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ELA Author Study Unit

Eric Carle
Jayme Beckwith Jennie Cyran Aubrey Demmin Jenna-Marie Mango Stacey McKie
Niagara University Spring 2008 EDU 561 L1 Professor Lisa Lubin

Description of Eric Carle Unit


Eric Carle Biography: Eric Carle is acclaimed and beloved as the creator of brilliantly illustrated and innovatively designed picture books for very young children. His best-known work, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, has eaten its way into the hearts of literally millions of children all over the world and has been translated into more than 45 languages and sold over 25 million copies. Since the Caterpillar was published in 1969, Eric Carle has illustrated more than seventy books, many best sellers, most of which he also wrote, and more than 84 million copies of his books have sold around the world. Born in Syracuse, New York, in 1929, Eric Carle moved with his parents to Germany when he was six years old; he was educated there, and graduated from the prestigious art school, the Akademie der bildenden Knste, in Stuttgart. But his dream was always to return to America, the land of his happiest childhood memories. So, in 1952, with a fine portfolio in hand and forty dollars in his pocket, he arrived in New York. Soon he found a job as a graphic designer in the promotion department of The New York Times. Later, he was the art director of an advertising agency for many years. One day, respected educator and author, Bill Martin Jr., called to ask Carle to illustrate a story he had written. Martins eye had been caught by a striking picture of a red lobster that Carle had created for an advertisement. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? was the result of their collaboration. It is still a favorite with children everywhere. This was the beginning of Eric Carles true career. Soon Carle was writing his own stories, too. His first wholly original book was 1,2,3 to the Zoo, followed soon afterward by the celebrated classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Eric Carles art is distinctive and instantly recognizable. His art work is created in collage technique, using hand-painted papers, which he cuts and layers to form bright and cheerful images. Many of his books have an added dimensiondie-cut pages, twinkling lights as in The Very Lonely Firefly, even the lifelike sound of a crickets song as in The Very Quiet Cricket - giving them a playful quality: a toy that can be read, a book that can be touched. Children also enjoy working in collage and many send him pictures they have made themselves, inspired by his illustrations. He receives hundreds of letters each week from his young admirers.

The secret of Eric Carles books appeal lies in his intuitive understanding of and respect for children, who sense in him instinctively someone who shares their most cherished thoughts and emotions. The themes of his stories are usually drawn from his extensive knowledge and love of naturean interest shared by most small children. Besides being beautiful and entertaining, his books always offer the child the opportunity to learn something about the world around them. It is his concern for children, for their feelings and their inquisitiveness, for their creativity and their intellectual growth that, in addition to his beautiful artwork, makes the reading of his books such a stimulating and lasting experience. Carle says: With many of my books I attempt to bridge the gap between the home and school. To me home represents, or should represent; warmth, security, toys, holding hands, being held. School is a strange and new place for a child. Will it be a happy place? There are new people, a teacher, classmateswill they be friendly? I believe the passage from home to school is the second biggest trauma of childhood; the first is, of course, being born. Indeed, in both cases we leave a place of warmth and protection for one that is unknown. The unknown often brings fear with it. In my books I try to counteract this fear, to replace it with a positive message. I believe that children are naturally creative and eager to learn. I want to show them that learning is really both fascinating and fun. *Biography from Eric Carles Official Website: http://www.eric-carle.com/home.html*

Description of Unit: Throughout this unit students are exposed to different Eric Carle books and given a chance to grow through a literature rich experience. The activities encompass a lot of different skills that are important for children to grasp at a young age such as: sequencing the order of events, spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, comprehension and listening skills. Eric Carles books are not only age appropriate, but have illustrations that attract students attention no matter what age. Since Eric Carles books are so brilliantly presented, it is easy to find ways to incorporate all of his stories across the curriculum. Many of the lessons could be used in different subject areas.

Overview of UnitWeek 1
Day 1 Book Mister Seahorse Activity *Students will write about a time when their mom or dad cared for them. Goals/Objectives *The students will listen to the teacher read the book, Mister Seahorse, by Eric Carle. *The students will write about a time when there mother or father have protected them. *The students final response will include correct spelling, punctuation, and correct use of capitals. *Students will *Students will be able to sequence sequence the steps of a the story in order with classmates. flower as a whole class. *Students will be able to place

The Tiny Seed

their sentence strip on the sequencing circle in the correct order. 3 House for Hermit Crab *Students will create a paper sequence chain using the events in the story. *Students will draw and write about their own perfect hermit crab. *Students will sequence the different foods in the story. *The students will sequence the story events (in monthly sequence) using a paper chain. *The students will create their own perfect hermit crab shell. *The students will describe their own perfect hermit crab shell. *Students will be able sequence things in the order that appeared in the story. *Students will learn new vocabulary for the foods they are unfamiliar with in the story. *Students will create a few sentences on their favorite food from the book using descriptive detail. *Students will be able to understand the concept of writing and using a recipe. *Students will be able to understand that recipes have steps and a procedure to follow. *Students will create a recipe of their own using different trail mix materials.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Pancakes, Pancakes!

*Students will create their own recipes and follow the idea of sequencing in recipes.

Overview of UnitWeek 2
Day Book Activity Goals/Objectives

Little Cloud

*Students will design and write about their own cloud shape.

*The students will listen to the teacher r the book, Little Cloud, by Eric Carle. *The students will write about a shape th want to become, pretending to be a cloud They will describe their shape and tell w they want to become that shape. *The students final response will includ correct spelling, punctuation, and correc of capitals.

The Secret Birthday Message

*Students will create their own *Students will be able to understand the secret messages for classmates concepts of giving messages and clues fo to discover. others to find. *Students will create a message with clu for other students to find. *Students will create drawings of him/her and describe it using adjectives.

Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, said the Sloth

*Students will be able to identify adjecti *Students will be able to use adjectives t describe themselves. *Students will be able to create a picture about themselves and write a sentence th explains the picture using adjectives. *Students will include correct punctuatio spelling and grammar.

The Mixed-Up Chameleon

*Students will draw their own *The students will illustrate and write ab mixed-up chameleon and write their own mixed-up chameleon. about it. *The students will present their writing during authors chair. *The students will understand the impor of being an individual and being happy w whom you are. *Students will perform a readers theatre.

