs
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/4
@Padres
7:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/5
vs.Cubs
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/1
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/7
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/5
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/6
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
6/2
@Royals
11:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
6/3
vs.Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/4
vs.Cubs
4:15p.m.
FOX
6/2
vs.Cubs
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/3
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 19
New York 8 3 2 26 26 18
Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 10
Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 13
Chicago 5 4 3 18 15 15
Houston 4 3 4 16 12 12
New England 4 7 1 13 16 18
Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 21
Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 14
Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 14
San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 17
Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 9
Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 18
Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 14
Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 14
Portland 3 5 4 13 12 15
FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 24
Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 21
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
MLS STANDINGS
Major LeagueBaseball
MLB—Suspended retired RHP James Ehlert 50
gamesafter asecondviolationof drugabuseunder
the minor league drug prevention and treatment
program.
AmericanLeague
BALTIMOREORIOLES—Placed OF Nick Markakis
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 30. Selected
the contract of INF-OF Bill Hall from Norfolk (IL).
BOSTONREDSOX—Assigned RHP Mark Prior to
Pawtucket (IL).
KANSAS CITYROYALS—Activated INF Yuniesky
Betancourt from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Irv-
ing Falu to Omaha.
OAKLANDATHLETICS—Reinstated OF Yoenis Ce-
spedes from the 15-day DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS—Selected the contract of
RHP Stephen Pryor from Tacoma (PCL).Transferred
LHP George Sherrill to the 60-day DL.
TORONTOBLUEJAYS—Assigned OF-DH Vladimir
Guerrero to Las Vegas (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Reinstated OF
Jason Kubel from paternity leave.Optioned OF A.J.
Pollock to Reno (PCL).
CHICAGOCUBS—Claimed RHP Jairo Asencio off
waivers from Cleveland. Designated RHP Michael
Bowden for assignment.
NEWYORK METS—Activated C Josh Thole from
the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Elvin
Ramirez from Buffalo (IL). Designated RHP Chris
Schwinden for assignment.Optioned C Rob John-
son to Buffalo.
PITTSBURGHPIRATES—Activated RHP Juan Cruz
from the restricted list. Placed RHP Charlie Morton
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 30.
TRANSACTIONS
By Ken Ritter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Floyd
Mayweather Jr. surrendered in a
courtroom Friday to begin a three-
month jail sentence for attacking his
ex-girlfriend in September 2010
while two of their children watched.
Las Vegas Justice of the Peace
Melissa Saragosa credited the unde-
feated five-division champion with
attending weekly domestic violence
counseling sessions — including
one the day of
the May 5 fight
she allowed him
to make — and
with beginning
to meet commu-
nity service
requirements she
imposed in
December. The
judge then
watched as
Ma y we a t h e r
was handcuffed and taken away.
Mayweather didn’t say a word.
Ellerbe declined to comment.
Mayweather pleaded guilty in
December to reduced domestic bat-
tery charges in a hair-pulling, arm-
twisting attack on Josie Harris, the
mother of three of his children. The
plea deal allowed him to avoid trial
on felony charges that could have
gotten Mayweather up to 34 years in
prison if he was convicted.
Mayweather
begins jail term
Floyd
Mayweather Jr.
18
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION/WORLD
Diamond Jubilee: Britain marks queen’s reign
LONDON — The patriotic bunting is ready, the golden car-
riage on standby, the boats freshly painted, the shops filled
with royal souvenirs.
The normal ebb and flow of British life
gives way in the next four days to a series
of street parties, flotillas, outdoor concerts
and finally the appearance of an elderly
great-grandmother on her balcony to wave
to her subjects.
Britain is marking Queen Elizabeth II’s
60 years on the throne with a four-day hol-
iday weekend of ceremony, symbolism and
street parties.
The queen will celebrate Saturday at the
Epsom Derby, a highlight of the horseracing calendar, and on
Sunday she will lead a 1,000-boat flotilla on the River Thames.
Monday’s festivities include a pop concert in front of
Buckingham Palace with Paul McCartney and Elton John, and
festivities climax Tuesday with a religious service, a proces-
sion through the streets of London and the royal family’s
appearance on the palace balcony.
Clash kills Palestinian militant, Israeli soldier
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — A gunbattle along Israel’s bor-
der with the Gaza Strip on Friday killed a Palestinian militant
and an Israeli soldier, the military said, in the latest flare-up
along the volatile frontier.
The Israeli military said the Palestinian militant cut through
the border fence separating Hamas-run Gaza from southern
Israel and opened fire on troops, killing one soldier. Israeli
forces killed the militant in the ensuing shootout, said Col. Tal
Hermoni.
The border has been mostly calm since the last escalation in
March, but shootouts such as Friday’s and other violence raise
concerns of a new flare-up between Israel and Gaza-based mil-
itants.
U.N. rights body condemns Syria over massacre
BEIRUT — The U.N.’s top human rights body voted over-
whelmingly Friday to condemn Syria over the slaughter of
more than 100 civilians last week, but Damascus appeared
impervious to the crescendo of global condemnation following
a string of horrific massacres.
Syria’s most important ally and protector, Russia, voted
against the measure by the U.N. Human Rights Council in
Geneva. Russia has refused to support any move that could
lead to foreign intervention in Syria, Moscow’s last significant
ally in the Middle East.
demand that Congress step up and enact
some of his jobs proposals.
Calling the Eurozone’s debt crisis a
“shadow” hanging over the U.S. econo-
my, Obama made his most urgent plea yet
for measures that he said would “serve as
a buffer in case the situation in Europe
gets any worse.”
Later Friday, speaking to donors at a
fundraiser, Obama said: “Europe is having
a significant crisis in part because they
haven’t taken as many of the decisive
steps as were needed to deal with the chal-
lenge, and that’s weakened Asia and that
means it’s harder for our exports. All this
stuff makes a difference in the global
economy.”
The jobs numbers, issued early every
month, have become the year’s dominant
economic barometer, a baseline from
which to gauge Obama’s and Romney’s
political fortunes in an election that rides
on the pace of a post-recession recovery.
Romney, responding to the first report
since he effectively clinched the GOP
presidential nomination, called the figures
“devastating news.”
In an interview Friday with CNBC,
Romney said that Obama’s policies and
his handling of the economy had “been
dealt a harsh indictment.”
Obama was in Minnesota to push his
proposal to expand job opportunities for
veterans and to raise money for his cam-
paign. He also raised money Friday
evening in Chicago, where he was to
spend a rare night in his family home.
He said private business has created
more than 4 million jobs over the past 27
months, but, he added, “as we learned in
today’s jobs report, we’re still not creating
them as fast as we want.”
Still, he said, “we will come back
stronger; we do have better days ahead.”
The economy, struggling to recover
from the worst recession since the Great
Depression, has had to fend off a number
of external pressures, from high oil prices
to natural disasters and, now, economic
troubles in Europe and a weakening econ-
omy in China.
The unemployment numbers, while
imprecise and typically a lagging indica-
tor of economic performance, are never-
theless an undeniable marker of the
human cost of a weak economy.
May’s 69,000 new jobs and downward
adjustments for March and April mean the
economy has averaged just 73,000 jobs a
month over the past two months. That’s
half of what’s needed simply to keep up
with population growth and is a dramatic
drop from the 226,000 jobs created per
month in the January-March quarter.
May’s 8.2 percent jobless rate, the first
increase in 11 months, reflected more peo-
ple coming back into the job force, but
that was a thin silver-lining to an other-
wise discouraging report.
No president since the Great
Depression has sought re-election with
unemployment as high as that, and past
incumbents have lost when the rate was
on the rise.
The economy is central to each candi-
date’s argument — Obama wants it to be
a choice between his and Romney’s eco-
nomic visions; Romney wants it to be ref-
erendum on Obama’s economic policies.
Obama is counting on an unemploy-
ment trajectory that has fallen from a high
of 10 percent in October 2009. The presi-
dent likes to point to the 3.8 million jobs
created since he became president, though
12.5 million people remain unemployed.
He highlights the resurgence of the auto
industry following government bailouts of
Chrysler and General Motors.
Continued from page 1
JOBS
Around the world
Army adds charges
against Afghan shooting suspect
SEATTLE — The Army dropped a murder charge, but added
others, including steroid use, against a soldier accused in a
deadly shooting rampage in Afghanistan,
his lawyer said Friday.
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales is now accused of
gunning down 16 civilians in a pre-dawn
raid on two Afghan villages in March.
Initial reports pinned the number of dead at
16, but the Army put the figure at 17 when
it first charged Bales.
Due to discrepancies in the names on
lists of the victims, officials had apparently
counted one of them twice, but are now
certain there were 16 killed, said Lt. Col. Gary Dangerfield, a
spokesman for Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle,
where Bales is based.
His attorney, Emma Scanlan, said there was nothing surpris-
ing in the new charges, which also accuse Bales of assaulting
an unidentified Afghan male with his hands and knees the
month before the shooting.
“We’re looking forward to putting on a defense and seeing
what they can prove,” she said. The Army dropped off 5,000
pages of discovery materials at the defense team’s office on
Friday, she said.
Zimmerman back to jail; judge says he lied
SANFORD, Fla. — Trayvon Martin’s shooter must return to
jail, a judge ordered Friday in a strongly worded ruling that
said George Zimmerman and his wife lied
to the court about their finances to obtain
bond in a case that hinges on jurors believ-
ing his account of what happened the night
the teen was killed.
Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to
second-degree murder for the February
shooting. The neighborhood watch volun-
teer says he shot Martin in self-defense
because the unarmed 17-year-old was beat-
ing him up after confronting Zimmerman
about following him in a gated community
outside Orlando. Zimmerman was arrested 44 days after the
killing, and during a bond hearing in April, his wife, Shellie,
testified that the couple had limited funds available.
Around the nation
Queen
Elizabeth II
Robert Bales
George
Zimmerman
By Andrew Lyu
E
ver since I graduated from Aragon
High School, I have often floated in
my head the question of what my
high school experience has meant to me. I
have heard plenty of
aphorisms, quotations
and pieces of advice.
But, as is the nature of
language, no one phrase
or speech quite accurate-
ly describes the emotions
associated with graduat-
ing. As futile as it may
seem to write about grad-
uation, I will attempt to collect my gradua-
tion ruminations here.
To some of my friends, graduation is a
cherished event — the ceremony which rec-
ognizes the accomplishment of success
through high school. To some of my friends,
graduation is merely an odd ritual that socie-
ty has created — complete with the oddest
shaped clothing imaginable.
Honestly, as I stepped off of Aragon’s
graduation stage, I couldn’t help but wonder
what the entire ceremony meant. Following
the recessional, I, along with the rest of my
graduation class, was swarmed by mobs of
parents armed with cameras and flowers.
What would follow was a 30-minute frenzy
of picture taking, hand shaking and congratu-
lations giving. Ironically, I remember turning
to my best friend asking, “So is this what my
four years of high schools have amounted
to?”
Of course, I had already known the answer
to this question: Of course not. But simply
knowing that my high school experience did
not amount to a photo opportunity yielded
few answers as to what my high school expe-
rience did mean to me.
The photos were nice and I’m sure I’ll be
glad to have taken them years later in my
life; however, I felt the photos and the diplo-
ma were in many ways insignificant. A still-
frame shot and certification of graduation
recorded just mere moments of high school.
And yet at the same time, I realize why
taking photos was so compelling. I know
many of my memories will be lost with time.
Much of what has not been written down in
yearbooks or saved through photography will
be forgotten.
What has high school been to me then? To
me, high school, just like elementary school
and middle school and my years before
schooling, has been an experience of self-dis-
covery. Perhaps some friends will be lost.
Perhaps some memories will be forgotten.
But, regardless of what is lost in the future, I
myself will continue to carry on as an indi-
vidual changed because of high school.
In past years, graduation had always been a
sad experience for me. It was a grand good-
bye to leaving seniors. I could never quite
understand why every year the graduates
Rite of passage
E3
Wii U, sequels
coming to Electronic
Entertainment Expo
SEE PAGE 23
Bonsai show and sale
Sei Boku Bonsai Kai Show. Demonstrations
by Steve Iwaki, door prizes, a tree clinic,
vendor sales and plant sales.
The show takes place 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both
Saturday and Sunday at the San Mateo
Garden Center, Beresford Park, 605 Parkside
Way, San Mateo.
For more information visit
sanmateogardencenter.org. Free.
Spring dance show
The Youth and Adult Dance Programs
Spring Dance Show begins 11:30 a.m.
Saturday and continues throughout the
afternoon at Central Park Outdoor Stage, El
Camino Real and Fifth Avenue in San
Mateo.The show features a wide
assortment of dance styles, including
creative, modern, jazz and ballet.
For more information call 522-7444. Free.
Plant clinic
Master Gardener Plant Clinic helps the
horticulturally challenged learn to re-pot
orchids.
The clinic takes place 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday at the San Mateo Arboretum
Society, Kohl Pumphouse, 101 Ninth Ave. in
San Mateo.
For more information call 579-0536 or visit
sanmateoarboretum.org. Free.
Best bets
See STUDENT, Page 20
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It’s a
sink or swim moment for the
filmmakers behind the sequel
to “Piranha 3D.”
Combining a silly, self-
aware sensibility with over-
the-top gore, the original
comedic horror film starring
the likes of Richard Dreyfuss,
Christopher Lloyd and
Elizabeth Shue as townsfolk
fighting off prehistoric flesh-
eating fish became a just-add-
water cult hit when it was
released two summers ago
opposite more mature fare
such as “The Expendables”
and “Eat Pray Love.”
Dimension Films, the divi-
sion of the Weinstein Co. that
produces horror and sci-fi
fare, quickly christened a
sequel with the tongue-in-
cheek title “Piranha 3DD” —
yes, that’s pronounced dou-
ble-D — in hopes of riding
the same wave of success as
“Piranha 3D,” which report-
edly cost just $24 million to
make but reeled in more than
$83 million worldwide.
The original also chomped
off an unexpected amount of
guilty-pleasure acclaim, not
just from horror blogs, but
from actual mainstream crit-
ics. “Piranha 3D” was called
“bloody watchable trash” by
Entertainment Weekly’s
Owen Gleiberman, “‘Jaws’
without the art” by Rolling
Stone’s Peter Travers and
“cleverly gory” by Christy
‘Piranha’ hopes to lure moviegoers
See PIRANHA, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Expires June 30, 2012
Reservations Recommended - 650.342.6358 - Downtown San Mateo
#1 Transit Way - Next to CalTrain Station - www.meltingpot.com
4 Course Fondue Feast & Wine
Come in Monday - Friday to The San Mateo Melting Pot for a 4
course fondue feast with a bottle of house wine/bubbly for only
$98. Enjoy a melted cheese fondue, salad, entree with succulent
meats and veggies ending with a decadent chocolate fondue with
fruit and pastries. Regular price is $126. Please mention
The Daily Journal when booking your reservation.
Free
Magic Show
Wednesday June 20
Thursday June 21
6:00 to 9:00 PM
Reservations recommended
seemed so happy and excited while I felt so
compelled to cry. This year, however, at
graduation, I could not cry. I could not help
but feel an impending readiness. I felt ready
to take on whatever will come into my life in
the future.
And thus, as customary, I must appropriate
some much deserved gratitude to the com-
munity which I will be leaving in the fall.
Thank you to San Mateo County for provid-
ing a wonderful place to life. Thank you to
Aragon’s faculty, my internship mentors and
my other various teachers for inspiring me to
follow my academic passions regardless of
the challenges I may face. Thank you to my
family for keeping me in check at all steps
along the way. And thank you to my friends
and fellow graduates — without all of the
uniqueness and energy I have been surround-
ed by, I could have never become uniquely
ready for my future.
Andrew Lyu is a recent graduate of Aragon High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
Lemire of the Associated Press.
“I don’t even know if we can top it,” lament-
ed sequel director John Gulager, whose horror
film “Feast” was the subject of the Bravo
moviemaking documentary series “Project
Greenlight” in 2005. “I don’t think that was
totally our goal. We just wanted to be differ-
ent. They had Academy Award-winning actors
and stuff. We just wanted to have our own sep-
arate story.”
Curiously, Dimension isn’t screening
“Piranha 3DD” in advance for critics, not nec-
essarily a very positive indicator of a film’s
quality.
Gulager and his “Feast” screenwriters dove
into the “3DD” project after Alexandre Aja,
the previous film’s director, opted to work on
new material. Set after that first school of pira-
nha devoured a lake of horny and chesty
spring breakers, “Piranha 3DD” finds the evil
critters making their way underground and
through plumbing toward a tawdry waterpark
called Big Wet.
“We wanted to double everything,” boasted
“Piranha 3DD” screenwriter Marcus Dunstan.
“If the first one had laughs, we wanted to dou-
ble the laughs. If the first one had violence, we
wanted to double the violence. If the first one
had offensive elements, well, actually, we
wanted to triple the offensive elements. That
was always the DNA of this movie.”
The film, which opens Friday in theaters
and through on-demand video services, was
originally scheduled to debut last October, but
Gulager said production was delayed so the
cast and crew could film in warmer weather at
the Jungle Rapids waterpark in Wilmington,
N.C. The filmmakers admit that the premise is
outlandish but the setting was too fun to dis-
miss.
Though the previous “Piranha,” an overhaul
of the 1978 movie produced by B-movie king
Roger Corman, caught audiences’ attention, it
wasn’t as successful as other films that year
that more closely followed horror trends, like
faithfully remaking a classic (”A Nightmare
on Elm Street”), employing amateur trickery
(”Paranormal Activity 2”) or torturing victims
(”Saw 3D”).
“There are always patterns and fads in hor-
ror,” said “Piranha 3DD” screenwriter Patrick
Melton. “Right now the found footage and
ghost stories are doing really well. That’s in.