Roosters Off to See the World

*Students will be able to demonstrate th understanding of text structure by retelli and sequencing the story in order with classmates. *Demonstrate an understanding of characters, plot and setting in the story b performing a Readers Theatre *Students will practice oral fluency

*Culminating Activity*

* Students will create an illustration similar to the way

* Students will be able to write a letter to Eric Carle.

Eric Carle creates his illustrations. *Students will write a letter to Eric Carle about their favorite book.

* Students will be able to create an illustration using Eric Carles art style. * Students will include correct punctuati spelling and grammar.

Materials and Estimated Length of Lesson


1 Book Mister Seahorse Materials Needed a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft. b. Teacher materials: Mister Seahorse by Eric Carle, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. 2 The Tiny Seed a. Student materials: none Time Estimate: 1 hour Time Estimate: 45 minutes

Estimated Length of Less

b. Teacher materials: The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper, large graphic organizer, sentence strips, tape, flower 3 House for Hermit Crab a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, worksheets b. Teacher materials: A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle, worksheets 4 The Very Hungry Caterpillar a. Student materials: scissors, glue, pictures of different foods found in the book, vocabulary words and pencils

Time Estimate: 45 minuteshour

Time Estimate: 1 hour

b. Teacher materials: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle, chart paper, different fruits to stick on the chart paper and pre made caterpillars. 5 Pancakes, Pancakes! a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, graphic organizer/rough copy paper and paper for final draft. b. Teacher materials: Pancakes, Pancakes! by Eric Carle, sample recipe, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper, trail mix ingredients, spoons, plastic baggies. 6 Little Cloud a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft. Time estimate: 45 minutes b. Teacher materials: Little Cloud by Eric Carle, cotton balls, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper.

Time Estimate: 1 hour

The Secret Birthday Message

a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, object to hide, graphic organizer/rough copy paper and paper for final draft. b. Teacher materials: The Secret Birthday Message by Eric Carle, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper.

. Time estimate: 1 hour

Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, said the Sloth

a. Student materials: pencils, paper, creative materials (markers, crayons, colored

pencils), glitter glue b. Teacher materials: Slowly, Slowly Slowly, said the Sloth by Eric Carle, markers and chart paper, teddy bear 9 The Mixed-Up Chameleon a. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, My Mixed-Up Chameleon worksheet, writing checklist b. Teacher materials: The Mixed Up Chameleon by Eric Carle, authors chair, My Mixed-Up Chameleon worksheet for students, writing checklist for students 10 Roosters Off to See the World a. Student materials: Readers Theatre script b. Teacher materials: Roosters Off to See the World by Eric Carle, make up a readers theatres script for the book, chart paper for sequencing, dry erase markers or regular markers. *Culminating Activity* a. Student materials: Writing: Directions, Eric Carle books, writing prompts, paper, pencils, final copy paper (to be used later) Art: Directions, Eric Carle books, glue, paint brushes, tissue paper, white paper, scissors, crayons, colored pencils b. Teacher materials: art book: The Art of Eric Carle by Eric Carle, example letter,

Time estimate: 1 hour

Time Estimate: 1 hours

example art work, letter checklist, art checklist

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Jenna-Marie Mango Subject of Lesson: Reading and Writing Time Estimate: 45 minutes I. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives a. The students will listen to the teacher read the book, Mister Seahorse, by Eric Carle. b. The students will write about a time when their mother or father have protected them. c. The students final response will include correct spelling, punctuation, and correct use of capitals. 2. NYS Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Speaking Language for Information and Standard Standard Number 1C Students will select and use strategies Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding

Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

Specific Expectations for Listening and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression.

they have been taught for note taking, organizing, and categorizing information. 1E Students will make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. 4A Students will listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them 4B to speak. Students will take turns speaking and responding to others ideas in 4C conversations on familiar topics. Students will recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations. Standard Standard Number 1A Students will present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. 1B Students will select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations. 1F Students will use the process of prewriting, drafting, revising, and proofreading (the writing process) to produce well-constructed informational 1G texts. Students will observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. 2A Students will present personal responses to literature that make reference to the plot, character, ideas, vocabulary, and text structure. 2D Students will observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation.

Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. II. Preparation 1. Materials:

3H

Students will use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing.

c. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft. d. Teacher materials: Mister Seahorse by Eric Carle, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. 2. Prior knowledge; Students will have an understanding of what it means to protect someone and care for someone. Students will also know the importance of including who, what, where, when, why, and how when writing. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare photocopies (1 for each student) graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. III. Body of the Lesson 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask the students, what it means to protect someone and to care for someone? Ask the students, who can share some examples of how they have protected/cared for someone or have had someone protect/care for them? Show students the book, Mister Seahorse, and ask the students what they think this book might be about. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, Mister Seahorse, stopping several times to check for comprehension. 4. Explain to the students that you would like them to use the graphic organizer (sloppy copy) to write about a time when their mother or father has protected them. Once students are finished, check their graphic organizer. Once their graphic organizer is checked, students can move onto final draft paper. They will write about a time that their mother or father has protected them. When they are done, they can draw their picture on the top portion of the final draft paper.

5. Ask students if anyone wants to share their work with the rest of the class. 6. For students who are done early, they can draw their picture on the final draft paper. They can also read Eric Carle books which will be available for them to read. Students who do not finish on time can take their work home to finish. IV. Assessment: Students will use My Response Checklist to determine whether or not they have included all necessary components in their graphic organizer (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. V. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. II. References: Carle, Eric (2004). Mister seahorse. New York, New York: Philomel Books.

_______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________

_______________________________ _____________________. By: ___________________

My Response Checklist
My response includes:
Completed graphic organizer (sloppy copy) Who What Where When Why How Capitals at the beginning of every sentence and for all proper nouns Correct punctuation at the end of each sentence Neat writing Proper spelling

Yes

No

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Stacey McKie Subject of Lesson: ELA Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25

Time Estimate: 1 hour III. Intended Student Outcomes

Grade Level: 1

1. Objectives d. Students will be able to sequence the story in order with classmates. e. Students will be able to place their sentence strip on the sequencing circle in the correct order. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1A Standard

Students gather and interpret information from children's reference books, magazines, textbooks, electronic bulletin boards, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, and from such forms as charts, graphs, maps and diagrams.