You can only have three or four successful
movies in that subgenre before Hollywood
does it to death, so having little bumps in the
road along the way like ‘Piranha’ keeps it
fun.”
If moviegoers and critics think the latest
“Piranha” is as much fun as the first one,
another attack could be around the corner.
Matthew Stein, the film’s executive producer
who formerly worked as a production execu-
tive at Dimension Films, believes the sequel’s
waterpark setting raises the drama and leaves
plenty of space for the piranha to prowl in the
future.
“If the studio were to call me and greenlight
‘Piranha 3DDD’ or ‘Piranha 4D’ or ‘Piranha
XL’ or whatever they wanted to call it, I’m
there,” said Stein. “I think that would be a lot
of fun. Ultimately, I think it would be a cre-
ative and economic decision. I can tell you
that there are a lot of ideas floating around
about the mythology of our piranha.”
Continued from page 19
PIRANHA
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The sequel “Piranha
3DD” comes out this week but it wasn’t
shown to critics before opening day — which
is a bummer, because the original “Piranha
3D” from 2010 was just a shamelessly gim-
micky blast.
But as you know, we like to be glass-half-
full around here. And speaking of liquids,
we’re using the opportunity to focus on five
great films set on the water — an ocean, lake,
river, whatever. “Jaws” definitely would have
made the cut if I hadn’t used it for last week’s
list about ultimate summer movies. And the
subject is so huge, you’ll notice I didn’t even
get to any Busby Berkeley productions or
anything with the word “Gidget” in the title.
Still, you’ve got to dive in somewhere ...
“The African Queen” (1952):
Humphrey Bogart won his one and only
Oscar, if you can believe that, for his indelible
portrayal of Charlie Allnut, the drunk, coarse
captain of a rickety steamer who’s stuck on a
river with Katharine Hepburn’s prim, rigid
missionary, Rose Sayer, during World War I.
They’re both playing types but they play them
with great timing and zest. Snappy banter and
— eventually, improbably — love ensue. The
filming of John Huston’s comic adventure,
which took place on location in Africa, was
famously difficult but the results are lush and
vivid. You can feel the heat and the grime and
the muck while you’re watching it.
“Apocalypse Now” (1979):
Speaking of difficult shoots, this one was so
legendary for nearly destroying Francis Ford
Coppola that there’s an entirely separate doc-
umentary (”Hearts of Darkness: A
Filmmaker’s Apocalypse”) detailing the trou-
bles. Still, the results are legendary in their
own right. It’s hard to think of the phrase
“going upriver” without thinking of Martin
Sheen’s long, harrowing trek to track down
and “terminate with extreme prejudice”
Marlon Brando’s rebellious and revered Col.
Kurtz in the Cambodian jungle. Here, the
water leads Sheen’s Willard and his crew
toward a territory so frightening, it must be
hell itself. But as Robert Duvall’s surfing Lt.
Col. Kilgore finds, water can also provide an
escape.
“Dead Calm” (1989):
One of the earliest films Nicole Kidman
starred in, this thriller allowed her to show-
case both her steely, cold strength as well as
her fiery, formidable presence. Kidman and
Sam Neill star as a married couple who take a
trip on their yacht to heal after the death of
their son. Billy Zane is creepy and unhinged
as the stranded passenger from a nearby ves-
sel who climbs aboard and, naturally, turns
out to be a homicidal maniac. The combina-
tion of claustrophobia in such a contained
space and isolation on the high seas makes
Phillip Noyce’s film intensely suspenseful.
“Titanic” (1997):
Although I’ll go so far as to say that the 3-
D re-do James Cameron released this year is
actually preferable. I don’t really have to
explain why this one’s on the list, do I? Big
boat, supposedly unsinkable, hits an iceberg
and slowly — slooooowly — fills up with
water. Until then, it was all fun and games for
Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, who’d
fallen in love despite the socioeconomic
chasm that divides them. Now they’re swim-
ming and splashing and dashing across chaot-
ic decks and increasingly cramped spaces in
hopes of surviving. It’s very easy to make fun
of “Titanic.” But it’s still a pretty spectacular
spectacle to behold.
“Master and Commander:
The Far Side of the World” (2003): Director
Peter Weir tells a huge, sweeping story that’s
also intimate and human. Russell Crowe again
proves he can fill any role with authority and
emotional resonance as a British captain
pushing his ship and his crew beyond their
limits in pursuit of a bigger, faster French ves-
sel during the Napoleonic Wars, and he has
great chemistry with Paul Bettany as the
ship’s doctor. Flawlessly staged and beautiful-
ly shot, it’s just a good, old-fashioned epic.
Nominated for 10 Oscars including best pic-
ture, it won two: for cinematography and
sound editing. Every creak and groan makes
you feel as if you’re on board, too.
Five great movies set on the water
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes º Mu|ti-Fami|y º Mixed-Use º Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Reñnance / Cash Out
Investors We|come º Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
ROUTE 66 (AND BEYOND) BECKONS.
Road Trip. Can the traveler hear two more
beautiful words? Worth saying again. Road
Trip. Whether you like to be behind the wheel
or are the first to call “shotgun,” the 250 miles
of Route 66 that run the length of Southern
California’s vast San Bernardino County call
out. With an area of 20,105 square miles, San
Bernardino is the largest county in the conti-
nental United States, larger than New Jersey,
Connecticut, Delaware and Rhode Island com-
bined, so you have plenty of room to roam and
discover roadside wonders, both natural and
man-made. The pace and order of the trip is up
to you. Here are the stops, get out a map and
make your plans.
ROY’S MOTEL AND CAFÉ IN AMBOY.
You can spot the Jetson-esque sign for Roy’s
Motel and Café a mile away, its Googie design
towering above the few structures that make up
Amboy, Calif. Stop in and pick up an ice cold
Route 66 Route Beer, drink it, and keep the cap
and the bottle as a souvenir. Time passes slow-
ly between vehicles on this lonely stretch of
road in the flat Mojave Desert country and vis-
itors use the opportunity to have themselves
photographed beside the iconic road marker
painted on the blacktop right in front of Roy’s.
(Traffic may be light, but look both ways
before stepping out. Swarms of motorcycles
can appear out of nowhere.) The Amboy post
office, ZIP code 92304, right across from
Roy’s, is the perfect place to mail your “wish
you were here” postcard.
BAGDAD CAFÉ IN NEWBERRY
SPRINGS. Yup. The one made famous by the
movie. Patsy Cline on the jukebox and walls
covered with notes and business cards left by
travelers just like you. Be sure to tack some-
thing up and sign the guestbook.
THE BOTTLE TREE RANCH IN ORO
GRANDE. Folk artist Elmer Long welds old
signs, typewriters, vintage toys, lengths of
pipe, wheels and anything else he might find
into phantasmagorical tree trunks, then fills out
the branches with bottles. Hundreds of these
clustered creations make an unusual forest that
you can’t (and shouldn’t) miss. Long is happy
to welcome visitors and talk about his work.
BARSTOW’S HISTORIC HARVEY
HOUSE. The restored 1911 Spanish-
Moroccan style Casa del Desierto (“House of
the Desert”), standing grandly on the main rail-
road lines in Barstow, is one of the few extant
Fred Harvey hotel buildings. The Fred Harvey
Company, which owned the Harvey House
chain of restaurants and hotels alongside rail-
roads in the western United States, traces its
origins to the 1875 opening of two railroad eat-
ing houses located at Wallace, Kan. and Hugo,
Colo. Its famous waitresses came to be known
as “Harvey Girls,” best known today because
of Judy Garland’s 1946 film The Harvey Girls.
In the old days, people alighted from the trains
and stayed in the Barstow Harvey House.
Today the building contains offices, function
rooms and the Route 66 Mother Road
Museum. But the railroad is still a strong pres-
ence. Amtrak provides passenger service at
Casa del Desierto and long freight trains con-
stantly roll past, some pulling so many cars
that the engine disappears into the distance
before the caboose can be seen.
AND BEYOND. Joshua Tree National Park
is off Route 66 but worth the detour.
Punctuated with gigantic piles of massive
boulders and wild-armed Joshua Trees, this
otherworldly 800,000-acre piece of high desert
is at once forbidding and mesmerizing with
lots to see and do. Take the Hidden Valley one-
mile loop walking trail to a legendary cattle
rustlers’ hideout. From 5,185 feet up at Keys
View, see both the Salton Sea spread out in the
distance and the San Andreas Fault scarring the
valley below. Pick up a brochure at the park
entrance to guide you through an 18-mile tour
of geological sites, pop in your U-2 CD, and
drive, drive, drive. Hungry after the park?
Check out Pappy & Harriet’s Pioneertown
Palace. Ribs and southwestern red rice. Steak
with pinto beans. Pork chops with garlic-
mashed potatoes. All cooked on outdoor
mesquite fire. Live music and dancing. 53688
Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown.
THE ROUTE 66 INTERNATIONAL
FESTIVAL 2012 IN VICTORVILLE.
California Dreamin’ on Route 66 is the theme
of the Route 66 International Festival 2012,
Aug. 9 through 12 at the San Bernardino
County Fairgrounds in Victorville. Road fans
flock in to share their travel stories and enjoy a
vintage car show, a 5K run and a drive-in
screening of American Graffiti.
www.route66festival2012.com or
www.national66.org.
AND REMEMBER: “To awaken quite
alone in a strange town is one of the pleasan-
test sensations in the world.” — Freya Stark.
Susan Cohn is a member of Bay Area Travel Writers
and North American Travel Journalists Association.
She may be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
JONAS HENNINGSSON
The Mother Road.Route 66 at Roy’s Motel and Café in Amboy,Calif.,stretches east toward the
Arizona border.
22
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST
CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Big sodas today; bagels
with schmeer tomorrow?
By Adam Geller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Just how far would a government go to pro-
tect us from ourselves?
In New York City — which already bans smoking in public
parks in the name of public health and bars artificial trans fats
from food served in restaurants — Mayor Michael Bloomberg
now wants to stop sales of large sodas and other sugary drinks,
in a bid to battle obesity. But in a country where fries have been
equated with freedom, Bloomberg’s proposal raises super-sized
questions about government’s role in shaping and restricting
individual choices. What’s next, a Twinkie purge?
“The idea of the state stepping in and treating adults essen-
tially as children and trying to protect them for their own good,
as opposed to the good of others, that’s been with us for as long
as we’ve been around, as long as we’ve had governments,” says
Glen Whitman, an economist at California State University-
Northridge who is a critic of paternalistic public policy.
The most famous example was Prohibition, which barred the
manufacture and sale of alcohol from 1919 to 1933. But
Whitman and others see a new wave of intervention afoot,
based on behavioral economics rather than religious moralism,
and symbolized by moves like Bloomberg’s. Allow it to contin-
ue, they say, and who knows where it could lead?
If government officials can limit the size of sodas, why could-
n’t they next decide to restrict portion sizes of food served in
restaurants or the size of pre-made meals sold at supermarkets?
Why wouldn’t a government determined to curb obesity restrict
sales of doughnuts or pastries or — perish the thought, New
Yorkers — ban bagels with a schmeer of cream cheese?
If government is within its right to restrict behavior to protect
health, then why wouldn’t a mayor or other official ban risky
sexual conduct or dangerous sports like skydiving? What’s to
stop a mayor from requiring people to wear a certain type of
sunscreen or limit the amount of time they can spend on the
beach, to protect them from skin cancer?
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Is the Wii U right
for you?
At last year’s Electronic Entertainment
Expo (E3), Nintendo captured most of
the spotlight by unveiling the Wii’s suc-
cessor, a high-definition console called
the Wii U that utilizes a tablet-like touch-
screen controller. Attention alone wasn’t
enough to declare a victory. Folks
weren’t, well, feeling it. Critical reaction
was mixed, and the Japanese gaming
giant’s stock dropped.
“Nintendo has an uphill battle this
year,” said Morgan Webb, co-host of the
G4 gaming show “X-Play.” “It’s really a
branding problem. I think a lot of people
are still confused about the Wii U.
They’re going to have a hard time con-
vincing people that this could be a better
gaming experience than the iPad.”
At this year’s E3 convention in Los
Angeles next week, Nintendo Co. will
attempt to assuage such concerns by
introducing gamers to titles that will be
available for Wii U when it’s expected to
launch later this year. Previously, the
“Mario Bros.” creator only teased what
was capable through a series of technol-
ogy demonstrations.
E3 comes at a time when the gaming
industry could use a few good parties and
pep talks. The NPD Group, a research
firm that tracks the U.S. sales of game
software, hardware and accessories, said
that while consumers spent more than $1
billion on games and accompanying giz-
mos in April, retail sales fell 32 percent
from a year ago, the fifth month of
decline.
The continued interest in cheaper-to-
produce mobile, social and download-
able games is expected to be showcased
more than ever before at E3, a flashy
extravaganza typically focused on build-
ing buzz for the loudest and sexiest
games. Zynga, the developer of social
games like “FarmVille” and “Words
With Friends,” will have a presence at E3
for the first time.
“Every time I go to E3, I’m usually
surprised,” said Jay Wilson, lead design-
er of the role-playing game “Diablo III.”
“I expect to be surprised again. What I
hope is that no matter what platform peo-
ple are working on, no matter what new
area that they’re exploring, the most
important thing is gameplay. If a game
provides great gameplay, the platform
doesn’t really matter.”
Indeed, a strong line-up of games will
be integral to the future success of the
Wii U, a lesson Nintendo learned the
hard way after last year’s lackluster
launch of the 3DS, its glasses-free 3-D
handheld device. “X-Play’s” Webb
thinks Nintendo could win over the E3
crowd if it introduces innovative, unex-
pected, must-own games that appeal
equally to both hardcore and casual
gamers.
Unless Nintendo’s fellow first-party
publishers Sony Corp. or Microsoft
Corp. unveil new hardware or radical
updates to their respective PlayStation 3
and Xbox 360 consoles, the E3 spotlight
— for better or worse — will undoubted-
ly be shining back in Nintendo’s direc-
tion. (Microsoft and Sony have previous-
ly shot down rumors they’d unleash new
consoles at this year’s E3.)
“The Wii U was announced last year,
and that stimulates all kinds of thoughts
about what’s possible,” said Mark Lamia,
the studio head at “Call of Duty: Black
Ops II” developer Treyarch. “It’ll be
interesting to see what happens with the
first parties. It’s always an exciting time
when rumors are in the air, and we see if
E3 is the time when they become more
than rumors.”
Most other game makers will use the
expo to hype new entries in their seem-
ingly never-ending franchises. There’s
Activision’s “Call of Duty: Black Ops
II,” Microsoft’s “Halo 4” and “Forza
Horizon,” Sony’s “God of War:
Ascension” and “LittleBigPlanet
Karting,” Ubisoft’s “Far Cry 3” and
“Assassin’s Creed III,” as well as the
revealing of several other new chapters.
Some sequels at E3 are emerging from
deep within the vault. Franchises once
considered extinct, such as invasion sim-
ulator “X-COM,” stealthy shooter
“Hitman” and town builder “SimCity,”
will return to a vastly different landscape.
Will these once beloved series be re-
embraced? It’s a strategy that’s worked
for some (”Twisted Metal”) but failed
others (”Syndicate”).
Electronic Arts Inc. will show off such
games as the real-world military simula-
tor “Medal of Honor: Warfighter,” a new
iteration of its “Need for Speed” racing
series and the sci-fi horror sequel “Dead
Space 3.”
Wii U, sequels take swing at E3
At this year’s E3 convention in Los Angeles next week, Nintendo Co. will introduce
gamers to titles that will be available for Wii U when it’s expected to launch later
this year.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
24
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JUNE 2
Eighth Annual NAMIWalk
Fundraiser. 9 a.m. registration, 10:30
a.m. opening ceremony. Lindley
Meadow, Golden Gate Park, San
Francisco. Raises funds to support Bay
Area, Santa Cruz and Solano county
NAMI mental health programs and
helps to educate the public to remove
the stigma associated with mental
illness. 5K and 2K walk routes. For more
information visit namiwalksfbay.org.
Port of Redwood City and USS
Potomac celebrate 75 years of
Maritime History. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Port of Redwood City Marina, 451
Seaport Court, Redwood City.Tours $5
for adults, free for 12 and under. For
more information visit
redwoodcityport.com.
Automotive Event Just for Women.
MB Garage, 2165 Palm Ave., San Mateo.
Learn from a master technician to do a
safety inspection. Communicate
effectively so you’re not intimidated;
question and answer session about
your car. Free. For more information call
349-2744.
Memorial Day Grave Decoration:
Flag Retrieval. Golden Gate National
Cemetery, 1300 Sneath Lane, San
Bruno. Honor the men and women
who bravely served our country. Help
remove American flags at each of the
112,600 graves. Anyone can
participate: Boy Scouts, families, friends,
veterans. Boy Scout Contact: Keith
Blackey at 704-2985.
Friends of the Millbrae Library
Twice-YearlyBook/MediaSale.9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Free admission. For more
information email smco-
pr@plsinfo.org.
Sei BokuBonsai Kai Show. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. San Mateo Garden Center,
Beresford Park, 605 Parkside Way, San
Mateo. There will be demonstrations
by Steve Iwaki, door prizes, a tree clinic,
vendor sales and plant sales. Free. For
more information visit
sanmateogardencenter.org.
Youth DanceProgramSpringDance
Show.11:30 a.m. Central Park Outdoor
Stage, El Camino Real and Fifth Avenue,
San Mateo. There will be a wide
assortment of dance styles including
creative, modern, jazz, ballet and more.
Refreshments will be available for
purchase. Free. For more information
call 522-7444.