1E Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 2A

3D

4A 4B

Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge abou subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding o letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students read a variety of literature of different genres: pict books; poems; articles and stories from children's magazine fables, myths and legends; songs, plays and media producti and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young read Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listen critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fu Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropri for them to speak.

Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics.

4C

Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussio and one-on-one conversations.

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1A

Standard

Students present information clearly in a variet oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. Students use a few traditional structures for conveying information such as chronological order, cause and effect, and similarity and difference.

1C

IV. Preparation 1. Materials: e. Student materials: none f. Teacher materials: The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper, large graphic organizer, sentence strips, tape, flower 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with sequence they have had an introductory lesson. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare sentence strips and create a graphic organizer on chart paper. V. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Show the students a flower and ask them what they know about flowers. Record their ideas on a piece of chart paper. Hold up the book The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle and discuss that a flower starts from a tiny seed and there are steps in order for the seed to become a flower. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from.

3. Read the book, The Tiny Seed, stop and check for comprehension. 4. Discuss what the story was about. Discuss the cycle that the seed goes through. 5. Put students in groups of two. Give each set of partners a sentence strip. Students will need to read their strip. This strip will have one of the steps of a seed becoming a flower. 6. Students will then work together as a class and line up in the correct sequential order based on the sentence strips they were given. 7. Once the students have successfully put themselves in sequential order the teacher will go through the book and check a checklist to ensure that the student order is correct. 8. Finally, the students will place their sentence strips on a large graphic organizer. 9. Review with the students the purpose of the graphic organizer and how it is a continuous cycle. VI. Assessment: The teacher will use the text and review a class check list after the students have put themselves in sequential order. There will be follow up lessons on sequence where the students will be asked to sequence story events on their own. VII. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. Carle, E. (1987). The Tiny Seed. New York, NY: Scholastic.

Tiny Seed Checklist

Yes
Does the class have all of the steps to the cycle? Are the steps in the correct order? Did the class work as a team? Did the class correctly place their steps on the graphic organizer?

No

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Jayme Beckwith Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 45 minutes 1 hour VIII. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives f. The students will sequence the story events (in monthly sequence) by creating a paper chain. g. The students will create their own perfect hermit crab shell. h. The students will describe their own perfect hermit crab shell. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1E Standard Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students understand the literary elements of setting, character, plot, theme, and point of view and compare those features of other works and to their own lives. Use inference and deduction to understand the text. Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Date: May 7th, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1st

2C Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. 2D 4A Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 4B

4C

Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations.

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1A

Standard

Students present information clearly in variety of oral and written forms such a summaries, paraphrases, brief reports stories, posters, and charts.

1B Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. 2A

Students select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations. Students present personal responses literature that make reference to the plot, characters, ideas, vocabulary, an text structure. Students observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation. Students express opinions (in such forms as oral and written reviews, letters to the editor, essays, or persuasive speeches) about events, books, issues and experiences, supporting their opinions with some evidence.

2D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. 3E

IX. Preparation 1. Materials: g. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, worksheets h. Teacher materials: A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle, worksheets 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with previous books read by Eric Carle. Students are familiar with growing up and making

environmental changes, such as getting a toddler bed instead of a crib, as a result of growing up. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: prepare worksheets needed for the lesson activities X. Body of the Lesson Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask students to raise their hand if they have a baby brother, sister, or maybe cousin at home that was once little but has now started to grow up. Then ask the students for a few more examples of things that grow up, such as animals. Then briefly discuss how babies have to get a new toddler bed once they outgrow their crib, maybe paint their room to look more grown up. After discussion, show students the cover of the book and ask for predictions. 1. Discuss with students the previous Eric Carle books that have been read so far this week. Tell students to look for any similarities or differences with this book and the other Eric Carle books that have been read. 2. Read aloud A House for Hermit Crab, stopping at various checkpoints to monitor comprehension and listening skills. While reading draw students attention to the growth changes in the hermit crab along with the sequence of months. Draw attention to the hermit crab changing his environment as he continues to grow. 3. After reading, discuss the story and if predictions made prior to reading were close. Discuss the changes the hermit crab made to his environment and the growing process involved. This will allow opportunity to revisit the anticipatory set discussion. Revisit any similarities or differences about the Eric Carle books that have been read. 4. Next students will complete a paper chain story sequence activity. Students will properly sequence the story based on the months and the corresponding event (Events are short phrases with words students should hopefully know or be able to sound out). (Students will do this with minimal guidance from the teacher.) Students will order the paper chain at their seat, have the order checked and then illustrate each link before they glue the paper chain together. (If needed, depending on make-up of class, maybe have students complete with a partner) 5. Once students have finished the paper chain sequence activity, they will draw a picture of the perfect hermit crab shell they would

live in if they were a hermit crab. Students will then write 2 sentences about their perfect hermit crab shell. Students perfect hermit crab shell creations will be put on display. 6. Once students have completed both activities, there will be Eric Carle books available to read. XI. Assessment: Students will complete the paper chain sequence activity with minimal guidance from the teacher. This will allow the teacher to make informal observations about the sequence knowledge students have. Students will complete the corresponding checklists for each activity that will be used as a form of informal assessment. XII. Resources: Carle, E. (1987). A House for Hermit Crab. New York, NY: Scholastic. XIII. Reflection (to be completed if the lesson is taught):

A House for Hermit Crab Paper Chain Sequence Activity


Directions: Cut each strip along the black line. Put them in order based on events in the story. Have your teacher check the order of events. Illustrate each link. Glue the chain together.

July
sea urchins with sharp needles

February
new, plain, big shell

April
handsome starfish

September
bright lantern-fish

January
looking for a new home

May
hard, pretty coral

March
gentle, sea anemones

December
new, smaller hermit crab

June
tidy, hard-working snails

November
happy with new friends

August
dark, gloomy seaweed

October
sturdy, smooth pebbles

January
little hermit crab moved in

Name: _____________________________________ __

My Perfect Hermit Crab Shell

______________________________________ __________

My Perfect Hermit Crab Shell List Do I have


my name on my paper? an illustration? two sentences? capital letters and periods?