Adult DanceProgram Spring Dance
Show. 1 p.m. Central Park Outdoor
Stage, El Camino Real and Fifth Avenue,
San Mateo. Refreshments will be
available for purchase. Free. For more
information call 522-7444.
Courthouse Docket: Jim Friedman
will discuss the evolution of toys in
the 20th century. 1 p.m. Historic
Courtroom A in the San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
call 299-0104.
Youth DanceProgramSpringDance
Show. 2:30 p.m. Central Park Outdoor
Stage, El Camino Real and Fifth Avenue,
San Mateo. There will be a wide
assortment of dance styles including
creative, modern, jazz, ballet and more.
Refreshments will be available for
purchase. Free. For more information
call 522-7444.
Burlingame Idol Dinner Show. 5:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Burlingame Parks and
Recreation Departments Auditorium,
850 Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
Fourteen finalists will compete for the
coveted titles of Burlingame Idol.
Burlingame Glee will open the
evening’s entertainment. Show is free.
Catered buffer by NINGS will be
offered; $25 adults, $15 seniors and
children. For more information call 697-
6936.
Some Like It Hot Ball. 7 p.m. San
Mateo Masonic Lodge Ballroom, 100
N. Ellsworth Ave., San Mateo. Vintage
dance lesson at 7 p.m., dance lasts until
midnight to music of Lee Presson and
the Nails. 1920s costume or
vintage/modern evening dress is
admired but not required. Includes
musical and theatrical entertainment
as well as a light snack buffet. Tickets
$20 at the door. For more information
call (510) 522-1731.
International Latin-Samba Dance
Class. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. $16 Drop-ins. For more
information call 627-4854.
Abbott Middle School presents a
Family Friendly version of ‘Grease.‘
7:30 p.m. 600 36st Ave., San Mateo. $9
for all tickets. For more information call
520-1529.
Night and Day. 8 p.m.Transfiguration
Episcopal Church, 39th Avenue and
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.This
concert celebrates music about dawn,
dusk and deepest midnight. Advance
purchase $20, at door $25, with student
ID $10. For more information call 574-
6210.
Dragon Productions Theatre
Company presents: Wonderful
World. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general. $20
seniors. $16 students. For more
information or to purchase tickets
online visit
www.dragonproductions.net.
Heart’s Gate World Premiere. 8 p.m. to
10 p.m. Cañada College Main Theatre,
4200 Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City.
Maestro Eric Kujawsky conducts World
Premiere: local composer Dan Wyman’s
concerto called ‘Heart’s Gate.’
Preconcert lecture by Maestro
Kujawsky and Dan Wyman at 7 p.m.
$25, $20, $10 for adults students. 18
and under free. For more information
call 366-6872.
SUNDAY, JUNE 3
Sei BokuBonsai Kai Show.10 a.m. to
4 p.m. San Mateo Garden Center,
Beresford Park, 605 Parkside Way, San
Mateo. There will be demonstrations
by Steve Jang, door prizes, a tree clinic,
vendor sales and plant sales. Free. For
more information visit
sanmateogardencenter.org.
Master Gardener Plant Clinic:
Repotting orchids for the
horticulturally-challenged.1 p.m. to
3 p.m. San Mateo Arboretum Society,
Kohl Pumphouse, 101 Ninth Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
579-0536 or visit
sanmateoarboretum.org.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book/Media Sale. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae.
Free admission, ‘Bag of Books’ $5. For
more information email smco-
pr@plsinfo.org.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and JeanetteFeinberg. 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.
Madrigals from Around the World.
3 p.m. First Congregational Church of
Palo Alto, 1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto.
The Congregational Oratorio Society,
conducted by Gregory Wait, with Joe
Guthrie, will perform songs by Morley,
Lassus, Marenzio, Weelkes and others.
An ice cream social will follow the
concert. $15 general admission. $10 for
students and seniors. For more
information and for tickets call 856-
6662 or visit
fccpa.org/FCCPA_Site/Concerts.html.
After-Hours Teen Study Night. 5:15
p.m. to 9 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. The
library will be open after hours for
students and light snacks and
refreshments will be provided. For
middle and high school students. Free.
For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Dragon Productions Theatre
Company presents: Wonderful
World. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 535
Alma St., Palo Alto. $25 general. $20
seniors. $16 students. For more
information or to purchase tickets
online visit
www.dragonproductions.net.
MONDAY, JUNE 4
Job Seekers at San Mateo Library.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W.Third Ave., San Mateo. Job
search, resume writing and online job
applications. Volunteers with
experience in human resources,
coaching and teaching are here to help
in search for job. Free. For more
information call 522-7802.
American Rhythm East Coast Swing
Dance Class. 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Foster City. Drop-in cost $16. For more
information visit
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
ing the opposition, said the claim sounds
accurate.
“It is a new business license tax on
gross receipts for rental cars so it seems to
me like a new car tax,” Turner said.
Horsley, however, said the ads are “dra-
matically disingenuous.”
San Mateo County Forward — a coali-
tion of elected officials, service providers
and others who see the taxes as a way to
stave off further cuts — said voters are
being mislead by the opposition group
whose more than a quarter-million dollar
war chest is funded entirely by Hertz and
Enterprise rental car companies.
In comparison, the proponents who
have raised roughly $60,000 are relying
on endorsements by officials like U.S.
Rep. Jackie Speier, fliers and — they hope
— the common sense of the community to
battle back the broadcast campaign of
companies that argue the taxes will hit
them hard. Specifically, the three meas-
ures on the June 5 primary — T, U and X
— will add business license taxes to rental
car and parking businesses and increase
the transient occupancy tax at hotels.
Specifically, rental cars would gain a 2.5
percent tax, parking an 8 percent tax and
TOT, or hotel tax, would jump from the
existing 10 percent to 12 percent. Taken
together, the taxes will generate an esti-
mated $13 million annually which county
officials say is part of their multi-pronged
approach to reducing a structural deficit,
keeping a balanced budget and preventing
future cuts to services and workers.
Gathered outside the Millbrae BART
station Friday, members of San Mateo
County Forward made their last-ditch
pitch before the June 5 primary election.
The group’s strongest argument is that the
taxes, which they describe as modest, will
be paid primarily by visitors to and from
San Francisco International Airport rather
than San Mateo County residents.
Although the airport is the primary focus
of the campaign, federal law prohibits the
county from exclusively taxing airport-
related business so the taxes will apply to
all commercial operators in the unincor-
porated area, including restaurants with
valet parking and hotels that charge sepa-
rately for parking.
The formal opposition, a group known
as Taxpayers for a Strong Economy,
counter that the taxes will actually affect
residents and the county’s economy nega-
tively by dissuading tourism and heaping
more costs on those who either own or use
such businesses. Proponents, however, say
travelers aren’t going to choose the
Sacramento airport over SFO, for
instance, when visiting the Wine Country
just to save a few dollars.
“We’re talking about a cup of coffee,”
said Supervisor Dave Pine.
Local individual opponents are likely
those who are just opposed to any taxes,
Horsley said.
Instead, Horsley and Pine took aim at
the organized effort, saying that if mem-
bers were really concerned about tourism
they would be speaking with San
Francisco and other cities that already
impose parking and car taxes or have
higher hotel taxes.
Jon Ballesteros, vice president of public
policy for the San Francisco Travel
Association, said the group did battle San
Francisco’s 2010 hotel tax proposal. He
also disagreed that more taxes won’t dis-
suade tourism.
“It’s just pretty clear when you look at
the competitive nature of destinations.
Travelers get to decide and when there is
a new rental tax they look at compared to
all the other metro airports,” Ballesteros
said.
Yesterday, Pine and Horsley argued that
the county has sustained the impact of
SFO on its infrastructure, services and
environment without reaping any of the
benefits. The city of San Francisco
receives $50 million in revenue from the
airport.
“San Francisco has an ATM of sorts at
SFO. They take the large bills and we just
want some change,” Pine said.
Service League Executive Director
Mike Nevin, a former county supervisor,
said county residents pay high sales tax
for transportation needs, like the Millbrae
BART station, that are used by travelers so
the tax is just a matter of paying their fair
share.
“All we’re asking is to throw us a bone,”
he said.
The taxes, proponents say, are a way to
recoup some benefit from the airport
while also helping the county ease its
ongoing challenge to provide public safe-
ty, medical and other services to more
than 700,000 residents. Pine and Horsley
said the county has done its part by cutting
more than $70 million in operating costs
through a combination of eliminating 500
positions, slashing budgets and negotiat-
ing $13 million in labor cost reductions.
The taxes are considered another key to
solvency and are already assumed in the
recommended county budget released ear-
lier in the week. If the taxes fail, county
officials will need to fill that $13 million
hole through more cuts to health and pub-
lic safety, Horsley said.