Yes

No

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Jennie M. Cyran Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hour XIV. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives i. Students will be able sequence things in the order that appeared in the story. j. Students will learn new vocabulary for the foods they are unfamiliar with in the story. k. Students will create a few sentences on their favorite food from the book using descriptive detail. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Speaking Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1E Standard Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully. Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

3D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

4A Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 4B 4C

Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations.

Specific Expectations for Reading and Writing

Standard Number 1A

Standard

Students present information clearly in a variet oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts.

1B Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. 1F 1G

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation XV. Preparation 1. Materials:

2D

Students select a focus, organization, and poin view for oral and written presentations. Students use the process of pre-writing, draftin revising, and proofreading (the "writing proces to produce well-constructed informational text Students observe basic writing conventions, su as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitaliza as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. Students observe the conventions of grammar usage, spelling, and punctuation.

3H

Students use effective vocabulary and follow t rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctua in persuasive writing.

i. Student materials: scissors, glue, pictures of different foods found in the book, vocabulary words and pencils j. Teacher materials: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle, chart paper, different fruits to stick on the chart paper and pre made caterpillars. 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with the life cycle of a caterpillar. They have learned about it in science. Students recognize that all living things new food for energy to grow. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare photocopies (1 for each child) pictures found in book and worksheet to glue the sequenced pictures onto.

XVI. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask the students to tell about a time they ate too much food and got sick to their stomach. Encourage students to tell the events that led up to the point before they felt sick. Hold up the book, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Ask students what they think the book may be about. Write ideas on the board. Also take the students on a picture walk looking at the different pages. Ask them if they have any ideas as to why the story is called The Very Hungry Caterpillar. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, checking periodically for comprehension and talking about the different foods on the pages. 4. Discuss what the story was about. List all of the foods found throughout the story. The foods do not need to be in any particular order. 5. Ask the students what it means to sequence something. (The answer should be along the lines of: to put events or objects in a particular order) 6. Explain to the students that they are going to use the different foods in the story during a sequencing activity. The teacher will split students into equal working groups. 7. First, the students will cut out the different foods from the story. 8. Then, students will work as a group to put the foods in the right order. After they are done, the teacher will come around and check for accuracy before the students move to the next step. 9. Once given the okay, the students will glue the pictures in the correct order on their caterpillar. 10. The students will then be given the opportunity to write about one of the foods they have glued on the caterpillar. Students should tell whether or not they like the food and reasons for this decision. 11. For students who finish early, have more Eric Carle books for them to read. Students who do not finish can work on it at a later time. XVII. Assessment: The students will be given a worksheet and have to work in groups to sequence the different foods in the order that they appeared in the story. Students will

be assessed on how accurate their paper is and how well they work with their group members. XVIII. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. VI. References: Carle, E. (1969). The Very Hungry Caterpillar. New York, NY: Scholastic. (1998-2008). The very hungry caterpillar: Story sequencing cards. Retrieved April 21, 2008, from DLTK Growing Together Web site: http://www.dltk-teach.com/books/hungrycaterpillar/sequencing.htm

My Checklist

Do I have?
Pictures that are neatly cut All the pictures glued in the correct place At least two descriptive sentences about a food on my paper Neat handwriting proper grammar and punctuation

Yes

No

*Students will sequence by gluing the foods in order of how they appeared in the story. Each body circle will require on food on it. The teacher might have to add more body to the caterpillar depending on how many foods the teacher decides to have his/her students cut out.*

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Aubrey Demmin Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hour XIX. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives l. Students will be able to understand the concept of writing and using a recipe. m. Students will be able to understand that recipes have steps and a procedure to follow. n. Students will create a recipe of their own using different trail mix materials. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Speaking Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1E Standard Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully. Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

3D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

4A Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 4B 4C

Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations.

Specific Expectations for Reading and Writing

Standard Number 1A

Standard

Students present information clearly in a variet oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts.

1B Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. 1F 1G

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

2D

Students select a focus, organization, and poin view for oral and written presentations. Students use the process of pre-writing, draftin revising, and proofreading (the "writing proces to produce well-constructed informational text Students observe basic writing conventions, su as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitaliza as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. Students observe the conventions of grammar usage, spelling, and punctuation.

3H

Students use effective vocabulary and follow t rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctua in persuasive writing.

XX. Preparation 1. Materials: k. Student materials: pencil, eraser, graphic organizer/rough copy paper and paper for final draft. l. Teacher materials: Pancakes, Pancakes! by Eric Carle, sample recipe, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper, trail mix ingredients, spoons, plastic baggies. 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with procedures and steps. They are also familiar with the idea of using recipes to cook. The students also have previous knowledge of Eric Carle and his books.

3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare photocopies (1 for each child) graphic organizer and final draft paper, buy and organize trail mix materials. XXI. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask the students to tell what they know about following procedures and steps. Ask students to share what they know about recipes. Hold up the book, Pancakes, Pancakes!. Ask students what they think the book may be about. Write ideas on the board. 2. Talk with the students about the previous lessons and the sequencing weve done with the previous Eric Carle books. 3. Read the book, Pancakes, Pancakes!, checking periodically for comprehension and understanding. 4. Discuss what the story was about. Discuss the importance of following steps and procedures. 5. Explain to the students that they are going to create their own recipes today for trail mix. Show the students a sample recipe. Discuss with them the different parts of a recipe. Show the students the different trail mix ingredients and explain to them that we are going to measure the materials using spoons. Then, create a sample recipe as a whole group. Also, explain to the students that they can choose up to 5 different ingredients and that they must have at least 3. Finally, tell the students that they can use no more than 3 spoonfuls of each ingredient they include. 6. Afterwards, allow the students to work alone on deciding what ingredients they wish to include and how many spoonfuls of each they want. 7. Once the students have successfully filled out the organizer and had it approved by the teacher, they can start to create their trail mix. 8. Finally, have students use their graphic organizer to create their final recipe copy. As they are creating they may eat their trail mix. 9. For students who finish early, have more Eric Carle books for them to read. Students who do not finish can work on it at a later time.

XXII. Assessment: The students will be given a recipe checklist to make sure that they have included all components in their graphic organizer and final copy. XXIII. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. XXIV. References: Carle, Eric (1990). Pancakes, pancakes!. New York, New York: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Recipe Checklist

Do I have?
at least 3 different ingredients no more than 5 ingredients a recipe name an ingredients section a procedure or directions section

Yes

No

proper grammar and punctuation

From the Kitchen of

__________________________
Recipe Name

______________________________
Ingredients:

______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________


Procedure:

____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________

____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________


Name:______________________________ Date:_______________________________

_____spoonfuls of___________ ____________ ________

_____spoonfuls of___________ ____________ ________

_____spoonfuls of _____spoonfuls ___________ _____spoonfuls ____________ of___________ of___________ ________ ____________ ____________ ________ ________

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Jenna-Marie Mango Subject of Lesson: Reading and Writing Time Estimate: 45 minutes XXV. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives o. The students will listen to the teacher read the book, Little Cloud, by Eric Carle. p. The students will write about a shape they want to become, pretending to be a cloud. They will describe their shape and tell why they want to become that shape. q. The students final response will include correct spelling, punctuation, and correct use of capitals. 2. NYS Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Speaking Standard Standard Number Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding

1C

Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

Specific Expectations for Listening and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding

Students will select and use strategies they have been taught for note taking, organizing, and categorizing 1E information. Students will make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. 4A Students will listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. 4B Students will take turns speaking and responding to others ideas in conversations on familiar topics. 4C Students will recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations. Standard Standard Number 1A Students will present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and 1B charts. Students will select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral 1F and written presentations. Students will use the process of prewriting, drafting, revising, and proofreading (the writing process) to produce well-constructed informational 1G texts. Students will observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms.

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression.

2A

2D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. XXVI. Preparation 1. Materials: 3H

Students will present personal responses to literature that make reference to the plot, character, ideas, vocabulary, and text structure. Students will observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation. Students will use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing.

m. Student materials: pencil, eraser, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft. n. Teacher materials: Little Cloud by Eric Carle, cotton balls, graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. 2. Prior knowledge; Students will know that when writing, it is important to use descriptive words. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Get cotton balls for students, prepare photocopies (1 for each student) graphic organizer for (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. XXVII. Body of the Lesson 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask the students if they have ever looked at the clouds before and seen a shape? Ask the students what shapes they have seen? Show students the book, Little Cloud, and ask the students what they think this book might be about. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, Little Cloud, stopping several times to check for comprehension. 4. Explain to the students that you would like them to use the graphic organizer (sloppy copy) to write, pretending to be a cloud, about a shape they would like to become.

Once students are finished, check their graphic organizer. Once their graphic organizer is checked, students can move onto final draft paper. They will write about what shape they have become, using descriptive words. They will also tell why they have become this shape. When they are done, they can use the cotton balls to form their shape on the top portion of the final draft paper. 5. Ask students if anyone wants to share their work with the rest of the class. 6. For students who are done early, they can form their shape using the cotton balls on the final draft paper. They can also read Eric Carle books which will be available for them to read. Students who do not finish on time can take their work home to finish. XXVIII. Assessment: Students will use My Response Checklist to determine whether or not they have included all necessary components in their graphic organizer (sloppy copy) and final draft paper. XXIX. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. XXX. References: Carle, Eric (1996). Little cloud. New York, New York: Philomel Books.

_______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ ___________________________. By: ___________________

My Response Checklist
My response includes:
Completed graphic organizer (sloppy copy) A description of shape Why you wanted to become that shape Capitals at the beginning of every sentence and for all proper nouns Correct punctuation at the end of each sentence Neat writing Proper spelling Cotton balls showing shape

Yes

No

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Aubrey Demmin Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hour XXXI. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives r. Students will be able to understand the concepts of giving messages and clues for others to find. s. Students will create a message with clues for other students to find. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Speaking Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1E Standard Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

3D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation:

Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation 4A 4B Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 4C

recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully. Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-onone conversations.

Specific Expectations for Reading and Writing

Standard Number 1A

Standard Students present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. Students select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations. Students use the process of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading (the "writing process") to produce well-constructed informational texts. Students observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. Students observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation.

1B Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. 1F 1G

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

2D

3H

Students use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing.

XXXII. Preparation 1. Materials: o. Student materials: pencil, eraser, object to hide, graphic organizer/rough copy paper and paper for final draft. p. Teacher materials: The Secret Birthday Message by Eric Carle, dry erase markers or regular markers and chart paper. 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with the idea of surprises as well as leaving clues and playing secret games. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare photocopies (1 for each child) graphic organizer and final draft paper. XXXIII. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask the students to tell about a time they got a secret message. Hold up the book, The Secret Birthday Message. Ask students what they think the book may be about. Write ideas on the board. Also take

the students on a book walk looking at the different pages. Ask them if they have any ideas as to why the paper is shaped the way it is. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, The Secret Birthday Message, checking periodically for comprehension and talking about the shapes of the pages. 4. Discuss what the story was about. Discuss the idea of leaving secret messages and finding secret messages. 5. Explain to the students that they are going to create secret messages. With the students brainstorm an object to hide and where to hide it. Then, have the students think of 3-4 clues to find the location of that object. Do this as a whole group example. 6. Afterwards, break the students into groups of 3 or 4. Have them pick an object to hide and decide on a place to hide it. Then together they will brainstorm clues. 7. Once the students have successfully described the location of their object, have students formally write up their secret message. 8. Finally, have students present their clues to the class as the class guesses the location of their object within the classroom. 9. For students who finish early, have more Eric Carle books for them to read. Students who do not finish can work on it at a later time. XXXIV. Assessment: The students will be given a secret message checklist to make sure that they have included all components in their graphic organizer and final copy. XXXV. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. XXXVI. References: Carle, Eric (1972). The secret birthday message. New York, New York: HarperCollins.

Secret Message Checklist

Do I have?
a object a location at least 3-4 clues a neatly written message proper grammar and punctuation

Yes

No

Name:__________________________ Date:___________________________ A Secret Message!