An increase in the transient occupancy
tax would put the county on par with
neighboring jurisdictions and generate an
extra $200,000 yearly based on current
receipts of approximately $1 million,
according to calculations by the County
Manager’s Office. The county doesn’t cur-
rently tax parking facilities but several
cities like Millbrae and South San
Francisco do. Of the approximately $80.9
million in gross receipts created by SFO,
nearly $63 million falls in the unincorpo-
rated area. Assuming the figures stay
roughly the same, a business license tax of
8 percent would generate approximately
$4.9 million annually. Likewise, a 2.5 per-
cent business license tax on the operators
of vehicle rental businesses would bring in
approximately $7.75 million in general
fund revenue annually based on the $310
million in receipts generated in 2010.
The county tried similar car and parking
taxes in 2008 but both failed with just
more than 52 percent voters opposed.
After the election, county supervisors
blamed a lack of active campaigning. The
county taxes also come just months before
the November election in which state vot-
ers will be faced with a proposition for a
sales tax increase. Tax proponents believe
voters will not let the fall request color
their opinions on the local measures
Tuesday.
All three taxes need a simple majority
to pass because they are not earmarked for
specific uses.
Continued from page 1
TAX
“We are confident in the abilities of the
Capuchino leadership and staff to sustain
their steady progression. We will work
with the staff and administration on the
concerns expressed but I do not want the
Capuchino community to lose sight of
their recent gains or the positive focus on
the students and their accomplishments,”
Laurence wrote in an email.
Fogle declined to comment further.
Shanks has created a number of prob-
lems since joining Capuchino four years
ago, teachers said in the letter.
“She has demonstrated significant
inadequacies in her leadership skills, as
well as management and personnel
skills,” the letter reads. “This has resulted
in a toxic school climate and the loss of
many dedicated educators, with numer-
ous others submitting transfer requests,
thus devastating Capuchino’s long-stand-
ing culture of staff leadership, empower-
ment and cohesiveness.”
A consulting firm was brought in to
help the school climate but only one
meeting took place, teachers wrote. At
that meeting, staff expressed feelings of
being harassed, intimidated or fearful.
Despite the differences, Fogle and
Tuite wrote that staff has remained dedi-
cated to providing “an exemplary educa-
tional experience for Capuchino’s
diverse learning community.”
Without change, the teaching faculty
was asked if they would like Shanks to
remain as principal. Only 10 of the 60
asked responded with yes, according to
the teachers. Now the teachers are asking
the superintendent and the board to sup-
port the request.
Laurence said the staff and principal
have made great work over the last few
years in terms of student performance,
program development and community
outreach.
“However, to achieve these results, a
tremendous amount of change was nec-
essary. Change can be unsettling, but at
times schools need to re-evaluate and
change in order to reach their potential,”
he said, adding that he is confident in the
leadership at Capuchino.
Similarly, Shanks pointed out the
changes which have gone into effect in
recent years including increasing
involvement in two programs:
Advancement Via Individual
Determination, a college readiness sys-
tem that has increased from two classes
of 50 students to five classes with 130
students and the International
Baccalaureate program, an academically
challenging program that prepares stu-
dents for college, which has grown from
132 students in 2008 and 312 this year.
She added that there has been an increase
in test scores and the creation of the
Freshman Small Learning Community
which led to a new Sophomore Small
Learning Community.
Shanks ended by committing herself to
Capuchino and the vision that all stu-
dents graduate with the skills needed to
be prepared for college and career oppor-
tunities.
Continued from page 1
SHANKS
were chosen for the honor, part of the
annual Festival of Flowers started in 1941
as a dedication to children. It was pat-
terned after the Tournament of Roses
Parade in Pasadena, instead with the posy
as its signature flower. The parade, tradi-
tionally for youngsters 14 years old and
younger, has achieved both state and
national fame for San Bruno. Last year,
bad weather leading up to the parade
made it questionable if it would be held.
Despite a smaller turnout, the parade
went on. This year, Lions Club members
hope to start rebuilding the community
participation.
This year’s princess court also includes
Reagan McNichol from Crestmoor
Elementary, Gianna Alcaraz from St.
Roberts and Alyssa Panameno from
Rollingwood Elementary. All children 14
and under are encouraged to participate
by using artificial or real decorations to
depict this year’s theme, “Education is
Everything.” There is no sign-up or fees.
Children simply need to be there 30 min-
utes prior to the parade to participate.
Put on by the San Bruno Lions Club,
the parade is meant to bring the commu-
nity together. Lion Issac Mejia, who owns
Don Pico’s in San Bruno, remembered
attending the parade in high school. A
member of the Crestmoor band, Mejia
was surprised at how even teens got
involved with the event. Each year, the
parade includes a marching band but this
year’s will be particularly big. More than
200 alumni from Capuchino High
School’s band program have signed up to
come together for the occasion.
Mejia said the hope is to really cele-
brate the community coming together.
There will also be the annual Posy
Parade baseball games at Tom Lara Field.
A free hot dog lunch will be provided by
the San Bruno Lions for all parade partic-
ipants. Hot dogs will also be for sale.
The parade begins at Posy Park on San
Mateo Avenue at Kains Avenue and trav-
els south to El Camino Real at Taylor
Avenue, crossing over to Crystal Springs
Road to San Bruno City Park. The parade
starts at 1 p.m. but participants are asked
to be lined up with the group they would
like to be judged in by 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 3. The parade will form on
the streets adjacent to Kains Avenue.
Continued from page 1
PARADE
SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 2012
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A great sense of accom-
plishment can be achieved by attending to all those
little tasks and duties that you’ve been neglecting.
Get them out of the way once and for all.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Although you’re entitled
to have some fun with your friends, don’t overindulge
in game playing. You can enjoy yourself in a variety of
ways without going overboard.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You might not be the frst
one out of the starting block, but once you get out
there, you’ll be bound and determined to run a good
race. You’ll show your stuff to one and all.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Participation that
requires more brainpower than physical exertion will
be your cup of tea. Rest your aching back and give
your noggin a big workout instead.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Something unusual could
suddenly develop that you may want to respond to
immediately. It’s likely to have to do with a fnancial
investment that you’ll want to be part of.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Matters that had been
taken over by others could once again revert back
into your capable hands. Make sure to substantially
alter the dynamics this time around.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Make sure you
work in surroundings that are devoid of negative
infuences. If you don’t, you might get a few things
done, but not anywhere near what you wanted.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If a signifcant
relationship needs a bit of mending or tender loving
care, now is the time to get together with that person
and shore up those old bonds.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You’re well suited for
competitive matters of any nature. It isn’t likely that
you’ll deliberately seek one out, but somehow one is
apt to fnd you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Having a positive and
optimistic attitude will enable you to accomplish just
about anything you set your mind to. Your key to suc-
cess is a strong belief in yourself.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If you take your
involvement seriously, there’s no reason why you
shouldn’t do well, whether you’re conducting busi-
ness or playing a game. It’s indifference that leads
to defeat.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Although you might not
be able to function as independently as you’d like,
you can placate others by yielding a bit of ground. In
fact, you’ll fnd that being part of a team effort isn’t
painful at all.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-2-12
fRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
6
-
2
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Deluge
5 Ms. Arthur
8 Ax or awl
12 Argue for
13 Maj. ocean
14 Lahore language
15 Plod along
16 Suave
18 Symbol
20 Sleep phenom.
21 Gypsy Rose --
22 Nail polish
25 Dell wares
28 Ode writer
29 Holy terrors
33 Isolated
35 Eminent
36 Missouri tributary
37 Kitchen whistler
38 Family member
39 Foul mood
41 Unmoving
42 Political thaw
45 Get a loan
48 First gear
49 New Mexico’s fower
53 Luxury car
56 Highway
57 Small combo
58 Ryan’s stat
59 Green pod
60 Black cat, maybe
61 Moon’s place
62 Thin stratum
DOwN
1 Jalopy woe
2 Alice’s chronicler
3 Have -- -- news for you!
4 Mideast desert
5 One-star
6 Forever, to Keats
7 Even though
8 Winery cask
9 PhD exam
10 Comic-strip pooch
11 Fisherman’s fy
17 Mantra chants
19 Sugarbush tree
23 Judge -- Bean
24 Trumpeter Al
25 Sit down quickly
26 -- Nostra
27 Ginger cookie
30 New York team
31 Bleached-out
32 Proofer’s word
34 By Jove!
35 Museum near Malibu
37 Reunion crowd
39 Elegant wraps
40 La Guardia alternative
43 Building wing
44 Mark replacers
45 Eight, in combos
46 Slow oven
47 Falco or Sedgwick
50 Blast furnace fuel
51 Irene -- of “Fame”
52 Not know from --
54 Charged particle
55 Low-lying island
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 25
THE DAILY JOURNAL
26
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
INSIDE SALES /
TELEMARKETING
The Daily Journal has two openings for high
output sales professionals who know their way
around a phone.
The ideal candidate will enjoy selling products
and services over the telephone, using the fax.
email, and social media as support tools. Ulti-
mately, you will need to be comfortable making
sales calls over the phone, and once in awhile,
seeing clients in person.