Today is your lucky day! I have a really neat surprise that I want you to find! In order to find my surprise follow these clues carefully.

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________I
f you followed my directions carefully you should have found

____________________________________________

Name:______________________________ Date:_______________________________
Clue # _____

Clue # _____

_____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________

_____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________


Clue # _____

My object is

Clue # _____

__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Adjectivescolors, smells, sight, touch Other

_____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ __________________________________________________ _____________

_____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________

_____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________

Clue # _____

LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Stacey McKie Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hour XXXVII. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives t. Students will be able to identify adjectives. u. Students will be able to use adjectives to describe themselves. v. Students will be able to create a picture about themselves and write a sentence that explains the picture using adjectives. w. Students will include correct punctuation, spelling and grammar. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1A Standard Students gather and interpret information from children's reference books, magazines, textbooks, electronic bulletin boards, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, and from such forms as charts, graphs, maps and diagrams. Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students read a variety of literature of different genres: picture books; poems; articles and stories from children's magazines, fables, myths and legends; songs, plays and media productions; and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young readers. Students recognize that the criteria that one uses to analyze and evaluate anything depends on one's point of view and purpose for the analysis. Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully. Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

1E

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

2A

3C

3D

Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

4A 4B

4C

and one-on-one conversations.

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1A

Standard Students present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. Students use a few traditional structures for conveying information such as chronological order, cause and effect, and similarity and difference. Students use details, examples, anecdotes, or personal experiences to explain or clarify information. Students observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. Students create their own stories, poems, and songs using the elements of the literature they have read and appropriate vocabulary. Students observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation. Students use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing.

1C

1D

1G

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions

2C

2D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. 3H

XXXVIII. Preparation 1. Materials: q. Student materials: pencils, paper, creative materials (markers, crayons, colored pencils), glitter glue r. Teacher materials: Slowly, Slowly Slowly, said the Sloth by Eric Carle, markers and chart paper, teddy bear 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with adjectives they have had an introductory lesson. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books.

3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Create paper for sentences, collect materials. XXXIX. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Hold up a teddy bear and have the students describe it. Once they have had a chance to share discuss adjectives and that they were using adjectives to describe the teddy bear. Introduce the book Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, said the Sloth by Eric Carle. Do a picture walk and have students predict what words they might used to describe the sloth. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, said the Sloth stop and check for comprehension. 4. Discuss what the story was about. Check students predictions about the sloth. 5. Ask what words Eric Carle used to describe the sloth. 6. Have the students discuss words they would use to describe themselves. Discuss- would you use those words all the time to describe yourself or only in certain situations? 7. Create an example to show students what they will be doing. Draw a picture of yourself doing something and write a sentence using an adjective. Use the glitter glue to underline the adjective. 8. Finally, have the students create a picture of their own and write a sentence explaining the picture. Once they are completed they can underline their adjective(s) with glitter glue. 9. If time permits allow students to share their pictures and sentences and then post in the classroom. XL. Assessment: The students will be assessed by using the checklist attached to this lesson. XLI. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. Carle, E. (2002). Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,: said the Sloth. New York, NY: Scholastic.

Adjective Checklist

Do I have..
a detailed picture of me doing an activity? a complete sentence? an adjective in my sentence? an adjective underlined in glitter? correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar?

Yes

No

Name___________________________________ Date_______________

__________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________

NIAGARA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS Teacher Name: Jayme Beckwith Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 45 minutes 1 hour XLII. Intended Student Outcomes 1. Objectives x. The students will illustrate and write about their own mixed-up chameleon. y. The students will present their writing during authors chair. z. The students will understand the importance of being an individual and being happy with whom you are. 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1E Standard Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of lettersound relationships to decode difficult words. Students understand the literary elements of setting, character, plot, theme, and point of view and compare those features of other works and to their own lives. Use inference and deduction to understand the text. Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations. Date: May 7th, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1st

2C Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. 2D 4A Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 4B 4C

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1A

Standard Students present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. Students select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations. Students present personal responses to literature that make reference to the plot, characters, ideas, vocabulary, and text structure. Students observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation. Students express opinions (in such forms as oral and written reviews, letters to the editor, essays, or persuasive speeches) about events, books, issues and experiences, supporting their opinions with some evidence.

1B Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. 2A

2D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. 3E

XLIII. Preparation 1. Materials: s. Student materials: pencil, eraser, crayons, My Mixed-Up Chameleon worksheet, writing checklist t. Teacher materials: The Mixed Up Chameleon by Eric Carle, authors chair, My Mixed-Up Chameleon worksheet for students, writing checklist for students 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with previous books by Eric Carle. Students are familiar with the fact they often wish they could be someone else because that person is lucky or more fortunate than they are. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: prepare worksheets needed for the lesson activities XLIV. Body of the Lesson Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Ask students to think of a time when they wished they could be someone else. If needed, provide examples such as wanting to be a specific adult, super hero, or maybe trade places with a friend. Have students think, pair, then share the time they thought of. The teacher will then provide an example of a time when he/she wished they could be someone else. Then ask students for predictions while showing them the front cover.

1. Discuss with students the previous Eric Carle books that have been read so far this week. Tell students to look for any similarities or differences with this book and the other Eric Carle books that have been read. 2. Read aloud The Mixed-Up Chameleon, stopping at various checkpoints to monitor comprehension and listening skills. Draw students attention to the way the chameleon is changing on each page and if he appears happy. 3. After reading, discuss the story and if predictions made prior to reading were close. Discuss the importance of being happy with yourself just the way you are. This will allow opportunity to revisit the anticipatory set activity about wishing to be someone else. Revisit any similarities or differences about the Eric Carle books that have been read. 4. Explain to students they will be drawing their own mixed-up chameleon and writing about it. On the attached worksheet students will illustrate their own mixed-up chameleon and write at least 2 sentences describing who their chameleon wishes to be and why. 5. After students have written about and illustrated their mixed-up chameleon, they will complete the simple checklist with the teacher in preparation for authors chair. 6. Students will share their mixed-up chameleon writing and illustration during an authors chair. 7. If students finish early, they may explore other Eric Carle literature that will be available while the remainder of the students complete. XLV. Assessment: Students will complete the checklist with the teacher to be sure the student has properly prepared for authors chair. As the student is completing the checklist with the teacher, the teacher will also question students about why they think the chameleon in the story just wanted to be himself in the end. This will allow the teacher to assess if students understand the importance of being yourself as well as the procedure for authors chair. The checklist will be kept with the writing piece and added to the students portfolio. XLVI. Resources: Carle, E. (1984). The Mixed-Up Chameleon. New York, NY: Scholastic. XLVII. Reflection (to be completed if the lesson is taught):

Name: _____________________________________ __

My Mixed-Up Chameleon

________________________________________________

My Mixed-Up Chameleon List Do I have


my name on my paper? an illustration? two sentences? capital letters and periods? my authors chair voice ready? listening ears on?

Yes

No

LESSON PLAN FORMAT FOR CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS

Teacher Name: Jennie M. Cyran Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hours XLVIII. Intended Student Outcomes

Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

1. Objectives aa. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of text structure by retelling and sequencing the story in order with classmates. bb. Demonstrate an understanding of characters, plot and setting in the story by performing a Readers Theatre cc. Students will practice oral fluency 2. Learning Standards Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1A Standard Students gather and interpret information from children's reference books, magazines, textbooks, electronic bulletin boards, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, and from such forms as charts, graphs, maps and diagrams. Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words. Students read a variety of literature of different genres: picture books; poems; articles and stories from children's magazines, fables, myths and legends; songs, plays and media productions; and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young readers. Students evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully. Students listen attentively and recognize when it is appropriate for them to speak. Students take turns speaking and respond to others' ideas in conversations on familiar topics. Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations.

1E Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. 2A

3D

4A 4B

4C

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1A

Standard Students present information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts. Students use a few traditional structures for conveying information such as chronological order, cause and effect, and similarity and difference.

1C

XLIX. Preparation 1. Materials: u. Student materials: Readers Theatre script v. Teacher materials: Roosters Off to See the World by Eric Carle, make up a readers theatres script for the book, chart paper for sequencing, dry erase markers or regular markers, w. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with the term sequencing, since they have had an introductory lesson. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books. 2. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Prepare a readers theatre script for the students based on reading levels of students in the individual class. L. Body of the Lesson Outline step by step how the lesson is going to be developed including; 1. Setting the Stage for Learning/Anticipatory Set: Show the students the front cover of the book Roosters Off to See the World by Eric Carle and discuss what the story might be about. Ask students if they have ever traveling to a different place to see a friend and maybe what events took place along the way. Record their ideas on the chart paper of chalkboard. 2. Talk with the students about the previous Eric Carle books that we have read and learned from. 3. Read the book, Roosters Off to See the World, stop and check for comprehension. 4. Discuss what the story was about. Discuss and sequence the events that took place in the story and the order in which the rooster met different animals. 5. Have students talk with a partner to determine the order of events. 6. List the events in sequential order on the chalkboard. 7. Split students into different groups for the readers theatre. Assign them a part.

8. Have students work together on trying to decode their part. The teacher will come around to see if they need help reading or decoding the words in their individual part. (It would be good to have the scripts already highlighted for students, so that it is easier for them to locate their individual parts). 9. Students will have time to come up with a costume for their part (materials will be provided by the teacher). Also if there is more than one student in the group students can discuss how they want to act out their part. 10. Once the students have successfully read through the script, they will perform it for their classmates. Teach may choose to invite another class to watch the performance.

LI. Assessment: The teacher will assess students on how well they put events into sequential order. Also, students will be assessed on fluency throughout the readers theatre performance. There will be follow up lessons on sequence where the students will be asked to sequence story events on their own. LII. Reflection: (to be completed if the lesson is taught) After teaching your lesson, provide a narrative description of what went well and provide examples from your teaching as evidence. In addition, describe what you would do differently next time and why. Finally, using data collected from your assessment(s), analyze and describe whether students met your intended outcomes. LIII. References: Carle, E. (1972). Rooster's Off to See the World. New York, NY: Scholastic.

Readers Theatre Script


Narrator 1: One fine morning, a rooster decided that he wanted to travel. So, right then and there, he set out to see the world. He hadnt walked very far when he began to feel lonely. Narrator 2: Just then he met two cats. The rooster said to them Rooster: Come along with me to see the world. Narrator 2: The cats liked the idea of a trip very much. Two Cats: We would love to Narrator 2: they purred and set off down the road with the rooster. Narrator 3: As they wandered on, the rooster and the cats met three frogs. Rooster: How would you like to come with us to see the world? Narrator 3: asked the rooster, eager for more company. Three Frogs: Why not?

Narrator 3: answered the frogs. Three Frogs: We are not busy now. Narrator 3: So the frogs jumped along behind the rooster and the cats. Narrator 1: After a while, the rooster, the cats, and the frogs saw four turtles crawling slowly down the road. Rooster: Hey Narrator 1: said the rooster, Rooster: how would you like to see the world? Turtle 1: It might be fun, Narrator 1: snapped one of the turtles and they joined the others. Narrator 2: As the rooster, the cats, the frogs, and the turtles walked along, they came to five fish swimming in the brook. Five Fish: Where are you going? Narrator 2: asked the fish Rooster: Were off to see the world, Narrator 2: answered the rooster. Five Fish: May we come along? Narrator 2: pleaded the fish. Rooster: Delighted to have you, Narrator 2: the rooster replied. And so the fish came along to see the world. Narrator 1: The sun went down. It began to get dark. The moon came up over the horizon. Two Cats: Wheres our dinner? Narrator 1: asked the cats. Three Frogs: Where are we supposed to sleep? Narrator 1: asked the frogs. Four Turtles: Were cold, Narrator 1: complained the turtles. Just then, some fireflies flew overhead.