Must be reliable, professional, and with a drive
to succeed. We expect you to be making calls.
To apply, call Jerry at 650-344-5200.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
We’re a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906
or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
CUSTOMER SERVICE,DETAILERS &
Production workers Needed Provide
exceptional customer service,
bilingual/Spanish speaking is a plus. We
provide training and support. Apply in
person at any Auto Pride Car Wash
locations.
DRY CLEANER, presser wanted,
(650) 589-2312
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
PROCESS SERVER (legal paper deliv-
ery) car and insurance, reliable, swing
shift, PT, immediate opening.
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250085
The following person is doing business
as: Armanino Trucking 3928 Casanova
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Alex
Armanino, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Alex Armanino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/12/12, 05/19/12, 05/26/12, 06/02/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 513604
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Samantha Yvette Lash
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioners, Samantha Yvette Lash filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Samantha Yvette Lash
Proposed name: Echo Yvette Heart
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 27,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/14/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/11/2012
(Published 05/19/12, 05/26/12, 06/02/12,
06/09/12)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 513774
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jacqueline Patricia Der Torossian
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner,Jacqueline Patricia Der Toros-
sian filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Jacqueline Patricia Der
Torossian
Proposed name: Jacqueline Patricia Ley-
legian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 10,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 05/18/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/17/2012
(Published, 5/26/12, 06/02/12, 06/09/12,
06/16/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250365
The following person is doing business
as: DL, INC, 1098 Foster City Blvd.,
#106/846 Foster City, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Dlinkhorn, INC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Daniel Linkhorn/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/12/12, 05/19/12, 05/26/12, 06/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250505
The following person is doing business
as: Albert Loves Frida, 639 Yosemite Ct.,
WOODSIDE, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Carol Eder,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Carol Eder /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/19/12, 05/26/12, 06/02/12, 06/09/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250455
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Scanforkeeps, 2) Scan For Keeps,
2019 Ray Dr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Venicio Antonio Pozon De
Leon, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Venicio Antonio Pozon De Leon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/19/12, 05/26/12, 06/02/12, 06/09/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250494
The following person is doing business
as: Evian Rain, 1060 El Camino Real,
Ste D, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Judith Chipman, 1422 Marcie Cir., South
San Francisco, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Judith Chipman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/26/12, 06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250590
The following person is doing business
as: Refvem Properties, 67 Pine Ave,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Catherine
R. Aydelott, same address, James D.
Refvem, Jr., 2740 Topaz Dr., Novato, CA
94945, William E. Refvem, 116 Planta-
tion Place Ln, Mt. Airy, NC 27030, Karen
Chandler, 376 Kalthoff Common, Liver-
more, CA 94550, and Charlotte O. Re-
fvem, 1 Baldwin Ave, #417, San Mateo,
CA 94401. The business is conducted by
an Unincorporated Association other
than a Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 2011.
/s/ Catherine R. Aydelott /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/26/12, 06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250418
The following person is doing business
as: Omni Modo, 7455 El Camino Real,
Ste A, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Omni
Modo, INC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by an Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Benito Pua /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12).
27 Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 501 Primrose Road,
Burlingame, California, until 2 P.M., on June 28, 2012 and will, at 2 P.M. on that date, be publicly
opened and read at the City Hall, in Conference Room "B" for:
LAGUNA DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS, CITY PROJECT NO. 82600 within the City of Burlin-
game, San Mateo County, California.
Contract documents covering the work may be obtained at office of the City Engineer during nor-
mal working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California. A non-refundable fee
of $50 will be charged for the Contract Documents.
The work shall consist of construction new approximately 690 linear feet of 5’x10’ box culvert, 70
linear feet of sanitary sewer replacement, sanitary sewer manhole construction, storm drain vault
construction, and the grading/cleaning of an existing drainage channel and existing culverts.
Special Provisions, Specifications and Plans, including minimum wage rates to be paid in compli-
ance with Section 1773.2 of the California Labor Code and related provisions, may be inspected
in the office of the City Engineer during normal working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road,
Burlin-game, California.
A prebid meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M., City Hall, Conference Room "B" on June 12,
2012.
The contractor shall possess a Class A license prior to submitting a bid. All work specified in this
project shall be completed within 60 working days from date of the Notice to Proceed.
_______________________________________
ART MORIMOTO, P.E.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR
DATE OF POSTING: May 29, 2012
TIME OF COMPLETION: (60) WORKING DAYS
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal June 2 and 8, 2012.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250715
The following person is doing business
as: Stained Glass By Frank, 1130 Balboa
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Do-
na Edlund, and Frank Edlund, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 05/31/2012.
/s/ Dona Edlund /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250263
The following person is doing business
as: M & M Mechanical, 455 Tiller Ln.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tom
McGuire, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/18/2012.
/s/ Tom McGuire /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250264
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mad Town Custom, 2) Kut Throat
Technology, 2709 Foster St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Hernando Bueno,
Jr., same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/25/2012.
/s/ Hernando Bueno, Jr. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250720
The following person is doing business
as: Parent Empowerment Academy, 21
Ray Ct., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Consuelo M Puccetti, 21 Ray Ct., BUR-
LINGAME, CA 94010. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/01/12.
/s/ Consuelo M Puccetti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/02/12, 06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12).
NOTICE INVITING BIDS
Project: 2580 El Camino Real -
Phase I Site Preparation
Owner: Urban Housing Redwood
City, LLC (Affiliated with Summerhill
Homes)
1. Segue Construction, Inc. will accept
bids for the 2580 El Camino Real
project in Redwood City, for on or
before June 15, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. via
fax or Emai. Email is
margaritha@seguecon.com; Fax
Number is 925-931-1758. Construc-
tion Start will be July 9, 2012 with a
Contract Duration of 8 weeks. This
Phase I will only include the following
scopes: Survey,
Demolition, Grading, SWPP, Utilities,
and Joint Trench.
2. The plans, specifications, and
contract documents for the project will
be available at the Santa Clara
County Builders Exchange, Peninsula
Builders Exchange, Reed
Construction Data, Bid Clerk, and
Dodge-Scan/McGraw Hill plan room,
at
https://www.box.com/s/d525efb1670a
301b0d2f or for review at Segue
Construction's office.
3. Segue Construction, Inc. is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
MBE/WBE/DVBE and local sub-bids
are encouraged.
4. This is not a prevailing wage
project.
5. Additional information is provided in
the Instructions to Bidders, which
should be carefully reviewed by all
bidders prior to submitting a Bid
Proposal.
Segue Construction, Inc.
7139 Koll Center Parkway, Suite 200
Pleasanton, CA 94566-3120
Phone: (925) 931-1750
Fax: 925-931-1758
Contractor License #B-638854
210 Lost & Found
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others CLAIMED!
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST SILVER BRACELET - Lost on
5/18, possibly in Millbrae, off El Camino,
Reward, (650)343-7272
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
WATCH - BLACK WOMEN Chanel
Watch lost May 9th in Burlingame,
Reward Offered (650)921-9294
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
DRYER HEAVY Duty electric, like new,
Roper, all instructions $40.00.
BURLINGAME. SOLD!
HEATER, ELECTRIC Radiator, top per-
fect $15.00 SOLD!
ICE CREAM Maker, Electric, Perffect, all
instructions $10 Burlingame,
SOLD!
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 SOLD!
LARGE REFRIGERATOR- Amana
Looks and runs great. $95 OBO,
(650)627-4560
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TOWER FANS Lasko, like new, 2 availa-
ble. $25, Burlingame SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new $49, (650)494-1687
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, Retails at $3,900, new.
$1,000/obo. (650)627-4560
WINDOW A/C, still in box. Soleus 6200
BTU $75, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK - Roof mounted, holds 4
bikes, $65., (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 See print: http://i.mi-
nus.com/ibeJMUpvttcRvW.JPG
(650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIABLE DOLLS MADAME
ALEXANDER Dolls. $20 each or best of-
fer.(650)589-8348
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, $8. each, (650)364-
7777
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GIANTS BOBBLEHEADS -(6) Barry
Bonds, Lon Simmons, etc., $15. each
obo, SOLD!
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JIM BEAM decorative collecors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
‘50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLAT SCEEN Monitor and Scanner, mint
condition; HP monitor 17in; Canon Scan-
ner 14 x 10 flatbed, SOLD!
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout matches the
your fingers naturally movement, avoid-
ing RSI. Num pad, $20 (650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40 See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$50 (650)589-8348
SONY TRINITRON TV, 27 inch, Excel-
lent picture Quality, SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ALL WOOD Kitchen Table 36” plus leaf,
William-Sonoma, $75 OBO, (650)627-
4560
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53”X66”, $19., (650)583-8069
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6’ x 2.5’, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FRENCH PROVINCIAL COUCH - gold,
7’ long, good condition, $40., San Bruno,
(650)583-8069
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
304 Furniture
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
$50 OBO text homessmc@yahoo.com
for foto
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
(650)343-4461
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $35 each or both for $60. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair (flowery pat-
tern) great condition $100 (650)853-8069
WOOD PLANT stand, unused, 45 inch
wide, 22 high, 11 deep, several shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
306 Housewares
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DELTA 15 amp. 12" Compound meter
saw excellent condition $95. SOLD!