Five Fish: Were afraid, Narrator 2: cried the fish. Now the rooster really had not made any plans for the trip around the world. He had not remembered to think about food and shelter, so he didnt know how to answer his friends. Narrator 3: After a few minutes of silence, the fish suddenly decided that it might be best if they headed for home. They wished the others a happy trip and swam away. Narrator 1: Then, the turtles began to think about their warm house. They turned and crawled back down the road without so much as a good-bye. Narrator 2: The frogs werent too happy wit the trip anymore, either. First one and then the other and finally the last one jumped away. They were polite enough, though, to wish the rooster a good evening as they disappeared into the night. Narrator 3: The cats then remembered an unfinished meal they had left behind. They kindly wished the rooster a happy journey and they, too, headed for home. Narrator 1: Now the rooster was all alone- and he hadnt seen anything of the world. He thought for a minute and then said to the moon, Rooster: To tell you the truth, I am not only hungry and cold, but Im homesick as well, Narrator 1: The moon did not answer. It, too, disappeared. Narrator 2: The rooster knew what he had to do. He turned around and went back home again. He enjoyed a good meal of grain and then sat on his very own perch. Narrator 3: After a while he went to sleep and had a wonderful happy dream-all about a trip around the world!

Subject of Lesson: ELA Time Estimate: 1 hour+ LIV. Intended Student Outcomes

Date: May 7, 2008 No. of Children: 25 Grade Level: 1

1. Objectives dd. Students will be able to write a letter to Eric Carle. ee. Students will be able to create an illustration using Eric Carles art style. ff. Students will include correct punctuation, spelling and grammar. 2. Learning Standards
Specific Expectations for Listening and Reading Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard Number 1A Standard Students gather and interpret information from children's reference books, magazines, textbooks, electronic bulletin boards, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, and from such forms as charts, graphs, maps and diagrams. Students ask specific questions to clarify and extend meaning. Students make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of lettersound relationships to decode difficult words. Students read a variety of literature of different genres: picture books; poems; articles and stories from children's magazines, fables, myths and legends; songs, plays and media productions; and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young readers. Students read and form opinions about a variety of literary and informational texts and presentations, as well as persuasive texts such as advertisements, commercials, and letters to the editor. Students recognize that the criteria that one uses to analyze and evaluate anything depends on one's point of view and purpose for the analysis.

1D 1E

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions. Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation

2A

3A

3C

Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

4C

Students recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances, such as story hour, group discussions, and one-onone conversations.

Specific Expectations for Speaking and Writing Language for Information and Understanding: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding.

Standard Number 1B 1D 1F

Standard Students select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations. Students use details, examples, anecdotes, or personal experiences to explain or clarify information. Students use the process of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading (the "writing process") to produce well-constructed informational texts. Students observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written forms. Students present personal responses to literature that make reference to the plot, characters, ideas, vocabulary, and text structure. Students observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation. Students express opinions (in such forms as oral and written reviews, letters to the editor, essays, or persuasive speeches) about events, books, issues and experiences, supporting their opinions with some evidence. Students use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing. Students exchange friendly notes, cards, and letters with friends, relatives, and pen pals to keep in touch and to commemorate special occasions. Students adjust their vocabulary and style to take into account the nature of the relationship and the knowledge and interests of the person receiving the message.

1G

Language for Literary Response and Expression: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expressions

2A

2D Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. 3E

3H Language for Social Interaction: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction 4A

4B

Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Arts

Students experiment and create art works, in a variety of mediums (drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, video, and computer graphics), based on a range of individual and collective experiences.

LV. Preparation 1. Materials:

x. Student materials: Writing: Directions, Eric Carle books, writing prompts, paper, pencils, final copy paper (to be used later) Art: Directions, Eric Carle books, glue, paint brushes, tissue paper, white paper, scissors, crayons, colored pencils y. Teacher materials: art book: The Art of Eric Carle by Eric Carle, example letter, example art work, letter checklist, art checklist 2. Prior knowledge: Students are familiar with letter writing and done letters in the past. Students also have knowledge of Eric Carle and are familiar with his art work and different books. 3. Need to Do Ahead of Time: Create letter sample, create writing prompts, create final copy paper, create art sample, collect materials LVI. Body of the Lesson Students will participate in the following two centers as a culminating activity. The centers could be made into two lessons or done with partners. The idea can be adjusted to fit the class. Letter Pick your favorite Eric Carle book Write Eric Carle a letter Be sure to include: date, greeting, introduction (1-2 sentences), body (2-5 sentences), conclusion (1-2 sentences), and closing in your letter. Tell Eric Carle which book is your favorite and why. There are writing prompts to help you start your letter. Picture Look through the Eric Carle Art Book again Watch the video at http://www.ericcarle.com/photogallery.html Pick your favorite Eric Carle book Choose a picture Draw the object in the picture Cut tissue paper to fit your picture shapes. Paint on the glue Use crayons or colored pencils to add to your creation

LVII. Assessment- The students will need to complete a checklist after each center. LVIII. Reflection- To be written after lesson is taught. Carle, E. (1996). The Art of Eric Carle. New York, NY: Philomel Books. http://www.eric-carle.com/home.html

Letter Checklist

Do I have..
the date? an introduction of 1-2 sentences? a body with at least 3 sentences? a conclusion of 1-2 sentences? a closing? the name of my favorite Eric Carle book? why I like the book? correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation?

Yes

No

_______________

_____________, _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ __________________________ _____________, _____________

Resources

Carle, E. (1987). A House for Hermit Crab. New York, NY: Scholastic. Carle, E. (1996). Little cloud. New York, New York: Philomel Books. Carle, E. (2004). Mister seahorse. New York, New York: Philomel Books. Carle, E. (1990). Pancakes, pancakes!. New York, New York: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. Carle, E. (1972). Rooster's Off to See the World. New York, NY: Scholastic. Carle, E. (2002). Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,: said the Sloth. New York, NY: Scholastic Carle, E. (1996). The Art of Eric Carle. New York, NY: Philomel Books. Carle, E. (1984). The Mixed-Up Chameleon. New York, NY: Scholastic. Carle, E. (1972). The secret birthday message. New York, New York: HarperCollins. Carle, E. (1987). The Tiny Seed. New York, NY: Scholastic. Carle, E. (1969). The Very Hungry Caterpillar. New York, NY: Scholastic. http://www.eric-carle.com/home.html
(1998-2008). The very hungry caterpillar: Story sequencing cards. Retrieved April 21, 2008, from DLTK Growing Together Web site: http://www.dltk-teach.com/books/hungrycaterpillar/sequencing.htm