308 Tools
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970’s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
(650)873-8167
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
28
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Crams
9 Tool that
requires
steering
15 Credit union
offering
16 Lab subject
17 Buffet platform
18 Evidence of a
choice
19 Kit __
20 Physicist Ohm
22 Stick in a
percussion
section
23 __ Reader
25 Dixieland jazz
highlights
27 North Sea
feeder
28 Rings
30 Encouraging
word?
32 EuroBonus
frequent flyers’
airline
33 Without a hitch
37 Riding a train,
say
40 Begin, for one
41 Reality cooking
show with a
pitchfork in its
logo
43 Displeased
reaction
44 Slice and dice
45 Sticker
49 Austrian river
51 Event monitored
by the CIA
54 Caramel candy
brand
55 Couldn’t not
57 French toast
59 NCAA athlete’s
eligibility factor
60 Top performers
62 Like one who
can’t hit a pitch?
64 Depression
65 Fame
66 Page and
others
67 Frontman, often
DOWN
1 Hike, in a way
2 Salt containing
gold
3 Eur. peak
mentioned in the
“Aeneid”
4 Okra unit
5 Shake __
6 Dairy Queen
supply
7 Instrument
honored in a
Beaufort, South
Carolina,
museum
8 Speak angrily to
9 Poke
10 Jobs creation
11 “Wow!”
12 Rasta’s messiah
13 Most important
14 Sports item usually
seen in pairs
21 Literature genre
24 Common Latino
newspaper name
26 Cache
29 Big hit
31 Start of an
embarrassment
simile
34 Sitcom spender
of brandels and
grebbels
35 Some lyrical
writers
36 More stable
37 Austin Powers
catchphrase
38 Like some
nurses
39 Joan nominated
for an Oscar in
“The Blue Veil”
(1951)
42 Play area
46 Effective, as an
argument
47 Fleece source
48 Good-for-nothing
50 Passé
52 Certain
reviewer’s tool
53 Belted ancient
garment
56 Sign
58 Endurance race,
for short
61 Part of Mac OS:
Abbr.
63 Bouvier __
Flandres:
herding dog
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/02/12
06/02/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others SOLD!
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (7) mint condi-
tion, hard cover, eclipse, solar systems,
sun, fundamentals, photos $12.00 all,
(650)578-9208
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5” long X 17”
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - “Fighting Aircraft of WWII”,
Jane’s, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, 200 Mystery, sus-
pense, romance, fiction, many famous
authors, hardback and soft, 50 cents
each OBO, (650) 578 9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm,
(650)344-8549
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45”L, 20”W, 3”H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LARGE PRINT. Hard Cover. Mystery
Books. Current Author. (20) $1 each
SOLD!
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
310 Misc. For Sale
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unopened, Plate
set of 4 William Sonoma white/black/red
$12.00 SOLD!
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unused, Hard
covered Recipe book, marinades, cook-
ing, BBQ, SOLD!
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $65. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PATRIOTIC BLANKETS (2) unopened,
red, white, blue, warm fleece lap throw.
$10.00 both. (650)578-9208
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $8. each (12 available), while sup-
plies last, Bill (650)871-7200
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, sealed
book Past Campaigns From Banners to
Broadcasts, insight on politics, $10.00
SOLD!
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea (650)871-7200
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WALNUT ARMOUR with 2 drawers on
bottom and brushed gold knobs. Good
condition for $85. Kim Pizzolon
(650)455-4094
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - cage,
tunnels, 30 pieces approx., $25.,
(650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $30
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
316 Clothes
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
HAT: LADIES wide brim, Leghorn
straw, pouf/bow, pink/red velvet vintage
roses. From “Hats On Post”, SF-- orig.
$75. Yours for $25. OBO.
SOLD!
HAT: LADIES’ black wool felt Breton
with 1” grosgrain ribbon above broad
brim. Sophisticated--fin the Easter Pa-
rade! $18., SOLD!
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MEN’S jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MEN’S PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 650 245-3661
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8”x4”x2” $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL STEEL LUMBER
RACKS for 8 foot bed. Will go over
camper shell, $85., Mike Pizzolon
(650)455-4095
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45
(650)365-1797
318 Sports Equipment
LAT PULL machine, with accessories,
$50 OBO, (650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
PROFESSIONAL DART BOARD with
cabinet, brand new, $50obo (650)589-
8348
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
320 Spas & Hot Tubs
SUNDANCE SPAS HOT TUB - Cameo
model, 5-6 people, purchased 2000, new
cover, new motor in 2010, SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
2203 Portsmouth Way,
San Mateo
Bedroom Sets,
Round bed and headboard,
Couch, and love seat,
Lamps, misc. furniture and
Some antiques.
Saturday - Sunday
June 2 & 3
9AM-4PM
ESTATE
SALE
Fri, June 1st,
Sat, June 2nd
9AM to 4PM
757 Elm St., #13
San Carlos,
CA 94070
GARAGE
SALE
BURLINGAME
2709 Mariposa Dr.
(off Trousdale)
Saturday
June 2nd
9 am - 4 pm
Tools & more!
RUMMAGE SALE
Benefiting a Non-Profit
SAN MATEO
San Mateo Gardener’s Hall
(on the corner of 5th Ave. &
S. Claremont St.)
Saturday
June 2nd
10 AM - 3 PM
Clothes, toys & misc.
household goods.
THE THRIFT SHOP
ALL CLOTHING ON
SALE 50% OFF
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
29 Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
YARD SALE
Saturday
June 2nd
10AM-4PM
716
Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
Some Estate Items
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
345 Medical Equipment
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
CADILLAC ‘93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
LIEN SALE - On 06/15/2012 at 1465
Mission Rd. South San Francisco CA
a Lien Sale will be held on a 2004
BMW 745LI Vin#
WBAGN63564DS54785,
STATE: 6CYJ909 at 10:30 AM.
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
BMW 530 ‘95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, 165K miles,
$3,850 (650)349-0713
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC OLDS CUTLASS SU-
PREME. 81K orginal miles, new paint,
excellent condition. $4500 OBO
(650)868-0436 RWC.
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
NISSAN ‘87 Centura - Two door, man-
ual, stick shift, 150K miles. Clean title,
good body, $1,250., SOLD!
PLYMOUTH ‘72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - ‘88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
1995 FORD Cargo Van 130K
6 Cylinder, good condition, SOLD!
DODGE 99 1/2 ton van V6 runs $100
(650)481-5296
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT ‘97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $2,000. Owner fi-
nancing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
“WE FIX CARS”
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
670 Auto Service
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13”,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
THULE CAR rack load bars, with locking
feet. $100 (650)594-1494
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Pictures on Yelp
Qualifing
Special
flat & low
slope roofs
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
MENA’S
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
• Move in/out
• Steam Carpet
• Windows & Screens
• Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning Concrete
Construction
Construction
30
Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
FLAMINGO’S
FLOORING
14086 Washington Ave
San Leandro
510-895-5400
Gutters
ESTATE SHEET METAL
Lic.# 727803
Rain Gutters,
Service & Repairs
General Sheet Metal,
Heating,
Custom Copper Work
Free Estimates
(650)875-6610
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, All types of Roofs.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
• General Home Repairs
• Improvements
• Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting •Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
B BROS
HAULING
Free Estimates
Junk & Debris Removal
(650)619-5943
10% Off with this ad!
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
•Sprinkler systems • New fences
• Flagstone • Interlocking pavers
• New driveways • Clean-ups
• Hauling • Gardening
• Retaining walls • Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Landscaping
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
• New Lawns
• Lawn Renovations
• Sprinklers
• General Clean-Up
• Commercial/ industrial
(650) 347-2636
www.fisher-garden-
landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES
QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BATH, SINK, &
TILE GLAZING
Refinishing
Some Interior Painting
(650)720-1448
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Workmanship
• Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona
®
,
VelaShape II™and
VASER
®
Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Español
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specific directions
31 Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way • San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Low Cost
Divorce
• We handle Uncontested
and Contested Divorces
• Complex Property Division
• Child & Spousal Support Payments
• Restraining Orders
• Domestic Violence
Peninsula Law Group
“One of The Bay Area’s Very Best!”
Same Day, Weekend
Appointments Available
Se Habla Español
(650) 903-2200
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Printers
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
copier, & fax machine, like new, $25.,
(650)212-7020
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
CALIFORNIA
FORECLOSURE
ASSISTANCE
FREE Workshop & Seminar
1331
Old County Rd Ste C,
Belmont, CA 94002
(650) 922-2444
dean4cafa@gmail.com
Registered &
Bonded with
California Attorney
General, Secretary
of State &
Department of
Justice
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
32 Weekend • June 2-3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$â0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 6/30/12
WEBUY